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  • The Marx Brothers hated their first film, The Cocoanuts, so much that they tried to buy the film from the distributor to prevent its release. The brothers' effort failed and, despite the film's shortcomings, The Cocoanuts ultimately went on to be massively successful, leading to other (much better) Marx Bros projects. Groucho said of its two directors, "One didn't understand English and the other didn't understand comedy."
  • Julie Andrews has often said she disliked the "wholesome" image that surrounded her following Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music. However, she paid tribute to the films later in her career, at least in front of the cameras. S.O.B. actually had this as a plot point, with the main character trying to get ol' wholesome Julie Andrews to do a topless scene in a film.
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    • In addition, P.L. Travers, the author of the book Mary Poppins actually cried at the premiere of the movie because of how botched it was from her book and refused to allow Disney to adapt anymore of her work as long as she lived (new adaptations from Disney, for the stage and the screen, would ultimately be made years after her death). To this day her book lives in the shadows of the Disney movie.
  • Jessica Alba has said that she dislikes most of the work on her resume. She had such a bad time filming Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer that she almost quit acting altogether.
  • Idris Elba has made fun of Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance in interviews.
  • Zoe Saldana said she did not have fun making Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, which explains why her character mysteriously disappears in the sequels. As she put it:
    "Those weren’t the right people for me. I’m not talking about the cast. The cast was great. I’m talking about the political stuff that went on behind closed doors. It was a lot of above-the-line versus below-the-line, extras versus actors, producers versus PAs. It was very elitist. I almost quit the business. I was 23 years old, and I was like, “Fuck this!” I am never putting myself in this situation again. People disrespecting me because they look at my number on a call sheet and they think I’m not important. Fuck you."
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  • Hugo Weaving has also openly admitted that he did the Transformers Film Series for the money and has no particular interest in the movies. Michael Bay was particularly pissed off with Weaving after hearing this.
  • Megan Fox has a history of badmouthing the director and franchise that made her famous, Michael Bay and Transformers. Though she's certainly not the only one who feels that way, as Shia LaBeouf has mentioned that he wasn't too fond of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen himself, claiming that the film made no sense to him (or anyone else for that matter). Bay definitely has a real talent for pissing people off, as several actors and actresses including Scarlett Johansson, Kate Beckinsale (who claimed that Bay made her feel "ugly" on the set), and Bruce Willis have all said in one way or another that they would never work with Bay again. Even Michael Bay himself apologized for Revenge of the Fallen.
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  • Speaking of the live-action Transformers films, Peter Cullen was not fond of Optimus Prime's newfound hostility towards humans in Age of Extinction.
  • Star Wars
    • Despite the staggering success of A New Hope, George Lucas is very modest regarding the film. In J.W. Rinzler's "The Making of Star Wars", he admitted he's never been satisfied with the movie's script despite the numerous rewrites it went through. He also disowned the original theatrical cut and went out of his way to bury it after the mid 90's in favor of the Special Editions and subsequent rereleases based on it.
    • Producer Gary Kurtz has expressed dissatisfaction with the changes done in the Special Edition of the film, with him singling out the restored Jabba scene as the worst change because it added absolutely nothing to the story that wasn't in the Greedo scene.
    • Jabba the Hutt's original sculptor, John Coppinger, likewise disliked the CGI Jabba from the 1997 Special Edition.
      "Very hard to be objective here, but there's no doubt the first CGI Jabba was awful. I actually think it was a brave attempt, given the state of CGI then, but I believe they tried to do too much. The subtleties of facial expression were really beyond CGI at that point, even on face as large as Jabba's! One aspect of 'our' Jabba was how many people it took to make him live. There were always at least three people operating his face from outside, not including David Barclay and Toby Philpott who were inside as puppeteers. They were moving his arms, his head, body, jaw and tongue. But despite that I think we co-coordinated a better result than CGI. And Jabba was really there for the other actors and performers to react and relate to."
    • George Lucas also called The Empire Strikes Back "the worst Star Wars film". Yes, really. Though, then again, problems with filming and its original reception need to be remembered, since at the time of its release the film was considered worse than the original by critics and many moviegoers.
    • The cast had mixed feelings about Return of the Jedi.
      • As a rule of thumb, nobody who worked on the film (except George Lucas) was on board with the Ewok concept. Concept artist Ralph Macquarrie in particular despised the concept so much that he refused to do art of them, and eventually walked off the movie due to a combo of this and being burned out from almost a decade worth of working on the films.
      • The Empire Strikes Back was David Prowse's (the guy who usually played Darth Vader in the suit) personal favourite. By contrast, he isn't particularly fond of this last entry of the trilogy.
        "This for me was the weak part of the trilogy, and unfortunately turned out to be the worst film experience I have ever had. I did not like the introduction of the Ewoks, although the kids loved it. The premise that a bunch of teddy bears with sticks and stones could defeat the might of the Stormtroopers was totally unbelievable and spoilt the film for me, even though I did not have a great involvement."
      • In J.W. Rinzler's Making of Return of the Jedi book, Carrie Fisher is quoted saying that she felt Jedi was the weakest film in the trilogy. Mark Hamill likewise had mixed feelings about the film, and felt that the script was a letdown compared to the first two films.
        "Watching Jedi was like finding your old high-school yearbook up in the attic. I couldn't really relate to it. I really felt outside the whole thing. It was a sad feeling in a way, because it was a part of my life that's over now."
      • Harrison Ford didn't regret working on the film, but he was clearly burned out on playing Han Solo and wasn't satisfied with the ending or the overall script.
        "I'm glad I did all three of them. I'm glad it brought itself to a natural conclusion. But three is enough for me. I was glad to see that costume for the last time. I don't think it had a very successful ending, with that teddy bear picnic."
      • Both George Lucas and director Richard Marquand hated the results of the "Lapti Nek" number in the film for its dated Disco atmosphere and stiff puppetry, hence why Lucas replaced it with a new song and CGI in the Special Editions of the movie.
    • Sir Alec Guinness grew to hate the series over time and regretted having played Obi-Wan Kenobi, because of how audiences came to only remember him for the role despite his illustrious career. He once famously told a fan who claimed he had seen the movie a hundred times that he could have an autograph if he never watched the film again. Ironically, Star Wars made him rich, as he was the only actor able to get a cut of the gross (2%). In his autobiography, Blessings in Disguise, he acknowledges this irony, and admits that the film gave him the financial freedom to do whatever he wanted with his career for the rest of his life. The other cast members knew how much he disliked the series while filming, and commented that he still remained professional despite his own feelings towards the film, and that despite his misgivings about the first film, he agreed to reprise his role in the two films that followed, even after George Lucas cautioned him that by doing so, nobody would ever again be able to look at the actor without seeing Obi-Wan Kenobi.
    • Neither Harrison Ford or Carrie Fisher were particularly fond of their characters by the time the original trilogy ended. Ford felt that Han Solo hadn't developed the way he should have, in a way that he felt had Redemption Equals Death as a logical outcome, and he only ever returned to the role in The Force Awakens because he finally got his wish. Fisher, meanwhile, felt that Leia was a dull Flat Character and resented that getting more interesting roles became hindered due to people only ever seeing her as Leia.
    • Jake Lloyd, the young 9-year-old Anakin's actor, hated the role so much he felt George Lucas ruined his acting career. This wasn't helped by him constantly getting teased by kids making lightsaber noises after the movie came out, as well as being bullied and harassed by fanboys blaming him for "ruining" Star Wars and Darth Vader (and keep in mind, he was only nine at the time). He also had to do over 60 interviews, which was very exhausting for him to do. After all that, he quit acting after voicing Anakin in five video games and wouldn't watch the movie anymore. His opinions of Star Wars have since gotten better though.
