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  • Video System's F-1 Grand Prix and its sequel are the successors to their similar but unlicensed Formula 1 Racing Game Tail to Nose: Great Championship.
  • Far Cry, as well as spawning a couple of re-imaginings, also has a spiritual sequel in Crysis. It was made by the same company, it's set in a similar location, and includes similar themes.
    • In fact, Crysis plays much more like a sequel to Far Cry than Far Cry 2 does. Far Cry 2 was developed by a different team, is highly non-linear in terms of both storyline and gameplay, and isn't connected to the original's story in any way.
  • The FAST Racing series is often considered this to the F-Zero series.
  • Fatal Fury to Street Smart. The first stage music from the latter is even featured as the Versus Mode theme in the former.
  • Final Fantasy Brave Exvius has clear influences from Brave Frontier.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • Bravely Default started development as a sequel to Final Fantasy: The 4 Heroes of Light, itself a love letter to the early Final Fantasy entries (I, III, and V in particular). Along with its Class and Level System, its save-the-crystals plot and Warriors of Light are lifted straight from there and then given a twist.
    • Another game by Square-Enix, that's technicaly a spin-off, but also feels like a throwback to the first six Final Fantasy games, is Final Fantasy Dimensions. Many characters, not seen since Final Fantasy return here, like Bikke and his crew, Matoya, and the Prince (well, now King) of Alfheim. The Final Boss is also a form of Chaos, and the super boss is the Omega Weapon from the Gameboy Advance port of Final Fantasy VI.
  • The Final Fantasy games set in the Ivalice universe (including Vagrant Story, which technically isn't a Final Fantasy game) are successors to Quest's Ogre Battle franchise. Final Fantasy Tactics, the first game in the Ivalice universe, was already a spiritual successor of Tactics Ogre in its gameplay. Not surprisingly, Yasumi Matsuno, the director of most of the Ivalice series, was also the director of Ogre Battle and Tactics Ogre, as well as the script writer of Ogre Battle 64, while Hiroshi Minagawa and Akihiko Yoshida were the illustrators in most of his games. After the release of Vagrant Story, Squaresoft actually purchased all of Quest's assets and absorbed them into the company.
    • Technically, Final Fantasy can be seen as a "Spiritual Series", as virtually none of the games have direct relation to each other, unless they have odd numberings or alternate subheadings, like Final Fantasy X-2 and Final Fantasy: Dirge of Cerberus. Every numbered Final Fantasy game has no direct relation to any other other than a few series trademarks. Even though they are technically sequels based on numberings, fans never consider them to be actual sequels. Thus Final Fantasy takes Spiritual Successor to the extreme.
    • In the other direction, Richard Eisenbeis of Kotaku argued that Lost Odyssey and The Last Story were closer to being Final Fantasy games than the actual Final Fantasy games that came out during the Seventh Generation. This is particularly notable given both games' lineage — they were made by Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of the Final Fantasy series, with music by Nobuo Uematsu, who scored Final Fantasy through X.
  • Although the two games are very different, much of Final Fantasy V's dungeon/castle layout system is seen in Treasure of the Rudra.
  • Final Fantasy XIII-2 is slated to be something of a Spiritual Successor to Chrono Trigger, with its storyline that revolves around Time Travel through the centuries with the goal of preventing the postapocalyptic future one of your main characters hail from and multiple endings depending on your actions in the game.
  • Despite being a beat-'em-up instead of a competitive Fighting Game, Final Fight is a spiritual successor to the original Street Fighter. It was even marketed at trade shows under the Working Title Street Fighter '89. Guy and Sodom would later show up as playable characters in the original Street Fighter Alpha, followed by Rolento, Cody, and Poison in the sequels.
    • Captain Commando is in turn a spiritual successor to Final Fight as a beat 'em up set in Metro City (albeit in the future). A bust of Mike Haggar is even a collectible.
  • The Fire Pro Wrestling series, along with HAL Wrestling for the Game Boy, is this to Nintendo's classic Pro Wrestling game, following the same style of play mechanics as well as the use of Captain Ersatz versions of existing wrestlers.
  • Fishing Superstars, the successor to Gaia Online's fishing minigame.
  • Following development of the late-80s soccer simulation Kick Off and its sequel, author Dino Dini left publishers Anco. Although Anco released a poorly-received "official" Kick Off 3, Dino Dini's Goal (written for another company) is considered to be the true successor to Kick Off 2.
  • Football Manager to the earlier Championship Manager, as the development studio Sports Interactive split from the publisher, retaining the game code but not the name of the franchise.
  • Forbidden Siren was made by former members of Team Silent, the original developers for the Silent Hill series.
  • According to Turn 10 Studios, they consider Forza Motorsport 3 to be the true spiritual successor to Polyphony Digital's Gran Turismo series. To paraphrase Polyphony Digital president Kazunori Yamauchi, "No it bloody well isn't".
  • The Foto Flash duology of games by Studio Gamaii is a successor to the Frank's Adventure series of Flash adventure games, about a photographer working for an adult magazine completing various tasks to take cheesecake pics of various models.
  • Galactic Civilizations is this to Master of Orion 2. In fact, it's a better Master Of Orion 3 than Master Of Orion 3 was, since MoO3 was Spreadsheets IN SPACE!.
  • The Tiger Game.com could be considered the spiritual successor to the Game Gear, as the Game.com featured games from Sega licenses (like Virtua Fighter II and Sonic Jam), and was launched the same year as the Game Gear was discontinued in 1997, with Sega not making a new full handheld console after that.
  • General Chaos is a spiritual successor to Pigskin, a "footbrawl" game developed by the same people back when they worked at Midway Games.
  • God Hand is the spiritual successor to Final Fight and a Genre Thow Back to the Beat Emup genre as a whole.
  • The G.I. Joe arcade game by Konami is a spiritual sequel to an obscure pseudo-3D shoot-'em-up titled Devastators by the same company, which itself was loosely based on the 3D stages from the original Contra.
  • Ghost Trick is a Spiritual Successor to the Ace Attorney series. Both of the games even share the same director and creator, Shu Takumi. This got recursive once Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Dual Destinies came out, as much of its cast are outright expies of Ghost Trick characters.
  • Many players of the defunct browser-based RPG Glitch have recreated their avatars and in-game communities as "Folk" in Here Be Monsters.
  • G-Loc was developed as a spiritual successor to Sega's After Burner.
  • Gobliiins trilogy didn't get a proper sequel for two decades. In the interim there were:
  • Strategic Simulations Inc.'s legendary Gold Box Game Engine and the eponymous Western RPG meta-series running on it had at least three successors: the Black Box series, a.k.a. Eye of the Beholder, by Westwood Studios; the Infinity Engine meta-series by BioWare and Black Isle Studios; and the Seven Dragon Saga, announced in 2015 (!) by Tactical Simulations Interactive (an indie studio comprised of SSI veterans). The former two in particular had strong ties, as both were based on the Dungeons & Dragons Game System, and BioWare developers noted the Gold Box series as one of the inspirations for Baldur's Gate (also, David "Zeb" Cook worked on both Pool of Radiance and Baldur's Gate, the first games on the Gold Box and the Infinity Engine, respectively). Another Spiritual Successor specifically to the Gold Box-based 1991 Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game Neverwinter Nights, is Cryptic Studios' MMORPG Neverwinter.
    • The two Icewind Dale games that run on the Infinity Engine, are argubly the most similar to Gold Box games in general feel and gameplay. In the Icewind Dale games, like in Gold Box games(and many other older games), the player creates the whole adventuring party.
    • The Realms of Arkania series creator, Guido Henkel, outright admited in an interview, that the split into the first person exploration, and isometric view battle mode, is patrly inspired by the Gold Box games. In turn, the founders of Bioware admited that the Realms of Arkania games, were also one of the inspirations for the Infinity Engine games, like Baldur's Gate. Guido Henkel himself latter worked personaly on Planescape: Torment, one of the Infinity Engine games. It's actualy even him in make-up as the Nameless One, on the game's box.
  • Rare's Perfect Dark is often described as an unofficial sequel to their GoldenEye game, albeit with the James Bond license swapped out for a near-future sci-fi setting and a Distaff Counterpart to Bond in the form of Joanna Dark (a classy, British-accented super-spy equipped with a vast suite of high-tech gadgets). It was built on the same Game Engine as GoldenEye, so it feels like a natural extension of the same game, despite Bond being nowhere in sight. They even use Rare Guns and settings from GoldenEye with the names slightly changed. GoldenEye later had another Spiritual Successor in the form of the TimeSplitters games, done by the core team behind GoldenEye. TimeSplitters 2 especially is very similar to GoldenEye, and with the use of the Map Maker, one can get extremely close to it.
  • Word Of God says that Golden Sun is this to the Shining Force tactical RPG series, which makes sense considering Camelot was the ones who developed said series before they split with SEGA. In fact, the botched release of Shining Force III on the Saturn is the whole reason why they split and started Golden Sun.
  • Gotcha Force is considered by its fans a thematic successor to Virtual-ON. It's also a Spiritual Successor-slash-Serial Numbers Filed Off version of the Gundam Vs Series.
  • The Two Guys from Andromeda, the guys behind the Space Quest games, have just recently come back together to try and create a "SpaceVenture" that looks every inch like it'll be a successor to their previous series. They've even gotten Gary Owens back to narrate again!
  • Codemasters' GRID is a spiritual sequel to the TOCA Race Driver series, while DIRT was the spiritual successor to Colin McRae Rally.
  • Grim Dawn shares the same game engine, gameplay mechanics, and game development team as Titan Quest.
  • Gubble is a spiritual sequel to Crystal Castles, with a Sci-Fi setting instead of fantasy. Both games were developed by Franz Lanzinger.
