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"Oh no! Half in the Bag has jumped the shark! It's never been the same since episode four!"

Nadine: Mister, please, just let me go! I promise won't say anything! I'll do anything, just let me go!
Mr. Plinkett: Quiet! I'm making my YouTube Star Wars review!
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RedLetterMedia is a film and video production company with a channel on YouTube and a website that produces a number of films and short videos. The company was founded by Mike Stoklasa in Arizona, but it later moved to Milwaukee, WI. It began as a creator of zero-budget horror films and has gradually shifted to producing humorous film and pop culture reviews online.

RedLetterMedia's online shows include:

  • Mr. Plinkett Reviews: Mike performs in voiceover as Harry S. Plinkett, who painstakingly reviews terrible films and sub-par offerings of beloved franchises. The character of Mr. Plinkett is a cantankerous old man prone to mumbling, mispronouncing words, and getting sidetracked on unrelated tangents. His reviews are heavily sprinkled with increasingly overt insinuations that he is a Serial Killer who murdered his wives and regularly kidnaps other women. The videos are notable for their length, often extending beyond an hour. RedLetterMedia earned mainstream acclaim with the Mr. Plinkett review of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, and it remains their most popular and celebrated offering.
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  • Half in the Bag, a traditional movie-review series featuring Mike Stoklasa and Jay Bauman discussing new releases. While the show maintains a loose Framing Device of the two being VCR repairmen working for Mr. Plinkett (played here by Rich Evans), the bulk of each episode is a Siskel & Ebert-style conversation about one or two movies.
  • Best of the Worst, in which various members of the RLM team watch a marathon of three B-movies from their collection and host a roundtable discussion to determine the "Best of the Worst." After a few episodes, the gang introduced the tradition of also naming the "Worst of the Worst" and destroying the physical copy in some inventive new way.
  • Previously Recorded: A since-concluded video game retrospective/review show hosted by Jack Packard and Rich Evans. In addition, they also have a lengthy playlist of livestreams available.
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  • re:View: While Half in the Bag focuses on reviewing new films, re:View is a stripped-down, generalized review show with no framing device and no set criteria beyond whatever film or show two people want to discuss. It could be an 80s cult classic, it could be a weird art film, or it could be Mike's pitch for a new Picard-led Star Trek series.
  • The Nerd Crew: A parody of geek culture podcasts and YouTube shows, in which Mike Stoklasa, Jay Bauman and Rich Evans play hosts who obsess over and shamelessly shill major corporate franchises.
  • Red Letter Media Talk About....: Like re:View, this is a stripped down discussion series without any gimmick or conceit beyond two people discussing movies. However, as implied by its blunt title and the fact that it's filmed on couches in the RLM break room, it's intended for quickie, impromptu discussions and recommendations that don't require a full-blown episode.

In addition to its web content, the production company also makes feature-length, relatively No Budget films, most of them horror.

Their discussion thread is here.

Supporting member Jack Packard was signed by The Escapist to cover videogames in mid-2019, such as doing a Let's Play of Yahtzee Croshaw's game The Cleaner.


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Examples given by their other works:

    The channel overall 
  • Catchphrase:
    • Rich Evans is prone to shrieking "Oh my god!", which seems to have caught on with other members such as Mike and Jay, to the point that it's become a common joke and frequently written into their gags. Here's a super cut.
    • "That's right, Jay" and "Are you saying...?"
    • Mike also frequently shouts at the top of his lungs, "Ooooooooooh FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCK."
    • The Nerd Crew has "Very cool", said with as much mock-sincerity as possible.
    • Jay's "Oh, no!". Mike occassionally uses it, drawing it out more.
    • Jay saying "I guess we should talk about..." with the faintly concerned tone of a parent who's been trying to put off discussing his child's paste-eating habit. Usually followed by "Should we get into spoilers?"
  • In Name Only: invoked Invoked verbatim when describing such films as The Hangover Part III and Star Trek Into Darkness.
  • Malaproper: Rich occasionally stumbles over his speech or mispronounces words, such as saying he's "ambivalous" instead of "ambivalent." The rest of the gang is quick to mock him about it, and occasionally text will display the guessed-at spelling of whatever it sounds like he just said.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin:
    • Internet commenters are invariably quoted with their exact words, all spelling and grammatical errors included.
    • Also, Rich's mispronunciations are almost always spelled out on screen. He Lampshaded it when Mike promised to fix one of his gaffes in post-production, laughing that what Mike meant was he'd exaggerate it with Jump Cut editing and a downloadable .gif.
  • Running Gag:
    • Accidental Innuendo or Incredibly Lame Pun is almost always followed by the Stock Sound Effect of a slide whistle.
    • Rich Evans getting so overemotional or freaked out he runs amok and knocks over cameras, ploughs through green screens, and—in one infamous incident—rips toy boxes apart and masturbates with a Darth Vader head in a trailer reaction video.
    • Mike bringing up Star Trek wherever he can, to the annoyance of anyone who isn't Rich.
    • In a similar vein, Jay bringing up obscure or artsy movies that none of the others have ever seen.
    • Mike flinging a prop or beer bottle off-screen so hard it shatters or breaking a piece of set dressing, and then calmly continuing the discussion as if it never happened.
    • In the Bandcamp commentaries, Mike pretending to be a hipster film critic snob.
    • The comment sections have their own running gags:
      • "Did you know it took twelve years to make?!", referencing the Film/Boyhood review. note 
      • "It's so dense, every frame has so much going on!" in reference to The Phantom Menace.
      • "It's about family. That's what's so great about it.", following The Last Jedi.
      • Continually asking if a new video series is replacing an existing one.
  • Signature Laugh: Rich's magnificent laugh. Witness its raw power.
  • Stylistic Suck: A hallmark of most RLM videos is periods of intentionally stilted delivery, clumsy editing and awkward situations.
  • Take That!: Zigzagged with Mike's Pathetic Man-Child Destroys 2,387 Vintage Star Wars Figures video. While the video is meant to be an obvious jab towards the more volatile parts of the Star Wars fanbase, it can also interpreted as the culmination of Mike's disillusionment with the franchise.
  • The Teetotaler: While the hosts of most shows drink pretty heavily during filming, Rich Evans does not drink at all and usually sips on water or Diet Coke. This is never drawn attention to and sometimes cleverly obfuscated. During the Ghostbusters (2016) episode of Half in the Bag, the three hosts supposedly down a shot of Crystal Skull Vodka, but an edit skips over the part where Mike hands out the shots he's poured, suggesting that the shot Rich actually drinks was probably just water.