    • A great many of those involved in Star Wars, up to and including George Lucas, came to see it (temporarily) as a noose around their necks. Lucas especially felt this way since working on the movies led to a divorce from his first wife.
    • Everybody who worked on The Star Wars Holiday Special either denies its existence or wishes to hunt down and destroy every copy. Yes, that includes George Lucas (even though he wasn't directly involved in it). When Conan O'Brien brought up the subject of the Holiday Special with Harrison Ford during an interview, Ford first tried to deny it ever happened. Then O'Brien announced they had a clip. The look on Ford's face was one of whether he should flee the scene or terminate O'Brien with extreme prejudice. Carrie Fisher had similar feelings about the special; she wrote in her autobiography Wishful Drinking that both the special and her association with Star Wars as a whole led to her to start taking drugs (her role as Princess Leia in the special has her noticeably intoxicated in each scene she's in).
    • In an interview, Natalie Portman said she has no intention of ever showing her children the prequels (because of her death scene), and that acting in the first prequel hurt her career, but she doesn't regret doing the franchise and still enjoyed doing the trilogy.
    • Zigzagged with Mark Hamill. Before the release of The Last Jedi, he stated in multiple interviews that he had disagreed with Rian Johnson's take on Luke Skywalker. He later came around to appreciate the changes and the way they pushed him out of his comfort zone, and publicly regretted voicing these opinions due to how they were taken out of context. (the full quote is 'I at one point had to say to Rian, "I pretty much fundamentally disagree with every choice you’ve made for this character. Now, having said that, I have gotten it off my chest, and my job now is to take what you've created and do my best to realize your vision.'") After its release, some people speculated that Hamill's disagreements with how the character was handled might have stemmed from the little detail that Luke Skywalker ends up dying in the film. However, the one thing Hamill disliked about the movie was the decision to remove a scene of Luke mourning Han's death.
  • Rick Moranis hated doing Streets of Fire, mostly because he was not allowed to improvise, and he disliked the finished product.
  • Stephen King:
    • The original Children of the Corn (1984) adaptation.
    • King didn't want to talk about the adaptation of The Lawnmower Man for the longest time. It departs so far from his short story that before it was released he sued the producers to prevent them from promoting it as "Stephen King's The Lawnmower Man" (a few onesheets with that wording nevertheless still exist). After watching it some time later he admitted he liked it, though.
    • King's only directorial effort to date is Maximum Overdrive, an adaptation of his short story Trucks; he has long since panned the film as one of the "worst adaptations" of any of his works, going so far as to write it off as a "moron movie." (Incidentally, King himself wrote the script, and also appears in the movie. And in the trailer. And even on the poster.) He has since stuck with what he does best.
    • He was also considerably displeased with the changes made to The Shining for Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation, eventually leading to him creating a more faithful adaptation in miniseries form. His overall opinion of the film version is somewhat closer to lukewarm, though—it's not bad, it's just not his story.
  • Michael J. Fox regrets having been in Teen Wolf, which has maintained its cult popularity and got a sequel. He appeared in the original simply because he had a break in his Family Ties schedule and the shoot was quick. Fox refused to do the sequel, which caused problems because he was the title character. Ultimately, Jason Bateman was cast as a Suspiciously Similar Substitute.
  • Parodied by Kevin Smith:
    • When a group of people announced they were going to picket his film Dogma at a theater near where he lives, Smith himself showed up and picketed the film too with a "Dogma is dogshit" sign. He ends up being filmed by a news crew as a protester, and the reporter recognized him. Hilariously, Smith—who was wearing the same overcoat that his character Silent Bob wears in the movie, and using the name of his close friend and fellow protester Bryan Johnson—made a point of telling the interviewer that he hadn't seen it, "but [fellow Catholics] tell him it was really, really bad," despite thinking Clerks was really funny.
    • He also famously made a mock apology for how awful Mallrats was on the official movie website just to screw with all the fans who hated it. Listen to the commentary track on the Laserdisc and DVD—Smith, Ben Affleck, and Jason Mewes destroy the movie throughout.
    • He has a genuinely low opinion of Zack and Miri Make a Porno and Cop Out though, considering them films that anyone could make.
  • In-Universe example: The movie Galaxy Quest shows the cast of the Star Trek knock-off despising the show for both derailing all their careers and being their only means of support. Ironically, the Shatner counterpart is the only one who doesn't mind it.
  • Gwyneth Paltrow was displeased with View From The Top and doesn't speak very positively about some of her film roles in the mid-'00s.
  • The Alien films:
    • David Fincher doesn't talk about Alien³ and refuses to put it on his resume to this day, chiefly because he was brought onto the film late in its already troubled production cycle (which had gone through three other directors and numerous rewrites), and his vision for the final product was hampered by major executive meddling. He finally did speak about it here, but without fondness. Supposedly, he was interviewed for The Beast Within: The Making of Alien documentary, but it was all cut because he did not have a single positive thing to say.
    • Sigourney Weaver forced the script writers to kill her character Ellen Ripley off in the third movie, and only reprised her role after being offered a ton of money.
    • Joss Whedon's opinion about Alien: Resurrection is that it twisted around all the good ideas in his script. The director, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, was never happy with it either, and makes dismissive comments about it on the DVD for his next film, Amélie.
  • Courtney Love doesn't mind if you think Sid & Nancy was her first film. Her actual first film was a neowestern called Straight To Hell, which was filmed on a lark with a cast of punk rockers after their music tour was canceled. When the film was brought up by an interviewer, Love immediately replied "Trust me, you don't want to see it."
  • Joss Whedon disowned the Buffy the Vampire Slayer film for which he provided the script. He launched the series to correct the errors of executive meddling, retconning major plots of the film, but keeping in the part where Buffy said that she burned down the gym.
  • Faye Dunaway regrets having played Joan Crawford in Mommie Dearest for a multitude of reasons. She intensely disliked the book it was based on, feeling it was a very one-sided account, and signed on for the film only after being promised it would take a more balanced look at Crawford's life. However, scenes which provided explanations for Crawford's erratic behavior wound up being cut, leaving the character with less context for her outbursts. She also took issue with Frank Perry's direction and the way the film was marketed, which she feels contributed to its camp reputation. In addition to the film's reception, making it was a tremendously difficult and tiring experience for her, as she found Crawford's presence hard to shake at the end of each shooting day. As a result, Dunaway is incredibly reticent to discuss the film in any context.
  • Despite the film being a horror classic, many cast and crew members of Dracula (1931) felt this way about the film:
    • Bela Lugosi enjoyed making the film and playing the character, though he later referred to it as a "blessing and a curse" and disliked the typecasting that occurred after the film. He spent his later years making B-films (at best) and battling drug addiction.
    • Director Tod Browning did not enjoy making the film, since his original choice for the film, Lon Chaney, had died, and the film was being made on a much lower budget than he wanted. The cast complained about Browning being a hands-off director, and showing no enthusiasm for the project whatsoever.
    • Dwight Frye (Renfield) was also typecast as crazy loons after the film, and he was not happy about it. His career never recovered, and he died of a heart attack in 1943 at the age of 44.
