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Film / Thor: Love and Thunder

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Spoilers for all Marvel Cinematic Universe works preceding this one, particularly Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Endgame, will be left unmarked. You Have Been Warned!

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"Come, come gather 'round, and listen to the legend of the space viking, a.k.a. the God of Thunder, a.k.a. Thor Odinson."
Korg

Thor: Love and Thunder is a 2022 superhero space opera romantic comedy film from Marvel Studios. It is the 29th feature film, 13th Phase Four installment, and 36th installment overall in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, as well as the fourth Thor film. Taika Waititi returned to direct after Thor: Ragnarok.

Following the events of Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Endgame, Thor Odinson has left the people of Asgard relocated to Earth in the hands of their newly christened king, Valkyrie, and joined up with the Guardians on their galactic adventures. However, after finding his heart just isn't in it anymore, Thor decides to retire from superheroics and set off on a Journey to Find Oneself with Korg across worlds, realms, and mythologies instead— a plan that is soon complicated by the threat of a God Butcher named Gorr, and the revelation that his ex-girlfriend, Jane Foster, has gained the powers of his mighty hammer Mjölnir.

The film stars returning MCU actors Chris Hemsworth as Thor Odinson, Natalie Portman as Jane Foster / the Mighty Thor, Tessa Thompson as King Valkyrie, Jaimie Alexander as Sif, Taika Waititi as Korg, and Chris Pratt, Dave Bautista, Pom Klementieff, Bradley Cooper, Vin Diesel, Karen Gillan and Sean Gunn as the Guardians of the Galaxy, as well as new cast members Russell Crowe as Zeus and Christian Bale as Gorr the God Butcher.

Love and Thunder was released in theaters on July 8, 2022.

Previews: Official Teaser, Official Trailer, Team Trailer, Journey Trailer, Final Trailer


Thor: Love and Thunder provides examples of:

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    Tropes # to F 
  • The '80s: Like Ragnarok, the heavy metal rock music (Guns N' Roses, among others) used in the movie and the logo design (chrome colouration and spike-like font) just drip with a 1980s vibe.
  • Abdicate the Throne: Played with. Though Valkyrie is the official successor to the Throne of Asgard and is a far more competent a politician, diplomat and businessman than the depressed Thor was during the five-year timeskip, the respect for The House of Odin's legacy still carries considerable weight even four years after Endgame. Notably, it is a single word of firm but reassuring comfort from Thor, not Valkyrie, that instantly calms down a panicking town hall of Asgardians desperate to rescue their kidnapped children from Gorr the God Butcher. Valkyrie for her part, political competence and business acumen notwithstanding, is visibly bored living a life of peaceful administration, and only regains her spark when back in the heat of battle.
  • Accent Upon The Wrong Syllable: Thor pronounces Quetzalcoatl's name as an English word, sounding like "Kwetzal-coo-atl."
  • Accidental Misnaming:
    • Korg ends up getting Jane's full name wrong twice, first by calling her Jane Fonda and then calling her Jodie Foster.
    • Thor has Nick Fury's contact saved as "Nick Furry" in his phone.
  • Achievements in Ignorance: Thor merely confiding in Mjölnir somehow has the same effect as Odin's spoken enchantment back in the first movie, creating a loophole that allows Jane to wield it.
  • Achilles in His Tent: The opening montage shows that Thor has increasingly been sitting out fights and leaving the work to the Guardians, culminating in him deciding to give up fighting and meditate on a mountain. When Quill comes to ask for his help, Thor doesn't hesitate to jump back into the fray.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics, Gorr's entire race looked like a mix between Twi'leks and Voldemort. Here, if it weren't for their facial markings, they would be Human Aliens. Even after becoming more monstrous due to the Necrosword's corruption, Gorr still looks easier on the eyes than his comics counterpart.
  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Gorr is presented as an almost irredeemable villain whose Roaring Rampage of Revenge against the gods comes off as more petty than justified. He's shown murdering gods completely innocent of any wrongdoing with no remorse, and more than one character calls him out as becoming as bad as the evil gods he claims to be hunting. However, in the film, Gorr looks more heroic in his quest for revenge by virtue of many of his targets being portrayed as actual scumbags who deserve what's coming to them.
  • Adaptational Late Appearance: Toothgnasher and Toothgrinder were Thor's draft animals in the original myths, and the comics followed suit — they don't actually appear until 1976, but that establishes that they've been around since the days Thor was actively worshipped. Here, Thor is gifted them during the events of the movie.
  • Adaptational Ugliness: Invoked in-universe. When the playwrights-and-actors performing Loki (Matt Damon) and Thor (Luke Hemsworth) do their take on the events of Thor: Ragnarok, they choose to portray Hela with Melissa McCarthy, who despite being a Big Beautiful Woman is made up to be as unflattering compared to the original by Cate Blanchett.
  • Adaptational Villainy:
    • In the comics, it was implied the pantheon of Gorr's home planet had the perfectly legitimate excuse for not looking after their followers of being killed by or at war with Knull. Here, not only are they still alive and at peace, they see their devout worshippers as dispensable and are willing to let them all die to the desert while they live in luxury because there are many more mortals to enslave through their empire.
    • In the comics, Omnipotence City enforced order amongst the pantheons of the cosmos, signing treaties for the good of entire worlds. Here, it's simply a sort of elite club for gods to indulge in their vices while Gorr rampages across the universe.
  • Adaptation Amalgamation: The film mixes elements of Thor: God of Thunder (Gorr the God Butcher, Black Berserkers, Asgard being on Earth) and the 2014 Thor series (Jane Foster becoming Thor by taking up Mjölnir).
  • Adaptation Distillation: In the comics, it is explained that Jane becoming the Mighty Thor is slowly killing her because Mjölnir, in the process of empowering her, magically purges all toxins and venoms in her body. This undoes all of her chemotherapy treatments and allows her cancer — which is made up of her own body's cells — to run rampant. Since a similar reveal happens in a scene when time is of the essence, the film expedites the explanation by saying the transformation is using up too much of her energy, which she needs to fight cancer, echoing Jane's meeting with Darcy earlier in the film when the latter begged her to slow down. A brief nod exists to the original concept when Jane glances over her Norse Mythology books and focuses on a line that claims Mjölnir would make its wielder "healthy".
  • Adapted Out: Knull and his connections to the Necrosword are completely removed due to Venom's film rights being tied up with Sony. That being said, the underlying concept of the weapon being an Artifact of Doom wielded by a dark god at least remains unchanged and the fact that it's changed hands numerous times from the very beginning leaves the door open for his existence.
  • Advertised Extra:
    • Jaimie Alexander is given fifth billing as Sif despite appearing in 3 short scenes. She does however reference an important plot point that is referenced later.
    • The Guardians of the Galaxy were heavily featured in the trailers, but they go off on a separate mission early in the movie, and are never seen again. Fittingly, they don't have appearances on the film's poster, though they were featured in the merchandise line (with both Star-Lord and Groot getting action figures in the movie's tie-in Marvel Legends wave).
    • Zeus is also heavily advertised in the trailers, but is seemingly killed off by Thor early in the movie, and later only appears in the mid-credit scene to sic Hercules on Thor.
  • Aerith and Bob: Among the known Kronans in the MCU we have the names Korg, Ninny of the Nonnie... and Dwayne.
  • An Aesop: Generosity.
    • To be born into a fortunate life is a gift, which one has the moral responsibility to generously share in order to protect and uplift those less fortunate than they are. Even though Frigga tried to instill this lesson in Thor by taking him into battle since childhood, it is only when he personally witnessed how the apathy and selfishness of the Olympian Gods is what allowed so much of the Universe's misery to continue unchecked on his quest to Omnipotence City, that he finally understands. Upon leaving said gilded city of vice, Thor redirects the purpose of his life to sharing the bounty of his Divine Birth, literally by empowering the kidnapped Children of Asgard with his temporary might to save them from Gorr, and symbolically by becoming a free-roaming agent of kindness who defends innocence across the galaxy, with Love, the niece adopted from his nemesis Gorr, fighting by his side to pass down onto her the virtue of Compassion that Frigga taught him.
    • Never indulge in the cruelty of bullying the unfortunate and refusing to offer them kindness at their absolute lowest emotional point, when they have absolutely nothing left to lose, as how Rapu's Pantheon did to drive Gorr insane with grief.
    • Holding onto the pain of loss is better than walling off your heart and never feeling love again. Finding the strength to find a Second Love, despite the grief of losing the first, form the crux of the film's emotional arc and is reflected via almost every major character (Besides the obvious of Thor and Jane sharing the screen again, there's Gorr's Roaring Rampage of Revenge over his lost daughter, and even Valkyrie, still traumatized by being the Last of Her Kind and seeing her beloved slain in battle, finding someone to flirt with).
  • Age Cut: While Korg narrates Thor's story, we see him running: first as a child, then as an adolescent and finally as an adult.
  • Aimlessly Seeking Happiness: Thor's been adrift ever since Endgame, with no real connections or motivation to drive him forward. He's been trying to find inner peace, but the best he's managed is getting back in shape and going on a few adventures to distract himself. The film opens with him meditating in an attempt to find peace, which fails as well. Adopting Love at the end of the film allows him to finally find happiness as a father.
  • Alien Arts Are Appreciated: Heimdall's son renames himself from Astrid to Axl, expressly after Axl Rose, a reference that Korg also shows recognition towards. Thor himself is not amused.
  • Alien Blood: The blood of the various gods is golden, referencing Ichor from Greek Mythology.
  • Alien Sky: Lampshaded by Thor on Thirnand, when he says it has a wonderful sky of three suns and a "Saturn" (ringed planet).
  • Amazonian Beauty: Jane has gained a considerable amount of muscle mass and she's still played by Natalie Portman.
  • Ambiguous Situation: A Running Gag in the movie has Thor talk to his weapons as though they were people, treating seeing Mjölnir again and his problems with Stormbreaker as though he's reconnected with an ex-girlfriend and his new girlfriend being jealous. That said, Thor seems to have performance issues activating the Bifrost with it after their first fight with Gorr, and both weapons tend to conveniently gravitate around him when he focuses on one of them. Is this just Thor subconsciously controlling them when his emotions are acting up, or do the enchantments on them make them sentient? We never get an answer.
  • And Starring: With Russell Crowe and Natalie Portman. Featuring the Guardians of the Galaxy (with all of the actors playing the Guardians listed in the same billing)
  • Appropriate Animal Attire: Miek, whom Korg identified as an insect in Ragnarok, is wearing a blazer and a skirt.
  • An Arm and a Leg: Sif loses an arm during battle against Gorr.
  • Artifact of Doom: The Necrosword appears to have a will of its own, having "chosen" Gorr. It also physically corrupts and destroys him, such that he dies once it's destroyed, and mentally corrupts him as well, driving him to kill all gods, regardless, not just the Jerkass Gods that mocked his daughter's pointless, drawn-out death.
  • Artistic License – Religion:
    • In common with virtually every other work featuring him, Zeus' son is referred to as Hercules. Zeus was a Greek god whilst Hercules was a Roman god, and the two names were not used interchangeably. He should have been referred to as "Heracles". Justified, in the Marvel comics that character changed his name from Heracles to Hercules to distance himself from his despised step-mother Hera.
    • Dying of sickness is a one-way ticket to Hel, so Jane’s cancer should condemn her. Regardless how many battles you fought, if you don't go out on the field, you’re screwed. Oddly, Thor even points this out to Sif earlier, noting that her losing her arm isn't enough to get to Valhalla. However, the difference between them is that while Sif was gravely wounded in battle, she had enough strength to keep living if she got help while the effort Jane expended left her too weak to survive, so that may have been enough of a distinction.
  • Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence: As per the Norse myths, Thor mentioned that every time an Asgardian dies in battle, their spirits will ascend to Valhalla, the Asgardian afterlife. This is where Jane Foster ends up in the second Stinger after she passed away from her cancer. Due to taking up the power of Thor and joining the final battle despite the strain it caused to her own health, Jane died in battle as an Asgardian, and thus her spirit was permitted entrance to Valhalla, where she is greeted by none other than Heimdall.
  • Asshole Victim: It's really hard to feel any sorrow for Rapu when Gorr sticks the Necrosword through his throat.
  • As You Know: Amid a battle between the Guardians of the Galaxy and an army of marauders on an alien planet, the king starts, "As you know..." and explains to Thor (who's among the Guardians) that their temple was unguarded and eventually overrun after their god was killed, and the Guardians are trying to help recapture it.
  • Author Appeal: When Thor and co. are preparing to head to the Omnipotence City to try and rally an army of gods to fight Gorr, Korg mentions that one of the gods they may encounter is Tūmatauenga, the Māori god of war, hunting, and fishing, among other things. During the convocation of the gods, there are also a few shots of a Māori woman in full regalia (credited as Māori Princess). These are pretty clear references to Taika Waititi's own Māori heritage.
  • Autobots, Rock Out!: Of the four times Guns N' Roses is played, two are in battle scenes, with "Welcome to the Jungle" against the temple raiders on Indigarr and "November Rain" during the final battle at Eternity's altar.
  • Babies Ever After: By the end of the movie Korg is conceiving a child.
  • Baby Planet: The planet where the gang fight Gorr in the Shadow Realm is one of the larger examples, but you can still tell that it's spherical when they're on it. Mjölnir and the Thunderbolt are shown zipping around the whole planet multiple times.
  • Back for the Dead:
    • Doctor Jane Foster succumbs to her cancer and dies in Thor's arms, with her soul going to Valhalla in the post-credits sequence.
    • Subverted with Lady Sif. She's introduced fatally wounded after her off-screen battle with Gorr when Thor arrives and wants Thor to leave her to die. However, once Thor tells her she wouldn't go to Vallhalla for not dying during the battle she gets back her will to live and agrees going to Asgard. She's seen again in the end, training Axl.
    • Also subverted for Korg, who gets nailed by Zeus's thunderbolt (get its name right!) and collapses into rubble. However, it turns out the only part of his species that's actually alive is the face and he ends up pulling himself back together in the end.
  • Back from the Dead:
    • In a sense, Mjölnir. The Hammer has been left broken and not reforged or repaired (or even moved, as the ground around it appears to have been dug down for its pedestal) since Hela destroyed it during Ragnarok. However, upon sensing Jane Foster is Worthy of the Power of Thor, and because of an enchantment Thor unknowingly placed on the Hammer years ago, Mjölnir pulls itself back together again (though it still bears all the marks of Hela's damage).
    • Gorr uses his wish in front of Eternity to bring his daughter back to life.
  • Badass Adorable:
    • The Asgardian children, once Thor temporarily empowers them. Especially the girl using her stuffed toy bunny to shoot electric Eye Beams at the enemy.
    • Also Gorr's daughter, Love, who charges into battle wielding Stormbreaker.
  • Bad "Bad Acting": The actors of New Asgard's theatre group are just as bad as they were last time. Odin's actor crawls awkwardly off stage after his "death" and Loki's actor sprays water into his eyes to represent tears.note 
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Zig-zagged. While there are still gods living at the end of the movie, Thor admits he couldn't stop Gorr from reaching Eternity to get a free wish. However, his wish is way less dangerous than everyone thought, as after a heart-to-heart with Thor and Jane, he wishes for his daughter to live again before he dies.
  • Bathos: Thor gives an inspiring speech to New Asgard, and is then interrupted by Miek making a lot of squeaking noises transcribing it with a marker on a whiteboard.
  • Bare-Handed Blade Block: Thor catches the Necrosword in the final battle a few moments before Jane makes her big appearance.
  • Bawdy Song: Korg sings one such song, explaining that his father sung it to seduce his other father in the past.
  • Beautiful Dreamer: Thor watches Jane sleep with a smile on his face during the flashback montage.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Despite seemingly only existing to scream gratingly whenever they're on screen, the goats manage to make short work of several Black Berserkers.
  • Big Bad: Gorr the God Butcher is an alien being who despises all gods for their hubris and apathy towards mortals due to his family's death, and seeks to butcher the lot of them using his pitch-black, deity-slaying blade, the Necrosword. To this end, he captures Asgardian children to force Thor to give up his axe so it can let him reach the godlike Eternity, a being who he can convince to do the task.