  • The Guided Fate Paradox is a spiritual successor to another Nippon Ichi-developed roguelike, Zettai Hero Project. Whereas ZHP's protagonist is a loser who becomes a superhero, GFP's protagonist is a loser who is selected at random to become a god.
  • Guilty Gear 2: Overture is a spiritual successor to the Herzog Real-Time-Strategy/Action hybrid games. Really.
  • The Neo Geo & Sega Dreamcast Platform Game Gunlord is essentially this to Turrican.
  • Gunstar Heroes was considered a spiritual successor to Contra III: The Alien Wars due to the fact that two of its main programmers worked on both games. In fact, it was the closest thing to a Contra game for the Sega Genesis before Konami decided to release Contra: Hard Corps.
    • A similar case of a spiritual successor to the Contra games could be made with Sin and Punishment, another game by Treasure. It also has programmers returning from Contra III: The Alien Wars, and the very story and setting of game is very much a darker version of Alien Wars. It was, and is also regarded as way superior 3D Contra game, than the contemporary Contra: Legacy of War and C: The Contra Adventure.
  • Hacknet is one to Uplink.
  • Some consider Bungie's Halo series a spiritual sequel to their earlier Marathon series.
    • The other theory is that the Halo series takes place between Pathways into Darkness and Marathon, though that seems more unlikely now due to the Halo IP no longer being owned by Bungie. With that said, Destiny appears to be a successor to that franchise.
  • Haunting Ground is considered to be the Spiritual Successor to the Clock Tower series due to its similar gameplay and style. The fact that it was made by some of the same people behind Clock Tower 3 didn't hurt either.
  • H.A.W.X., to Blazing Angels (both arcade flight sims by Ubisoft's Romanian studio).
  • The game Heavenly Guardian was originally supposed to be a game in the Kiki Kai Kai series (Pocky & Rocky), and had its sprites reworked into a new game when the publisher lost the license.
  • Heavy Rain is a spiritual successor to Fahrenheit. Both from the same developer and both being mostly interactive movies.
  • Hell Pie to Conker's Bad Fur Day, a similarly crass and vulgar 3D Platformer.
  • Hellgate: London to Diablo.
  • Heretic is a spiritual successor to Doom. Both are published by id Software, and both use the id Tech 1 game engine. In fact, using the God Mode and Weapons cheats from Doom will result in death and loss of all weapons, respectively, when used in Heretic.
  • Heroes of Newerth was intended to be the Captain Ersatz of Defense of the Ancients: All-Stars. With the only real difference being that the Warcraft-based characters and visuals are replaced with ones from S2 Game's previous game, Savage, all the mechanics, items, and heroes are nearly identical to the original, barring a few new additions. With Icefrog leaving development to work with Valve to create Dota 2 however, the game was left to its own and became a more straightforward example.
  • Hometown Story was made by Yasuhiro Wada, who is better known for making Harvest Moon. Its general idea is Harvest Moon with the player running a shop instead of a farm, but the Dating Sim aspect gets downplayed in favor of forming friendship bonds with all 32 main villagers.
  • Horizon Chase is such an unabashed tribute to SNES classic Top Gear, the soundtrack was commissioned from Barry Leitch, the original game's composer.
  • Hotline Miami has a very similar premise to Hitman; you fail and/or die a lot, must learn the layout of the levels and the placement/patterns of the enemies in order to progress, and so on.
  • Ikaruga was a Spiritual Successor to Treasure's earlier game Radiant Silvergun, and had the Working Title Project RS2. The octahedron-shaped object also makes an appearance in both games; the track that plays when you fight it is even called "The Stone-Like", which was its name in Radiant Silvergun.
  • Illusion of Gaia and Terranigma are considered to form a thematic, though unofficial, trilogy as successors to SoulBlazer. Although there are direct links included; The first boss of Soul Blazer is a Bonus Boss in Illusion of Gaia, with a storyline explanation of why, albeit a somewhat bizarre one. Meanwhile, Terranigma is explicitly referred to as "Illusion of Gaia 2" in a Developer's Room Easter Egg.
    • There's also a dog named Turbo who shows up in all three games.
    • To some, The Granstream Saga on the PlayStation may be considered a fourth game due to a few shared themes.
  • The Infinity Engine games themselves had a colossal impact on the Western RPG genre and, thanks to their complicated parentage (it's virtually impossible to separate BioWare and Black Isle's contributions to their awesomeness), received a plethora of successors:
  • Iron Helix can be considered a Spiritual Predecessor to Survival Horror games like Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Outlast, which popularized the idea of running away and hiding from the monster as opposed to challenging it head-on, which is what most mainstream horror games were doing at the time.
  • I Wanna Be the Guy has a spiritual successor by the name Battle Kid: Fortress of Peril, endorsed by the maker of I Wanna Be the Guy.
    • I Wanna Be the Guy itself is arguably the spiritual successor to a Japanese flash game known as Zinsei Owata no Daibouken/The Big Adventure of Owata's Life, which inspired IWBTG's creator. Owata acknowledged this in its final version, which ended in a Homage to I Wanna Be the Guy...followed by a Crossover appearance of the main character as the Final Boss.
  • Jade Empire is either the successor to Bridge of Birds, or the only game adaptation it's ever going to get.
  • Jimmy and the Pulsating Mass is clearly being inspired by EarthBound, being a RPG with simple colorful graphics, quirky characters and a similar battle system (with similar psychedelic backgrounds too) which hides some serious and creepy themes behind the cheerful facade. Theme-wise, it also reminds of Rakuen, in that you play as a young boy with cancer who travels to a fantasy world that is a distorted, colorful reflection of his own life and experiences.
  • Japanese video game developer Arzest, is essentially Artoon, without actually being Artoon. Many key staff members, such as SEGA veterans Yoji Ishii and Naoto Ohshima, worked for Artoon before it went defunct and then moved on to work at Arzest. Additionally, many games developed by Arzest resemble games developed by Artoon, including games in the Yoshi series.
  • Data East's Neo Geo platformer Spinmaster stars the same characters from the Sega Genesis game Dashin' Desperadoes, but plays more like a modernized version (literally and figuratively) of the original Joe & Mac (aka Caveman Ninja) than the game it's supposed to be a sequel to (which was more of a racing platform game). Spinmaster might as well had been called Joe & Mac AS INDIANA JONES-STYLE TREASURE HUNTERS.
  • Jewelry Master is Arika's attempt at making a Falling Blocks game that isn't a Tetris game with all the copyright baggage that follows. Like Tetris: The Grand Master, one of Arika's best known series, Jewelry Master features a speed level counter that increases with each piece dropped (in addition to each line cleared), a short delay between when a piece reaches the stack or floor and when it locks in place and a "firm drop" command that instantly drops the piece without locking it in place. The key difference is that instead of clearing lines, you try to surround gems with blocks to clear them.
  • Journey (2012) is pretty much the successor to ICO and Shadow of the Colossus.
  • The Wii game Saint is effectively the successor to The Monkey King: The Journey Begins, with a more realistic art style. They were clearly developed on the same engine, and are both very loosely inspired by Journey to the West.
  • Jumping Flash! is a spiritual successor to a Sharp X68000 game called Geograph Seal. Same developers, similar gameplay blend of First-Person Shooter and Platform Game. Have a look at video and compare the two.
  • Kane & Lynch can be seen as a successor to Freedom Fighters (2003). Both were developed by IO Interactive and feature music by Jesper Kyd, and aside from the co-op mode in the former game, the gameplay in the two games is practically identical.
  • Kaze and the Wild Masks to the classic Donkey Kong Country games. Kaze plays very similarly to Dixie Kong, the Wild Masks function much like the Animal Buddies, and many other elements of the games are reproduced; for example, giant crossbows that Kaze can launch herself out of stand in for the series's signature barrel cannons.
  • Kengo serves as the spiritual successor to the deceased Bushido Blade series.
  • Kenka Banchō is sometimes considered to be the 3D version of Nekketsu Koha Kunio-kun that Technos never got to make.
  • Kero Blaster by Studio Pixel is this to his most famous game, Cave Story. Both are Run-and-Gun type games using a strong Retraux aesthetic with a variety of unique upgradeable weapons, and a healthy dose of Surprise Creepy. Also, a few of the music tracks in it are remixed from Cave Story.
  • Killer7 and No More Heroes, both brainchildren of Goichi Suda. Travis, the protagonist of No More Heroes, can learn special abilities themed after the various personalities from Killer7 by bringing balls to a drunk in a bar.
  • Kill Switch, to WinBack.
  • Nintendo announced a Chinese company is developing an MMORPG featuring all of the Disney franchises separated into different worlds that the players can visit called "Disney Fantasy Online". That's right, it's an MMORPG version of Kingdom Hearts with the Square elements subtracted. The website really screams it out, since the Disney characters are wearing the same outfits they do in Kingdom Hearts.
  • Kirby: Planet Robobot can be seen as a spiritual successor to the Mega Man series, given that Kirby must battle some enemies by piloting the Robobot Armor in a similar manner to how Mega Man tends to employ Mech Machines, as well as the setting being a mechanized Pop Star, similar to the futuristic setting of the Mega Man series.
  • Knack to the Naughty Dog-developed Crash Bandicoot games. Mark Cerny, one of the chief architects of the PlayStation 4, was an executive producer of the latter game, and director of the former.
  • While Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords is the sequel to Knights of the Old Republic, it is the spiritual sequel to Planescape: Torment. The first Knights of the Old Republic itself is a spiritual successor to Neverwinter Nights.
  • Since a direct sequel of Knights of the Old Republic fell through (although they ended up making Star Wars: The Old Republic), Mass Effect is seen as this due to the story progression, outer space setting and decision making system, along with a type of morality meter.
