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The original and most prolific series in the LEGO Adaptation Game franchise.
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A long time ago (1999 to be exact), in a galaxy (not so) far far away, there was a toy company called LEGO, and Star Wars was the first licensed theme that they got the rights to make. These were wildly successful, and alongside BIONICLE, helped the company become more influential than anyone could have possibly imagined. Eventually, a company known as Traveller's Tales decided to make a tie-in game based on these toys.

Thus, in 2005, they released LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game. The game (which was released just in time for the release of Revenge of the Sith in theaters) covered the Prequel Trilogy that consists of The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. The game was so successful, played by many children and Star Wars fans, that LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy was quickly greenlit and released in 2006. In 2007, the games were combined into a Compilation Rerelease, known as LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga, which fixed issues from the first two games and sweetened the deal by adding in an abundance of new content as well.

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With the Star Wars saga complete (at that point in time), TT Games shifted their focus to other IP to adapt, such as LEGO Indiana Jones and LEGO Harry Potter. Nonetheless, they returned to the Galaxy Far, Far Away in 2011 with a new title — LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars — which adapted the first two seasons of the show. While no sequel covering subsequent episodes was made, the Disney purchase happened a year after the game was released, which led to some concerns that this would be it for the series, since Disney agreed to allow Electronic Arts to exclusively create new Star Wars games for a multi-year commitment. Thankfully, the new deal did not invalidate the existing agreement with TT Games, and they were then allowed to create LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which released in 2016, which bridges the gap between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens with additional content. No follow-ups were made for the two subsequent episodes in the trilogy, and by E3 2019, it became clear as to why that was: they were thinking bigger. Much bigger.

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LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga covers all nine films in the Original, Prequel, and Sequel Trilogies, and was released on April 5, 2022. Said game is not just The Complete Saga and The Force Awakens bundled with the missing two episodes; instead, it's a completely new experience with all-new levels and more complex puzzle design and combat systems. The Skywalker Saga is by far the biggest LEGO title of its kind in terms of scope and scale, which includes a cast of almost 400 playable characters and vehicles, and features open-world elements on dozens of planets and spaceships that previous games only scratched the surface of. In addition, Downloadable Content made up of character packs based on Rogue One, Solo, The Mandalorian, and The Bad Batch was released, along with packs tied to other Star Wars characters. Another wave of DLC adds characters from The Clone Wars, Rebels, The Book of Boba Fett, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Summer Vacation, and Andor.

For a more concise list of entries, the LEGO Star Wars games consist of:

  • LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game (2005)
  • LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy (2006)
  • LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga (2007)
  • LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars (2011)
  • LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2016)
  • LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga (2022)


These games contain examples of:

    open/close all folders 

    Tropes present in multiple games 
  • Actor Allusion:
  • Adaptation Deviation: A number of changes are made to the stories of the films that are being adapted in order to provide a more ideal gameplay experience. Case in point, having Luke and Darth Vader team up to defeat Emperor Palpatine is more fun for a co-op game than it would be for two players to have to fight each other and reduce the Emperor to a Cutscene Boss.
  • Adapted Out: A handful of scenes, characters, and even ships that are seen in the movies don't appear in the games. The Skywalker Saga makes an active effort to prevent these omissions. In fact, the first story mission of The Phantom Menace depicts the long-omitted Gungan Sub sequence.
  • Affectionate Parody: The games wear their love for Star Wars on their sleeves, but they also aren't above making fun of it.
  • Air-Aided Acrobatics: Breezes from fans let characters float and jump higher.
  • Badass Adorable: The majority of the characters featured in the games are this, especially LEGO Darth Vader. They're just as badass as their original film counterparts... but now, they're all cute LEGO minifigures.
  • Bloodless Carnage: In full effect — whilst characters are dismembered, such as Luke Skywalker's hand being cut off in the adaptation of The Empire Strikes Back, the characters are still plastic LEGO pieces.
  • Butt-Monkey: C-3PO and R2-D2 tend to be on the receiving end of a lot of slapstick.
  • Can't Use Stairs: Protocol droid characters like C-3PO can't jump or navigate stairs. Many levels have sections that require the player to go through an elaborate puzzle solving process in order to move the droids across the area that the human characters can easily jump or climb a staircase to access.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: The games use visual shorthand so you know what you can do. Silver objects have to be blown up with explosives, red and black ones can only be manipulated by Sith powers, and so on.
  • Cool Versus Awesome: Free Play. Darth Maul vs. Darth Vader.
  • Denser and Wackier: Not only in general, but gradually with the series itself. Comparing the cutscenes of The Force Awakens to that of The Complete Saga shows the different approaches to gags and humor that leaves even serious scenes still having an edge of silliness. Consider the Battle of Endor in ''The Complete Saga'' versus its ''The Force Awakens'' summary.
  • Double Jump: Certain characters such as Force-users can perform this, as well as having access to a jumping backflip. Some characters who can't do this may perform an Unnecessary Combat Roll instead.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: In these games, the standard LEGO Adaptation Game reward for effective vandalism goes by the name of "True Jedi". Who would have guessed that a true Jedi was the one most committed to smashing other people's stuff?
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress:
    • At the start of The Phantom Menace, the red Republic cruiser blows up. Its two crewmembers hover in the air for a moment, then they hit the floor and fall apart.
    • During The Empire Strikes Back after the duel with Vader. In one of the air tubes, the trap doors open below Luke, who hovers in the air for a bit, and then he falls out below Cloud City.
  • Hub Level: The first game uses Dex's Diner, Original Trilogy and Complete Saga have the Mos Eisley Cantina, and The Clone Wars has the Star Destroyer Resolute and its opponent, the Invisible Hand. The Force Awakens has several: The Resistance Base on D'Qar, Takodana, Jakku, and Starkiller Base all have hub levels. The Skywalker Saga has even more.
  • Joke Character:
    • Characters without any kind of special ability, or even some of the basic abilities, including Chancellor Palpatine, the PK droid, and carbonite-frozen Han Solo. They can't even attack.
    • The Gonk droid is close, unable to do anything but walk around, but it's invincible; the right combination of unlockable Red Brick extras can make the Gonk a Lethal Joke Character. They are Self Destruct (droids can self destruct) and Super Gonk (debuting in Complete Saga, the Gonk can now move faster and jump). Aww, wook at da cute widdle Gonk droi- BOOOM!
  • Killed Off for Real: Happens in a comedic fashion for characters like Darth Vader and Qui-Gon, who are Doomed by Canon. Vader's death was actually one of the early scenes that wasn't Played for Laughs, but still includes a gag with the shuttle loading ramp.
  • Loading Screen: Each mission loading screen gives you a text scroll explaining what has happened between the end of the last mission and the current one. The Force Awakens even has interactive loading screens — in some, you can steer the ship you're flying through hyperspace, while others are a minigame where the Millennium Falcon can shoot down endless waves of TIE Fighters.
  • May the Farce Be with You: The games are a parody of Star Wars.
  • Moveset Clone: This is the case for a lot of the roster, particularly the less-relevant characters. It shouldn't come as much of a surprise that the Clonetrooper and Stormtrooper variants are mostly identical in how they function, and many of the lesser Jedi share not just skillsets, but also animations.
  • New Skill as Reward: The Power Bricks, as they were first called in II and Complete Saga (game manual excerpts here). Collecting these red bricks unlocks more and more powerful abilities as the player progresses through the Episodes. Simply known as Red Bricks in later LEGO games.
  • Obsessed with Food: Later games indulge in a lot of visual gags involving characters enjoying snacks and meals while the plot unfolds. Notable examples include the Geonosis arena audience during the Prologue to The Clone Wars, the Rebels throughout the Battle of Endor in the Force Awakens prologue, or even Padme bringing out wedding platter goodies when confronting Anakin on Mustafar during The Skywalker Saga.
  • Painfully Slow Projectile: Lasers in these games are slow enough for players to dodge or deflect, in contrast to how fast they go in the movies.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: Several changes are made to ensure that there are always two playable characters available.