  • Big Damn Heroes: During the Final Battle, Gorr is about to kill Thor with the Necrosword... and then Jane arrives through on Valkyrie's pegasus, as Mighty Thor, and smashes him with Mjölnir.
  • Big Entrance: Zeus enters the throng of gods on a floating platform, performing multiple tricks with his lightning bolt. Lampshaded by Thor, who comments that Zeus loves an entrance.
  • Bigger Is Better in Bed: Zeus flicks too hard and strips Thor nude. Cue multiple people (men and women) fainting, along with Valkyrie and Jane deciding not to interrupt for the moment.
  • Bigger Stick: Downplayed but also played for laughs between Valkyrie and Jane, Dragonfang (a couple daggers and a portable speaker?, and Mjölnir
    Valkyrie: "You packed?"
    Jane [shows Mjölnir] are you packed? [Valkyrie produces Dragonfang] Yes! [then two daggers, to which Jane Gasps, and a third object] "A hand grenade?"
    Valkyrie: No, it's portable speaker.
  • Binary Suns: The planet that Thor and the Guardians fight on in the beginning has three suns.
  • Bird People: The movie starts with Thor and the Guardians fighting a race of owl-like aliens.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Thor loses Jane to cancer, Gorr dies after knowing what he actually wanted and an injured and irate Zeus sends Hercules after Thor. However, Gorr's request to revive his daughter, Love, is fulfilled, allowing him to see her before he dies, the Asgardian kids are returned home safely and are under training by Val and Lady Sif, Thor finds closure from his latest adventure and continues on more to help others with Love by his side and Jane passes on to Valhalla for her heroic actions, with Heimdall greeting her upon entry.
  • Bizarre Alien Reproduction: Kronan babies are made by two Kronans holding hands over a lava pit for a month. In the end, Korg begins making a baby with a Kronan called Dwayne.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: Zeus' Thunderbolt is a golden bolt-shaped javelin.
  • Blood Knight: In the "Tickets on Sale" promo, Valkyrie exclaims a relieved "I get to fight again!" when Thor adds her to his team to fight Gorr.
  • Blood-Splattered Warrior: Thor, Jane and Valkyrie fighting the Greek gods leaves them splattered in their golden blood, a scene which would be a lot gorier if the blood were red.
  • Bond One-Liner: Thor gets one after defeating Zeus with his own Thunderbolt by catching it and hurling it through his chest.
    Thor: That is the sound of lightning.
  • Bookends:
    • The film opens and closes with Korg narrating the story of Thor.
    • During the Cold Open, Rapu callously informs Gorr that there is no eternal reward for him after his death. The final stinger proves Rapu wrong, as Heimdell greets Jane Foster and welcomes her to Valhalla, though that could have just been Rapu talking about Gorr's people.
    • The film begins with Frigga taking Thor into a battle as an infant to defend a helpless village from brigands, to teach him the values of kindness and compassion. The film ends with Thor honoring and passing down his mother's teachings to Love, his niece adopted from Gorr, by letting her inherit Stormbreaker and charging together into battle with him to defend another village of innocent aliens from bandits.
    • In the opening scene, Gorr cradles his daughter as she dies. At the close the resurrected Love cradles him as he passes away.
  • Bound and Gagged: When Thor, Jane, and Valkyrie escape Omnipotence City with Zeus' Thunderbolt and arrive at the Shadow Realm to fight Gorr, he manages to trap them into a large canopy of shadowy vine-like tendrils. All three are quickly immobilized and restrained in the tendrils, noticeably with large ones clamped over their mouths. Gorr also uses ones wrapped around Jane's neck to slowly strangle her in order to force Thor to summon Stormbreaker so he can steal it.
  • Bratty Teenage Daughter: Groot II is still in a gender-inverted version of this phase, with Rocket needing to literally pull binoculars out of his mouth.
  • Bread, Eggs, Breaded Eggs: How Valkyrie describes the challenges of being king.
    Valkyrie: It's all meetings and raven-mails and meetings that could've been raven-mails.
  • Brick Joke:
    • While getting back into shape, Thor is wearing a trucker hat that says "Strongest Avenger" on it, something Thor had been insisting multiple times was him rather than Hulk since Thor: Ragnarok.
    • Darcy brings candy and snacks for Jane at the start of the movie. Closer to the end, Thor brings more to her after she's bedridden and Thor reacts poorly (smashing the vending machine) to the doctor's news.
    • Sif references wanting to die in battle and be admitted to Valhala. This happens to Jane, who succumbs to cancer after using Mjölnir to destroy the Necrosword for good.
  • Bridal Carry: Thor carries Jane this way when they arrive home in a moment during their flashback montage.
  • Bring It: Thor and Gorr can both be seen making taunting hand gestures at each other when Gorr tries to take Stormbreaker.
  • Broken Pedestal:
    • This trope plays a big role in Gorr's origin: In the beginning of the movie a desperate and suffering Gorr meets his god shortly after his daughter died. He expected help and a reward for his worship, but instead gets mocked by his god as the latter sees mortals as pieces of crap who only exist to worship gods. This leads to Gorr killing him and vowing to kill all gods.
    • The Guardians of the Galaxy practically worshipped Thor when they met in Infinity War due to finding him awesome, attractive, and a charismatic leader to follow, putting down their leader Peter Quill in the process; upon the team's reunion by the end of Endgame, they were eagerly encouraging a fight for leadership in which they were hoping Peter would lose to Thor, even though he'd lost his figure and some of his fighting prowess. However, enduring a sustained amount of time with Thor's ever-inflated ego and show-boating that puts Quill to shame has worn out their welcome for him. While they're still friends, it's clear they only tolerate him outside the battlefield at best, and only Peter is shown taking the time to have heart-to-hearts with him as the captain and leader. When Thor parts ways with them, they barely share a word besides Peter.
    • Thor mentions that Zeus was a huge inspiration for his own powers and godhood and is severely disappointed when Zeus refuses to do anything and instead engages in mockery, self-aggrandizement, and self-indulgence.
  • Bully Hunter: What Frigga attempted to teach Thor to be by taking him into battle in infancy to protect the innocent... By the ending of Love and Thunder he honors his mother's memory by passing this philosophy onto his niece Love, adopted from a dying Gorr, by taking her on a Bifrost-assisted crusade across the galaxy to defend the helpless whenever and wherever the duo are needed.
  • The Bus Came Back:
  • Call-Back:
    • Seeing Mjölnir being in a pedestal where it got dropped by Hela after being shattered and in the original layout with the ground underneath. It seems the ground under it was lifted up and encased in the display stand. Clearly, the ground is not worthy, similar to the Elevator.
    • Like in Thor: Ragnarok, the events of the previous movies are retold in an Asgardian theatre play. Thor, Loki and Odin are once again played in a Cameo Cluster by Luke Hemsworth, Matt Damon and Sam Neill; this time they are joined by Melissa McCarthy as Hela.
  • The Cameo:
  • Canon Foreigner: Kieron L. Dyer stars as Axl, Heimdall's son. Axl has no comic book counterpart.
  • Canon Immigrant: A very minor one, but Daley Pearson played Thor's roommate Darryl in the non-canon Team Thor-One Shots. A character named Daryll, portrayed by Pearson, appears in the movie.
  • Casting a Shadow: Gorr the God Butcher. Through obtaining the Necrosword, he displays a considerable control of darkness, being able to teleport via shadows and create monsters made out of pure blackness.
  • Cast from Lifespan: It's revealed near the end that turning into Thor is exacerbating Jane's cancer and killing her.
  • Casting Gag: For the Japanese dub, the voice of Gorr, the God-Butcher, is Takehito Koyasu, who is most famously known for voice-acting as a century-old vampire who fights Japanese delinquents with Fighting Spirit powers and whose name directly translates in Italian to "god".
  • Catch and Return: When Zeus throws Thunderbolt at Thor, he catches it and throws it back.
  • The Cavalry: Literal example. During the Final Battle, Jane rides an Asgardian Pegasus as she teleports in Just in Time to save Thor from Gorr.
  • Celebrity Paradox: When Jane is explaining the concept of Einstein-Rosen bridges to a fan of her book, she asks him if he's seen either Event Horizon or Interstellar, since both of those movies feature a simplified demonstration of the concept. Event Horizon starred Sam Neill, who appears in this film and in Thor: Ragnarok as the Asgardian actor who portrays Odin; Laurence Fishburne, who played Bill Foster in Ant-Man and the Wasp; and Kathleen Quinlan, who appeared in Runaways (2017). Interstellar, meanwhile, featured Matt Damon, who is the Asgardian actor portraying Loki in this film and in Thor: Ragnarok, and Josh Stewart, who portrayed John Pilgrim in the second season of The Punisher (2017).
  • Central Theme:
    • Love.
      • Star-Lord gives Thor a pep talk about love (or in his words, having something to feel "shitty" about).
        Star-Lord: If you ever feel lost, just look into the eyes of the people that you love. It'll tell you exactly who you are.
      • Thor and Jane's relationship comes back into play years after their breakup, and they slowly begin to rekindle their love throughout the film.
      • Thor also gets caught up in a Love Triangle between himself, Mjölnir, and Stormbreaker, with the latter clearly getting jealous of Thor's ex-weapon.
      • At the end, Gorr realizes that Thor and Jane's love for each other reflects his own love for his daughter, and he uses his dying wish not to exact revenge on the gods, but to reunite with his girl and give her a second chance at life.
      • In the epilogue, Korg himself finds love in the form of a fellow Kronan named Dwayne.
    • Compassion, unconditional kindness towards those less fortunate than you, is a love more noble than any other; Rapu and Zeus are hence little better than monstrous brutes for lacking this kindness in spite of their Godhood, while Jane Foster, a "mere" mortal is deemed worthy of being regarded as a Hero by Valhalla itself by laying down her life to protect the innocent chidlren of Asgard kidnapped by Gorr, and hence enter the afterlife of Heroes AS a God in Death. And it is precisely Thor's compassion for a remorseful dying Gorr that allowed him to forgive the God Butcher for causing Jane's final death, and then passes this virtue onto Love, Gorr's resurrected daughter, by adopting her as his niece, and teaching her to be a kinder God than the ones who failed her father by taking her into battles to defend the innocent, just as Frigga taught him in his childhood.
  • Cessation of Existence: Gorr turns villainous when his God tells him that there's no afterlife waiting for him, though the Asgardians discuss Valhalla a few times. It's confirmed to exist in a post-credits scene.
  • The Chains of Commanding: Valkyrie is shown looking bored out of her mind at a political meeting with various world leaders, several empty martini glasses stacked next to her. In the "Tickets on Sale" TV spot and "Team" trailer, she's also overjoyed to get to fight again.
  • Character Catchphrase: Discussed:
    • When Thor tells Jane and Valkyrie that Gorr hides in the Shadow Realm, Jane replies: "Then let's bring in the rainbow!" Thor then asks Valkyrie whether this is Jane's catchphrase.
    • In Omnipotence City, Jane tells Thor several catchphrases she came up with, among others "Eat my hammer." Thor tells her that his catchphrase is "This ends here and now."
    • Before Jane dies, she whispers another catchphrase she came up with into Thor's ear. We don't hear what it is, but Thor tells her that it's the best one yet.
  • Character Title: In his narration before credits roll, Korg gives Gorr's daughter the epithet "Love", and she and her honorary uncle Thor teaming up to defend innocents are together only known as "Love" and "Thunder".
  • The Coats Are Off: Before joining the battle with the Guardians of the Galaxy to retake a temple, Thor dramatically throws off his coat, earning an exasperated look from Quill.
  • Collapsible Helmet: Jane Foster as the Mighty Thor has an Asgardian helmet that comes and goes as part of her costume. In this case, though, it isn't through technology but thank to Mjölnir's magic.
  • Comedic Work, Serious Scene:
    • Gorr confronting a restrained Thor, Jane, and Valkyrie is played completely straight with all four principals doing their best to make it as creepy as possible. In fact, the entire black and white sequence is mostly serious and contains few comedic bits.
    • Jane having cancer is consistently treated seriously, and no jokes are made regarding it, except for her blusteringly questioning how bad stage four cancer can be (Darcy, of course, notes that it's stage four of four, meaning it can't get any worse).
    • The deaths of Jane and Gorr are very much Played for Drama.
  • Commitment Issues: While dating, Thor and Jane both had private fears about losing one another, which festered over time and helped drive them apart.
  • Continuity Cameo: This tweet points out that one shot in the trailer shows what appear to be statues depicting Death, The cosmic entity Infinity, the Living Tribunal, and the Watcher.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • When Thor is working out, he wears a baseball cap with "Strongest Avenger" on it, with "Strongest" being scribbled onto the hat in felt marker.
    • In the montage depicting Thor's time with the Guardians, Peter Quill is shown drinking with him and quickly consoling him when he breaks down crying. In Infinity War, Rocket mused it was "time to be the captain" when he went to check on Thor's well-being during their trip to Nidavelir, evidently inspired by Quill doing the same for his crew.
    • Kraglin is shown wearing the same fin he was practicing using in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 during the film's opening.
    • Thor's "snake" handshake with Star-Lord, which ends with him miming stabbing Quill, recalls his story from Thor: Ragnarok (about the young Loki turning into a snake, waiting for Thor to pick him up, then transforming back and stabbing Thor).
    • When we see Ninny of the Nonny, god of the Kronans, he's sitting on a throne made of scissors, referencing Korg's rock-paper-scissors joke from Ragnarok.
    • Valkyrie offers Jane a grape in a way that makes it clear this is still the closest thing to candy they've got.
    • A pair of Celestials are shown on Omnipotence City watching the spectacle through a window, getting out of the way of the Goat Boat and turning to watch it fly past.
    • When Thor says goodbye to Jane in New Asgard's infirmary, he kisses her hand just like he did when he said goodbye to her in Thor.
    • When Thor goes off to fight Gorr on his own, Valkyrie tells him "don't die", just like she did in Thor: Ragnarok right before he went off to confront Hela on his own.
    • During the final battle, Thor once again finds himself pinned down with his enemy's blade dangerously close to his chest, only for a Mjölnir-wielding ally to intervene.
  • Continuity Snarl: Eternals says the titular aliens were the inspiration for the legends about Greek gods. Here we're shown that the gods actually exist and there's no mention of the Eternals. Interestingly two of their bosses, the Celestials, appear amongst the gods on Omnipotence City. Although this is in keeping with the comics in which the Greek pantheon and the Eternals co-exist but some ancient people mistook the two, such as Gilgamesh taking credit for some things Hercules did.
  • Cool Boat: Thor, Korg, and Valkyrie set out for Omnipotence City from New Asgard in what the LEGO merchandise dubs "the Goat Boat" — an Asgardian longship with "Aesir" and "New Asgard Tours" signs on the sides and a neon cocktail bar sign on the cabin, pulled by the alien goats Toothgnasher and Toothgrinder. The Goat Boat is also capable of interstellar flight via the Bifrost.
  • Creative Closing Credits: The main-on-end credits are shown in a similar manner to getting summoned by the Bifrost, written in the style of old-school Heavy Metal album titles.
  • Creepy Child: The empowered children of Asgard are as creepy as they are awesome in the final fight. One little girl in a princess outfit dances around a shadow monster tying it up like a Maypole before bisecting it with an adorable little smile on her face.