  • Krazy Rain is a spiritual sequel to the massively-multipler online Rhythm Game O2Jam.
  • The NES game Laser Invasion can be considered the successor of the two first Top Gun games released by Konami for the NES. Laser Invasion shares the same engine used in Top Gun The Second Mission and similar HUD, except that you control a gunship instead of a F-14, and there's a few light gun and maze sequences set on foot.
  • L.A. Noire is a spiritual successor to the (very) rough but surprisingly ambitious Dick Tracy videogame on the NES. With a nigh-identical open-world structure about finding clues and using them to interrogate and incriminate perps with shooting sections in between.
  • The Last of Us is a Darker and Edgier successor to the Uncharted series. Both are made by Naughty Dog.
  • League of Legends is one to Defense of the Ancients since most of its dev team previously worked on earlier versions of Dota.
  • Legasista is a spiritual successor to Nippon Ichi and System Prisma's ClaDun games, and features some of the same elements, such as create-a-character mode and Randomly Generated Levels.
  • The first Legend of Zelda game was planned from the start as a spiritual successor to Adventure. In fact, the working title for the game was "Adventure".
    • Adventure itself was a graphical spiritual successor to Colossal Cave Adventure.
    • Link's Awakening is a spiritual successor to For the Frog the Bell Tolls because both are action-adventures for the Game Boy that run on the same engine. The rival character from the game, Richard, even makes a cameo in Link's Awakening.
    • Triforce Heroes is a spiritual successor to the Super Famicom title, Marvelous: Another Treasure Island as both games are teamwork puzzles, and both were directed by Eiji Aonuma.
    • The infamous CD-i games, Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, were designed by the creator of the acclaimed Below the Root and have a rather similar gameplay style. So it's easy to see them as spiritual successors. Whether or not they're worthy successors, that's a different question.
  • LEGO Indiana Jones to LEGO Star Wars, and further LEGO games to both of them — we tropers have even filed all of them as a single series.
  • LEGO Minifigures Online is one to LEGO Universe; both are LEGO minifigure MMORPGS.
  • Len'en Project has a lot of influences from Touhou Project, from the Fantasy Kitchen Sink setting to the Expies of Touhou's characters to the spellcard system. Heck, some of the assets from Len'en were initially used in unpublished Fan Remakes of the PC-98-era Touhou games made by the same creator!
  • Little Dragons Café is a Spiritual Successor of a Spiritual Successor. It's Hometown Story (in itself a Harvest Moon successor) but in a cafe. Little Dragons Cafe is made by the same team who created Hometown Story and all three series share a creator.
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  • Mad News to Mad TV (1991). Both were designed by Ralph Stock, but for different publishers. The only major difference is that you run a newspaper instead of a TV station; it is heavily "implied" that you still control the same character, just with the Serial Numbers Filed Off.
  • MadWorld appears to be a Spiritual Successor to God Hand, being made by the reassembled remains of Clover Studios, creators of the original game.
  • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha A's Portable: The Gears of Destiny is this for the Wild ARMs series. To start with, the Original Generation main character is a combined Expy of the various Wild ARMs protagonists, and she comes from a dying wasteland planet that's a Filgaia Expy and whose restoration serves as one of the main plots of the game. It helps that Kaneko, the Wild ARMs creator, is the one in charge of the game's development, and that he and Tsuzuki, the Lyrical Nanoha creator, are old acquaintances. This was confirmed in an interview Tsuzuki included in the guide, where he mentions that the Wild ARMs elements were included as a show of respect to Kaneko and the franchise he made, of which he had been a fan of since Wild ARMs 3.
  • Mario Kart DS was not only a successor to the previous Mario Kart games, but to Crash Team Racing as well because of the infamous snaking mechanic: both games required a vehicle with low drift stats to spam boosts on straight lines.
  • Mars Matrix is a spiritual sequel to the Giga Wing games.
  • Martial Masters doesn't even try to hide that it's first and foremost an unlicensed fighting game adaptation of the Once Upon a Time in China film series, to the point that some of the characters have the exact same names in the Taiwanese version (Wong Fei-Hung, Ghostfoot Seven, 13th Aunt and White Lotus Master).
  • Marvel Super Heroes: War of the Gems is this to X-Men: Mutant Apocalypse: Both games are Beat 'em Up with Platform Game elements, developed by Capcom; both share the same gameplay and graphic style, even Wolverine's sprites are reused.
  • Alot of people consider Mass Effect to be one of these to Advent Rising. Some even argue that had Advent Rising not been released, Bioware might not have even made Mass Effect in the first place.
  • The Matrix Online development started a year before the films as a MMORPG remake of mid-1980s Alternate Reality series. Those were an unfinished episodic sandbox RPG (only 2 parts were released) with Lotus-Eater Machine planned as The Reveal for part 7.
  • Max: The Curse of Brotherhood is a successor to Heart of Darkness
  • Maximo: Ghosts to Glory was created as an heir to the Ghouls 'n Ghosts series, to the point of borrowing the first-stage music of the latter, and having protagonist stripped to his boxer shorts after taking enough damage.
  • Mega Man:
    • The platformer Mighty No. 9 is one to the classic Mega Man series, from the bright cartoony artstyle, upbeat music styling (which also has an 8-bit rendition composed by Manami Matsumae), similar run and gun gameplay but the crux of the gameplay is built around the character's faster mobility, and copying some other abilities beyond their special weapons.
    • Azure Striker Gunvolt is a spiritual successor to the Mega Man Zero series, and developed by the same company, Inti Creates. It loosely takes the themes and gameplay of said series, particularly when the sequel introduced Copen as a playable character, whose Power Copying abilities are rather evocative of Mega Man.
    • Mighty Gunvolt is more a retro-throwback to the Classic series' platforming with Beck and Gunvolt as the stars, with various other characters thrown in for good measure.
    • Dragon: Marked for Death is yet another spiritual successor to Mega Man Zero and Mega Man ZX series, and in fact was deliberately designed that way by Inti Creates. Whereas Gunvolt is loosely inspired by Zero and ZX in theme and gameplay, Dragon: Marked for Death looks, plays, and feels like a Zero or ZX game if you replaced all of the futuristic elements and Power Copying with medieval fantasy and multiple character classes.
    • A roguelike game going by the name One Step From Eden can be considered one for the Mega Man Battle Network series, given its fast-paced grid-based combat is based on it and its sequel series, to the point where the most widely used description for it is Mega Man Battle Network meets Slay the Spire.
  • Metal Slug is the spiritual successor to Gunforce 2 and In the Hunt, which were made by the same staff back when they were working for Irem.
  • Metro 2033 and Metro: Last Light are considered by many to be the successors to the Stalker franchise. They are very similar in theme, the major difference in setting being Metro taking place mostly in the underground Metro in Moscow, and for the gameplay, that Metro is a traditionally linear fps as opposed to the sandbox of the Stalker series.
  • The Konami arcade game M.I.A.: Missing In Action is pretty much an unofficial official sequel to Rush'n Attack (aka Green Beret), using what is essentially a more advanced version of the same engine, but with a different setting (being set in Vietnam instead of Russia).
  • The Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers video game by Bandai for the Super NES is a spiritual successor to the Choujin Sentai Jetman game by Angel for the Famicom. Not that surprising, considering Natsume developed both.
  • The old Taito game Mizubaku Adventure AKA Liquid Kids could be considered a successor to The NewZealand Story. Both of them are cutesy maze-like platformers with a hero who needs to rescue his kidnapped relatives/friends from cages in every level, have enemies pop up from randomly appearing portals, and have warps to other levels that appear by shooting empty portions of the stages. They also both have the same font for in-game messages!
  • Modern Warfare itself has two of these. Call of Duty: Ghosts is one, created by the new Infinity Ward that Activision created after much of the original Infinity Ward left to create Respawn Entertainment. Respawn's game Titanfall can also be seen as a Spiritual Successor as it seems to share many of the same ideas, although it diversifies significantly from the Modern Warfare games.
  • Medal of Honor: Allied Assault led to Infinity Ward's Call of Duty 1, 2, and the Modern Warfare trilogy''.
  • Moonlighter is this to Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale, giving its own take on the dungeon crawler/shop management hybrid gameplay.
  • Mr. Do! could be considered a spiritual successor to Dig Dug, what with the tunneling, the center-screen prizes and the boulders/apples.
  • The open-source game Naev is a Fan Sequel to Escape Velocity, meant to be what EV 4 might have been if Ambrosia Software hadn't stopped making games. The also open-source game Endless Sky is much the same, although goes in different directions to Naev in what it changes. In either case, the line between Spiritual Successor and Fan Sequel is blurred by Escape Velocity having been a Thematic Series.
  • Nickelodeon All-Star Brawl is this to both the web-browser Super Brawl series (a fighting game featuring Nicktoons) and Cartoon Network: Punch Time Explosion (a Super Smash Bros.-like clone with characters from a children television channel).
  • Naughty Bear is the spiritual successor to Manhunt with teddy bears.
  • NBA Jam is a spiritual successor to Arch Rivals (both are arcade-style basketball games created by Midway which played fast and loose with the rules).
  • Saber Interactive's NBA Playgrounds series is a spiritual successor to both NBA Jam and NBA Street.
  • NeoGeo Battle Coliseum is a practically a sequel to SNK vs. Capcom: SVC Chaos, only without the Capcom characters.
  • Nexus War to Urban Dead, with the added twist that the former made off with a substantial chunk of the latter's player base when it came out. So not only does it have similar mechanics and interface, it's played by all the same people.