    • Helen Chandler (Mina) wanted to play Alice in a film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland and wasn't happy being stuck in a horror picture instead. Her career never got off the ground, and she battled alcoholism only a few years later, and nearly burned to death in a fire 15 years before her death at age 59.
    • David Manners (John) didn't have it as bad as his co-stars, but he disliked being a Hollywood actor and making Dracula, and in an interview shortly before he died in 1998, claimed to have never seen the finished film.
  • Joel Schumacher has repeatedly apologized for Batman & Robin; this interview is one such instance. Also, George Clooney highly regrets being in this film, feeling that he helped kill the 90s Batman film franchise. One persistent, unattributed rumor is that he will give the price of admission to the film back to anybody that approaches him and says they saw it in theaters. Clooney also likes to say he played Batman gay to show his contempt for the part. Even the soundtrack of the film hates the film. Soul Coughing recorded "The Bug", which includes the repeated mantra "George Clooney is Satan."
  • Tim Curry (a.k.a. Dr. Frank N Furter) was very reluctant to talk about being in The Rocky Horror Picture Show for years, mostly due to some rather unpleasant memories involving stalkers and people digging through his trash. However, he's become more open to talk about being in Rocky Horror and sees it as a "rite of passage" for teenagers. Most of the main cast of RHPS at first distanced themselves from the production, only to embrace it years later. The lone hold-out is Peter Hinwood, who played Rocky, who immediately and permanently tried to pretend it never happened, albeit for different reasons - he's incredibly self-critical and finds it extremely embarrassing to watch himself on a big screen.
  • Roland Emmerich regrets making the 1998 remake of Godzilla, but protects it all the same.
  • James Bond:
    • Sean Connery grew to dislike the role, even though it's what made him a star. Distancing himself from 007 is one of the main reasons he took the role of Zed in Zardoz. Needless to say, that worked beyond his wildest dreams.
    • While Roger Moore enjoyed playing Bond, his absolute least favorite film from his tenure was A View to a Kill due to its troubled production, the tensions he had with costars Tanya Roberts and Grace Jones, and the gratuitous violence within the movie (namely, Zoran gunning down his own miners). Not helping matters was his discovery that he was older than Tanya Roberts' mother. For that reason in particular, he bowed out of the role after this film.
    • Pierce Brosnan has had this to a degree in regards to his tenure, saying that he felt he never did nail down the role. It certainly didn't help that he was canned before filming began on Casino Royale (2006), a film he thought might have given him one last shot to perfect the role.
  • Chevy Chase hated Caddyshack II, even during production, so much so that after a take, he mentioned to the producer to call him when a laugh track had been added, and stormed off in disgust.
  • KISS refuses to even discuss their So Bad, It's Good film KISS Meets The Phantom Of The Park. That film is as horrifically cheesy as it sounds.
    • Paul Stanley, in one of the only times they did discuss it, mentioned that he was so embarrassed watching the film, that he sank in his chair and wanted to crawl out of the theater.
      • According to Ace Frehley's biography, he's the only person who didn't totally hate the film; he likened it to a cheesy Saturday morning cartoon - understandable, considering who made the movie - and said that Gene Simmons (who was the most vocal in hating the film) took the production far too seriously.
  • Alec Baldwin:
    • He claims to hate his long-shelved directorial debut The Devil and Daniel Webster/Shortcut to Happiness. He also disowned his role in Rock of Ages, calling it a "horrible movie", and stated that the only reason he did this movie was to work with Tom Cruise.
    • In an interview with NPR, he admitted that he dislikes The Marrying Man and a great many of his early movies. He says he was aware the scripts were awful, but that growing up in a household where his parents frequently struggled to make ends meet motivated him to earn as much money as possible as quickly as possible.
  • Bill Cosby hates his notorious "comedy" Leonard Part 6 as much as audiences did - possibly even more, going on numerous talk shows telling people not to see it even before it was released.
  • Robert Pattinson, the male lead in the Twilight movie, has outright mentioned in interviews that he hates his character Edward and considers Stephenie Meyer insane. The female lead, Kristen Stewart, doesn't seem overly fond of the movie either, but she's less vocal about it. There are some pretty great photos floating around of her looking utterly bored at the premiere to Breaking Dawn Pt. 2.
  • Jared Padalecki has denounced his role in New York Minute with the Olsen Twins. Although he does it mostly in jest, he still said that it's the one film credit he wishes he could erase from his resume. Even the Olsen Twins themselves have gone on record stating that the film was done purely to fulfill a contractual obligation.
  • Back in the 1970s, after years of making the character his own, a cheesed off and increasingly typecast Christopher Lee made a complete disconnect from Dracula. It didn't help that Christopher Lee reported that Hammer Film kept him playing the role well below his actual payscale by essentially guilt-tripping him - 'you work at this pay we say or we'll have to put these crew members you like out of the job'. If his claims are true, no wonder he hated the role.
  • During the production of Gremlins 2: The New Batch Christopher Lee personally apologized to director Joe Dante for being in Howling II, as Dante had also directed the first film in that series.
  • Orlando Bloom, while never outright complaining about or bashing his Pirates of the Caribbean character Will Turner, has made it bluntly clear that he wants nothing more to do with the character. Keira Knightley seems to share a similar disposition towards Elizabeth Swann. Predictably, neither returned for On Stranger Tides. Though apparently, their attitudes toward their characters stem not from the characters themselves, but the romance story that took over the trilogy. To the point both appeared to changed their minds by the time of the fifth film, where they have brief appearances.
  • The real Patch Adams has publicly expressed his disdain for the movie based on his life, though he was saddened by the death of Robin Williams.
  • The movie Field of Dreams has the character of Terence Mann (James Earl Jones) who just wants to be left alone by the fans of his writing. Terence Mann is said to be inspired by the life of reclusive author J.D. Salinger. Salinger is the author sought by the main character in Shoeless Joe, the novel the film is based on. Salinger became reclusive after critics panned Nine Stories, his short story anthology published after The Catcher in the Rye.
  • Mark Romanek, director of the award-winning psychological thriller One Hour Photo, refused to release his directorial debut Static (a quirky black comedy reminiscent of David Lynch) on DVD for almost a whole decade. He has expressed that, while he does not actually dislike the film, he considers it a "sophomore attempt" that does not stand up well when compared with his more recent work; and is best forgotten. This is exacerbated by the film's seriously Downer Ending.
  • In her Razzie acceptance speech for Worst Actress, Halle Berry called Catwoman an "awful, piece of shit movie." And the crowd went wild.
  • Sylvester Stallone:
    • Sly is not fond in retrospect of his various attempts to stretch into comedy, famously calling Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot "the worst movie ever made in our solar system, including alien productions we have never seen."
    • Stallone has also expressed distaste towards Rocky IV and Rocky V, and to a lesser extent Rocky III. He said that if he could make Rocky IV again he would have hired Bill Conti to score it (this is the only film of the series to have been scored by someone else - Vince DiCola, if you're wondering) and would have punched Brigitte Nielsen in the face.
    • He also deeply regretted Rhinestone but did enjoy working with Dolly Parton nevertheless.
    • Rambo:
      • Stallone has expressed embarrassment about Rambo: First Blood Part II, largely because of its drastic Genre Shift from its prequel's dark anti-war content towards an ass-kicking action movie where Violence Really Is the Answer. However, it's a more affectionate embarrassment than some of the above movies, since the film is too iconic for him to want to truly disown.
    • He's also disowned the first sequel to Escape Plan, saying it may be the single worst movie in his entire filmography.