  • Cringe Comedy:
    • Thor has just defeated the leader of the owl-headed invaders hiding in the delicate crystal temple of a city of devoutly religious aliens... by crashing full speed into said delicate crystal temple, which crumbles to the ground like a pile of broken glass just as he takes the bow for "saving the day". And, as a backhanded "reward" for his clumsy "heroics", the understandably unamused aliens "gift" the Guardians of the Galaxy with a pair of giant, uncontrollable goats who would kick and scream all day long. The fact that Thor doesn't take a hint and stop trying to apologize for wrecking the temple (which the high-priest mutters through gritted teeth is "a very painful memory") only rubs more salt in the wounds.
    • New Asgard becoming a tourist site with golf-courses and Infinity-Gauntlet-themed ice-cream stands being built in their suburbs.
    • Zeus making Thor as naked as a newborn babe with a flick is already embarrassing enough (and hot enough to make Goddesses and Gods in the audience faint with admiration), made even more groan-worthy by the "RIP Loki" tattoos (complete with Roses and Broken Hearts) plastered across his hunky back.
  • Crisis Makes Perfect: Korg claims the goats can be summoned by a special whistle but since his lips are made of rock, he can't do it. He successfully manages to summon them by whistling during the fight in Omnipotence City.
  • Crossover Cosmology: The movie introduces many deities from different mythologies and folklores who even are shown to hang out with each other in Omnipotence City. Not really a surprise as this is also the case in the comics and the MCU has already introduced us to Egyptian gods on top of the Norse gods in the Thor franchise.
  • Crystal Dragon Jesus: Valkyrie points at an offscreen god of carpenters who is presumably Jesus.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: The movie opens with a hostile alien force attacking an otherwise peaceful people who are being defended by the Guardians of the Galaxy. Just as all seems lost, Thor joins the battle and ends it quite quickly and decisively.
  • Darker and Edgier: A literal example. Most of Gorr's scenes show him in dreary lighting and a monochrome palette. The Shadow Realm is also monochrome. The film also gets a sad subplot regarding Jane's terminal cancer.
  • Deadly Upgrade: Jane begins wielding Mjölnir in the hope that the Asgardian magic it contains will act as a miracle cure for her cancer. It ultimately has the opposite effect as it's a magical Asgardian weapon which is more powerful than a normal human can handle, slowly sapping the strength from her already weakened body and leaving her even more susceptible to the cancer.
  • "Dear John" Letter: It's revealed that Jane broke up with Thor via a letter.
  • Declaration of Protection: During the flashback montage, Thor asks Mjölnir to always protect Jane. He unknowingly turns these words into a spell.
  • Deliberately Monochrome: Upon arriving at the Shadow Realm, all color is completely gone.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: In Asgardian culture, Astrid is a unisex name whose meaning is derived from elements such as "god" and "beloved". On Earth, it's primarily a girl's name, meaning "divinely beautiful". Thus, Heimdall's son decided to change his name to "Axl" to avoid embarrassment.
  • Depth Deception: As the heroes are reaching the Shadow Realm, they're heading toward a monochrome planetoid that appears planet-sized... until their ship suddenly hits it far sooner than expected, revealing it is a Baby Planet.
  • Destroy the Villain's Weapon: The heroes aim to destroy the Necrosword as it is simultaneously empowering Gorr and keeping him alive. Jane shatters the physical blade of the Necrosword, and then dispels its essence with Mjölnir to prevent the weapon from reforming itself. Unlike most instances of this trope, Gorr survives without the blade long enough to reach Eternity and almost make his wish.
  • Destructive Savior: After he knocks over the temple he was there to save, Thor is referred to as "God of Destruction" by the alien king.
  • Died in Your Arms Tonight:
    • Gorr's daughter dies in his arms in the beginning.
    • Jane decides to use Mjölnir one last time despite knowing that it will kill her, and she dies in Thor's arms.
    • After Gorr uses his wish to resurrect his daughter, he dies in her arms.
  • Differing Priorities Breakup: This is implied to be a reason for Thor and Jane's breakup when Thor looks at a baby in a stroller during the flashback montage.
  • Digging Yourself Deeper: One of Thor's attempts at rousing speeches goes butt-shaped a little too quickly.
    "My fellow Asgardians! Wish us well, for we shall travel with the speeed of Odin's ravens! We will return with children. Many children! And then, we shall feast!... Not on the children. We don't do that anymore. Those were dark times. Shameful times. Ok, we should go."
  • Dirty Coward:
    • When Gorr kills Rapu with the Necrosword, his fellow gods hide or flee in terror upon realizing the person they had viciously mocked only minutes earlier now has the means to kill them.
    • Zeus, despite claiming Gorr has only killed low-level gods and isn't worth their time, admits to Thor that he won't do anything to stop the God Butcher's reign of terror because he's too scared of the Necrosword. It's implied every god in Omnipotence City is the same, preferring the decadent safety of Omnipotence City over actually fighting against Gorr.
  • Disappears into Light:
    • Anytime a god dies, they fade away into golden sparks. The same happens when Jane dies.
    • This effect is replicated by New Asgard's theatre group. When they reenact Odin's death in Thor: Ragnarok, they use golden glitter to represent the sparks as Odin's actor crawls off-stage.
  • Discount Lesbians: Gender-inverted, as Korg's species is implied to be all-male with Korg himself having a child with a Kronan called Dwayne. In the comics, Korg's species don't have genders at all.
  • Distress Call: Thor finds out about the gods being killed when monitoring distress calls. It's implied the Guardians of the Galaxy's modus operandi is to check the space waves for distress calls.
  • Does Not Know His Own Strength: Zeus attempts to use his powers to flick off Thor's hood, but accidentally (or "accidentally"?) ends up flicking off his entire robe. The now completely naked Thor sums it up:
    Thor: You flicked too hard, damnit!
  • The Dog Bites Back: After his god gives him a thorough kicking while he's down, Gorr takes up the Necrosword, slays his god, and pledges to kill all gods in the universe.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me!: When Jane reveals to Thor that she is dying of cancer and he says that he's sorry, she tells him not to feel sorry for her.
  • Dramatic Irony: Minor example. The tattoos on Thor's back include a list of friends and loved ones he's lost since The Dark World. Loki's name is naturally among those listed... but unlike the others, Loki's name includes a question mark after it. Even half a decade after Thanos snapped Loki's neck, Thor still isn't certain whether or not his brother's truly dead (almost certainly out of both grief and Loki's past successes at Faking the Dead). The irony, of course, is only the audience is privy to the confirmation from Loki: The Sacred Timeline Loki is dead and gone (though the God of Mischief is still alive in a sense thanks to the temporal variant the Avengers indirectly created during the Time Heist).
  • The Dreaded: Everyone is scared of Gorr, including Zeus.
  • Dressed in Layers: Miek, working as Valkyrie's secretary, is wearing his combat Mini-Mecha under a blazer and skirt.
  • Dying as Yourself: The Necrosword is destroyed in battle, freeing Gorr of its corrupting influence, but he still makes it to Eternity anyways. He dies happily in the arms of his resurrected daughter.
  • Early Personality Signs: During the montage of Korg telling about Thor's life, there's a moment where baby Thor is strapped to Frigga's front in a baby carrier during a battle, and he's holding a small wooden hammer trying to participate in the battle.
  • Eating the Eye Candy: Zeus's entire entourage collapse at the sight of Thor's body when the Olympian accidentally strips Thor naked. Notably, the woman furthest of Zeus's right holds her gaze for as long as she can before fainting with a smirk. Even Jane and Valkyrie hold off on immediately helping him and instead literally eat candy as they watch.
  • Eldritch Location: The Shadow Realm is described by Thor as a place so dark that color itself refuses to go there. This is shown to be true when the team's color fades away on their arrival. The place they battle Gorr is a barren Baby Planet with a single sun, that moves uncannily across the sky seemingly at his will, shifting the shadows wherever he pleases to better conjure more monsters or teleport himself.
  • The Elites Jump Ship: The most powerful and influential gods have all retreated to Omnipotence City to ride out Gorr's rampage in safety, leaving the lower gods to be slaughtered and the worlds thrown into chaos.
  • Embarrassing First Name: Astrid, Heimdall's son, doesn't like the name his father give, possibly since on Earth and in present day, Astrid is a girl's name. Instead, he calls himself Axl, after Axl Rose.
  • Empathic Weapon: This movie establishes Stormbreaker as more than just a powerful ax, but also as a jealous weapon, possessive of Thor's attention toward other weapons.
  • Empowered Badass Normal:
    • Like in the comics, Jane Foster gets the powers of the Mighty Thor via Mjölnir after being a normal astrophysicist in her previous appearances in the franchise. In the climactic fight against Gorr, Thor empowers the children of Asgard with (for a limited time only) the Power of Thor.
    • At the end of the movie, Gorr's resurrected daughter is shown to have been empowered by Eternity, giving her laser vision, the physical strength to wield Stormbreaker, and who knows what else.
  • Entertainingly Wrong: Thor tells Sif that you have to die during battle to get into Valhalla, not afterward. In the end, he's proven wrong when Jane Foster goes to Valhalla after the final battle. Although he might have known and did it on purpose to get Sif back on her feet.
  • Establishing Character Moment:
    • Gorr gets two:
      • The opening scene, where Gorr and his daughter trek a seemingly endless desert shows Gorr both praying to Rapu, demonstrating piety, and him caring for his daughter, whom he holds as she dies of thirst.
      • Gorr's attack on New Asgard demonstrates his control over shadows and his ability to summon the Black Berserkers, while his fight with Thor shows off his newfound sadism and deadly combat skill; he holds his own against Thor while taunting him over how painful his death by the Necrosword would be.
    • After a flashy entrance, Zeus immediately starts talking about "the next orgy" and numbers of human sacrifices, showing he's ultimately a hedonistic blowhard.
  • Even the Guys Want Him: When Zeus accidentally strips Thor naked, his muscular physique is exposed to a large crowd in Omnipotence City's arena. Cue numerous women and men fainting.
  • Evil Overlooker: In the poster above, Gorr is shown looking down at Thor and Jane with an evil grin on his face.
  • The Exact Center of Everything: It's revealed that the center of the MCU is the Gates of Eternity, a temple that houses the titular Eternity. The first person to open the Gates of Eternity is given one wish by the titular being, Gorr the God-Butcher intending on wishing for the death of all gods in the universe.
  • Face Death with Dignity: When Thor finds Sif, who lost an arm from battling with Gorr, she says to leave her to die, so that she can ascend into Valhalla, like others who died in battle. Thor points out to her that she needed to die in battle, not from wounds inflicted from battle. Sif isn't too happy about that tiny, minor, infinitesimal detail. At least she'll have another chance to die in battle eventually.
  • Facial Markings: Gorr and his daughter have tattoos on their faces. Since Gorr apparently cuts them off after repudiating and killing his god, it’s possible they may have had some kind of religious significance.
  • Fanservice: Thor's muscular physique is put on full display after Zeus flicks off his robe, with his bare ass — censored with pixelation in the trailers — on full display as well.
  • Fantasy Pantheon: Several alien gods appear amongst Gorr's victims and Omnipotence City alongside the Earth gods.
  • Feet of Clay: Turns out the gods of Omnipotence City aren't nearly as badass and awesome as they'd like everyone to believe. Zeus in particular turns out to be a Broken Pedestal for Thor, and then Thor, Mighty Thor, and Valkyrie give a Curb-Stomp Battle to his guards before Thor drops Zeus himself with his own favored weapon.
  • Finale Title Drop: In the last scene, when Thor and the resurrected Love charge into battle, Korg gives this final piece of narration:
    Korg: They traveled far, and have been given many names, but to those who know them best, they are simply known as Love and Thunder.
  • Five-Second Foreshadowing: Mjölnir is shown to be still immobile and unmoved from the ground it fell when Hela broke it. This shows that the enchantment on it is still in effect and it still has power waiting for one who is worthy to take it.
  • Flechette Storm: Since being shattered by Hela, Mjölnir was never reforged into a single weapon. However, now it can spontaneously form into a hammer, and when thrown, separate into separately targetable shrapnel, causing damage over a widespread area, then reform into its hammer-shape.
  • Flying Broomstick: Thor enters a battle by jumping off a cliff with Stormbreaker between his legs and flies away on it. It even grew a bunch of roots like a broomstick from the time it spent planted in the ground while Thor was meditating.
  • Flying Seafood Special: Thor and Jane have a romantic moment watching "Space Dolphins".
  • Foil: In a bit of Irony, Zeus serves to the "lesser god" he dismisses, Gorr's patron deity Rapu. While Zeus seems to have maintained his exalted state in Omnipotence City and Rapu seems to have been reduced to a small oasis in the middle of a desert, both were ultimately neglectful patron gods who help give a solid basis for Gorr's newfound Nay-Theism. The difference here is that Rapu suffers death at Gorr's hand immediately, while Zeus comes to a realization and is thus motivated to enforce his will again.
  • Fold the Page, Fold the Space: Jane tears a page out of her own book and folds it to explain to a man how wormholes work. For bonus points she mentions Event Horizon and Interstellar while doing so.
  • Fourth-Date Marriage: The Guardians return to the Milano to find that Kraglin has gotten married in their absence.
    Quill: Kraglin, what did we say about rushing into relationships like this?
    Kraglin: That I shouldn't be doing that.
  • Foregone Conclusion: Since Korg is telling the story, the viewer knows he has to survive.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • When first bringing up Omnipotence City, Thor mentions Hercules as one of its famous residents, who shows up in The Stinger.
    • It is shown during Thor and Jane's relationship montage that he wishes to be a father, and looks longingly at a baby with its parents. At the end he adopts Gorr's daughter. Korg lampshades it, saying that he went from "sad god to dad god".
    • Jane ruins the pages of her own book to make sure her co-patient understands wormholes, foreshadowing her willingness to ruin her body and health in order to help others, ultimately sacrificing her life to save Thor and rescue the New Asgardian children.
    • Gorr grabs at Stormbreaker while fighting Thor in New Asgard. The axe is the crux of his master plan, to use the Bifrost to reach Eternity and use the omnipotent entity to destroy all gods in one fell swoop.
  • Formerly Fit: While Thor has recovered a substantial amount of his hunky muscular physique since The Snap (enough to make the ladies faint when Zeus flicked his clothes off), there is still visible signs of residual pudginess from his five years of depression. So while a muscular warrior again, Thor will never quite again be as slim as he was before The Snap.
  • Framing Device: The film is narrated by Korg like a campfire story.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: Thor has overstayed his welcome with the Guardians by the beginning of the movie. He has to be told to pull his weight to help save a planet in distress and ends up destroying their temple. When Thor leaves to find Sif, the Benatar takes off and flies through a jump point before he can even finish his farewell speech.