  • The rare coin-op Nightmare In The Dark is a spiritual successor of sorts to the more well-known Snow Bros., except that you control a hunchback who engulfs enemies in balls of fire rather than snowmen burying enemies in snow by pelting them with snowballs.
  • Nintendo Land continues the spirit of Wii Sports, since both games are fun and lighthearted games that show off the capabilities of their consoles. The main difference is that the former is Nintendo franchise-themed.
  • The Nintendo Switch is ironically one to the PlayStation Vita outside of Japan where the system bombed. The Vita, after developers jumped ship and western retailers abandoned it, became known for its selection of ports, remakes, and indie titles. Within its first year, developers announced a bunch of ports, remakes, and support from indie developers - making the Switch an unknown Spiritual Successor.
  • Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom is a direct sequel to the first Ni no Kuni, but it borrows a lot of elements from Level-5's much older RPG Rogue Galaxy. Both Ni no Kuni II and Rogue Galaxy are action RPGs where each character uses both a melee and a ranged weapon, where battles in dungeons take place on the dungeon map instead of in specialized arenas, and jumping is an important mechanic. Compared to the first Ni no Kuni, which was not a pure action RPG, was Mons-focused, and, while you could jump, it was a bonus ability that was not supposed to be as good as it was.
  • No Man's Sky to Noctis, as both games feature gameplay revolving around exploring lots of procedurally-generated planets.
  • Not for Broadcast is this to Papers, Please and Night Trap, borrowing story elements from the former and gameplay elements from the latter and even giving Shout Outs to both.
  • The Tetris clone NullpoMino is somewhat of a spiritual successor to Heboris: Unofficial Expansion (sharing the same font and a similar level of customization), developed from scratch due to Heboris UE's source code—a mixture of C++ and a gaming script — being an Eldritch Programming Abomination.
  • Obliterator, a Platform Game by Psygnosis, features a slightly more refined form of the mouse-based control system and gameplay of their earlier game Barbarian (not to be confused with Barbarian: The Ultimate Warrior), but takes place in a science fiction setting instead.
  • Octopath Traveler:
    • Producer Masashi Takahashi considers the game to be a spiritual successor to Final Fantasy VI in terms of game mechanics, in the same way that Bravely Default built upon Final Fantasy V.
    • As far as art style, setting, and combat system goes, Octopath might as well be considered a spiritual successor to the Bravely Default series. (This is a little contentious for some, though, as while the producers at Square-Enix worked on both games, the development studios are different - Silicon Studios for BD vs. Acquire for Octopath.)
    • The Legend of Legacy shares the same concept of choosing one of many characters and watching their story unfold within the same setting, while also recruiting any other characters that weren't chosen from the start. The vague connections between each character's story also hearkens back to Square's own game Live A Live.
    • Finally, the overall structure of the game, with the choosing of a protagonist, the freedom to go in your own direction, and even the arrangement of the battle screen, harkens back heavily to the SaGa series, particularly the Romancing SaGa games. It's to the point that a number of fans jokingly say that the game's other title is Romancing SaGa 4.
  • Oddity was developed, art style, gameplay, and all, to be a successor to the Mother series. This is an invoked trope, though, as it was initially conceived as an outright fan sequel.
  • Odin Sphere is a Spiritual Successor to the little-known and Japan-exclusive Sega Saturn title Princess Crown, being created by the same director and company, and featuring several thematic similarities, including the "little girl reading the game story in a book" narrative device.
    • The Nintendo Wii game Muramasa: The Demon Blade is a spiritual successor to both of them, and was in earlier stages referred to as Princess Crown 3, in the same way Odin Sphere was named Princess Crown 2.
  • Of Love and Eternity is a Retraux Survival Horror game where you play as a literal Failure Knight who is murdered along with his girlfriend in the intro cinematic. Barred from the Afterlife and stuck in purgatory as undead, he has to reunite with her soul and set right his greatest failure so they can rest in peace. For anyone who has played Medievil on the original PS 1, this setup seems really familiar.
  • Omega Five is a successor to Capcom's Forgotten Worlds, using the same rotary aiming mechanic.
  • One Piece: Gigant Battle for the DS was developed by Ganbarion, makers of Jump Super Stars and Jump Ultimate Stars, and reuses many of the same assets.
  • After a falling out between the developer and publisher of Operation Flashpoint, the publisher won the rights to the name and would reuse it for a rather different duology, while the developer kept the rights to the engine behind Operation Flashpoint and went on to create the ARMA series, which is widely considered to be the true successor to Operation Flashpoint to the point that the developers collectively call both series the Armaversum.
    • As a twist, for the tenth anniversary of the original Operation Flashpoint, the developers released a final patch (just over six years after the penultimate patch) that actually renamed the game to ARMA: Cold War Assault, as well as removing the Codemasters-developed expansion campaign "Red Hammer."
  • The Mitchell arcade game Osman and feelplus/Square Enix's recent Moon Diver are this to Capcom's Strider, both developed by the same designer (Kouichi Yotsui).
  • Overload, by the creators of Descent, is a spiritual successor to that series.
  • The Pandora is the spiritual successor to the GP2x which is the spiritual successor to the GP32. While all three handhelds differ in developers, companies, and even nationalities, the philosophy of being and open games device anyone can make games for has been present and strengthened throughout the series.
    • A more closely-related successor to the GP2X is the Wiz, made by the same company (Gamepark Holdings). The Pandora, it should be noted, is made by a separate group of developers though its underlying philosophy is very similar to the GP32, GP2X, and Wiz.
  • The Paper Mario series was conceived and created in-house by Nintendo's Intelligent Systems after a direct sequel to Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars became impossible due to Nintendo and Square's late-nineties falling-out.
    • Likewise for the hand-held Mario & Luigi series. Practically the only differences between Mario & Luigi and Super Mario RPG are the plot, characters, and change of perspective from isometric to more traditional side-scrolling. Incidentally, Alphadream, the development company, is made of staff originally from Square.
    • Two licensed games, South Park: The Stick of Truth and Steven Universe: Attack the Light, are both successors to Paper Mario as Action Command-heavy RPGs despite being based on two shows that couldn't be more different.
      • Bug Fables takes direct inspirations from the Paper Mario games, taking its aesthetics and combat system and turning it on its head in a bug-themed world.
  • Phantom Breaker is one to the Asuka 120% series. It was developed by former Fill-in-Café employees Masatoshi Imaizumi (Asuka 120%, Mad Stalker: Full Metal Force, and Panzer Bandit) and Masaki Ukyo (who also worked on Mad Stalker, and for a time worked with Treasure on games such as Guardian Heroes and YuYu Hakusho: Makyō Tōitsusen), and share similar Tournament Arc themes featuring pretty girls.
  • Planet Coaster is one to Rollercoaster Tycoon 3. Both of which were developed by Frontier Developments.
    • Same as goes with Planet Zoo from the same developers that are widely considered to be the successor of Zoo Tycoon series.
  • The emergent "battle royale" genre of game, including Trope Codifier Player Unknowns Battlegrounds and its competitor Fortnite Battle Royale, are spiritual successors to the controversial Japanese novel Battle Royale. Both of the aforementioned games follow very similar sets of rules to the novel's eponymous death game: players are dropped off in the battlefield and tasked with killing one another until only one player (or team of players) is left standing. As the game progresses, areas of the map become cordoned off, forcing players into closer proximity with one another and forcing them to fight, less they be killed for staying out of bounds.
  • For some, the original PlayStation is considered the spiritual successor to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System even more so than its actual successor the Nintendo 64. This is mostly due to the fact that the PlayStation was originally an add-on to the SNES, both systems have similar controller layouts (which is especially noticeable with the original controller), and many third-party developers for the SNES moved to the PlayStation during the fifth-generation.
  • One could make a case for the entire Pokémon series being a spiritual successor to the Mother series, considering that the two series were made in part by a common developer (Creatures Inc.), and share a number of uncanny similarities.
  • Poker Night at the Inventory and its sequel Poker Night 2 are successors to both Telltale Texas Hold Em as a poker video game where you play against four other players with lots and lots of funny dialogue and Sam & Max: Freelance Police since it features both of the titular protagonists in both of the games and was devised as a form of Revisiting the Roots with the sense of humor that their Sam and Max games pioneered.
  • Valve's Portal is officially the Spiritual Successor of Narbacular Drop, and the whole team behind ND now works at Valve.
  • Prince of Persia was a Spiritual Successor to Karateka, an earlier Jordan Mechner game. The rotoscoped kicks and punches in Karateka prefigured the rotoscoped swordplay in Prince of Persia. Karateka even included a gory instant-death Booby Trap.
  • Project Exonaut is this to FusionFall. Both are online games revolving around redesigned Cartoon Network characters.
  • The Project Gotham Racing series is a spiritual successor to the Dreamcast game Metropolis Street Racer. In turn, Forza Horizon is a spiritual successor to PGR, with its development team including many former Bizarre Creations employees.
  • Project Wingman confessed right from its Kickstarter pitch that it was aiming to be Ace Combat with the Serial Numbers Filed Off after the latter series had been dormant for a number of years. After the game was funded, Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown was announced and released to considerable acclaim. When Sector D2 released their effort a year later, the revitalized fanbase congratulated them on releasing Ace Combat 8 so quickly.
  • [PROTOTYPE] is this to The Incredible Hulk: Ultimate Destruction. Both are superhuman Wide-Open Sandbox games by Radical Entertainment that downright relish in their Video Game Cruelty Potential.
    • According to Word Of God, the inspiration for Prototype came about due to Hulk's "weaponize" ability; that is, the ability to turn vehicles and such into improvised weapons, rather than limiting the player to "pick up and throw." Reportedly, during testing, somebody posed the question "what if you could weaponize the player?"