  • Many of Peter Sellers' early 1970s efforts, when his star had fallen far enough he was willing to do anything, qualify as this in one way or another. He tried to prevent the release of 1970's Hoffman and badmouthed 1972's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland before it opened. In fact, he called his 1965 through mid-1970s output a "bad patch" to Time magazine not long before his death. Sellers was infamous for being overly self-critical of his work, though - the truly shameful work didn't kick in until the '70s. (And Hoffman is surprisingly popular with the more devoted fans.)
  • John Wayne aggressively campaigned to be cast as Genghis Khan in The Conqueror. He would later shudder at the mention of the movie and claimed the moral of the story was "not to make an ass of yourself trying to play parts you're not suited for." This movie did have a very good, and tragic, reason to be regretted; it was shot in Nevada near an atomic test site, and many of the cast and crew (including director Dick Powell, co-stars Susan Hayward and Agnes Moorehead, and Wayne himself) were later stricken with cancer. Studio owner Howard Hughes took the film out of circulation for many years, but contrary to that fact, he actually liked the film...
  • Fritz Lang came to dislike his best-known film, the sci-fi epic Metropolis, called it "silly" and "ridiculous" in interviews, and tried to draw attention to his favorite film M instead. There were many reasons for this: the heavy executive meddling by distributors who cut a quarter of the film's footage (Lang died believing that a full cut no longer existed, and the full cut was only re-assembled in 2011), reports that it was Adolf Hitler's favorite film (especially bitter since Lang was half-Jewish, and emigrated from Germany in 1934 to get away from the Nazisnote ), and that the plot was a little silly (and was written by his ex-wife, whom he divorced over political and creative differences - namely, that she was becoming a Nazi). It overshadowed the other 3 decades of his long film career.
  • Mike Judge hated Office Space for several years after its release. Due to insane amounts of executive meddling and lousy marketing, he had trouble watching it again without those memories popping up. He said that he never watched the whole movie again for many years until his daughter asked to watch it. He has since felt a bit more positive about the film.
  • J. D. Shapiro, the original screenwriter of Battlefield Earth, was fired from the film because Executive Meddling wanted to change his script too much, and he didn't want to - considering the end result of the changes, a wise choice. Shapiro even wanted to remove his name from the credits, and shows his disgust (and Self-Deprecation) by both receiving the Razzies of the film (the one for Worst Screenplay in a radio program, and the one for Worst Picture of the Decade at the actual ceremony!), and posting an apology letter, which included the line "The only time I saw the movie was at the premiere, which was one too many times".
    • Co-lead Barry Pepper didn't like it any more than Shapiro, and said that if he'd known one of the Razzies had his name on it, he would have shown up alongside Shapiro.
  • Orson Welles:
    • He had a love/hate relationship with Citizen Kane, leaning often towards the latter, as he considered his later works The Trial and Chimes at Midnight to be much better. This was in large part because after it was voted the Best Film Ever Made multiple times, Citizen Kane became the only thing anybody wanted to talk to him about. It was also invoked by producers and critics (especially Pauline Kael) as a way to write-off Welles as a One-Book Author, which obviously made it harder for Welles to get funding for making later projects. Welles also lamented the general hypocrisy of producers telling him how much they liked Kane but still conduct Executive Meddling forgetting that Kane was the only film of Welles' that had Protection from Editors. Welles didn't really dislike Kane however, he always did say that it was the only film of his that had total freedom, made without budget restrictions and external pressure, and it came out exactly as he intended.
    • He also did not like The Stranger all that much, calling it one of his worst films, though as he said, "I did my best with it." It was his attempt to make a more mainstream film after Kane and The Magnificent Ambersons flopped at the box office, and indeed, it was one of his few films to make a profit in its theatrical release. He also disliked the omission of a somewhat dreamlike scene, which he felt would have made the film more interesting. Today, the film is somewhat admired, if not considered one of his best works. It was the first mainstream Hollywood film to tackle with The Holocaust and show footage from the camps.
    • In one interview Welles did with Michael Parkinson, he lamented that he only disliked his movies because he was such a perfectionist and it drove him up the wall that he couldn't possibly change or improve them, unlike the freedom of rewriting a novel.
  • Babylon A.D. was hit with this before it even came out. The director, Matthieu Kassovitz, has been quite open about how his initial vision of a dark but thoughtful cyberpunk world was meddled with beyond all recognition and turned into "a bad episode of 24." In the making-of featurette, he can be seen apologizing to the cast and crew while the film was still in production.
  • Reportedly, the second Asterix movie suffered from this. The owners of the franchise decided that the movie wasn't Asterix-ish enough, so they dropped all the elements they didn't like for the third movie. Unfortunately for them, said third film was a spectacular failure, while the one they didn't like is still the most critically and commercially successful of all three movies.
  • Right up to his death, Jerry Lewis refused to talk in any great detail about his unreleased film The Day the Clown Cried, a WWII comedy (with heavy tragic elements) about an inept German clown who is sent to a concentration camp and who, feeling unaccepted by the people on his side of the fence, decides to entertain the Jewish prisoners. Few people have ever seen the film, and Lewis apparently kept his own VHS copy locked away for good; time will tell if it will see the light of day now that Lewis has passed on, though considering a year or two before his passing Lewis donated a film print to the Library of Congress and cleared it to be screened as early as 2024 there may be some hope yet.
  • Paul Verhoeven disowned Showgirls after the film's writer Joe Eszterhas edited the film without his permission. When the film won its numerous Razzie Awards, he accepted them to show his hatred of the film. He did say once that "Some day, people will realize that Showgirls was an elegantly made movie", but then, he might have been referring to his own cut of the film.
  • Hoo boy, Caligula. Writer Gore Vidal walked away from production because he hated how director Tinto Brass wanted satire in the film. Brass was then cut loose because producer Bob Guccione wanted hardcore sex involving his Penthouse Pets. Neither Vidal or Brass are officially credited in their roles. Most of the actors (with the unsurprising exception of shame-challenged Helen Mirren and Sir John Gielgud, who had a blast making it and saw it three times in the cinema) now look upon it as an Old Shame due to its reputation as a high-budget porno; Anneka Di Lorenzo eventually won a lawsuit claiming the film damaged her career (though the punitive damages were overturned on appeal).
    • He also wasn't proud of Myra Breckinridge, claiming it missed the point of the book—the director, Michael Sarne, also wasn't proud of it due to executive meddling.
  • Almost no one involved with Cat Chaser stands by the released version, with studio-ordered voiceover narration added that another actor was hired to do after Peter Weller, worn out by a difficult shoot which saw him, director Abel Ferrara and costar Kelly McGillis often strongly at odds with each other, to the point that McGillis walked off set during a love scene with him. McGillis, for her part, was so disgusted with the experience she shaved her head immediately afterwards and took three years off from acting.
  • Harlan Ellison made it very clear that he was not a fan of The Oscar, which to this day remains his only feature screenwriting credit.
  • Screenwriter Mike White disowned School of Rock after the director decided to play up gay stereotypes without his involvement. Being bisexual and with a gay father, White was not pleased when he saw the final product.
  • William Gibson has distanced himself from the film adaptation of his short story Johnny Mnemonic, for which he wrote the screenplay, claiming that Executive Meddling turned what he and director Robert Longo had envisioned as a more experimental, independent film into a mainstream, generic sci-fi action movie.