    Tropes G to O 
  • Gender Flip: In the comics, Gorr had a son named Agar who died from thirst and hunger during a drought, contributing to Gorr's despair and hatred of the gods. In Love and Thunder, he instead had a daughter (known to the people she saves as Love), whose death occurs in the same manner.
  • Generation Xerox: A tragic example. Jane eventually succumbs to her cancer and dies, just like her mother before her.
  • Glorious Death: Played for Laughs. Thor finds Lady Sif fading away on the battlefield after losing an arm battling Gorr the God Butcher. She initially tells him not to save her so she can die a warrior's death and go to Valhalla. However, Thor points out one can only go to Valhalla if they die in battle — since the battle was already over, she would not go to Valhalla if she died now. She has an Oh, Crap! moment before agreeing to let Thor save her.
  • God of Thunder: Thor calls himself the God of Thunder and Zeus the God of Lightning. He looks up to Zeus rather than seeing him as a rival until he realizes that Zeus cares more about his orgies than protecting the gods from Gorr.
  • The Gods Must Be Lazy: Every god in Omnipotence City is apathetic towards mortals, and they all refuse to lift a finger to help fight Gorr, assuming he could never reach them or find Eternity before he dies.
  • Gold and White Are Divine: The Home of the Gods, Omnipotence City, is decked out in plenty of gold and light colors. Top God Zeus and his entourage arrive in gold bling and white Greek dress.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Though Thor still has the scar over his right eye from his fight with Hela, it's now a thin, barely noticeable line. Gorr, meanwhile, is Covered with Scars, all of which are thick and ugly.
  • Goo-Goo-Godlike: A flashback shows that Frigga took Thor into battle with her before he could even walk, wearing him on her chest in an Asgardian version of a baby carrier. At the end of the film, due to being brought back to life by Eternity, Gorr's daughter also has superhuman powers.
  • Götterdämmerung: Thor's people have already been through one, and they're at risk of going through another event, but along with other pantheons of gods at the hands of Gorr, which Thor has to prevent.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: The Necrosword. Gorr bound his soul and life to it and gained most of his powers from to get revenge on all gods, at a terrible price. Wielding it turns him into a ticking time bomb that will slowly kill him, and when the sword is destroyed, it accelerates his death, and Gorr eventually succumbs to it.
  • Green-Eyed Monster:
    • When he first sees Jane wielding Mjölnir, Thor, who doesn’t recognize her, is clearly jealous - his immediate reaction is to change his costume into a more ostentatious suit of blue and gold armor with an over the top helmet. Through the remainder of the first act, Thor actively tries to summon Mjölnir to his side away from Jane and even makes a point of proving that he’s still worthy by picking up his former hammer in front of her.
    • Thor's jealousy over Jane wielding Mjölnir has the knock-on effect of making Stormbreaker jealous, with the axe effectively being portrayed as someone who keeps seeing their lover making eyes towards their ex.
  • Hates Being Alone:
    • Valkyrie misses her sisters (the other Valkyries) and it shows - she admits this to Jane and desires for Jane to be around because it makes her feel better.
    • Gorr implies this out of fear for his daughter who he resurrects with his wish to Eternity. Jane retorts that she won't be (having Thor with her).
  • Hate Sink: Rapu, Gorr's own god, is clearly meant to be despised for his scant screentime; confronted with the last of his worshipers, Rapu only complains that Gorr is eating some of his fruit (of which the god has plenty), and he cruelly dismisses the loss of all of his devotees, as well as mocking Gorr for believing in a life after death and for his losses. When Gorr renounces him, Rapu quickly resorts to trying to strangle him, and, although the entire scene is Gorr's Start of Darkness, it's meant to be very satisfying when Gorr beheads the jerkass god with the Necrosword.
  • Have You Seen My God?: The driving force of Gorr's angst: when he and his daughter were the only ones of his faith left behind, they were forced to survive in the elements until she dies. This trope further gets twisted on when he realizes his god has not only abandoned his people, but seems perfectly satisfied in indulging himself at the expense of everyone else. After the Necrosword has chosen him to become the God-Butcher, it becomes Gorr's additional modus to impart his subsequent Nay-Theist beliefs to everyone he meets. The antipathy of Zeus and Omnipotence City, unsurprisingly, helps give greater weight to his beliefs. However, this really only lasts until he goes directly against Thor, realizing he's still the kind of god who believes in doing good even when everyone else does not.
  • Healthy in Heaven: The post-credits scene has Jane appear in Valhalla with no signs of cancer.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Despite knowing the cost, Jane again assumes the mantle of Mighty Thor, and dies saving Thor from Gorr.
  • Hero of Another Story: The Guardians of the Galaxy set off, unseen afterward, to answer multiple other distress calls, almost all of them due to Gorr.
  • High-Pressure Blood: Surprisingly for a movie owned by Disney, Zeus's guards splash blood when killed, only mitigated by the blood being golden ichor.
  • Home of the Gods: As well as New Asgard we get Omnipotence City where the top gods from several religions exist.
  • Homoerotic Subtext:
    • When Thor does the splits during the battle alongside the Guardians of the Galaxy, Drax looks on appreciatively, while the other Guardians are just dumbfounded (In Avengers: Infinity War, Drax had already been very frank about admiring Thor's physique).
    • As Star-Lord talks about looking at the people he loves while looking at the other Guardians, Thor attempts to slide into his line of sight.
  • Honorary Uncle:
    • Korg has become one to the Asgardian children, as Thor refers to him as "Uncle Korg" when listing the members of the "team" he intends to put together to rescue the kids from Gorr.
    • At the end, Love calls Thor "Uncle Thor".
  • Hourglass Plot: One that happens off-screen between the last two Avengers films and this movie. Initially Star Lord's the only one not instantly taken in by the sight of Thor while the others fawned over him. Now with Thor worn out his welcome, Quill, empathizing with the emotional pain that Thor's going through, is the only one to see him off while the rest are eager to see the last of him.
  • How the Mighty Have Fallen: Thor quotes this trope verbatim, however, upon witnessing how far the moral standing of the gods Ompnipotence City under the cowardly leadership of Zeus have fell in regards to cynically allowing Gorr's killing spree to continue uninterrupted until he dies himself of the Necrosword's corrosive corruption.
  • Hypocritical Humor: When Thor is stripped naked by Zeus, Jane and Valkyrie decide to hang back and take in the view that is a nude Norse god before them, rather than bother trying to de-escalate the situation. When Zeus threatens to blow off their disguises in front of everyone as well, they immediately unmask themselves out of fear.
  • Human Sacrifice: To show how corrupt the gods of Omnipotence City are, they not only approve of sacrifice in their name, they compete among themselves for how many sacrifices they can get.
  • I Kiss Your Hand:
    • Before fleeing with Thor and Jane, Valkyrie kisses the hand of one of Zeus's maidens.
    • Thor kisses Jane's hand when he says goodbye to her in Asgard's infirmary.
  • Idiot Ball: The head of Gorr's pantheon of gods (after Gorr spend his last remaining strength, and his daughter's life reaching him), tells Gorr to get out and die for his glory, while he and the others celebrate them taking down the wielder of a god-killing sword. Which sword? Oh, that one right next to you at arm's length. Why?
  • I Meant to Do That: Thor attempts to summon Mjölnir from Jane's hand into his. Mjölnir doesn't react; instead, Stormbreaker slowly floats into view and Thor pretends that he was actually calling it.
  • Impairment Shot: Thor's vision briefly turns blurry out of stress about seeing Jane wielding Mjölnir.
  • Innocently Insensitive: Right after New Asgard's children are kidnapped and all the citizens are on edge, the actors playing Thor and Loki ask Valkyrie if they should reenact the event in their play. She just gives them an annoyed look and doesn't even answer.
    Loki's Actor: I didn't hear a no, did you hear a no?
    Thor's Actor: No, I didn't hear a no.
    Loki's Actor: Okay, so, scene: New Asgard at night.
  • Insistent Terminology:
    • Zeus says his weapon is called the Thunderbolt, not Lightningbolt.
    • In the climatic battle, Gorr dismissively calls Jane "Lady Thor" as he attacks her. Jane responds by saying that it's Mighty Thor or Dr. Jane Foster.
  • Interspecies Romance:
    • As narrated by Korg, Thor has been in a relationship with a female pirate of unknown species (though humanoid-looking) and a wolf woman. Towards the end he rekindles his romance with Jane.
    • The Xandarian Kraglin has married a woman of unknown species, named Glenda. According to Star-Lord, he marries a woman on every planet the Guardians of the Galaxy come across.
  • Invasion of the Baby Snatchers: Gorr kidnaps the children of New Asgard to use as bait to get Thor to bring Stormbreaker to the Shadow Realm.
  • Irony: Gorr's vendetta comes about because his gods turn an apathetic ear to his pleading and then mocking him for his suffering causing him to determine that all gods are unworthy of devotion and should be exterminated. Yet his ultimate plan involves him basically appealing to a higher power to grant him his desires.
  • Jerkass Gods: Nearly all the gods except the titular hero appearing in this movie are portrayed that way, not really caring for people other than themselves. It makes it kinda hard to say that Gorr's motivation is unjustified.
  • Journey to Find Oneself: Thor is shown exercising to burn off his extra weight, meditating under a tree, and announcing his intent to retire from superheroics and travel the cosmos on a journey of self-discovery. Eventually, Thor parts ways with the Guardians of the Galaxy and goes back to New Asgard together with Korg.
  • Jump Scare: During Gorr's first attack, Thor spots the God Killer peering at him from afar. As he slowly approaches Thor, he disappears into the chaos à la Vehicle Vanish... then suddenly reappears right in front of the camera. There's even a Scare Chord.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Rapu sneers at Gorr's devotion, cruelly dismisses the deaths of Gorr's family and friends as meaning nothing to him, and tells Gorr that there is no afterlife waiting for him. Unfortunately for him, he does all this while the Necrosword is lying nearby...
    • Gorr kidnaps a bunch of Asgardian children, then jovially terrifies them before telling them that the gods don't care about them and will do nothing to save them.
  • Kill the God: Gorr's end goal is the death of all gods in the universe, and he has racked up a sizeable divine body count.
    Gorr: The only ones who gods care about is themselves. So this is my vow: All gods will die.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Like with Hela, the film gets very serious when Gorr appears.
  • Lady in a Power Suit: King Valkyrie is wearing a black suit at a conference with various world leaders.
  • Large Ham: Christian Bale was clearly enjoying himself as Gorr.
  • Last Request: With his last breath, Gorr implores Thor to protect Love, his resurrected daughter. He honors that wish, and raises her to be a kinder, gentler God than the ones that failed her father.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • Jane says that it was 3 years since she last seen Thor, while Thor says it was 8 years. A nod that Natalie Portman did not record new footage for Jane's cameo in Avengers: Endgame.
    • In the mid-credits Stinger, Zeus complains about the ascension of superheroes and how the Gods have been forgotten and are no longer feared. This mirrors the real-life academic argument about how super-heroes are modern day myths and have supplanted the gods and legends of yesteryear in global storytelling.
    • The movie Framing Device is Korg telling the story of Thor to a bunch of children. Korg is played by writer-director Taika Waititi.
  • Licking the Blade: In the "Tickets on Sale" spot, Valkyrie licks the blade of Dragonfang during a battle.