    Other Specific Works 
  • 10-Minute Retirement: In The Nerd Crew episode on the Solo premiere, Mike, after realizing what a sad existence he's living, leaves the crew, causing Jay and Rich to go their separate ways as well. A few days later, he lands a job as a telemarketer, where, after being encouraged by one of his clients, believes that he was born to review movies and brings the crew back together.
  • Abusive Parents: The Grabowskis.
  • Bait-and-Switch: The Grabowskis episode "The Hardware Store" starts out as a typical sitcom but ends up as a Surreal Horror.
  • Blatant Lies: Played for laughs in the fourth episode of "The Nerd Crew", titled "The Last Jedi Trailer Breakdown and Analysis!". A big part of of it is spent by Jay, Mike, and Rich giving shout-outs to their fake sponsors—various parodies of Loot Crate and similar products. When they do get around to actually talking about the trailer, Rich gives his impressions about it but accidentally talks about Thor: Ragnarok's trailer instead. By the time the misunderstanding is brought up, Jay simply says they have no time left and the episode ends.
  • Continuity Reboot: In their trailer for "New Alien Commentary Track", Jay and Mike mentions that the new Alien movie is going to ignore Alien³ and Resurrection. Mike then comments that "if the movie doesn't get the box office results you want", the makers could just retcon or even reboot the series, with examples like the Superman, Hulk, and Spider-Man films... and redoing Game Station 2.0 as Previously Recorded:.
  • Corpsing: Common in The Nerd Crew due to being a tongue-in-cheek, semi-improvised comedy performance. Occasionally someone in the crew will break character to laugh at someone's riff.
  • Creepy Stalker Van: In a Crossover with Macaulay Culkin's website Bunny Ears, titled "Macaulay Culkin Points at Milwaukee", Mike offers to show Mack around the city.
    Mike: Well, my filthy van is right over there. Come with me and I'll show ya some things you can point at.
  • Dull Surprise: Heavily parodied in "Rich Evans Auditions for Blade Runner 2049".
  • Flanderization: The first Nerd Crew episode is an exceptionally dry, satirical troll job about three boring, soulless corporate stooges parroting actual fanboyisms. Successive episodes make them more exaggerated, obvious, winking-at-the-audience caricatures of fanboy media types. However, as shown by this video, their behavior is not that much of an exaggeration from actual nerd culture channels.
  • Gag Boobs: Occasionally perks up in their work, as Mike seems preferential toward casting busty women in their films. Most memorably, the two main female characters of the RLM short "The Great Space Jam" size up one another's racks before deploying them as weapons.
  • Gag Penis: The alien cocks in "The Great Space Jam" are unusually long and used as weapons.
  • Hipster: Jay and Josh warn before their re:View episode about Eraserhead that if they're the hosts, be ready to shut the video off because they're going to enthuse about cult arthouse films. (Their next film? True Stories.)
  • Hooker with a Heart of Gold: Rosemary The Whore from "The Western Ore Musical". Flint lampshades this when he says "Hey, there, whore with your heart of gold."
    Rosemary: You see, Mr. Eastrock that where you are wrong, ever since I was a little girl, I've loved things that are hard. But mama misunderstood me and pushed into a life of prostitution. When really it was my love for rocks, minerals, and ore, especially ore.
  • Hypocrisy Nod: A promo-video has Mike and Jay taking about reboots and remakes, and Mike points how the business model of Hollywood seems to be that if something doesn't work you should just start over and redo it. Examples includes Fantastic Four being replaced by Fantastic Four (2015), Superman Returns being replaced by Man of Steel, Hulk being replaced by The Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man being replaced by The Amazing Spider-Man, and finally Gamestation 2.0 being replaced by Previously Recorded.
  • Impossible Hourglass Figure: The Snake Women in "The Care Boars Save Christmas"
  • Klingon Scientists Get No Respect: Discussed in the commentary track for Alien vs. Predator when Mike points out that there must be Predator (and Klingon) engineers building their spaceships and other technology.
  • Let Us Never Speak of This Again: The series finale of The Grabowskis ends with the two title characters experiencing a flashbacks of "Good times".
    Honey: Cliff, did you see that too?
    Cliff: Yeah, I did. And let's never speak of it again.
  • Line-of-Sight Name: When 'George Lucas' visits the Chicago Comic Con to destroy all the copies of The Star Wars Holiday Special, he tells one vendor that his name is 'Paul Superman' after seeing someone in a Superman costume walk by.
  • Loads and Loads of Roles: Mike and Jay live in a world full of people played by Rich Evans.
  • Mega-Corp: Disney becomes one in an episode of The Nerd Crew. After buying out ExxonMobil and Kroger, they create "Disney+ Basic Needs", a service that assigns people a number designation and requires them to pay $159.99 a month in order to get access to food and car gas. Soon after, they launch "Disney Healthcare Plus" after buying out all public and private healthcare providers.