  • The Farrelly Brothers disowned the film Outside Providence (co-written by them and based on a book by Peter Farrelly) after producer Harvey Weinstein insisted on numerous changes from the source material and recut the film in order to make it closer to their There's Something About Mary rather than the coming-of-age tale the original story was. The final film was a flop with critics and audiences and has been more or less forgotten.
  • Michael Moore does not like the film Slacker Uprising, which was a documentary that he only did to complete a three-film deal with producer Harvey Weinstein. He even personally bought the rights to the film so Weinstein would never release it theatrically and chose to premiere it for free online.
  • Wes Craven:
    • He disowned The Hills Have Eyes Part II as he only made the film for the money and felt the story ended with the first movie (he later co-wrote the sequel to the remake though, which may have been him doing what he could to make it better).
    • He hates the 2005 werewolf movie Cursed as much as film critics do, saying that his experience directing it taught him a lesson on not being a director-for-hire type of person.
    • Many years later, he disowned Scream 4 due to the constant Executive Meddling the film suffered and the amount of rewrites and reshoots done on the film.
    • Vampire in Brooklyn was also not one of Craven's favorite films (nor star Eddie Murphy's).
  • Jim Sheridan has come out and disowned Dream House after the film's producer locked him out of the editing room after reshoots where done (which were done after the film tested poorly). It is not known what Sheridan's original cut was like. As stars Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz refused to do any promotion for the film, it's safe to say they aren't too fond of it either.
  • Michael Biehn disowned The Blood Bond, a film he starred in and co-directed, after its nightmarish production and being fired as soon as filming ended (as the film's writer felt it was his movie and not Biehn's). Biehn's voice was also dubbed and he was horrified when he saw the released version.
  • In-Universe in American Dreamer, the writer of the Rebecca Ryan books has his mother claim to write them, as he feels the books are just pulp trash.
  • Mickey Rourke severely dissed A Prayer For The Dying before its release (he said making it was "a nightmare"), and director Mike Hodges tried to take his name off the credits; needless to say, both have disowned it.
  • Richard Griffiths hated talking about his role in Withnail & I, not because of the quality of the film but because he and most of the cast and the crew were shafted by producer Denis O'Brien and never received their proper payments.
  • Blake Edwards hated his 1972 film The Carey Treatment so much that he refused to be involved with the post-production on it. The constant Executive Meddling from MGM became so bad that he tried to leave the film during production, only to be told by the studio that doing so would end his career.
    • Edwards also didn't like how his script for City Heat was rewritten, to the extent that he's billed on the credits as "Sam O. Brown" (have a look at the initials).
  • Sam Peckinpah disowned many of his films due either to Executive Meddling or the final product not turning out well. Major Dundee is the most infamous example, due both to its chaotic production and drastic editing by the studio. Kris Kristofferson claims that Peckinpah was so angry at producer James Aubrey's interference on Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid that he actually urinated on film negatives before sending them to the studio. Take That! indeed.
  • David Lean grew increasingly tired of critics praising the "beastly little British films" like Brief Encounter and Great Expectations he made early in his career. It's not that Lean disliked the films per se; he mostly hated critics using them to disparage his later epics. His unfriendly run-in with Pauline Kael and Richard Schickel stands out: "How could the man who directed Brief Encounter make a piece of shit like Ryan's Daughter?" Additionally, Lean claimed to have made Madeleine (1950) solely to appease his wife, actress Ann Todd. He always disparaged the movie to interviewers, claiming it his worst feature film. That Lean and Todd divorced shortly after the film's release probably didn't sweeten his opinion.
  • Alfred Hitchcock claimed to regret making Foreign Correspondent after criminals copied its central assassination scene in real life.
  • David Lynch is so sorry for the Dune movie. So, so sorry. So sorry that he got the DGA to credit the longer version to Alan Smithee. He has called it "The only film I have made that I do not like to talk about", and turns down interviews that are specifically about the film saying that it is too painful for him to talk about it, even thirty years later.
  • Stanley Kubrick:
    • He so hated his first two movies, Fear and Desire and Killer's Kiss, for the amateurishness he felt they demonstrated that he bought up most of the prints later in his life and destroyed them. He also hated Spartacus because of the Executive Meddling. All three films are not included on the Stanley Kubrick DVD and Blu-Ray box sets (though Warner Bros. includes Spartacus in some markets).
    • He also had sour feelings towards A Clockwork Orange, not because of its quality, but because of the Misaimed Fandom it attracted. Teens began to enact the same crimes from the movie and it reached the point where Kubrick personally had it banned from being shown in the United Kingdom.
  • Super Mario Bros.
    • According to a 2007 autobiography, both John Leguizamo and Bob Hoskins really, really hated working on the film. It got to the point where they would get drunk in order to endure the experience of the film. They both knew it was going to be bad (and all the principal actors slammed the directors as the most unprofessional people they've ever worked for) but they made the most of it.
    • Dennis Hopper also regretted the movie. During an appearance on a talk show, he shared an anecdote of telling his son that he made it so he could have shoes. His son told him that he didn't need shoes that bad.
    • Even Nintendo despised the movie, to the point where they mandated that, outside the Pokémon franchise, none of their video games series were to become films. However, by late 2014, Nintendo is supposedly giving Mario another chance, this time in animated form and at, of all studios, Sony Pictures.note  Given the film was made by Disney's Hollywood Pictures, when Nintendo decided to join the theme park business, they aligned with their rival Universal Studios.
  • Takeshi Kitano disowned Brother (his only American film to date) due to the constant Executive Meddling and troubles with the MPAA (the film was heavily cut to receive an R rating). After this experience, Kitano swore to never direct another film in the US.
  • David O. Russell has disowned I Heart Huckabees (which nearly destroyed his career) due to its Troubled Production and his on-set treatment of Lily Tomlin (which went on to hit Memetic Mutation status and made Russell impossible to hire for a few years).
  • Ralph Bakshi isn't fond of the released version of Hey Good Lookin'' due to Warner Bros. forcing numerous changes to the film (the original cut was a mix of live action and animation) and delayed the film for seven years before finally dumping the film in select markets. When interviewed in 2010 on the film, Bakshi spoke positively about the first cut but had little to say about the released version.
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Highlander:
    • The second film Highlander II: The Quickening suffered from this quite a bit. By the end, many of the main cast had only finished the film because of their contractual obligations.
    • Much later, Adrian Paul was less than happy with the final product that was the fifth film, Highlander: The Source after it was finished.
  • Paul Newman disliked his role in The Silver Chalice; so much so, he named it the worst film of the 1950s and even invited some guests to see the movie and mock it MST3K style.
  • Star Trek Into Darkness:
    • Damon Lindelof apologized for the largely unnecessary fanservice scene of Alice Eve in her underwear. The fact that they had filmed a shower scene for Benedict Cumberbatch but cut it might also be part of the problem.
    • John Cho was not shy about his criticism of the decision to cast a white Englishman as Khan, who is supposed to be an Indian Sikh. Cho, who is a vocal advocate for increased diversity in Hollywood, even went so far as to state in interviews that as a child, he loved Khan precisely because he was a rare depiction of a smart, badass man of color on American television. He also had some unkind words for director J. J. Abrams, referring to himself as Abrams' "Asian puppet" at one point (though the context could read more as a joke).
    • Karl Urban, while not outright dismissive of the film, also offered some subtle criticism on the decision to emulate The Wrath of Khan so much, opining that the next installment should strive to be more original in its plotting.