  • Little "No":
    • A desperate one after Korg is hit by Zeus's thunderbolt. Korg doesn't die
    • A serious one when Thor sees Jane riding Warsong after pushing Gorr off him with Mjölnir and landing in the final battle - as he clearly did not want her involved in the fight given that using Mjölnir was killing her.
  • Logo Joke: The Marvel Studios fanfare is played on an electric guitar.
  • Love Hurts: Star-Lord gives Thor a pep-talk to cheer him up. He tells him that it is better to feel shitty about someone you love and lost, like he did Gamora and Thor did most of his loved ones in the past, than to feel the emptiness of not loving anyone.
  • Ludicrous Precision: When Jane estimates that it has been 3 or 4 years since their breakup, Thor corrects her by stating it to having been precisely "8 years, 7 months and 6 days".
  • Lured into a Trap: Gorr manages to do this to Thor, Jane and Valkyrie with one goal, acquire Stormbreaker.
    Jane: It's a trap!
  • Magically Regenerating Clothing: Thor's cape gets damaged during a crash landing. When it's pointed out to him, Thor insists it will grow back. And indeed it does.
  • Make a Wish: Eternity exists at the center of the universe and will grant a wish to the first person who reaches him. Gorr's plan is thought to be wishing the gods out of existence. He ends up wishing his daughter back to life.
  • Married to the Job: This was the reason why Thor and Jane broke up between The Dark World and Ragnarok. Thor was busy with the Avengers and Jane was busy with her science career, and the two of them grew apart.
  • Master Swordsman: Gorr, who was but a peaceful mortal priest who has not even held a weapon in his life, is able to through sheer hatred alone attain enough skill and might in swordsmanship to defeat and literally disarm Lady Sif, a warrior who is at least Thor's equal in age and skill of fifteen centuries, and then proceed to carve a bloody swathe through 1499 more planets of their Gods and people. And later on, he manages to hold off Thor, Jane and Valkyrie at once, even inflicting a stab wound on Valkyrie that forces her to stay out of the final fight.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: Jane openly states to Thor that she felt Mjölnir calling out to her, which is also clear to the viewer when she visits its monument in New Asgard. What remains ambiguous, however, is whether she was initially inspired to go there and seek it out because of particularly relevant passages about the hammer in her Norse Mythology books (which she looked up because of the "Space Viking" approach Darcy suggested earlier), or if Mjölnir itself subtly influenced her to look into those books in the first place.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • Gorr kills and brutalizes gods, i.e. he gores them.
    • Gorr's daughter Love follows this as well as Rule of Symbolism. When Love dies, Gorr loses his love for the gods, and her coming back teaches him how to love again. Love also influences Thor, helping him become more compassionate.
  • Merchandising the Monster: One of the sights we see of New Asgard's prosperity as a tourist destination is Valkyrie and Miek unveiling "Infinity Conez", an ice-cream parlor using the likeness of the golden Infinity Gauntlet used by Thanos. You know, the thing that allowed him to wipe out half of the universe's life? Plus, to assemble it, Thanos and the Black Order personally slaughtered Asgardians after so many had already died by Hela's hands.
  • Meta Twist: Previous entries have had a consistent Changing of the Guard as far back as Ant-Man, as new heroes took up the mantle of older heroes. Not only does Jane not replace Thor as the God of Thunder, she actually dies. Thor does give Love Stormbreaker, but that is simply an extension of Thor's Character Development that he is not intrinsically tied to his weapons.
  • The Mirror Shows Your True Self: When the resurrected Love walks to Gorr's side, her mirror image in the lake is filled with stars and galaxies like Eternity, but the shape is Love's, with glowing eyes, which hints at her empowered form.
  • The Missus and the Ex: Given a twist in that the missus is Stormbreaker, a massive battle-axe, while the ex is Mjölnir, a war hammer. Stormbreaker is clearly jealous that Thor keeps trying to get back with Mjölnir and even throws a couple of tantrums, forcing Thor to try and comfort his weapon as if it were a jealous lover. In fact, it's implied that part of Thor's trouble with trying to close the Bifrost in the climax is because Stormbreaker is refusing to cooperate out of spite.
  • Modernized Gods: The inhabitants of New Asgard don't act or dress much different from modern Norwegians.
  • Mood Whiplash: The trailer at first is a lighthearted and colorful romp with upbeat music that shows what Thor's been up to since Endgame and how he reacts to Jane now having Mjölnir. Then the music turns ominous, we cut to a ruin in the abyss of space, and Gorr starts monologuing. Then the upbeat music from before returns, and now we have the heroes fighting against Gorr, but the montage is for the most part as lighthearted as it was before. The film also has many serious or sad scenes undercut by a sudden joke.
  • Multicultural Alien Planet:
    • The movie starts with Thor and the Guardians defending a race of blue humanoids from a race of owl people.
    • Likewise the movie ends with Thor and Love defend one race from another on a different planet, though it's possible the aggressors in both cases could be invaders from another planet.
  • Mundane Utility: Jane takes advantage of the broken, glowing Tron Lines in Mjöllnir to use it as a flashlight.
  • My Name Is Inigo Montoya: "First, it is The Mighty Thor! Second, I also accept Dr. Jane Foster!"
  • Mythology Gag: Has its own page.
  • Naked People Are Funny: Thor is accidentally completely disrobed by Zeus in his arena, resulting in men and women alike swooning (and Jane and Valkyrie literally and figuratively Eating the Eye Candy).
    Valkyrie: You were humiliated.
    Thor: I was made naked, which I don't have a problem with.
    Jane: I didn't have a problem with it, either.
  • Named After Somebody Famous: Heimdall's son Astrid, for obvious reasons, decides to change his name, asking to be called Axl in homage to the Guns N' Roses frontman.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Gorr the God Butcher is probably one of the coolest and scariest names Marvel's ever produced.
  • Near-Villain Victory: Gorr is a complex play on the trope, since his strategy of tricking Thor into giving him Stormbreaker so he can access Eternity succeeds completely... but with the Necrosword destroyed in the final fight, Gorr is freed from his curse and changes the wish he was going to make. You might say that Gorr won, and the God-Butcher lost.
  • Neck Lift:
    • Rapu lifts up Gorr by the neck after he renounces him.
    • Thor briefly lifts up Gorr by the neck when Gorr tries to take Stormbreaker during the attack on New Asgard.
  • Never Trust a Trailer:
    • The official trailer suggests that Gorr is the one who hits the small planet with a shockwave. In the film, that's actually Thor's doing.
    • The teaser also suggests that Thor is trying to retire from superheroics, only for Gorr to pull him back out of it. In truth, Thor is still active as a hero, and only briefly stops to meditate early in the film.
  • New Neo City: As opposed to the struggling fishing village seen in Avengers: Endgame, New Asgard is regaining some of the original Asgard's former glory, with flying longboats soaring over the town and gold plating on several of the buildings. It's also become a tourist attraction, with cruise ships docked the harbor, a golf course, and the aforementioned flying longboats giving tours.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero:
    • There's an example at the beginning of the movie, but it's Played for Laughs. Thor single-handedly saves the planet the Guardians have been called to help. In the process, he completely demolishes the temple. The king is clearly upset by this, and in an act of passive-aggression hidden by generosity, rewards the Guardians with two giant space goats who scream incessantly. It's more than likely that Thor ruined the Guardians' reputation on that planet.
    • Thor, Jane, Valkyrie, and Korg's quest to Omnipotence City to request Zeus and the gods' help in the fight against Gorr turn out to be this. While Zeus turns out to be a pretty big jerk who actively ignores the galactic affairs in favor of hosting godly parties and hiding away in the safety of his domain, he still doesn't pose any threat until Thor disrespected and almost killed him, at which point Zeus realizes just how far the gods have fallen out of favor with their former worshippers. In the first stinger, Zeus decides to take action to make mortals fear the gods once more by sending his son Hercules on a mission to swat Thor out of the sky.
  • No Name Given: We never learn the name of Gorr's daughter, despite her importance to the plot of the film. Korg, at least in his tale, gives her the epithet of "Love", shared with Thor who has gained fame as the wandering hero "Thunder", making the film's title a Character Title of sorts.
  • Noodle Incident:
    • Thor gives a rousing speech to the Asgardians about how he will rescue the children and then they can feast in celebration. He then hastily clarifies they won't feast on the children which they apparently did during a "dark, shameful" period.
    • The dialogue between Zeus and Thor (particularly after he discovers the entire Asgardian party) suggests that the Aesir (either under Odin or even Bor, Thor's grandfather) once paid court to Omnipotence City. What drove them away from it is not explicitly touched upon. However, the fact that Bor and Odin have once been expansionists that would have likely clashed with Zeus's hedonistic apathy is the likeliest explanation, especially since it is implied Zeus has been long like this.
  • Not Quite Dead:
    • Zeus's lightning seemingly kills Korg. However, it soon turns out that only his face needs to be intact for him to survive, and he regenerates his body.
    • Zeus himself, as shown in The Stinger, was merely badly wounded when Thor nailed him with the Thunderbolt.
  • "Not So Different" Remark: Gorr draws parallels between himself and the trio of Thor, Jane, and Valkyrie: like Thor, he couldn't save those dearest to him, like Jane, Gorr is dying from the very thing giving him his power, and like Valkyrie, he lost everything he loved in service to gods who couldn't or wouldn't do anything to help him. Thor turns it back on Gorr in the finale; recognising that, like his experience with Thanos, Gorr's vengeance against the gods isn't bringing him anything but misery, empathises with him, saying that what Gorr truly wants is love, which convinces Gorr to ask Eternity to resurrect his daughter rather than destroying all the gods.
  • The Nudifier: Zeus magically removes Thor's disguise, but overdoes it and leaves him naked. When he motions to disrobe his companions, they quickly unmask themselves to avoid the same fate.
  • Odd Job Gods: Omnipotence City is home to gods of the most random of domains, such as a god of scissors and a god of bao.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome:
    • However the gods of Gorr's world managed to kill the previous wielder of the Necrosword. Downplayed in that it's firmly established the wielder of the Necrosword will inevitably die, leaving it ambiguous how much actual effort they needed to put in, if they even needed to put in any at all.
    • Most of Gorr's deicidal rampage is left to the imagination; in particular, the audience only sees the aftermath of him slaying Falligar the Behemoth and maiming Lady Sif.
  • Off with His Head!:
    • Gorr cuts off Rapu's head with the Necrosword.
    • Axl tells the other children the story of how Thor cut off Thanos's head with his axe. Gorr then enters the scene with a small serpentine creature and snaps off its head in front of the children, sneering that they were all happy for a decapitation story moments earlier but not so much when he does it.
  • Oh, Crap!: Valkyrie's reaction when Zeus brings up Eternity. Jane asks her why this is a bad thing and Valkyrie replies that Gorr can kill all gods at once if he reaches them.
  • Once per Episode: Thor once again has a scene without his shirt on. Unlike the Shirtless Scene of prior movies, Thor here gets straight up naked.
  • One-Gender Race: As in the comics, Korg reveals all Kronans are male (or at least male-voiced considering they're Rock Monsters) while discussing the mating practices of his people.