  • Memetic Mutation: invoked Conversed. In "The United States of Noooo!", Mike discusses the meme status of Darth Vader's Big "NO!" He mentions that before it became big on the internet, he thought he and Rich were the only ones who found it funny.
  • Mind Screw
    • Recipe for Disaster.
    • "The Hardware Store"
  • Nightmare Fetishist: Jay's fondness for weird exploitation films is occasionally exaggerated by the other members into claiming he's obsessed with the most perverse and debauched films out there.
  • Oh, Crap!: During a Nerd Crew episode discussing all the new streaming services offered by various companies, the cast (who are all openly owned by Disney) begin reacting with increasing dread as they learn about all the basic needs that Disney is monopolizing, learning that they'll soon need barcode tattoos to have access to food and background checks for gas. Mike has a panic attack upon learning that Disney has also monopolized the health care industry.
    Mike (forcing a smile): "Wow! It really sounds like Disney is holding everyone hostage over basic every day needs...It's not just about movies anymore..."
  • Product Placement:
  • Orphaned Series:
    • GameStation 2.0 was a parody of your typical late noughties video game review show, hosted by Rich Evans, with a weird, nonsensical "plot" for a framing device, produced during the brief period when RLM was affiliated with Machinima. The show abruptly ceased production pretty much as soon as the partnership with Machinima did, with two Spiritual Successor series: Previously Recorded for the video game review content, and The Nerd Crew for the parody of review shows.
    • Quick Cuts was the studio's first attempt at a serious, straightforward review show with no gimmicks. The idea was that any of the crew could produce their own segment whenever the mood struck them. The problem was the only person the mood ever seemed to strike was Jay, who hosted the first four episodes before stopping, not wanting Quick Cuts to become "The Jay Show". The Spiritual Successor shows, Re:View and X and Y Talk About..., notably both feature pairs instead of just one person.
  • Running Gag: In The Nerd Crew shorts, the gang plays a group of sell-out Star Wars groupies, but Jay will occasionally state that he has never even seen one of the Star Wars films previous to the one they're discussing. No one will react to this confession.
  • Sdrawkcab Speech: In The Nerd Crew episode on streaming services, Jay at one point talks backwards. When reversed, he says, "We all bow to our Disney overlords! Hail the mouse! Hail the mouse!"
  • Shout-Out:
  • So Unfunny, It's Funny: "101 Wacky Kids Jokes" Parts 1 and 2. They even do a "with kids" edition where they read the titular book to two kids to see their reaction. One kid hates the jokes and ends up ignoring them. The other kid laughed a lot. But it's hard to if it was at jokes or at Mike and Rich.
  • Stylistic Suck: Above and beyond their standard appreciation for this trope, The Nerd Crew is built around this concept, being an extended Take That! against Collider's Jedi Council podcast and similar online critics who simply shill whatever product they're covering in exchange for free stuff or attention.
  • Surreal Humor: The gorilla movie.
  • Take That!: Star Trek Discovery Season 2 In a Nutshell opens with a title card declaring it a product of "CBS All Ass" and spirals from there, mocking the show's contrived plots, sloppy writing and bizarre obsession with "science, fuck yeah" moments.
  • That Was Not a Dream: Mike in "The United States of Noooooo!" wakes up and says he had a bad dream about the ending of Revenge of the Sith stumbling out of a contraption and screaming "No", then invoked the Trope.
  • They Killed Kenny: Sammy Grabowski.
  • Totally Radical: The basic premise of their show Dudebros.
  • Trope Enjoyment Loophole: invoked In The Sacrament episode of Quick Cuts, Jay makes it clear that he dislikes "found footage" movies. But in his Quick Cuts review of WNUF Halloween Special, he mentions it works, partially because it's about a news show's Halloween special, so it makes sense that there'd be a camera.
  • Twist Ending: In "Das Foot", there's a guy going around chopping off women's feet. It looks like it's Mike's character. It turns out that he did chop the 1st woman's foot off. But the guy behind the rest of them was her fiancé. He was trying to find a replacement foot for her after she died.
  • Undying Loyalty: In The Nerd Crew, Mike, Jay, and Rich are this to Disney.
    Mike: Remember the mantra!
    Mike, Jay, and Rich (in unison): Loyalty to Disney. Loyalty to the brand. Loyalty is salvation. Loyalty is life.
  • Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist: Cliff Grabowski to an extreme. He is neglectful and abusive towards his baby son Sammy, doing things such as getting his head stuck on a sewer grate and intentionally electrocuting him with his microwave, and murders his wife twice over things such as not wanting to fix the lock to their apartment.



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