  • Francis Ford Coppola has evinced mixed feelings towards The Godfather. On the one hand, he's proud of how well it turned out despite a somewhat Troubled Production and Executive Meddling, and appreciates that it gave him enough freedom to pursue more personal projects. At the same time, Coppola still considers Godfather (and especially its sequels) as something he did for money rather than artistic reasons, not regarding it with the same affection as, say, The Rain People or The Conversation.
  • Director David L. Cunningham reportedly hated The Seeker, citing Executive Meddling for the reason it became the trainwreck that it's remembered as.
  • Sam Raimi
    • He disowned Crimewave due to the film being recut by the studio.
    • He also strongly disliked Spider-Man 3 due to the ridiculous amount of Executive Meddling he had to put up with, the most notable of which was the inclusion of Venom, a villain Raimi has stated multiple times he does not like. The main reason the franchise was cancelled and rebooted with The Amazing Spider-Man was because Raimi had asked for more creative freedom and a lengthier production time to make sure Spider-Man 4 didn't suffer the same fate as 3. When the studio refused, he walked. He was also upset that because of the meddling, the shoot ran out of time enough that the script had to be re-worked to put Mary Jane as the Damsel in Distressnote  just to finish the movie, and he notes on the DVD Commentary that calling Kirsten Dunst to tell her about it, after promising he wouldn't make her a damsel again, was one of the hardest things he's ever done in his career.
    • After producing The Quick and the Dead, Raimi blamed himself and his visual style for its failure.
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe:
    • Jon Favreau refused to return to direct Iron Man 3 because of the Executive Meddling Iron Man 2 had been subjected to in order to set up The Avengers (though that didn't stop him from appearing as Happy Hogan again). His 2014 film Chef!, about a chef who leaves a micromanaged restaurant to become a food truck owner so he can cook what he wants with total freedom, is a stealth Take That! to his former bosses at Marvel Studios, something that did not go unnoticed by critics.
    • Mickey Rourke wasn't happy about Iron Man 2 because he tried to play Ivan Vanko as a complete human being, but Marvel didn't want an Anti-Villain and thus cut his more nuanced and sympathetic scenes in favor of making him seem like a cartoonish monster.
    • Joss Whedon's feelings on working on Avengers: Age of Ultron were mixed to say the least. He has always been a big comic book fan (having actually written for Astonishing X-Men) and due to his cult status he was allowed more input into the Marvel verse than the other directors. He wanted to make the movie smaller and more personal...and found himself filming a movie on an epic scale across the globe (it just sort of happened) and that meant he had to spend a long time away from his family in Burbank. He explicitly did claim that he felt that the movie should have had a longer running time. However, in later interviews Whedon stated that he is proud of the movie in spite of the trouble behind the scenes, and that his initial attitude while promoting it (which he blames on exhaustion) caused people to think he didn't like it.
    • Related, but Jeremy Renner did not like filming The Avengers, as he felt he was misled about the size of Hawkeye's role and his characterization. He even joked that he would've been fine with Hawkeye being killed off if it meant getting to leave the film. However, he's since said that he's happy with the direction the character was taken in the sequels (with Hawkeye getting much meatier parts in Age of Ultron and Endgame), and looks forward to continuing the role.
    • Edgar Wright has admitted that he hasn't seen Ant-Man (following his departure from the film as director before filming began due to Creative Differences with the Creative Committee and Ike Perlmutter) and stated he will never see it, feeling that it would be like him seeing his ex-girlfriend having sex, as in it would bring back bad memories of his experience of working on the film.
    • Thor: The Dark World
      • Christopher Eccleston was angry how Marvel neglected to inform him that he would have to spend 6-to-8 hours every day of shooting to have make-up applied to him. He went so far as to describe his experience as ''just a gun in your mouth."
      • Idris Elba referred to working on the film as "torture" since the constant re-shoots were exhausting and time-consuming.
      • Natalie Portman was not happy with the decision to fire director Patty Jenkins from The Dark World, and only starred in the movie because Marvel wouldn't allow her to back out of her contract. She got her wish and didn't return for the third film, though she's said she would be open to perhaps coming back to the franchise one day.
      • Chris Hemsworth also dismissed the movie as "meh" in a later interview. The drastic tonal shift in Thor: Ragnarok was due in part to Hemsworth telling Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige that he was getting tired of constantly playing the Straight Man in movies like The Dark World and Avengers: Age of Ultron.
    • Downplayed in Black Panther. Although the cast and crew were proud of the final film as a whole, they did have some misgivings.
      • Both Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan grew sick of constantly performing the Wakandan salute for fans. Jordan's case was particularly egregious since his character never performs the action in the film in the first place.
      • In an interview after the movie's release, director Ryan Coogler regretted that he had to kill off Klaue. Although Coogler personally enjoyed the character, he couldn't find any way to keep him in without derailing the film's plot.
    • The cast of Guardians of the Galaxy protested the firing of James Gunn over several of his past jokes. Dave Bautista in particular hasn't minced any words about his contempt for Disney, going so far as to say if he wasn't contractually obligated to keep appearing in the films he'd walk away in a second. Even Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige was unhappy with the decision since he wasn't informed beforehand and he found out from the news just like the rest of the public. The backlash eventually led to Disney and Marvel Studios rehiring Gunn for the franchise.
  • Both Ryan Reynolds and director Martin Campbell dislike Green Lantern, with Reynolds even stating he was unlikely to return for DC's proposed Justice League movie. Campbell heavily criticized the studio for hacking the film to pieces during the editing process, which he claims resulted in the omission or alteration of numerous elements which would have made for a stronger film. Reynolds hates Green Lantern so much that a line making fun of the movie made it into not just the Deadpool movie proper, but even the trailer. Deadpool 2, meanwhile, ends with Deadpool going back in time to kill Reynolds before he can star in Green Lantern, as well as killing the much-maligned "Weapon XI" (or "Dudepeel") version of Deadpool from X-Men Origins: Wolverine.
  • Kurt Wimmer disowned Ultraviolet after Screen Gems recut the film.
  • Richard Beymer, who played Tony in the 1961 film version of West Side Story, later confessed in an interview that he wasn't happy with how his performance came out, saying that he wanted to play Tony as rougher and tougher, more like an actual street kid who used to run around with a gang starting fights for fun, but director Robert Wise made him play Tony as the nicest guy around, which Beymer felt didn't mesh with the character's back story. He also said he had trouble saying some of his lines with a straight face, namely the more romantic lines. He even reportedly walked out on the London premiere of the film - even though it ended up being his most famous role.
  • Not really a full on backlash per se, but the late legendary bodybuilder Steve Reeves, who helped kick off the sword and sandal craze in the late 1950s and early 1960s with Hercules and Hercules Unchained (both of which later appeared on Mystery Science Theater 3000), always expressed some dismay over the fact that most people didn't seem to know of the other films he made during his adventures as a B-movie leading man, such as the swashbuckling remake of The Thief of Bagdad and the spaghetti western A Long Ride From Hell (his final film).
  • There seems to be a lot of distortion over Dolph Lundgren's feelings towards his role as He-Man in the 1987 film adaptation of Masters of the Universe. For a long time it was said that Lundgren, who was still new to acting at the time, did not get along with the film's first time director Gary Goddard, who for the record only mentions Lundgren twice on his audio commentary (he never directed another film again - instead he spent the rest of his life working on amusement park roller coaster rides), and that he felt embarrassed about starring in a film based on a kid's toy. Years later though Lundgren said he enjoyed doing the film and even said he would gladly do a cameo in a He-Man reboot.