    Tropes P to Y 
  • Pajama-Clad Hero: During the nighttime attack on New Asgard, Thor and Jane are shown in their warrior armor, while Valkyrie is in her t-shirt and sweatpants, having not had time to change, since she can't magically do so like Thor and Jane can.
  • Parental Substitute: At the end of the movie, Thor ends up becoming Love's adoptive father after promising the dying Gorr he would look after his daughter.
  • Pass the Popcorn:
    • Jane and Valkyrie eat grapes as they watch Thor naked on-stage in front of the gods of Omnipotence City.
      Jane: Should we stop this?
      Valkyrie: Eventually. Grape?
    • In-Universe, Korg encourages a group of kids to get their popcorn as he begins to tell them the story of Thor.
  • Perspective Reversal: The Guardians of the Galaxy practically worshipped Thor when they met in Infinity War due to finding him an awesome, attractive, and a charismatic hero to follow, while their leader Peter Quill disliked Thor out of jealousy of his coolness and the respect he received from his team. However by the time of this film, Thor's ever-inflated ego and show-boating has caused most of the Guardians to grow tired of him, while Peter has come to respect Thor for his prowess on the battlefield and contributions to the team. When Thor parts ways with them, Peter is the only one to give a proper farewell.
  • Pixellation: When Zeus accidentally strips Thor naked in the ending joke of the trailer, the latter's bare ass is blurred out with pixels. This is not the case in the movie, where Thor's rear end is on display for all to see.
  • Pleasure Island: Omnipotence City is revealed to be this to the discomfort of Thor, with the gods focused on their own pleasures and competitions over anything else.
  • Power Dyes Your Hair: Jane's normally dark brown hair has lightened to a dirty blonde shade as a result of Mjölnir granting her Thor's lightning-based powers.
  • The Power of Hate: When a peaceful priest who has never even held a weapon is able to become a Master Swordsman who can smite warriors like Lady Sif with centuries more of experience in five years at best, you know his hatred and grief is a deep one.
  • The Power of Love: Thor asked Mjôlnir to always protect Jane, and it's revealed that the sheer strength of his love for her enchanted the hammer to do just that, hence why it reformed itself upon sensing her presence. At the end of the movie Thor even manages to convince Gorr to turn away from his deicidal quest by reminding him of just how wonderful love is. Gorr then uses his wish from Eternity to resurrect his daughter and entrust her to Thor's care.
  • Product Placement: Valkyrie is shown shooting a commercial for Old Spice, complete with a guy playing the ad jingle on a pan flute.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!:
    • Thor, when Gorr tries to take Stormbreaker during the attack on New Asgard:
      Thor: Don't. Touch. My. Stuff!
    • When Gorr calls Jane "Lady Thor", she retorts that she's Mighty Thor, but she "also [accepts] Doctor. Jane. Foster!"
  • Put on a Bus: The Guardians of the Galaxy end up exiting the movie early on so they can investigate the various sites of Gorr's murders across the cosmos. They part ways amicably with Thor before they go.
  • Rage Against the Heavens: After concluding that all gods are selfish monsters, Gorr decides he's going to exterminate them all.
    Gorr: This is my vow: all gods will die.
  • Really Gets Around: Apparently, Kraglin marries a woman on every planet the Guardians protect.
  • Redemption Equals Death: After Gorr is no longer corrupted when the Necrosword is broken and Thor convinces him to wish for his daughter's resurrection rather than the gods' extinction - Gorr dies shortly after.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Heimdall apparently had a never-before-seen son, Astrid, who appears in this film and insists on being called Axl. The boy's mother also appears, but her relation to Heimdall is not commented upon.
  • Rent-a-Zilla: Thor and Korg find the corpse of a colossal draconic god — called Falligar the Behemoth in the comics — who was slain by Gorr.
  • Retcon: A tentative example: Korg mentions how he has two fathers via Bizarre Alien Reproduction, even though Ragnarok had him mention that he has a mother (and her new boyfriend, who he hates). However, given the extremely limited details we are given about Kronan culture, biology, and family structure, combined with the Played for Laughs nature of the Korg's rambling stories throughout the series, it's entirely possibly that he has several parents.
  • Retired Badass: In the trailer, Thor's narration reveals that he intends to retire from his superhero lifestyle. However, that's not really the case in the movie itself, where Thor is continuing his superhero actions alongside the Guardians of the Galaxy while trying to find inner peace at the same time.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Bao, the god of dumplings, is a 3D cartoon creature who looks like something from a kids' show. He's a living little pork dumpling floating in soup and has a smiling face and childlike voice.
  • Running Gag:
    • Jane's terrible attempts at a Catchphrase, which finally gets played for pathos at the end when she whispers her latest attempt to Thor right before she dies.
    • Thor's terrible attempts at giving a Rousing Speech. It never really works, but he usually manages to cheer people up even so. Especially the kids.
    • The goats that are gifted to Thor scream in every scene that they're in.
    • Stormbreaker getting jealous and cranky every time Thor has eyes for Mjölnir or tries to use the Bifrost. Stops getting played for laughs in the climax when Stormbreaker's pettiness backfires and allows Gorr to achieve his objective of reaching Eternity.
  • Scarred Equipment: Mjölnir is still shattered, the cracks between the fragments of its head obvious even when they fuse together. Jane weaponizes this by not only being able to send the hammer flying, but also the separated fragments in a Flechette Storm.
  • Scary Teeth: Use of the Necrosword has sharpened Gorr's teeth and turned them near-black. Thor comments on them.
  • Screams Like a Little Girl: Toothgnasher and Toothgrinder the giant goats... constantly. Played for Laughs.
  • Self-Serving Memory: Thor's recollection of his break-up with Jane is that she wrote him a letter to end the relationship; Jane insists that Thor's recollection is wrong and he's the one who left (the letter-writing was because he wasn't present), but it's based on the technicality that they lived together in Jane's apartment.
  • Serial Spouse: Star-Lord reprimands Kraglin for bringing with him a random woman he apparently married, and says that Kraglin has married a random woman on every planet they have been to recently.
  • Series Continuity Error:
    • Hela's helmet and the weapons it conjures were referred to as the Necrosword in the artbook for Thor: Ragnarok and What If...?, but its relation to Gorr's Necrosword — if any — is never addressed or even alluded to.
    • When in the Shadow Realm with Thor and Valkyrie, Jane notices some ancient drawings on the wall depicting Stormbreaker being used to open the Gates of Eternity, indicating the weapon is ancient and has been used for such things in the past. This is despite the fact that Stormbreaker was only forged in 2018 thanks to Eitri and Groot's efforts, meaning it's nowhere near old enough to have been used for such a purpose, especially since before Endgame, Thor had only been using Stormbreaker as a glorified can opener.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: Thor likely assumed when Jane asked if he has a girlfriend, that she was referring to Valkyrie, since he took a few seconds after she asked, leading to Thor to reply he doesn't have one.
  • Shipper on Deck: Valkyrie is very supportive towards Thor in regards of reconciling his relationship with Jane. She and Korg both are visually happy when exactly that happens.
  • Ship Tease: Valkyrie gets a few brief moments showing she's attracted to Jane Foster — especially as the Mighty Thor, though Jane is still mutually attracted to Thor and dies at the end of the movie. Valkyrie also takes a moment to flirt with one of Zeus's handmaidens.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns:
    • The Boat Goats and their memetic yells provide a constant punctuation to almost any scene they're in, serving as comic relief. When the third act swings around and it's time for the Final Boss, they're nowhere to be seen; the boat they pull has been decommissioned, and they are no longer needed.
    • Similarly, Korg is reduced to a living head at Omnipotence City and, when the team reaches the Shadow Realm, he stays on the ship.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Thor does a full split to stop a pair of charging vehicles in tribute to Jean-Claude Van Damme's signature "Epic Splits".
    • The constant screams that Toothgnasher and Toothgrinder make are an obvious reference to the "screaming goats" meme that was popular in the early-mid 2010s. When they're first introduced, one of them even outright makes the most iconic of these screams.
    • When Jane is demonstrating the concept of Einstein-Rosen bridges to a fan of her book, she mentions Event Horizon and Interstellar, then proceeds to use the same visual aid that those movies did (i.e. putting two dots on a piece of paper, folding it, and poking a pen through both dots to represent the way E-R bridges fold space to enable FTL travel.) She also tells him to watch both movies.
    • Valkyrie is wearing a The Phantom of the Opera shirt during and after the attack on New Asgard.
    • The film revels in its Guns N' Roses influences. Aside from the soundtrack, which is stuffed with GnR tracks, Heimdall's son Astrid only answers to the name "Axl", and another child has a very prominent poster of the band in their room.
    • For whatever reason, there is a neon sign identical to the one in Cocktail on the Asgardian ship.
    • The impact of Thor's ship against a small planet in the Shadow Realm, along with its whole black-and-white aesthetic, is evocative of an iconic scene from Georges Méliès's A Trip to the Moon.
    • Ninny, the god of Korg's people, is shown sitting on a throne made of scissors in a reference to both the Iron Throne from A Song of Ice and Fire and the game Rock–Paper–Scissors.
    • One of the Gods that appears in Omnipotence City is Bao.
    • Korg becomes involved with a rock person called Dwayne.
    • For their disguises on Omnipotence City, Valkyrie and Jane steal cloaks from "emotion gods". Korg's cloak has a red bottom half, Valkyrie's a yellow bottom half, Jane's a green top half, and Thor's a blue bottom half.
  • Silent Whisper: Jane whispers a catchphrase she came up with into Thor's ear shortly before she dies, but the audience doesn't get to hear what it is.
  • Single Tear: When Gorr asks an incapacitated Valkyrie if the gods did anything to save her sisters-in-arms from being slaughtered by Hela, Valkyrie sheds a single tear.
  • Small Universe After All: The climax is set at the center of the universe where Eternity resides.
  • Someone to Remember Him By: Played with. It's revealed that Hemdall had a son with similar powers to his father. And when Korg suggests that Thor and Jane could make up and have "little baby Thors" someday, Valkyrie says it's unfortunately impossible since Jane has late stage cancer and probably wouldn't be able to survive long enough or have the strength to carry a child to term; but it's partially because of Jane's reassurance to Gorr that his daughter would be looked after if he chose to wish her back that Thor adopts the girl in the end.
  • Speculative Fiction LGBT: More so than any other Marvel Cinematic Universe movie.
    • Valkyrie is confirmed onscreen to have had a female lover and implied to also be attracted to a naked Thor.
    • Zeus is Ambiguously Bi and loves hosting orgies amongst the other gods.
  • Spiritual Antithesis: Continuing the MCU's streak of deliberate contrast, this movie is one for Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness:
    • In general, Multiverse of Madness is a (light) horror movie with the theme of letting go, while this movie is a light-hearted adventure with the theme of holding on to love.
    • The main plots both involve grieving parents driven to madness by a dark artifact and the loss of their children coming into conflict with the heroes. However, Wanda-616 was obsessed with getting her children back and ultimately must let them go because they don’t exist anymore in her universe, which prompted her Heel–Face Turn. Meanwhile, Gorr was so blinded by vengeance that he didn't think about getting his daughter back at all until the very end where he makes a wish for her resurrection. Meta-wise, Love and Thunder gives Gorr a lot of sympathetic moments while Multiverse of Madness focuses on the many nasty consequences of Wanda's actions which make Gorr a more sympathetic villain.