    • Continuing the chain of succession is Saints Row IV, which features a set of superpowers that control and function almost identically to the ones in Prototype.
  • The team that worked on Pro Wrestling later formed Human Entertainment and developed the Fire Pro Wrestling series.
  • Pochi & Nyaa, the last game Compile was working on before they went bankrupt, was an obvious attempt to recapture some of the gameplay and aesthetics of the Puyo Puyo Cash-Cow Franchise which they no longer owned.
  • Propeller Arena: Aviation Battle Championship is the spiritual successor to Wing Arms on the Sega Saturn.
  • Pump It Up Pro is, oddly enough, this to In the Groove. Since the rights to ITG were picked up by Konami (in other words, Konami nixed ITG), the team behind ITG, who had collaborated with PIU developer Andamiro for the In The Groove 2 dedicated cabinet, decided to collaborate with Andamiro once again, this time working on a Pump It Up game geared towards the same sort of players who enjoy ITG, featuring a lot of ITG elements such as the use of the StepMania engine, notes colored by beat (rather than each column having its own color like in mainline Pump, although the option to use that coloring scheme exists), scoring based purely on accuracy rather than other factors like note streaks, and a good chunk of the soundtrack consisting of songs from artists who contributed to ITG such as Kyle Ward. In short, it's In The Groove WITH A PUMP IT UP PAD LAYOUT!
  • Pumpkin Jack bares more than a few similarities to MediEvil; 3D Defanged Horror platformers about men brought back to life in a cartoonish, cel-shaded, Standard Fantasy Setting with their mission to kill a wizard. Health comes in the form of a green potion, their soundtracks are similar and the protagonist's reward is safe passage into the afterlife.
  • The UK-based company Graftgold ported Rainbow Islands to the Amiga and other European-market home computers. They followed it up with a game called Fire & Ice, which had somewhat similar game mechanics (in particular, combat is done by shooting something that immobilizes an enemy and then touching it while immobilized, enemies left immobilized for too long will become stronger, every level contains a certain amount of enemy-dropped items which the player is supposed to collect, and taking too long to finish a level causes something to chase the player character), and its box cover had a quotation from a review that called it "the best platformer since Rainbow Islands".
  • Rampage, to Crush, Crumble, and Chomp!.
  • Rare:
  • RayStorm: spiritual successor to RayForce. RayCrisis is the official prequel to RayForce.
  • Razing Storm is the spiritual sequel to Crisis Zone, the Gaiden Game to Time Crisis. Like Crisis Zone, you use a machine gun instead of Time Crisis's handguns (though for bigger targets, you automatically switch to stronger weapons), and instead of hiding behind objects, you take cover behind a heavy-duty shield. Razing Storm has since been renamed Time Crisis: Razing Storm for its PS3 release.
    • Time Crisis is itself a spiritual successor to Rolling Thunder, borrowing some elements from the older games. Take Cover! and a Timed Mission is a common similarity between them. The themes are also similar.
  • While Red Dead Redemption is the official sequel to Red Dead Revolver, Redemption has a lot more in common with the Activision-made Gun than its true predecessor.
  • Refazel was supposed to be the sequel to Ferazel's Wand—hence the similar title. Sadly, the fellow who was in charge of the first game left Ambrosia Software shortly afterwards, and they wouldn't give him the sequel rights, so he made it into a sort of inverted Dolled-Up Installment.
  • The Remothered trilogy for the Clock Tower series, unsurprisingly, considering it started out as a Fan Remake of the first Clock Tower (1995) game before it slowly morphed its own thing during its long development. Despite the changes in story, it retains the atmosphere and Alone with the Psycho-style gameplay that defined the Clock Tower games. It even has traces of the original Clock Tower plot and characters, most notably in how it ended up swapping the roles of Jennifer and Mary, with the originally villainous Mary — now named Rosemary — being the protagonist of Remothered.
  • Resident Evil also borrowed the control scheme from the original Alone in the Dark (1992). Eternal Darkness is also something of a spiritual successor to Alone in the Dark as both games feature a female character called to an old mansion to investigate the suicide of a family member; an investigation that leads to Lovecraftian horrors.
  • The original Resident Evil was conceived when Capcom wanted an updated version of their Famicom horror RPG Sweet Home. An early teaser for Biohazard even used an arrangement of the Sweet Home battle theme and it is believed that the international title of Resident Evil came from a line in Sweet Home which describes the mansion where the game is set "a place of residing evil."
  • Resogun is the modern successor of Defender.
  • The game Reunion (1994) followed by Imperium Galactica series and then Haegemonia: Legions of Iron series. All are plot-heavy 4X real time strategies about humans expanding to space. The publishers kept collapsing before the next instalment was ready, but kept the rights.
  • The 1995 pinball machine Attack from Mars turned out to be a huge seller, but didn't get a proper sequel until the Pinball 2000 machine Revenge from Mars. In the meantime, the 1997 pinball Medieval Madness was created by the same developers and, despite the different premise, was far more similar to the original game's structure than the sequel was.
  • RiME: Another "Myst"-like game, very much in the mold of the original. The protagonist lands on an eerie, beautiful island, is given no prompting, so the only way forward is to start exploring. The story unfolds as puzzles are solved.
  • Risen to Gothic series after Gothic 3. Developers — Piranha Bytes — left the publisher, who retained rights to the title, world and most characters. Risen uses similar mechanics, but tries to correct the drawbacks of Gothic games.
    • After mixed response to the former's sequels; ELEX would take up the mantle in a sci-fi setting.
    • The Gothic series is already a Spiritual Successor to the Ultima series, with the future Piranha Bytes seeing Ultima IX, and trying to do a better 3D Ultima game. The interactivity with the surroundings, life-like NPCs with their schedules, and many more will seeM familiar to fans of the Ultima series. The war with orcs, is even similar to the war with gargoyles from Ultima VI, with the orcs, like gargoyles being also revaled as a much more sympathetic species, that averts Always Chaotic Evil. The Sleeper is also defeated in a similar way to Exodus. both are defeated not in battle, but by destroying the things that bound them to reality. In Exodus' case, you insert 4 punchcards into slots in Exodus' computer interface, which overloads and destroys it, while in the Sleeper's case, you must stab the 5 hearts that anchor him in the Mortal Realm.
  • Rise of Nations, a strategy game designed by Brian Reynolds, is to some degree a Spiritual Successor of Civilization III.
  • While Guitar Hero III is obviously the notional sequel to Guitar Hero II, many feel that the "soul" of the franchise has moved along to Rock Band. After Harmonix, the series' creator, sold the Guitar Hero IP to Activision, they moved on to Rock Band, making it the game which still employs the Guitar Hero II development team, game engine, and philosophy regarding note chart design.
    • While we're on the subject of Rock Band, Unplugged for the PSP hearkens back to Harmonix's pre-Guitar Hero days, playing much more like Frequency or Amplitude (in fact, it was orginally supposed to be a direct sequel to the latter, but Sony then vetoed the idea, forcing Harmonix to slap the Rock Band label on it). The DS version of Rock Band 3 continues the trend, while the DS version of Lego Rock Band is a similar but more watered-down game. The similarities then ballooned into Rock Band Blitz, which is little more than a direct self-plagiarism of Amplitude. This means that, in a way, Harmonix finally got that Amplitude sequel they wanted!
      • And now, Amplitude has its own successor, thanks to Kickstarter.
    • The fan made Clone Hero is aiming at being a Spritual Successor to Guitar Hero III.
  • Players of both RuneScape and Ragnarok Online have each joked that Team Fortress 2 is a Spiritual Successor to their games, as they're all about collecting party hats, known for their "The one with the most hats wins" rule. In turn, Overwatch is often considered a spiritual successor to Team Fortress 2.
  • R-Type had a line of actual sequels, but before most of these Irem made a spiritual successor titled X-Multiply.
  • Satellite Reign is the spiritual successor to Syndicate. It was created by the lead programmer of Syndicate Wars, who was irked to see the renowned action-strategy series rebooted as a first person shooter.
  • The shoot 'em up-fighting game hybrid Senko no Ronde (known as WarTech in other countries) is one to Psychic Force. Both games are developed by Taito's arcade division, who then split up and formed G.rev, and both titles also share similar gameplay flow. What sets these two apart however is that Psychic Force is much more akin to a traditional fighting game, whereas Senko no Ronde plays much more like a bullet hell shooter.
  • Serpent In The Staglands to Darklands. Low Fantasy Wide-Open Sandbox in a world where medieval or pre-Christian beliefs are real. Not as much historical accuracy, though. No watercolor illustrations, but pixel art and sepia sketches are quite similar.
  • ShadowVerse is one to Rage of Bahamut. In fact, nearly every card in this game uses card art from Rage of Bahamut (not to mention the huge failure of Rage of Bahamut in the west due to Screwed by the Network). The second expansion is even called "Rise of Bahamut".
  • Fumito Ueda's Shadow of the Colossus was thought to be a Spiritual Successor to his previous game, ICO. However, he revealed a direct connection between the two games in an interview several months after the game's release: the protagonist of Shadow of the Colossus is actually a direct ancestor of the protagonist in Ico. However, the two play very differently and have no further storyline connections. In turn, The Last Guardian is part of this world.
  • Crowd-funded effort Shadow Of The Eternals was meant to be Eternal Darkness 2 in all but name.
  • Shin Megami Tensei:
    • The original Shin Megami Tensei is a spiritual successor to the original Famicom Megami Tensei games, refining gameplay elements introduced in those games while creating an original story inspired by both the Digital Devil Story novels (and the Megami Tensei adaptation) and the post-apocalyptic setting of Megami Tensei II.