  • Ridley Scott:
    • Scott has gone on record saying he much prefers the Director's Cut of Kingdom of Heaven to the theatrical version. Due to the Executive Meddling that hit the theatrical version and the differences in reception to both cuts, its easy to see why. To further this point, during the TIFF press conference for The Martian, he said that re-editing the film was the only regret he's made in his career.
    • Regarding the Xenomorphs from Alien, Scott has repeatedly stated that he feels "the beast is cooked" and that the series needs to move away from them. When his attempt to do so with Prometheus backfired, he had a brief moment of Creator Recovery with Alien: Covenant. However, the latter's lacklustre reception has caused him to reiterate his prior viewpoint and announce his intent to have the third prequel film focus on David, with the Xenomorphs potentially being replaced by something fresher.
  • Spike Lee and Josh Brolin were not happy with the released version of the Oldboy remake, which cut over an hour from Lee's preferred version and had its score replaced before opening.
  • Christopher Plummer has reportedly shown disgust towards The Sound of Music. He considered the characterization of Captain Von Trapp as weak. He has also said that the film was "awful and sentimental and gooey" and has been known for nicknaming it The Sound of Mucus. He ended up reuniting with the cast on The Oprah Winfrey Show, but he claimed that it was for the money, he respected Oprah, and he felt "guilty" about not attending similar functions. While he understands that the film has its appeal for its old-fashioned sentimentality, he still has not made peace with the film.
    • In a 2015 interview, timed with the Golden Anniversary of the film, Plummer had this to say.
    “They always got it wrong and it looked like I hated the movie which is not true at all. I wasn’t particularly happy in the role because I didn’t think it was, well, the most exciting role I’d played. I mean, it doesn’t quite measure up to Hamlet and Lear, and so I was slightly snobbish about it at the time and I was observed a little bit. If you’re on a set with about 24 nuns every day, you too will become jaded. No, I’m respectably, terrifically and particularly proud now that I’ve grown up. But I just didn’t like the way people talked only of The Sound Of Music when they spoke to me. As you know, I have made 120 other movies.”
  • Charlize Theron has said that Reindeer Games was a "bad, bad movie", but that she did it to work with director John Frankenheimer and harbored no illusions about the quality of the film.
  • Mary Martin made her Broadway debut in the 1938 musical Leave it to Me!, where her part included the hit Cole Porter song "My Heart Belongs To Daddy." She then signed a contract with Paramount, which subjected her to Typecasting that she resented so much that she returned to the stage in 1943, never to star in a Hollywood movie again.
  • George M. Cohan was unhappy with the only talkie film he appeared in, The Phantom President.
  • Roald Dahl disowned Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. He wrote the original script for the movie,note  but it was heavily rewritten by The Omen (1976) writer David Seltzer. Roald disliked the many changes made to his original script and was also peeved that his choice to play Wonka - Spike Milligan - was passed over in favour of Gene Wilder. It was years before he allowed another of his novels to be adapted for the big screen, and he arranged things so that the novel's sequel Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator could never be filmed (one reason why the 2005 film of Factory and most other adaptations end on a note of full closure).
  • There's a joke in the Breaking Bad episode "Granite State" about how the only DVDs Walt has to watch in hiding are two copies of Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium. Writer and director Zach Helm - who has never made another full-length film to this day - responded that Walt has "exactly two more copies than are allowed in my house." (Which suggests that the movie's opening credit dubbing this "Supposedly A Film By Zach Helm" is more telling than it seems.)
  • Hugh Jackman himself expressed regret over X-Men Origins: Wolverine, admitting it fell short of his expectations and that it felt like a half-baked X-Men 4 instead of a character-driven idea that was originally envisioned. Subsequently he and the rest of the crew sought to do a better job with The Wolverine and X-Men: Days of Future Past, both of which were better received by critics and fans.
  • Even the famously easy-going James Garner had this - he (and several other cast members) derisively called 1970's A Man Called Sledge "A Man Called Sludge," and he didn't like 1988's Sunset in part due to his working relationship with Bruce Willis.
  • Mara Wilson mentioned in interviews about how although filming all of the movies she made post- Matilda were (for the most part) great experiences for her, she isn't a particular fan of those movies and regretted doing them, at the very least because her mother died during the making of Matilda and she was still traumatized by the experience. She also claimed to regret her poor behavior on set when dealing with those events, wished she could have taken a break to grieve and recuperate, and felt, in retrospect, that A Simple Wish and some of the other roles she played in/auditioned for cut too close to the bone in some of the subject matter. She has also claimed she is such a perfectionist that it's hard for her to watch her own acting performances without being too self-critical.
    • She has at least acknowledged that her experience filming Thomas and the Magic Railroad as fun to make, and that she loved the script, but often self-deprecatingly comments on the movie in interviews that "they can't all be To Kill a Mockingbird". Her parents' encouragement for her to make family-friendly movies and her desire to keep busy and get experience in the film industry were also factors, and she had felt that acting had been, in spite of her increasingly negative experiences with it at the time, the one real constant in her life she could focus on, as she struggled with her undiagnosed OCD and the death of her mother.
  • Screenwriter Matthew Berry has spoken critically of Crocodile Dundee In Los Angeles, particularly about working with Paul Hogan. Berry expressed a low opinion of Hogan's sense of humor and accused Hogan of trying to cheat him and his partner Eric Abrams out of royalties. Hogan took the pair to court, but lost.
  • While not bashing the films themselves, Anna Paquin said she'd only be interested in reprising her role as Rogue in future X-Men movies if she got to be a Flying Brick like in the comics.
    I want to be badass Rogue, not shy teen Rogue.
  • Chris Columbus said he was not fond of I Love You, Beth Cooper in an interview.
  • Channing Tatum is not proud of G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, stating that he only did the film to fulfill a contractual obligation. He added that the regrets are worse given he grew up a fan of the franchise.
  • Andrew Garfield isn't fond of The Amazing Spider Man 2, and has stated that he feels the film's poor quality stems from a ridiculous amount of Executive Meddling. Despite this, he says he loved the original script, and felt the movie could have been quite good had they followed the earlier drafts more closely. His comments did not go unnoticed, and the infamous Sony leaks later revealed that the studio was considering firing him and replacing him with an Other Darrin before the deal with Marvel Studios. The reason the late James Horner, who did the score for the first film, didn't do the score for the sequel is also because of Sony not allowing Webb creative freedom, as as well as hating the script, with the main point being the death of Gwen Stacy. The Sony e-mail hack also revealed that Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige and Marvel Entertainment president Alan Fine also didn't care for the script, the latter even outright predicting the problems many people ultimately had with the film.

    Later, Garfield later went further, criticizing the lack of freedom even in the first movie of The Amazing Spider-Man Series, and comparing it to canning Coke. Additionally, Sally Field flat-out said she doesn't like either movie and only took the role of Aunt May in the first movie as a favor to her friend, producer Laura Ziskin, who died after the first film was shot, and said she felt the only positive thing about working on the films was working with Garfield.
  • Just hours before the release of Fantastic Four (2015) in North America, the film's director Josh Trank went to Twitter and bashed it, claiming that it wasn't the film that he'd wanted to make, blaming Executive Meddling for the film's quality. The lead actors (Kate Mara and Toby Kebbel especially) have also expressed disappointment with the final product, and the studio heads themselves weren't happy with how Fant4stic's abysmal critical and financial performance led to a 28% decline in revenues for that fiscal quarter.