    • The heroes's personal arcs both involved their exes, but whereas Strange learns to let Christine go, Thor learns to hold Jane forever in his heart. Bonus points for both taking a super-powered child under their wings.
    • Both films have a campy sense of humor and presentation, but come from completely opposite ends. Multiverse of Madness's humor is mostly Black Comedy mixed with likely deliberate campy horror elements from director Sam Raimi, while this movie’s comedy is a lighthearted rom-com style of humor.
  • Splash of Color: On a tiny planet in the Shadow Realm, everything is monochrome, except for Gorr's orange eyes. Thor describes the place as one where colour cannot reach. As they battle there, their weapons — Mjölnir, Stormbreaker and Thunderbolt — cause bursts of colour around them; in fact, one can see that the glow of Mjölnir colors anything the light is cast upon, as Jane is searching Gorr's tent.
  • Spoiler Cover: Kamala Khan is seen wearing her official Ms. Marvel's outfit briefly during Marvel's opening title card. However, as of Episode 5 of her Disney+ series (the last one to air prior to the film's release), her outfit was not officially finished yet.
  • Status Quo is God:
    • The training montage shows that Odinson has lost his post-Snap obesity and returned to his pre-Endgame physique. Justified, as undoing the Snap, getting closure with Frigga during the Time Heist, and abdicating the Throne have allowed Thor to heal and move forward again.
    • By the end of the film, and after the teases during Avengers: Endgame, Thor is wielding a restored (more or less) Mjölnir again — and this time for good.
  • The Stinger: As is tradition for the MCU, there are two, one mid-credits and one post.
    • Zeus is Not Quite Dead and bemoaning how gods are less worshipped than superheroes, and orders his son Hercules to swat Thor out of the sky, in order to remind mortals to fear the gods.
    • Jane arrives in Valhalla and is warmly greeted by Heimdall.
  • Stock Sound Effects: One of the sounds the Booskan Raiders speeders make when shooting their blaster cannons is the same the Droideka's blasters made in the Star Wars prequel trilogy (The Phantom Menace onwards).
  • The Storyteller: In the beginning, Korg tells the story of Thor to a group of kids in a cave, campfire and all.
  • Stylistic Suck: Any majorette, even one who drops the baton, could put Zeus's display of Thunderbolt to shame. He poses like a 14 year old who bought nunchucks in Time Square.
  • Summon to Hand:
    • Gorr can summon the Necrosword, and a remark from Rapu that the Necrosword chose him suggests that's why he has that ability.
    • Jane Foster is the newly repaired Mjölnir's new master and can call it to her hand. Thor can summon Stormbreaker and Mjölnir, though the latter only after Jane's death.
  • Superman Stays Out of Gotham:
    • Invoked by the Guardians of the Galaxy. Having spent more than enough time dealing with Thor while trying to help other civilizations, they're more than happy to leave him behind when he opts to return to New Asgard to protect his people from Gorr the God Butcher.
    • Also happens with Zeus and the other gods in Omnipotence City, as Zeus in particular is utterly terrified of facing Gorr, and knows that he'd never reach the city anyways due to not knowing where it is.
    • At no point during the movie does Thor call on the likes of Captain Marvel or the Eternals to assist him in his mission to defeat Gorr.
  • Tainted Veins: Gorr's veins turn black when the Necrosword claims him and starts to curse him.
  • Talking the Monster to Death: How Thor ultimately defeats Gorr, though the villain was already dying to begin with. As they're both near Eternity, Thor could've easily ended Gorr right there and then to prevent his and the other gods' deaths since he's vulnerable and no longer has the Necrosword. Instead, Thor tells him what he really needs is love and wants his daughter back more than the extinction of the gods.
  • Terminal Transformation: Through Mjölnir, Jane Foster is able to transform her cancer-stricken body into that of a healthy, buff goddess known as Mighty Thor, able to fight monsters and other godly beings. However, the power of Thor saps her energy needed to fight off the cancer, which accelerates the disease spreading in her body. She is forbidden by Thor to partake in the Final Battle against Gorr out of fear that it would be the one that ultimately does her in, but Jane refuses to sit quietly when others need help. She takes up Mjölnir to become Mighty Thor once last time and fights Gorr head on before succumbing to the cancer.
  • The Theme Park Version: New Asgard has evolved into a tourist town featuring watered-down versions of Asgardian culture. Tourists watch a low-budget stage play version of Thor: Ragnarok. They also drink "real" Asgardian mead but, considering what Thor says about Asgardian mead in Avengers: Age of Ultron, it's probably fake.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: In the "Speech" TV Spot, Valkyrie says "Oh, god. We're gonna die!" after Thor's failed attempt at a rousing speech.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Thor is shown getting back into shape, and bulks up even more than he was previously.
    • Jane now wields Mjölnir and all the power that comes with it taking on the mantle of The Mighty Thor.
    • Mantis is seen wielding a BFG, and later, a sword in the teaser, a far cry from the pacifist alien who previously used mind control to dispatch her opponents.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Amusingly, Star-Lord becomes this towards Thor while the rest of the Guardians become utterly sick of the God of Thunder staying with them. By contrast, Quill is nothing but sympathetic towards his trauma and pain, and gives Thor some well-meaning (if still bad) advice before taking off with the Guardians to parts unknown.
  • Training Montage: Thor trains to burn off the extra weight he gained in Endgame. He's seen performing alternating waves with the chains of a deceased giant.
  • Turn the Other Cheek: Has it not been for Gorr, Thor would not be forced to watch Jane die in his arms, giving her life so he can destroy the Necrosword and save the Children of Asgard. Thor has every right to hate the mad god-butcher, and owes him nothing. Yet not only does he forgive his dying enemy by honoring his Last Request to protect his resurrected daughter Love, but also teach her to be a kinder and more compassionate God than the ones that failed her father.
  • The Un-Reveal: We never find out what was Jane's catchphrase before she dies.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Gorr's god sets him on the path to becoming the God Butcher by cruelly dismissing his travails and telling him that there is no afterlife waiting for him.
  • Urban Warfare: The attack on New Asgard is a nighttime battle in the streets of New Asgard between the Asgardians and Gorr the God Butcher's horde of Black Berserkers, with Jane Foster as the Mighty Thor joining the fray by summoning Mjölnir to her hand.
  • Vengeance Feels Empty: Thor tells Gorr killing all gods will not give him what he really wants: his daughter back. Thor speaks from experience.
  • Verbal Backspace: Thor tells the Guardians that the two screaming goats, if nothing else, would be good for meat. The goats go silent and look at him, and he hastily corrects to "meeting new people".
  • Villain Has a Point:
    • While he's clearly painting with a broad brush, Gorr's point that gods are selfish beings who care nothing for those who worship them is vindicated by his own god (who became Gorr's first victim), and by Zeus, a hedonistic blowhard who doesn't care who Gorr kills and is perfectly willing to wait for the Necrosword to eventually kill Gorr rather than acting to help anyone else. Thor's encounter with Zeus forces him to reluctantly concede Gorr's case isn't wrong when it comes to gods like him.
    • Gorr, recognizing Valkyrie as, well, a Valkyrie, asks if the gods to whom she owed allegiance did anything to save her sisters-in-arms (among whom was Valkyrie's lover) when they were slaughtered by Hela (herself the godess of death). Valkyrie sheds a Single Tear and can't look Gorr in the eye, implying that she knows he's not far from the truth.
  • Villain Opening Scene: Before we are introduced to Thor, we open with Gorr and how he came to become the God Butcher.
  • Visual Pun:
    • In Omnipotence City, the God of the Kronans sits on a throne made of scissors, because rock beats scissors.
    • Korg's boyfriend in the end is called Dwayne.
  • Warrior Heaven: Fittingly for a movie about gods, there is much talk about whether they offer an eternal reward upon death. Gorr initially believed he and his daughter would live forever after death due to their faithful worship of his god, but a chance encounter proved his god was a deceiver. This contrasts with the Asgardians like Thor, Sif, and some actors, who casually make references to enjoying Valhalla after their deaths. In the end, we see that Valhalla is real and heroes like Jane and Heimdall can exist in peace there.
  • Wham Shot: The first trailer ends with a shot of Jane in full Asgardian regalia, summoning what appears to be a reforged Mjölnir.
  • What You Are in the Dark: In the climax, Gorr reaches Eternity and is prepared to wish for oblivion upon all gods. With mere moments left to live, Thor chooses not to go down swinging in a futile final battle with Gorr, but to spend his final moments comforting Jane as she dies. Ironically, it's this compassion and nobility that helps Gorr realize he was wrong about Thor.
  • White Sheep: Thor himself happens to be this, as most of the gods in-universe turn out to be Jerkass Gods. And sure enough, Gorr as he's dying puts his faith into Thor to watch over his daughter.
  • Wins by Doing Absolutely Nothing: The total sum of Zeus' strategy to deal with Gorr is for the gods to hide in Omnipotence City and wait until the Necrosword inevitably kills Gorr. The butcher's bill that would be accrued in the process amongst deities and mortals is of no concern to him.
  • Wolverine Publicity: Despite being featured extensively in trailers and promos, the Guardians set off to have their own adventures roughly ten minutes into the movie.
  • The Worf Effect: Lady Sif, previously established as a capable and dangerous fighter, is easily defeated by Gorr, losing an arm in the process.
  • Worf Had the Flu: Sif is left seriously injured by Gorr during their off-screen battle, leaving her sidelined and unable to aid Thor and company for the remainder of the film. Valkyrie is impaled after the first expedition to the Shadow Realm. The wound does heal up, but Valkyrie thinks she'd be a liability and die easily if she went for the final battle, so she needs time to recover.
  • Working with the Ex: Exaggerated. Not only does Thor have to team up with Jane Foster, she also brings his ex-Named Weapon Mjölnir. Played for Laughs with Thor attempting to get back into Mjölnir's good graces while Stormbreaker lingers around like a jilted lover.
  • World Tree: When Thor temporarily transfers his power to the children, the lightning takes the shape of Yggdrasil.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Downplayed in that Gorr doesn't cause them any physical harm, but he does kidnap all of the Asgardian children and takes great pleasure in scaring the bejesus out of them.
  • Yellow Lightning, Blue Lightning: Thor's lightning remains blue, while the lightning of Zeus and his Thunderbolt are distinguished as golden yellow. When Thor uses the Thunderbolt, the color varies between either or mixing.
  • You Do Not Want To Know: Attendance at the meeting at Omnipotence City is invitations only, so Thor, Jane, Valkyrie and Korg need a disguise. Valkyrie comes back with the cloaks of the Emotion Gods. When Jane asks where the Emotion Gods are, Valkyrie replies "Don't ask."
  • You See, I'm Dying: Jane finally tells Thor that she is dying of cancer when he tells her that he still has feelings for her.


"Another classic Thor adventure!"

 
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Korg and Dwayne

Korg's species is implied to be all-male with Korg himself having a child with a Kronan called Dwayne. In the comics, Korg's species don't have genders at all.

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5 (4 votes)

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