    • Persona is an obvious spiritual successor to one-off MegaTen Gaiden Game Shin Megami Tensei if... This is most prominent in the first Persona, with there being a truly astounding number of parallels between the two games, but even later Persona games have some of this; if nothing else, the "persona" system remains a greatly revised and expanded version of the "guardian" system found in If....
    • At the time of release, Digital Devil Saga was a Spiritual Successor to Persona, featuring some noticeable similarities in both story and gameplay. However, the Persona series itself has been fully revived since then, thanks to the success of Persona 3 and subsequent games.
    • Devil Survivor is a Spiritual Successor for the Majin Tensei spinoff series, although this statement is based only on the fact that they are strategy games.
    • Persona 5 Strikers ended up not becoming a typical Dynasty Warriors spin off given that it incorporates day and nighttime social interactions of Japanese cities to find clues when not exploring dungeons, while level exploration takes more from a typical action rpg, especially with its elements of platforming and stealth as opposed to the focus on defeating large number of enemies to guard points on a map. With combat itself also emphasizing Megaten weakness exploitation, the game is pretty much a modern Raidou Kuzunoha vs. The Soulless Army in both setting and release. Funny enough, Raidou was the first Megaten star to dress in black with a talking black cat sidekick.
  • One of the victory conditions in Civilization II is to make a journey to Alpha Centauri, thus beginning the colonization of the galaxy by your side. Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri can thus be seen as the direct sequel to this particular victory. Or, it's just Civilization II IN SPACE!
  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun is an attempt to resurrect the gameplay codified by the classic stealth-strategy series Commandos, but replacing the World War II setting with the Sengoku Jidai, and hardened Allied special forces operatives with a ragtag gang of ninjas.
  • Shantae (2002) is a successor to the Sabrina licensed games for the Game Boy Color. They both star a teenaged Half-Human Hybrid with magical powers embarking on an adventure. Both games run on similar themes, share similar level designs, and even run on the same engine with the exact same controls. Notably, they also have the same developer.
  • Sigma Star Saga is considered this in regards to The Guardian Legend. While both games are hybridizations of the Action-Adventure and Shoot 'Em Up genres, Sigma is more story-driven.
  • Electronic Arts's Skate is a successor to their NES-era game Skate Or Die.
    • And interestingly enough, the series it used to duel with, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater, is itself a spiritual successor to 720 Degrees.
  • Skies of Arcadia is considered to be a spiritual successor to Phantasy Star since both were developed by Sega's Overworks studios, and they're both turn-based roleplaying games. In fact, some fans consider Skies to be more a successor to Phantasy Star than Phantasy Star Online.
  • Skullgirls is being considered a spiritual successor to Arcana Heart, according to people in the fighting game community who attend professional tournaments and have played both of them.
  • The Sky Crawlers: Innocent Aces, a Wii flight sim game made by Project Aces with WW2 like planes, is this to the Ace Combat series.
  • Smash TV was a Spiritual Successor to the arcade classic Robotron: 2084.
    • Smash TV later got its own Spiritual Successor, Total Carnage, with the same gameplay and over-the-top violence, except you're fighting a Saddam Hussein lookalike instead of going through a futuristic game show.
      • It's actually Hitler.
  • Soccer Spirits, the successor to Captain Tsubasa, Tecmo Cup: Soccer Game and Blitzball.
  • Sockman is a spiritual successor to the ZX Spectrum classic Manic Miner.
  • The Soul Series can be considered one to the Samurai Shodown series. Another Historical Fantasy fighting game featuring a samurai who loves to fight strong enemies. It comes in full circle when Haohmaru becomes a Guest Fighter in Soul Calibur VI.
  • The laserdisc arcade game Space Ace was an obvious Spiritual Successor to Don Bluth's Dragon's Lair.
  • Sega's Spikeout series is the 3D successor to Streets of Rage.
  • Spore is this in some ways to SimEarth.
  • Squad is for the Project Reality, a Game Mod for Battlefield 2. Squad actually spun-off from a failed Project Reality 2 project, which was slated to be a standalone version of the mod in a more modern engine.
  • Starbound is this to Terraria, as one of the developers of Terraria is the head developer of Starbound.
  • Stardew Valley was apparently always designed to be a spiritual successor to the Harvest Moon games, borrowing many elements from them while also rectifying a number of common criticisms, such as the lack of a Gay Option. It uses an art style especially similar to the original SNES Harvest Moon.
  • Star Citizen is the successor to Chris Roberts' earlier titles Wing Commander, Starlancer, and Freelancer. The single-player "Squadron 42" portion is more like WC and Starlancer, while the Wide-Open Sandbox MMO half is more like Freelancer.
  • StarCraft can be argued to be a spiritual successor to the first two Warcraft games, also made by Blizzard Entertainment.
  • StarFlight and Star Flight 2 influenced several others:
    • Protostar started as StarFlight 3 under the same producer, Joe Ybarra, but had Serial Numbers Filed Off after disagreements between developer and publisher.
    • The first Star Control game, was inspired by Starflight, but bore little resemblance. Star Control 2 came much closer. Both were designed by one of Starflight designers Paul Reiche III.
    • Alien Legacy, also produced by Ybarra, has a smaller scope — only a single star system and only 1 on-screen alien race — but shares similar After the End / Apocalypse Not mood, as well as scouring the surface of alien planets for many kinds of Applied Phlebotinum and quest items.
    • Mass Effect director called Starflight a key inspiration. More so, the twist ending reveal Drew Karpyshyn originally planned was quite similar: the frequent use of mass effect caused stars to explode, thus Reapers wiped all advanced civilizations, hoping one of the harvested races would be able to figure a solution. (And harvesting Protheans took so long, it almost destroyed the galaxy. And the human proto-reaper seemed like their best bet.)
  • In Japan, Hudson Soft produced the NES and MSX ports of Star Force and ran a nationwide tournament around it. But Star Force was a Tecmo game, and so Hudson developed a rather similar game called Star Soldier to feature in the next year's tournament. Star Force and Star Soldier each had their own line of sequels.
  • Among the Wii U games revealed at E3 in 2014 was Project Giant Robot, which had the player controlling a Humongous Mecha. Unlike fellow "Project" game Project Guard (which went on to become Star Fox Guard), Giant Robot never went anywhere and was seemingly cancelled. Come January 2018, and Nintendo unveiled Nintendo Labo for the Nintendo Switch, and the second revealed kit for that game is Robot Kit, which took the mecha theme even further. Hilariously, one video promoting the original version has Reggie Fils-Aime duking it out with a man dressed up in a cheap cardboard robot costume, looking very prophetic as a result.
  • Star Ocean was a Spiritual Successor to Tales of Phantasia, the first game in the Tales Series. They share many gameplay and interface elements, and even things like items and spells; the original Tales of Phantasia team splintered into the two series, with the exception of music composer Motoi Sakuraba, who remains the composer on both series.
    • Tales of Symphonia is a spiritual successor to Tales of Eternia design-wise. Never mind that it's already a long-distance prequel to Tales of Phantasia, which makes it a spiritual successor as far as the theme is concerned.
      • Tales of the Abyss is the spiritual successor to Symphonia, particularly in terms of gameplay, but also in cartain thematic elements. This is due to it sharing Symphonia's development staff ("Team Symphonia"). It was followed in turn by Tales of Vesperia, making a sort of spiritual trilogy.
  • The Atari 2600 game Solaris was intended as an unofficial sequel to Star Raiders by Doug Neubauer, who programmed both games.
  • Star Trek Online's space navigation/combat portion is a spiritual successor to Star Trek: Starfleet Command.
  • Stella Deus: The Gate of Eternity is a successor to Hoshigami: Ruining Blue Earth, as the two games share a lot of the same battle mechanics.
  • Strikers 1945 series: Successor to the Aero Fighters series, but more Bullet Hell-ish.
  • Sunset Overdrive as this to Video Game/Crackdown, Saints Row IV, and to lesser note Jet Set Radio Future.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • New Super Mario Bros. 2 is strongly influenced by Super Mario Bros. 3, from the Tanooki Leaf power-up, to those colorful rectangular sheet platforms Mario can walk on, the Koopalings, and each World's map being a wide rectangle. Reznor's role in this game is also rather similar to that of Boom Boom, guarding the midpoint of each World.
    • New Super Mario Bros. U is likewise heavily based on Super Mario World, featuring the return of Yoshi after his absence from the above, baby Yoshis, visual elements like the slanted polygonal hills seen in the background of some levels, Edible Theme Naming, a level select consisting of one large map instead of eight separate small ones, a haunted shipwreck, and the hidden Brutal Bonus Level Superstar Road.
    • Super Mario 3D World is highly based on the American Super Mario Bros. 2, as it involves Mario being joined by Luigi, Princess Peach, and Toad on an adventure to another world to free a world of cute fairy creatures from the bad guy. The characters keep their own unique abilites (Mario is balanced, Luigi jumps higher, Toad moves fast, Peach can float) like in said game. The Sprixies are a stand-in for the Subcon fairies. The "Player Select" theme from Mario 2 get a Musical Nod in the Lucky Houses. Toad in particular even has his color scheme from the NES version of the game rather than his normal look. Finally, Bowser, who wasn't in Mario 2 originally, apes the original Big Bad Wart in the idea of capturing the Sprixies and imprisoning them inside of a jar.
    • Super Mario Odyssey is basically a modernized, larger-scale version of Super Mario 64.
      • A sandbox collectathon platformer, in which a hero and his sidekick change into myriad different forms to navigate the world? Sounds like a damn fine Banjo-Kazooie game.
  • Glitch Strikers is this to Super Mario Bros. Crossover in that the game is based on characters from vastly different games with their gameplay retained. The differences in this case are that Glitch Strikers is a Writing Around Trademarks version for commercial release (as such, the characters are replaced with expies — Mario himself, for example, is replaced by a German miner named Manni), the worlds in the game are based on each of the characters rather than solely emulating Super Mario Bros.., and there's an actual storyline that ties everything together.