  • Sean Penn was not happy with how small his role was in The Tree of Life despite getting second-billing. He felt that a lot of the emotional weight of the screenplay was lost in the final product and that the film would've benefitted from having a clearer narrative.
  • Nancy Allen isn't fond of RoboCop 3, as among other things, she didn't want to do it, thought they should've waited for Peter Weller to come back, and agreeing with fans that going PG-13 was not a good idea. While he doesn't regret the process of making it, as he enjoyed making the movie, director Fred Dekker does regret the end result, both as a Creator Killer, and wishing he had more money and hadn't toned down the film to be PG-13. Edward Neumeier, the co-writer of the original movie is also on record as despising the jetpack and weapon arm, feeling they were too-kiddy.
  • Anthony Hopkins has some ambivalence towards Hannibal Lecter. Though he feels The Silence of the Lambs is a "good film," and said likewise about the two follow-ups at one time or another, he later said it was a "mistake" reprising the role for Hannibal and Red Dragon. This is partly attributable ( for Hannibal especially) to his feeling that the character isn't nearly as scary when out in the open; his imprisonment makes him a "tarantula inside a bottle," but set him free and the fear is gone.
    • Likewise, actor Brian Cox, who played the character in Manhunter, has expressed that he doesn't quite care for how the character of Lecter has a fan following, seeing Lecter as little more than a psychopath not worthy of respect.
  • In the similar vein to Ridley Scott mentioned earlier, Peter Jackson is very dissatisfied with the theatrical cuts of The Hobbit. While not entirely hating them, he admits in the commentaries that they don't tell the complete story and that they're evident of the Executive Meddling the trilogy suffered. He in fact stated he prefers the extended cut of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies in particular.
  • Jennifer Lawrence doesn't think much of her singing voice and dislikes "The Hanging Tree" from The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 as a result.
  • Divergent:
    • Miles Teller said he only took the role of Peter Hayes in Divergent for "business reasons" and that it made him feel "dead inside". He had to do a rather large Verbal Backspace when the sequels were greenlit.
    • Shailene Woodley has hinted that she didn't like the direction The Divergent Series: Insurgent went in, due to the film differing so much from Neil Burger's original vision.
  • DC Extended Universe:
    • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice:
      • Jeremy Irons rather bluntly stated that he felt BvS deserved the negative reviews it got, as he found the movie to be "overstuffed" and convoluted.
      • Ben Affleck was upset over the reaction to the film, especially considering he signed on to escape the stigma of being in Daredevil. However, Affleck clarified that his reaction was with the criticism of the tone and said he was proud of the final product.
      • Michael Shannon, who played General Zod in Man of Steel, didn't see the film for over a year and only did so as he was bored on an airplane—and proceeded to fall asleep watching it. Shannon was also part of a poll among actors who were comic book fans or starred in comic book films about who would win in a fight between Batman and Superman where, while every other respondent answered excitedly, Shannon said in no uncertain terms that he coudln't care less about it, even poking fun at the infamous collateral damage caused by Zod's climatic fight with Superman in Man of Steel.
      • Gal Gadot later said that she was not a fan of how Wonder Woman was characterized in the film, as she felt Diana would never turn her back on mankind and stop being a hero. She would go on to say that she felt the solo Wonder Woman (2017) Spin-Off "correct[ed]" that mistake by emphasizing the character's warmth and compassion.
      • Henry Cavill admitted that he felt WB had made mistakes with the movie, though he at least praised them for taking risks and trying to do something unique for a superhero film, even if it didn't necessarily work out the way they wanted it to and ended up a "niche" product.
    • Suicide Squad (2016):
      • Jared Leto complained about how many of his scenes were cut, and sarcastically wondered if he was even still in the movie during an interview. Some reports claim that he felt he was misled about just how big his part in the movie would be.
      • In a much less severe case, David Ayer later said that in hindsight, he should've gone with The Joker as the main villain instead of the Enchantress, as a more grounded threat would've been a much better tonal fit. He also said that he would've liked to give the characters a more deserving plot had he gotten to make the sequel. He also owned up to the Joker's infamously derided "Damaged" tattoo, which he conceded was a "step too far."
      • Producer Jon Berg, who joined the DCEU after Batman v Superman, said the film's story was a major letdown, but praised the characters.
    • Justice League:
      • When interviewed about his upcoming Netflix-produced film Army of the Dead, Zack Snyder said that he won't be "handcuffed" on this one, referring to the Executive Meddling he had to put up with during the post-production of Justice League. When asked about the botched CGI on Henry Cavill's face in the final product (the new scenes of which he had no involvement in) on the social media Vero, he said "We all know it never works".
  • E.L. Doctorow distanced himself from the notoriously troubled 1991 film adaptation of his novel Billy Bathgate due to the liberties it took with the story.
  • Audience and critical appreciation of Caddyshack deepened over the decades since its release, but Harold Ramis' appreciation of his troubled directorial debut never did. "All I see are compromises and things we could have done better", he said in the late 2000s.
  • Nick Nolte has stated unequivocally that another difficult production, the mid-'90s I Love Trouble, is his worst film.
  • While John Carpenter is understandably proud of the original Halloween (1978), he's not so much as fan of its sequel, and admits to having written it "with a lot of beer sitting in front of a typewriter saying, 'what the fuck am I doing? I don't know.'" In particular, he disliked the twist that the villain Michael Myers was the long-lost brother of the Final Girl Laurie Strode, viewing it in hindsight as a Franchise Original Sin for the Halloween films.
  • Katherine Heigl, leading lady of Knocked Up, ultimately hates the movie due to what she felt was a one-dimensional portrayal of the genders: women as joyless nagging shrews and men as immature brats who avoid or resent their responsibilities in life.
  • This article by Alex McLevy of The AV Club recounts the story of A. J. Via, who, as a teenager in 1998, wrote a Black Comedy script called Aisle 12 in which a group of hardware store employees discover a dead body and a duffel bag full of cash, then uploaded it to InkTip. Fifteen years later, it was discovered by a producer named Chad Ridgely, who bought the rights to it from him. Via says that 40% of the script wound up in the finished film, titled Massacre on Aisle 12, and that his first indication that something was wrong was when a crew member gushed to him about a sex scene that he never wrote. After increasingly sporadic communication between Via and Ridgely, the film finally premiered Direct-to-Video in 2015. He said that his wife fell asleep twenty minutes in, and that he ultimately chose not to wake her as it was for the better that she missed most of the film, filled as it was with gay panic humor and other highly questionable jokes.
  • For reasons unknown, Mary Pickford hated Rosita and ordered all copies destroyed. The film would have remained one of the numerous missing Silent Movies if not for a single copy surviving.
  • Viola Davis doesn't like The Help all that much, criticizing the fact that the black maids were essentially SupportingProtagonists to the white characters and subsequently didn't give the audience enough of an idea about how her character and the other maids dealt with racism in the Jim Crow South.
  • Jack Haley did not view working on The Wizard of Oz as a fond memory, describing it as "awful" and "not fun at all" throughout the rest of his career.
  • Whoopi Goldberg hated her direct-to-video dinosaur science fiction noir comedy, Theodore Rex, calling it the only movie she regretted making. She sued the producer to get out of contract, but lost, being forced to perform opposite the malfunctioning dinosaur puppet, while loathing the producers to the core of their beings.
  • Charles Dance disparaged Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) following its debut, stating that he almost fell asleep while watching the premiere.

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