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Trope Enjoyment Loophole

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This is what happens when a trope normally is a Pet-Peeve Trope, but one particular example doesn't trigger the usual Berserk Button, or the reverse, when a Favorite Trope is done in such a way as to hit said Button.

Why? Well, for the non-annoying example of a Pet Peeve Trope case (which is the one for which we'll be providing examples) there are a few possibilities:

  • It could be because the justification is actually logical (there's a Record Needle Scratch in the trailer, but it's a movie about an actual Vinyl record shop in the 1960s).
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  • It could be because the subtext that's normally present in the trope is avoided (yes, he is a British lord raised by a native South American tribe, but he repeatedly claims to not be as good a hunter as most of the men of his adoptive tribe, and this is (mostly) borne out by what we see; he's still good enough to beat the bad guys, though).
  • It could be because the context requires the trope. (Sure, the Black Dude Dies First in the war film, but that was what exactly happened in the real-life battle the film (scene) is based on.)
  • It could be because the trope is used in a very understated way (yes, that character is very clearly the author's pet, but he's only on screen for maybe two scenes per episode at most).
  • It could be that it's being used in a sufficiently unusual way (it's not Black Comedy Rape; it's Rape as Drama being played by the rapist as comedy).
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  • It could be a case of an Intended Audience Reaction (we're supposed to find the wangsty teenager annoying, so that we understand when The Hero finally starts yelling at him).
  • It could be because the Unfortunate Implications normally associated with a trope are cancelled out by another (a Faux Action Girl is paired with a genuine Action Girl to show that competence isn't tied to gender).
  • It could just be so well done that we forgive the writers (The protagonist is a This Loser Is You archetype, but the comedy is so hilarious that it's funny).
  • It could simply be that the work does such a great job getting the audience invested that the trope works and can be taken seriously (Yes, the aliens are from a Planet of Hats, but the conflict is so gripping and thought-provoking that we're able to take these aliens seriously).
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  • It could be some species of deconstruction of the trope, showcasing why you hate it in the first place (the character is a Karma Houdini, but later realises that they deserve punishment and it eats at their soul).
  • It could be that the reason the viewer hates the trope is because it's too sad or scary, but it's played in a way that doesn't sadden or scare them (there's a Death of a Child, but it's a genuinely evil child, or there's a Jump Scare but the bad guy who jumps out is a Mook the audience doesn't care about, so it's not scary enough to push the berserk button).

Please do not add examples to work pages, this merely defines the term.

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