  • Super Robot Wars W is the Spiritual Successor to Super Robot Wars J for the Game Boy Advance. Despite being in separate continuities, they both share many of the same series' (Full Metal Panic!, Martian Successor Nadesico, Mobile Suit Gundam SEED, and Tekkaman Blade are the standouts), with units even using the same sprites and attacks. W also has many of the same features as J, such as Unit Switching with battleships, altering background music, and series favorites. A common fan theory is that the other race J's Fury mention they're avoiding is in fact W's Database, or at least will be once their storylines come up in the Original Generation series. Similarly, K has a similar engine and graphics, but series-wise it really only shares SEED This all culminates in Super Robot Wars High School, which combines all three.
    • Similarly, the original mecha of Super Robot Wars Advance are descended from the mecha of Super Robot Wars 64, and SRW MX is considered to be a successor of the Compact/Impact series.
    • K is actually a successor to Z — created out of all the content the devs wished they could have put in the latter, and sharing a few series and several themes.
    • Super Robot Wars Z is likewise one for Super Robot Wars Alpha Gaiden, sharing many of the same series as well as largely taking place in a post-apocalyptic setting.
  • A case of one with a fan work: Super Smash Ponies is considered a spiritual successor to My Little Pony: Fighting Is Magic.
  • The ill-fated 1st party Play Station Vita action game Freedom Wars has one: Sword Art Online: Fatal Bullet, of all games. Fatal Bullet is made by the same developers and features a more RPG-oriented spin on most of Freedom Wars' core mechanics. It even includes a hookshot mechanic that is clearly inspired by the Ibara Hookshot.
  • SWIV was created by the developer of the home computer versions of Tecmo's Silk Worm, reusing some of the sound effects, and was all but advertised as a sequel to it. "Silkworm IV" was only one of three official expansions of the Initialism Title.
  • System Shock has three. BioShock retains the gameplay of System Shock 2, Dead Space retains the horror atmosphere and setting, and Prey mixes up between gameplay of 2 and the setting of 1 with Bioshock's influence mixing in on both front.
    • Deus Ex can be considered as a spiritual successor to System Shock as well. Warren Spector, the creator of Deus Ex worked on System Shock in the past.
      • Deus Ex also shares many similarities to Commodore Amiga adventure game KGB, also known as Conspiracy.

    T-Z 
  • The Talos Principle: To co-writer Jonas Kyratzes's earlier game about an android questioning human spirituality in what might be the ashes of our civilization.
  • Tech Romancer, a 3D Humongous Mecha-themed fighting game, is a spiritual successor to another Capcom-made Humongous Mecha-themed fighting game, Cyberbots. One of the mechs from Cyberbots, Blodia, and its pilot, Jin Saotome, appear as a playable character in the home console version.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder's Revenge is a spiritual sequel to the classic Konami-era beat'em ups Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Arcade Game and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time, as stated in this GameReactor interview with the DotEmu CEO Cyrille Imbert.
  • Tell Me Why feels like Life Is Strange 3 in all but name. Developed by Life is Strange developer Dontnod Entertainment, Tell Me Why features a coming-of-age narrative, sympathetic focus on LGBTQ+ characters, and young people developing superpowers in Everytown, America. Some have even speculated that the stand-alone nature of Tell Me Why is mainly due to the game having a different publisher, suggesting that it might have been tied in to LiS in some way if not for that.
  • Telling Lies has similar themes and gameplay to Her Story (a prior game by the same creator), but a different plot and a broader scope.
  • Tenchu was originally Acquire's work but then FromSoftware had the license. This would lead to Acquire making the similar Shinobido games, which has Tenchu's stealth kills and Ki-meter for detecting enemies. FromSoftware had plans on returning to the world of Tenchu, but instead their Project Ninja would become Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice.
  • Tetris: The Grand Master is the spiritual successor to Sega's Tetris games, and borrows many elements such as the piece colors, the bottom-biased rotation system, fast sideways movement and soft drop, and piece lock delay (a feature present in all of Sega's Tetris games but not in Nintendo's, at least for a while).
  • The 1997 comedy hospital management game Theme Hospital had a spiritual successor in 2018, in the form of Two Point Hospital, and several old hands from Bullfrog (the developer of the original) worked on the successor.
  • Timespinner's gameplay and aesthetic are very closely based on Castlevania: Symphony of the Night-era Castlevanias, especially Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia.
  • Tiny Metal is one for Nintendo Wars, as both are Turn-Based Strategy games with a colorful cast of characters.
  • The cancelled Tiny Toon Adventures: Defenders of the Universe / Tiny Toon Adventures: Defenders of the Looniverse is a gameplay successor to Treasure's earlier Rakugaki Showtime.
  • Titanfall to Call of Duty, more specifically Modern Warfare, due to the fact that developer Respawn Entertainment is composed of the majority of developers from Infinity Ward who left Activision following the release of Jason West and Vince Zampella, the co-founders of Infinity Ward.
  • Torchlight is a spiritual succesor of Fate and/or Diablo.
  • Chris Taylor's Total Annihilation and Supreme Commander.
    • Uber Entertainment is trying to fund a new one called Planetary Annihilation on Kickstarter.
  • The Trackmania series is considered to be the Spiritual Successor of an early 90's game called Stunts, which not only has the merit of sporting super-sleek 3D graphics (for the time of course), but is about clearing obstacle-laden tracks on powerful sports cars. Coincidentally, Trackmania Nations, to put an example, is about clearing obstacle-laden tracks in an Formula-1-lookalike racing car.
  • Transformers: Animated: The Game is a successor to The Lost Vikings as a teamwork Puzzle Platformer.
  • Transistor to the earlier Bastion.
  • Chris Sawyer's Transport Tycoon and Locomotion.
  • Treasure's Bleach fighting games for the Nintendo DS are considered to be spiritual successors to their Mega Drive fighting game Yu Yu Hakusho: Makyo Toitsusen.
  • Even though it's an entirely different setting and story, Tree of Savior has been hailed as a successor to Ragnarok Online for a multitude of reasons:
    • Tree of Savior's developer, IMC Games, was founded by one of RO's original developers (prior to the Samsung buyout that caused most of Gravity Corporation's founders to leave). Several other people from those days are also working on Tree of Savior—notably, SoundTeMP, who provided most of RO's memorable soundtrack.
    • The game has a 2½D Sprite/Polygon Mix, like RO, and the in-game art style looks like a higher-detailed evolution of RO's.
    • Tree of Savior shares many game mechanics with RO—it can be controlled via mouse, it has a similar Character Class System and Point Build System, and features a number of things that were planned for RO by the original devteam but never happened.
  • The Turing Test: To Portal and The Talos Principle.
  • Twin Cobra was a spiritual successor to Tiger Heli, which in turn had a predecessor in Gyrodine, whose programmers went on to found Toaplan, the company which made the other two games. All three of these helicopter-based vertical shooters were distributed by Taito.
  • Ty the Tasmanian Tiger to Crash Bandicoot.
  • In a rare example of spiritual sequels crossing from one franchise to another, a group of developers wanted to make a new Ultima Underworld game, but failed to secure the license. They changed the project to a Spiritual Successor in an original IP, Arx Fatalis. They were later hired by Ubisoft, and created a Spiritual Successor to Arx Fatalis as part of Ubi's revived Might and Magic brand, becoming Dark Messiah.
    • Ultima VI received its own spiritual sequel in the form of Cythera, which featured an improved resolution and expanded skills.
    • The upcoming Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues is the spiritual Spiritual Successor to classic Ultima series, and it's MMORPG offshoot, Ultima Online, being even developed by Richard "Lord British" Garriot, the Ultima series creator. Interestingly, you will apparently be able to control if the game will be a single player, few friends online, or a full-blown MMORPG experience. The setting of game is even called "New Britannia", the player character will be called the Avatar, and there are other, almost sequel-like nods to the old series.
    • Underworld Ascendant is a spiritual successor to Ultima Underworld.
    • Legends Of Aria is a spiritual successor to Ultima Online.
  • Unbound Saga is one to Comix Zone, both being old-school arcade style Beat 'em Up action games set inside a comic book world. The stages in both games are designed in a similar way, too, looking like comic book panels where you leap out one panel to another to progress.
  • Valkyria Chronicles too is considered such to Skies of Arcadia. While Valkyria is a strategy RPG instead of turn-based, it has some members of Sega's now extinct Overworks studios on its development, and even Skies protagonists Vyse and Aika make a cameo in it.
  • The Valkyrie Drive series is basically this to the Senran Kagura series.
  • The Vic Tokai Platform Games Kid Kool, Psycho Fox, and Decap Attack all feature different characters (and the Japanese versions are different still), but have many elements in common, including the acceleration physics.
  • Viper Phase 1, while having no real plot of its own, retains much of the look and feel of the same developer's Raiden series, specifically Raiden II.
  • Irem's Vigilante is pretty much a more advanced version of their earlier single-plane Beat 'em Up Kung Fu Master in a different setting, although there was an official sequel for the Family Computer in Japan titled Spartan X 2.
  • Warframe is this to darkSector. Developers at some point hinted to Warframe taking place in the same universe, thousands of years in the future, though this was since recanted. They have also stated that Warframe is the game they wanted to make back when they were in early development of darkSector.
  • WarioWare to the Sound Bomber mode of Mario Artist: Polygon Studio, and Mario Artist to Mario Paint.
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane is one for Master of Magic
  • War for the Overworld is regarded as a spiritual successor to Dungeon Keeper.
  • The turbulent history of Wasteland's developers has prompted a lot of this:
    • After Interplay made Wasteland for Electronic Arts, EA made a "sequel" named Fountain of Dreams, which they ultimately decided not to market as a sequel to Wasteland.
    • Since Interplay couldn't get the rights to Wasteland back from EA, Interplay (specifically, the RPG group, which later became Black Isle Studios) instead repurposed a prototype GURPS RPG to make Fallout and Fallout 2.
    • As the crowning glory to this nonsense, InXile head Brian Fargo (the producer of the original Wasteland) reacquired the rights to Wasteland and released an actual sequel in 2014 thanks to the Kickstarter's success. Oddly enough, this game works in many ways as the spiritual successor to the first two Fallout games, since the Fallout 3 that was released is often considered to be different compared to the first two.
    • Then there's The Outer Worlds, developed by Fallout: New Vegas developer Obsidian Entertainment and led by Tim Cain and Leonard Boyarsky, key staff in the creation of Fallout. While Fallout is about 1950s culture in the 21st century, The Outer Worlds is about Gilded Age space exploration, and essentially embraces and advances the concepts that were largely abandoned by Bethesda, including the emphasis on player choice over linearity.
    • The scepter then has to go to Afterfall which is being developed as a spiritual successor to Fallout, set in Nuclear Winter Eastern Europe.
    • Interplay also released Dragon Wars, the spiritual successor to The Bards Tale trilogy they developed for EA. Brian Fargo then obtained the rights to The Bard's Tale and published another game under that title in 2004.
      • Similarly to the Starflight and Mass Effect example below, one of the Baldur's Gate series' designers, Kevin Martens, named The Bard's Tale game and series among the most important inspirations.
      • After Michael Cranford, the main creator and programmer of the first two Bard's Tale games, stopped working with Interplay, and wasn't involved in the creation of The Bard's Tale III, he created his own take on how he would make the third part of his game, Centauri Alliance, which was more, or less Bard's Tale In Space!, although with a lot of improvements to gameplay, and a battle-mode similar to that found in the Gold Box games. Centauri Alliance even had an option to transfer characters from the three Bard's Tale games.
  • The Westport Independent has been frequently compared to Papers, Please in style, theme, and tone. Both have a low-fi dictatorship setting, a somewhat similar art style, rebellious organizations, "choices mean everything" plots, and gameplay revolving around paperwork. The former revolves around a newspaper that must adjust to new government regulations or aid a rebellion, while the latter is about a border checkpoint official. Interestingly, Papers Please author Lucas Pope had also created a game with a similar premise called The Republia Times prior to the development of Westport, though the Westport development team have stated that they were unaware of Pope's first game until their game jam was over.
  • Wii Party appears to be one of Mario Party.
  • The Wii's menu system (including the default channels and at least part of Wii Sports) is a Spiritual Successor to Mario Paint. The music is too similar to be a coincidence, and the Wiimote works a lot like the old SNES Mouse did.
    • The way you can customize the Wii menu through drag-and-drop is also very similar to the GBA Movie Player. Both the Wii and GBAMP also have 512MB of memory.
    • WarioWare D.I.Y. also shares a lot of elements with Mario Paint, such as the usable colors. The music maker borrows all of the symbols used for notes and the man running above the staff outright.
  • The Witness: Very much in the style of Myst (even more so its sequel Riven), with the lonely Beautiful Void and numerous puzzles aimed towards a common goal.
  • The 2000 RPG Wizards and Warriors by D. W. Bradley (not to be confused with the NES Wizards & Warriors game) is one for the Wizardry series. Bradley was also the creator of Wizardry games 5 through 7.
  • WolfQuest is this to Wolf. Both games are very similar, having the same subject matter and made with the same goal in mind: Educating people about wolves.
  • The Wonderful 101, a Wii U game by PlatinumGames, seems to be based somewhat on Viewtiful Joe.
  • The WonderSwan can be considered to be a spiritual successor to the original Game Boy since they were both made by Gunpei Yokoi.
  • World's End Club is set up as a successor to Danganronpa, in a deliberate attempt to make the player believe it's just another "death game". The plot then spins off in another direction, and it ends up feeling like a Zero Escape successor instead, although it's significantly more lighthearted than either.
  • The X-Universe series is widely considered a Spiritual Successor to Elite and Privateer.
  • The original Xbox is widely considered to be the spiritual successor to the Sega Dreamcast, since many Dreamcast games - particularly those from Sega themselves - were ported to (Shenmue II) or received sequels on (Panzer Dragoon Orta, Jet Set Radio Future) the system, they both have similar controller layouts, the Xbox was at one point going to be backwards compatible with the Dreamcast, and both are compatible with Windows CE and Direct X.
    • To a noticeably lesser extent, the PlayStation 2 can also be considered a successor to the Dreamcast. While the two don't share any hardware or software, the PS2's mere existence being a factor in the Dreamcast's failure meant that those Dreamcast games which didn't see ports to or sequels on the Xbox instead saw them on the PS2. Amusingly, the PS2 even managed similar third-party support long after its time had ended — the Dreamcast still saw official releases in Japan until 2007 (and indie devs are still making the occasional game for it beyond then), while the PS2's last official release was in 2013, just two months before the debut of a fourth PlayStation.
    • Even the Nintendo GameCube can be seen as a spiritual successor to the Dreamcast, as many Dreamcast games like Sonic Adventure, Phantasy Star Online, and Crazy Taxi received updated ports on the GameCube, and both systems used proprietary disc formats. Also, the dual-screen functionality with the GameBoy Advance link-cable can be seen as a spiritual successor to the Dreamcast's VMU.
  • When developers leave their parent company to start a new studio or otherwise lose the rights to their previous intellectual properties, it's not uncommon for them to create spiritual successors. For example, when the development team responsible for Xenogears and Chrono Cross left SquareSoft to form Monolith Soft, they created successors to those games in the form of the Xenosaga and Baten Kaitos games, respectively. When the developers behind Devil May Cry, P.N.03, Viewtiful Joe and God Hand left Capcom to form PlatinumGames, they created Bayonetta, Vanquish, The Wonderful 101 and MadWorld, respectively.
  • Xenosaga was one for Xenogears. This was due to copyright, as Square Enix owned Xenogears, while all the people who worked on it and wished to do more with it went on to create their own studio called Monolith Soft, under Bandai Namco. There are a metric ton of Shout Outs and characters that are strikingly similar, and the third game and the sourcebooks would even hint that the two take place in the same timeline. Word Of God, however, states that Xenosaga was a Continuity Reboot for Xenogears, and not an actual prequel.
  • The popular, but now dated, X-COM series has a number of unrelated spiritual successors, including the UFO After Blank series, Xenonauts, the open-source UFO: Alien Invasion, and Rebelstar: Tactical Command for the GBA.
  • X-Men: Next Dimension was an attempt at doing a 3D take on the old Capcom-produced Marvel fighting games, like X-Men: Children of the Atom and the Marvel vs. Capcom series. Next Dimension even had moves that were obviously lifted from Marvel vs. Capcom.
  • Nexuiz: after the IllFonic fiasco with PS3!Nexuiz, the community created their own SS in the form of Xonotic, retaining the gameplay and most of the content.
  • The Yakuza series is a spiritual successor to Shenmue, being an action-adventure game with in-depth combat, a Wide-Open Sandbox with a plethora of content to uncover, and various minigames, sidequests, and other diversions.
  • Yo-Kai Watch to Dragon Quest Monsters.
  • Zera: Myths Awaken was a Spyro Fan Game that was shut down due to a cease-and-desist order. It was reworked but it still looks awfully Spyro-esque.
  • Aaero is Gitaroo Man meets Rez with a dubstep soundtrack.

  • Aquaria is essentially Ecco the Dolphin with a mermaid and a little Metroidvania. It also may be considered a better adaptation of The Little Mermaid than the licensed games of prior generations.

  • Aside from being a spiritual entry in the Luminous Arc series, Arc Rise Fantasia can be seen as an installment in the Tales Series. The characters are in anime-design, there are skits that tend to be on the light-hearted side, costumes can be acquired (though they can only bee seen on the character's portrait), and it isn't released in Europe. Two developers who worked on the Tales Series even worked on this game.

  • The Asphalt series of free-to-play racing games from Gameloft is basically Burnout with real licensed cars and Ridge Racer drifting.

    • There are many reasons why many refer to Asura as the Japanese God of War (though Asura, to his credit, is much nicer than Kratos is for the most part).

  • Axiom Verge is a modern adaptation of the classic 2D Metroid games.

  • BanG Dream! Girls Band Party! is perhaps the closest that Rhythm Game fans outside of Japan will get to CHUNITHM, with its lane-based touch-device gameplay that features tap, slide, and flick notes.

  • BeamNG.drive, with its intricate crash physics model and stunt-heavy gameplay, is a more than worthy follow-up to the Burnout series.

Bladed Fury a Metroidvania sequel to the long-lost Valis series.

  • Blazing Chrome is one of the best Contra games not developed by Konami, especially with reception of the previews of Konami's official (albeit In Name Only) next entry in said series, Contra: Rogue Corps, being largely negative.

Bloodborne may play like Demon's Souls and Dark Souls, but with its Victorian setting, it could also be considered a sequel to the long-defunct Nightmare Creatures series. Even more, due to it being a Cosmic Horror Story, it has also been considered to be an adaptation of H. P. Lovecraft's works and the Cthulhu Mythos. Its monster-mash themeing and interconnected levels also call to mind the Castlevania series.

In Broforce The Alien levels remind people of Contra. and If you're playing as Indiana Brones, you're pretty much playing Spelunky.


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