    • In Revenge of the Sith, Commander Cody accompanies Obi-Wan to fight General Grievous and subsequently dies by his hand, his blaster now being the one Obi-Wan kills Grievous with.
    • Later, Anakin and Obi-Wan are forced to work together until their final battle at the very end of the "Darth Vader" level. They don't work together in The Skywalker Saga and, instead, Obi-Wan is accompanied by C-3PO and Artoo throughout the fight.
    • In The Skywalker Saga, Yoda's fight with Darth Sidious is pushed back to while Obi-Wan is at the Jedi Temple trying to alert the Jedi to stay away from the Jedi Temple instead of happening simultaneously with his fight with Anakin. Yoda is also accompanied by Captain Typho during the fight.
    • During the "Cloud City Trap" level in The Empire Strikes Back, R2-D2 is not locked out of the carbonite chamber when Luke fights Darth Vader.
    • The most epic of them all? Darth Vader doing a Heel–Face Turn a few minutes earlier in the end of Return of the Jedi and helping his son fight the Emperor.
    • The Force Awakens, when Rey mind controls the Stormtrooper guarding her into letting her go, he accompanies her for the rest of the level to do all the bits she can't do – until the mind control wears off...
  • Product Placement: All the games have been based on pre-existing building sets, naturally. More than that, most games are timed to tie in with a related movie release.
    • The first Star Wars game with Revenge of the Sith, released just a little before the movie was.
    • The second was released at the same time as the unaltered versions of the Original Trilogy received a DVD release.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: Red and black objects can't be manipulated by most characters and are reserved only for those with evil powers (Sith).
  • Replay Mode: The first instance of this trope in a LEGO Adaptation Game comes from The Original Trilogy, where cutscenes can be rewatched from the Mos Eisley Cantina shop. This was also implemented in The Complete Saga.
  • Secret Character:
    • The original LEGO Star Wars game allows you to unlock Darth Vader, Princess Leia and a classic Stormtrooper.
    • LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga allows you to unlock Indiana Jones. Also, getting 100% Completion unlocks parts for Asajj Ventress and Saesee Tiin in the character creator.
    • In The Clone Wars, minikits are used to unlock characters who hadn't appeared within the show itself, like Darth Sidious, Darth Vader, Darth Maul, Luke Skywalker, and many more, which also includes Starkiller.
    • The Skywalker Saga has costumes from The LEGO Star Wars Holiday Special for Darth Vader, C-3PO, Chewbacca (actually Itchy), Poe, D-0, and the GNK Droid. These outfits are exclusively unlocked via a cheat code password. While a handful of characters being optionally unlockable this way is traditional, these costumes must be unlocked this way, unlike other code unlocks in the same game; they do not appear in the character menu unless unlocked, nor do they count towards the final count of 380 characters. Additionally, the Resistance Shuttle and the Razorcrest are password-exclusive ships. Unlike the Holiday Special outfits, these are listed before being unlocked, and counted for 100% completion. Their in-game rumors explicitly state that they must be unlocked through this method.
  • Sequel Escalation: The first LEGO Star Wars game had many different characters, but suffered from many characters being unable to build and a crippling lack of variety. The sequel added the ability to build without the Force, and riding vehicles and mounts. The third game added entire galaxies to explore, with even more characters. The upcoming The Skywalker Saga is set to be the biggest LEGO game ever.
  • Sequel Hook:
    • The first Star Wars game ended with a bonus level aboard the Tantive IV, where the original movie kicked off; the characters in that level were then unlocked for the rest of the game.
    • The Complete Saga featured Indiana Jones as a hidden character, hinting that the series would expand beyond the Star Wars universe.
  • Speaking Simlish: Everyone speaks Simlish in cutscenes, with the players expected to know what's going on from having seen the movies. However, samples from the movies, such as Han's "Yahoo!" from A New Hope, are occasionally used at appropriate moments. This was dropped with The Force Awakens, where the characters are all fully voiced in the cutscenes, in almost all cases by the original actors (yes, that does include Harrison Ford).
  • Spiteful A.I.: Enemies will only attack the character you control (unless you're a droid), ignoring any allies that are currently computer-controlled. This becomes extremely frustrating when Obi-Wan is swinging a lightsaber in the face of some stormtroopers, and all Han Solo wants to do is build a switch to open a door, but the enemies don't give a damn about anyone but the guy who isn't attacking them. Worse still, computer-controlled allies never do damage to enemies, which of course isn't much help.
  • Steam Vent Obstacle: The first games have a few obstacles involving cold air-shooting vent barriers, needing either the manipulation of nearby objects or sending a cold-immune droid through to access a panel on the other side.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: The first game had three vehicle levels (podracing, gunships blowing stuff up on Geonosis, space battle over Coruscant) that were all partly different between each other and having gameplaywise nothing to do with the platforming/action part. It got better. As of LSW II, vehicle levels are now of the same standard and no longer have their own rules for every level.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
    • Pushing Jar-Jar into a pit repeatedly. In fact, if you kill him 20 times in The Complete Saga, it unlocks an achievement called "Crowd Pleaser".
    • Protocol droids lose limbs as they lose health. It's funny to watch C-3PO hobble around on his single leg after a few punches, not to mention accessing the interface panels with his head.
    • In “Betrayal Over Bespin”, the final level of Episode V, it is possible to gain hearts and (with the right Power Brick) money by killing panicking civilians.
    • Chewbacca's melee attack consists of him jumping on his enemies and ripping their arms off.

    LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game 
  • 11th-Hour Superpower: For the Final Boss battle, your health skyrockets from 4 hearts to 10. Makes sense, given that said boss is Fighting Your Friend taken to its logical extreme.
  • Adapted Out:
    • While mentioned in the text crawls for The Phantom Menace story, Coruscant is not shown onscreen there. It does appear in the other two prequel stories.
    • The game interestingly starts off the Attack of the Clones story with Obi-Wan going to Kamino, skipping everything involving Anakin. The GBA version at least adds in Anakin's visit back to Tatooine. The Complete Saga fills in the blanks by including the level where you chase Zam Wesell, originally intended to be in the first game before it got cut.
  • Bonus Stage: A short prelude into A New Hope.
  • Bragging Rights Reward: Darth Vader and the Stormtrooper, as well as the Tantive IV level in general. To unlock it, you had to achieve True Jedi status on all 17 levels, by which point you had done everything the game had to offer except maybe completed the figurine kits.
  • Call-Forward: The final Bonus Stage calls forward to A New Hope, which was released before the prequel trilogy but chronologically takes place afterward.
  • Disneyfication: They changed a few of Revenge of the Sith's scenes: Anakin is only shown killing a single Jedi, and doesn't Force-choke Padmé.
  • Dueling Player Characters: Due to requiring two playable characters on the screen at all times, after Obi-Wan and Anakin make their way through the final Episode III level, they have to fight each other. However, there's only one way it'll turn out.
  • Dynamic Entry: The final cutscene of Episode One's "Escape from Theed" stage has our heroes jump into a corridor from above and break their fall with a pair of unfortunate battle droids. Then Obi-Wan stomps on one of them for good measure.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness:
    • This game feels notably different from all future LEGO games. The most jarring difference is the cut scenes being a more straightforward retelling of the original movies with a joke or two slipped in here and there, rather than the over-the-top cartoonish wackiness the later games would employ. A lot of features are also missing from this game as well, such as the power bricks, the golden bricks, the ability to dodge and do melee attacks, building without the Force, pulling levers, custom figures, and a number of other features. Many of these nuances were removed when The Complete Saga came around, though the cutscenes remain untouched. And even then, the Denser and Wackier direction newer games are heading towards means that Prequel Trilogy cutscenes in The Skywalker Saga will be just as over-the-top and cartoonish as cutscenes for the other two trilogies.
    • Characters are much more trigger-happy in the original game. You walk outside of Dexter's bar for even a short length of time, and you will see Clones getting into a shootout with battle droids, or Jedi and Sith going at it (though no one will attack you unless you get involved). Later games would see no fighting in the hub level unless you started it.
    • The first GBA port of the game was nothing like any other later game:
      • It had nearly twice the health and it could be temporarily extended in certain levels.
      • There was a regenerating bar to control the usage of the different special abilities.
      • Dying was not so trivial; instead of merely dropping some studs and immediately respawning, the player would be forced to restart at the last checkpoint.
      • The L and R buttons had their respective functions in the different games switched.
  • Enemy Summoner: The Battle Droid Commander is a normal battle droid with one more hit's worth of health and the ability to call other Battle Droids to help it fight you.
  • Evil Is One Big, Happy Family: In "Defense Of Kashyyyk", both the clones and battle droids, the sworn enemies in the Clone Wars, abandon fighting each other in order to kill you.
  • "Get Back Here!" Boss:
    • Darth Maul spends most of the level running away from Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon, forcing them to chase him down.
    • Jango Fett stays out of the Jedi's melee range when down to his last heart... unless you're on Free Play and have a blaster, then you can just shoot him.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: As not all of the story is covered, some of the bosses have this effect, notably Darth Maul.
  • Guns Akimbo: Jango Fett is notably the only blaster user to carry two of them, and he fires both of them in rapid succession.
  • Missing Secret: Episode II only has five levels, compared to the other two Episodes having six each. The "Bounty Hunter Pursuit" level was scrapped during development, but put back in for The Complete Saga, bringing its level count up to line with the others.
  • Mythology Gag: Some random Jedi in the "Jedi Battle" level have yellow skin. Long story short, minifigs in licensed sets like Star Wars used to have yellow skin just like normal minifigs, but around 2004-2005 they were replaced with realistic skintones.
  • Percussive Maintenance: Following the installation of the new hyperdrive after the Mos Espa Pod Race, Obi-Wan hits it to start it up.
  • Rail Shooter: The podracer level (minus the shooter part) where your objective is to hit the booster paths on the ground but otherwise you have no control over where you go, and the Episode III starfighter level which is something straight out of Star Fox. The added-in Coruscant level for Episode II would use the later free-roam setup.
  • Sequel Hook: A bonus level based off of the opening of A New Hope is unlockable, along with Princess Leia, Darth Vader, an Imperial Stormtrooper and a Rebel trooper. Completing said level indeed leads to a "To be continued..." screen.
  • Silly Walk: The final cutscene in Episode One's "Escape from Naboo" stage has two battle droids on guard duty. One of them starts goose-stepping.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: The Revenge of the Sith soundtrack was apparently not yet available to the game developers, so they instead used music from the original trilogy for the Revenge of the Sith levels. Much of the substituted music fits well enough, but one noticeable outlier would be the odd choice of the Return of the Jedi song "Into the Trap" for the final level on Mustafar. It's a rather bouncy and suspenseful song which doesn't feel dramatic or epic enough to fit a final battle in a volcanic hellscape. This is rectified by The Complete Saga, which finally uses the Revenge of the Sith soundtrack and appropriately plays a medley of "Anakin vs. Obi-Wan" and "Battle of the Heroes" during this level.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: In the final level of Episode III, Obi-Wan and Anakin spend a significant amount of time fighting in the cutscenes instead of in the level itself, but they continue to put their actual fight on hold and form temporary truces in order to keep themselves from getting killed by Mustafar's lava. It isn't until the very end where all bets are off.
  • Title: The Adaptation: It's called LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game.
  • Wings Do Nothing: You can play as Watto, the Toydarian junk dealer. His normal mode of travel is flying, but don't try it over a chasm...

    LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy 
  • Adaptation Expansion:
    • In this version of Episode IV, the Jundland Wastes are a fully-playable level where the film simply mentioned them in passing. Luke and Ben work together to rescue R2-D2 and C-3PO when they're kidnapped by the Jawas — infiltrating their sandcrawler in the process.
    • When destroying the first Death Star, the player first has to reveal and destroy turbolaser guns connected to the exhaust port's ray shield. Given the urgency of the original film's scene, the player would be puzzled that the proton torpedo wouldn't go right in at first. And in the GBA version, one of the turbolaser guns is mounted on and blocking the exhaust port itself. That defeats the purpose of it being an exhaust port!
  • Anti-Frustration Features: This game provides a few new things to make the game easier than the first.
    • The Adaptive Difficulty extra comes default. It changes how many studs you drop upon death (a poor player would drop 1000 studs instead of 2000, while a better player would drop 4000 studs instead, so it's a double-edged sword).
    • There's also the Red Brick Invincibility, which definitely comes in handy on those flying levels.
  • Armor Is Useless: Stormtroopers can't take a hit to save their lives. That's normal. It gets odd when Imperial officers, TIE pilots, and even regular stormtroopers wearing bathing suits (known as Beach Troopers) are used as tougher Elite Mooks, despite wearing little to no armor at all.
  • Armor-Piercing Slap: Princess Leia uses slaps in close combat instead of punches. One slap can completely dismantle a stormtrooper. Getting the aptly named "Super Slap" red brick allows the other characters to do this as well.
  • Bonus Stage: The Character and Minikit bonus levels. The latter even makes the minikits you have collected throughout the game playable in the levels. These reappeared in The Complete Saga.
  • Bragging Rights Reward: Collecting all the Gold Bricks (99 in LSW II or 160 in Complete Saga) allows you to build the stud fountain outside of the Mos Eisley Cantina. The only thing is, normally by this point you've already collected the x2, x4, x6, x8, and x10 Red Bricks, making money fairly worthless.
  • Character Customization: You can mix-and-match pieces from any unlocked character to make your own creation.
  • Collection Sidequest: The player can choose to go collect Minikits, Blue Minikits, and Red Bricks, with the former two both giving loads of studs and the latter greatly increasing the player's power. They are also completely optional (unless the player wants to play through the Minikit Bonus, in which case they must complete at least one full Minikit).
  • Cowardly Boss: The Emperor in the finale of Return of the Jedi fights you directly until you damage him enough, after which he will flee to another part of the room, send enemies to fight you, and wait for you to reach him before fighting again.
  • Dramatic Space Drifting: Played for laughs in the destruction of the first Death Star; the cutscene animation shows all sorts of exploding starship parts flying straight at the camera, ending with a flailing Stormtrooper minifig.
  • Flunky Boss: The Imperial Spy doesn't even try to attack you directly, instead summoning endless amounts of Stormtroopers.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: Due to its Obvious Beta status, the Nintendo DS version of LEGO Star Wars II is filled to the brim with bugs, some of which can make it impossible to complete certain levelsnote  in Free Play.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • Just like in The Empire Strikes Back, Luke is unable to lift the X-Wing on Dagobah during Story mode. The player must switch to Yoda to do it and complete the level. Averted in Free Play mode.
      • Despite being a Lightsaber character, Luke is unable to use the force until the later parts of the stage and must learn from Yoda first.
    • Like in Return of the Jedi, Luke can use Force Choke on Gamorrean Guard enemies.
    • Non-Stormtrooper characters such as Darth Vader and The Emperor can use Stormtrooper access panels due to being allies of the Empire.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Slave Leia carries a blaster because a blaster is basically Leia's only ability and she carries it in all versions by default. However, she doesn't shoot anyone on the cruiser until you gain control of her and she still kills Jabba the way she did in the movie. Also, where exactly is she keeping the blaster?
  • Gratuitous Disco Sequence: In Jabba's sail barge.
  • Guide Dang It!: In one of the later levels in Episode V, Betrayal Over Bespin, during the story the player will chase Boba Fett out to the Slave 1 where the Red Brick detector is pointing to a patch of thin air where the Red Brick is supposed to be. Unfortunately for the player, the Red Brick for the level is only accessible in Free Play mode, though it's likely many players are savvy enough to understand.
  • Gun Twirling: Han Solo, whenever he puts his gun away.
  • Heads I Win, Tails You Lose: "Cloud City Trap". Luke wins the boss fight against Darth Vader, but loses anyway.
  • I Will Tear Your Arms Off: "Wookiees are known to do that." Given that it's LEGO, it's more humorous than horrific.
  • Juggling Loaded Guns: Used with a lightsaber: After being handed the lightsaber, Luke turns it on and Obi-Wan ducks out of the way. Luke then swings it a few times and inadvertently beheads C-3PO.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Very few cutscenes with the Emperor are funny.
  • Marathon Level: The "Super Story" mode, found by completing each Episode's regular story mode. The player is tasked to play through the entire episode's six levels within one hour and without any Red Brick extras. This mode returned for Complete Saga.
  • Missing Secret: Eventually subverted. In December 2006, a code was given on an old StarWars.com page for Disguise 3. But there's no Disguise 2! ...Until March 2007, when Disguise 2's code was finally revealed. However, at the time, players had to donate to Comic Relief for Red Nose Day in order to find out.
  • Mood Whiplash: For a series that has a largely comedic take on the franchise, including mercilessly spoofing some of the more serious moments in the series, Anakin Skywalker's passing in front of his son on the second Death Star is played completely straight and is surprisingly poignant. Then it whiplashes back into being funny when Anakin's body slides into the shuttle as Luke gets inside and the landing ramp lifts his lifeless body inside.
  • Musical Nod: An abridged version of the "Imperial Rage Theme" remix from Star Wars: Force Commander is used in the first two Return of the Jedi levels. Playing this music will cause Gamorreans to stop fighting and start rocking out.
  • Nerf: In LEGO Star Wars II, the high jump option was removed. While not such a problem for General Grievous, who at least has lightsabers, it made Jar-Jar completely useless.
  • Obvious Beta: The Nintendo DS version of LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy, which is full of Game-Breaking Bugs that can render entire levels impossible to complete in Free Play (such as Jabba's Palace), Minikits that are impossible to get (such as in Speeder Bike Chase), and characters that are impossible to unlock without cheat codes even when they should be normally available (such as Slave Leia).
  • Off with His Head!: Luke accidentally beheads Threepio while playing around with the lightsaber that Ben gives him. Don't worry, Threepio's a Lego robot.
  • Old Save Bonus: Unlocked LEGO Star Wars characters could be transferred to The Original Trilogy.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: All you have to do is grab an enemy character's hat to pose as from that faction and unlock certain doors. Even when you're a seven-foot-tall Wookiee with a stormtrooper helmet hanging lopsided on your head. The bounty hunter helmet, namely the Boushh-type in Jabba's Palace, also gives access to unlimited thermal detonators.
  • Respawning Enemies: Many appear and reappear during levels such as the Battle of Yavin (Rebel Attack) and the Battle of Hoth.
  • Rummage Fail:
    • When Obi-Wan is digging out Anakin's lightsaber in A New Hope.
    • When Luke Force-grabs a cup instead of a blaster just before the Rancor battle in Return of the Jedi.
  • Sequence Breaking: For some reason, the DS port allows you to access the final battle with Palpatine after clearing eleven levels.
  • Shout-Out: The closing cutscene for The Empire Strikes Back shows Luke and Leia looking out over the galaxy from the medical frigate as Chewie and Lando fly off in the Falcon. Suddenly, Luke's hand pops off and begins running around with a will of its own.
  • Stab the Sky: The cover of Star Wars: The Original Trilogy, in reference to the poster for A New Hope.
  • Swivel-Chair Antics: During a cutscene where Darth Vader comes to check on the progress of the second Death Star, a technician is shown having fun with a swivel chair instead of working.
  • Thrown Out the Airlock: The first level of A New Hope, set on the Tantive IV, gives players the opportunity to space as many Imperials as you have time for during a level replay.
  • Timed Mission: The bonus levels that first appeared in The Original Trilogy and were adapted for The Complete Saga:
    • The "Super Story" mode. The player is tasked to complete all six levels of one of the films in order to gain an extra Gold BrickNote . The "timed" part is subverted in that only speed and score records (within an hour and over 100,000 studs) are kept, though the timer pauses for cutscenes.
    • The Character and Minikit bonus stages, and Jabba the Hutt's missions play this straight. You only have a few minutes to complete them. The Character and Minikit bonuses also simply force you to collect 1,000,000 studs.
  • Unnecessary Combat Roll:
    • Han Solo (and several other high-level gun characters, such as pre-Jedi Luke and Lando Calrissian) has a double-jump move where he can roll during a run and fire off three perfectly aimed shots when he comes out of it.
    • Subverted with the Stormtroopers, who land on their bellies when attempting to double jump.
  • Useless Useful Stealth:
    • When going through the Death Star hallways in stormtrooper disguises in a level based on A New Hope, there is one place where the player must, from a distance, shoot stormtroopers who are in front of Ben Kenobi so that he can build a bridge, but doing so alerts nearby stormtroopers.
    • There's also one part where stormtroopers are running a modern-day call center, but all of them must be killed to move on. However, after killing the stormtroopers, new helmets can be retrieved. Once the players reach the detention cellblock, stormtroopers come in and attack anyway.
    • Averted in that while your disguise won't let you sneak past most enemies, it does let you kill a few of them while they are unaware, potentially sparing you a death and your money.
  • Visual Pun: In Jabba's palace, you can set up stereos that play a Heavy Metal remix of the "Imperial March" from Force Commander (aka the Rage Mix). The Gamorrean guards start playing their axes like guitars. Note that "axe" is another word for guitar.

    LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga 
  • Anachronic Order: The player can invoke this after completing the first chapter of The Phantom Menace, being able to jump to the first levels of any of the other movies after playing through what is effectively a tutorial level.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: There are a number of improvements applied to both games in the collection:
    • There is of course the Red Brick extras like Invincibility now being usable for the levels from The Video Game.
    • The standardization of vehicle levels is now applied to the first-game examples like the "Mos Espa Podrace" and "Gunship Cavalry" levels, making them massively easier.
    • The "Super Story" in the second game required both under an hour and over 100,000 studs to register as properly finished, which got a lot of complaints due to how they really pushed the limit on both studs and time. In response to those complaints, here you only need to achieve one of the objectives, meaning leisurely collecting and super-speedrunning are just as viable for completion as the original stud-rushing. Additionally, since losing studs from dying and being forced to recollect them would heavily strain the time limit more than regular collecting already does, Super Story has it where you don't lose any studs on death.
    • A feature introduced and then only used in this game (due to future games adding even more improvements that made it unnecessary) is the "Power-Up", which when collected gives you around 15 seconds of Power Brick effects, specifically Invincibility, Deflect Bolts, all attack boosts, both "Fast" boosts, Stud Magnet, and Studs X2, all of which combined can make it much easier to get through levels and collect a lot of studs, especially when it comes to the Super Story where regular Power Brick's are disabled.
  • Ascended Meme: One of the achievements is "Shoot First", awarded for playing as Han and gunning down teammate Greedo on the Mos Eisley level (referencing the "Han Shot First" meme from the Special Edition Orwellian Retcon of the confrontation between Han and Greedo).
  • Armor-Piercing Slap: Princess Leia's slap from II is reused by Padmé Amidala. The Red Brick, Super Slap, gives the two the ability to kill enemies in one hit when slapped.
  • Bowdlerize: Beach Troopers in The Original Trilogy were troopers with helmets and nothing else on, with the leg-connector being blue-colored to indicate a bathing suit. Come The Complete Saga, they have life jackets as well to make it seem like they aren't completely naked but for a Speedo. In the DS version, however, they retain their original design.
  • Brutal Bonus Level: The Mos Espa Pod Race from the first game had its difficulty heavily reduced by having the incredibly strict time limits between each segment removed. In spite of this, the original version (time limits and all) became an unlockable bonus level, and it's just as difficult now as it was then. The player must complete the level to earn a singular gold brick.
  • Cheat Code: Loads and loads of them. They can be quite helpful if the player is struggling with a level or wants to avoid worrying about studs.
  • Compilation Rerelease: Combined with Updated Re-release — it has all the levels from the first two games, as well as some new content not found in the previous releases.
  • Developer's Foresight: If you turn off the music, the Cantina band will stand around looking confused as to what they're supposed to do. They go right back to playing when the music is turned back on.
  • Difficult, but Awesome:
    • If you press the attack button on any lightsaber-wielding character the moment before a blaster bolt reaches you, you can perfectly deflect the bullets back at the shooter. This works on anything from droids to the Slave I on Kamino (though the latter takes no damage). The extra, Perfect Deflect, removes the need for this when acquired, however, though it's still very useful.
    • Blaster characters get a skill of their own. If the player jumps then fires while falling in the general direction of either enemies, blaster activated buttons, or items to blow up, the blaster will automatically choose to lock onto the target. Doubles as Improbable Aiming Skills.
  • Disc-One Nuke: The Red Bricks found in Episodes V and VI. If the player chooses, they could unlock these bricks first, allowing them to quickly gain both invincibility and stud multipliers. This being said, the enormous price tags attached to them cause many players to simply follow the intended route of playing from I to VI in order.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Indiana Jones appears as a secret character, foreshadowing the next franchise to be adapted in a LEGO video game.
  • Idle Animation: Most characters have one where they look around. Boba Fett and Jango Fett share a funny one where both of them look at their arms, stare straight ahead, and repeat.
  • Lethal Joke Character: The Red Brick Super Gonk extra debuts in Complete Saga and gives the hilariously pathetic Gonk droid the ability to run and jump. Combine that with the Self Destruct extra.
  • Made of Iron: Taun-We, Lama-Su, Dexter Jettster and the Gonk Droid. They're immune to blasters, lightsabers, thermal detonators, and many other forms of damage when controlled by an AI. They are not, however, immune to being pushed off the edge in a level. Using a Force Choke or Force Lightning then throwing them will kill the former three, however, while two Red Bricks (Super Astromech and Super Zapper) are needed to kill the latter.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: Fittingly, the Force Ghosts have it. They're immune to all forms of damage save falling off the edge of a level (which had to be done so the player wouldn't become stuck). The Red Brick Invincibility also grants this to any player-controlled character (though they're still vulnerable to falling off the edge).
  • Non-Indicative Name: After Disney purchased Lucasfilm and developed the Sequel Trilogy, this can no longer be considered the complete saga, though it was at the time of release.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: Compared to the console versions of the game having 6 levels per episode, the DS version only has 5, as either a level from each of the Prequel Trilogy episodes was removed, or two levels from each of the Original Trilogy episodes were combined into one. To wit:
    • The Phantom Menace removes the "Invasion of Naboo" level, though the cutscene of the Trade Federation ships landing on Naboo from that level is seen at the beginning of the "Escape from Naboo" level.
    • Attack of the Clones removes the "Bounty Hunter Pursuit" level completely, not even leaving any cutscenes. The only thing related to the level in the game is Zam Wesell's airspeeder being available as a bonus minikit for collecting all of the minikits in that movie's levels.
    • Revenge of the Sith removes the "Chancellor in Peril" level, though the cutscene of Anakin killing Dooku was kept as part of the ending cutscene to the "Battle Over Coruscant" level.
    • A New Hope combines the "Rescue the Princess" level with the "Death Star Escape" level. Notably, the trash compactor is not active like it was in the movie and in a cutscene in the console versions that wasn't included in the DS version.
    • The Empire Strikes Back combines the "Cloud City Trap" level with the "Betrayal Over Bespin" level. Interestingly, the level is split into three sections: One with Lando, Leia, and Chewie, one with Luke fighting Vader after Han is taken by Boba Fett, and one where Lando, Leia, and Chewie are joined by R2 and 3PO.
    • Return of the Jedi combines the "Jabba's Palace" level with the "Great Pit of Carkoon" level. Unfortunately, the boss battle with Jabba's rancor is omitted.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Grabbing a power-up sphere turns a playable Jedi's lightsaber blade purple and increases their melee damage for a short period of time. The Red Brick named Super Lightsabers also does this.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: Using the Dark Side Red Brick turns a Jedi's lightsaber red. Averted as you can simply use the power to progress the level instead of doing anything actually evil.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: The Thermal Detonators wielded by all bounty hunters or anyone wearing the mask in Jabba's Palace. Defense of Kashyyyk's Red Brick ups their power with the Super Thermal Detonator extra, which shakes the entire screen when blowing up.
  • Timed Mission: The bonus Challenge levels, where the player must find ten blue minikits within a time limit. First appeared in the PSP version of The Original Trilogy (manual excerpt here).
  • Took a Level in Badass: Gonk Droids were originally Joke Characters that served absolutely no purpose in the game. In The Complete Saga, a Power Brick was added that, when activated, makes them run fast, jump high, and severely damage enemies by exploding.

    LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars 
  • Anachronic Order: While in The Complete Saga and The Skywalker Saga there is the option of playing the story out of order, the episodic nature of the Clone Wars cartoon combined with no Call-Back-making dialogue means TT Games was free to rearrange episodes based on how thematically they could be connected instead of canon order. For one example, the Grievous path starts on Ep. 7, goes back to Ep. 3, continues to Ep. 4, skips to Ep. 10, comes back to Ep. 5, then skips all the way to Season 2 Ep. 9.
  • Ascended Extra: In the series, Robonino is a one-off character in an episode with a large cast of equally forgettable bad guys. In this game however, he is one of only two characters able to operate electrical panels (the other being the magnaguard, who can only be unlocked late in the game). This wouldn't be noteworthy, if it weren't for the fact that electrical panels are some of the most common terminals in the game, unlocking a huge chunk of secrets. Add to that the fact that he can use crawlspaces, grapple objects, throw explosives and unlock bounty hunter terminals, and he quickly becomes one of the most useful freeplay characters. He is such an important character to gameplay that many were surprised his role in the series amounts to 5 minutes of screentime.
  • Attack! Attack... Retreat! Retreat!: One clone trooper in a TV spot is all heroic, leading the charge amid artillery fire. He goes over the hill and sees a massive army of droids, and then turns and runs back down the hill.
  • Bonus Feature Failure: The 100% Completion prize is... a stealth bomber, for the flight levels, something that you will probably never use due to preference for just preferring to control characters on normal levels.
  • Bowel-Breaking Bricks: In a commercial for The Clone Wars.
  • Butt-Monkey:
    • As a Running Gag, clones keep getting non-lethally stepped/landed on by larger vehicles during the cutscenes.
    • If a level includes TX-20, chances are you're gonna have to chop his head off in some way or another to access a panel.
    • All Eeth Koth wants is to relax and enjoy a nice, hot cup of something to drink, but circumstances conspire to never let him, including: being interrupted by Grievous, getting tortured while held captive by having a cup waved right in front of him but never allowed a sip, almost getting a cup before the escape shuttle doors close on him, and finally one splashing all over and scalding him after the shuttle pilot decided to do a loop.
  • Continuity Cameo: Darth Vader's helmet makes a brief appearance in The Clone Wars, when Palpatine is playing golf in his office.
  • Dual Wielding: A Red Brick gives all lightsaber-wielders two lightsabers. Sadly, characters equipped with double-bladed lightsabers don't get in on the fun.
  • Gatling Good: The Heavy Clone Trooper wields a minigun-style blaster cannon. It's quite good for combat, especially since this game finally introduced strafing. It's also the only weapon that can destroy certain objects.
  • Groin Attack: R2-D2 gets one, despite a lack of a groin.
  • I Fell for Hours: The first level of Asajj Ventress' route.
  • Invincible Minor Minion: There are tactical droids who cannot be destroyed, but if you attack them enough times they'll drop their head, which the player can pick up and use to access Separatist droid panels.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: A mission has R2-D2 and R3-S6 dueling with their stun prods in a way that mirrors a lightsaber duel.
  • Mythology Gag: The UFO from LEGO Indiana Jones 2 appears in The Clone Wars as a ground vehicle.
  • No OSHA Compliance: In the Republic capital ship, there are no guard rails in the hub linking the bridge, brig, medical bay and fighter/assault bays.
  • Scenery Porn: Despite the simple style of the rest of the game, the backdrops for the space missions are quite pretty.
  • Secret Character: Savage Opress, who can only be unlocked with a cheat code. His inclusion is notable in that the TV series had only just introduced him at the time of the game's release, and that it primarily draws from the first two seasons of the show, before he debuted.
  • Shout-Out: A cutscene shows the clones wanting to use a very familiar mechsuit to fight the Geonosian queen. Sadly, it's buried in rubble before it can be used. (You can build and use it in the free play version of the level! Sadly, not against the boss.)
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: After the past games had a couple characters with the ability, two of which (General Grievous and the Magnaguard) being quite useful outside it, super-jumping is now reserved exclusively for Jar Jar Binks, who is near-useless otherwise, though he at least gained the ability to punch enemies.
  • Use Your Head: One of IG-88's attacks.
  • Wingding Eyes: Padme and Anakin both get hearts in their eyes during the first battle.

    LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens 
  • Adaptation Expansion: The base game includes six "Adventure Levels" taking place before the film, plus additional levels available as DLC.
  • Art Evolution: Being the first title developed for Playstation 4 and XBOX One, it saw a huge leap in general graphical fidelity.
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Sidon Ithano, aka the Crimson Corsair, from The Force Awakens proved popular enough from the film to earn his own level.
    • FN-2199 (A.K.A That Stormtrooper who shouted 'TRAITOR!' and then gave Finn a good walloping with his shock baton) was popular enough to have been given his own miniboss battle and can be unlocked as a playable character in Free Play, despite only having enough screen time to amount to just under a minute.
  • Ascended Meme:
  • Deadpan Snarker: Now that the characters are voiced, some of their lines are more witty than their film counterparts.
    Han Solo: [confronting a flametrooper] I guess none of us are secretly fireproof.

    Flametrooper 1: A cake?! Let me light the candles!
    Flametrooper 2: No, wait! That's not a normal cake!
    Flametrooper 1: I know! It's a huge cake!
    [Flametrooper 1 lights the candles and the dynamite fuse, blowing him and a couple of others to pieces]
    Han Solo: Looks like I got my wish after all.

    Rey: [towards BB-8, after freeing him from Teedo and getting herself trapped among a Star Destroyer and other Imperial junk] Yeah, I bet you're helping. You're the one who got me here in the first place.
  • Easter Egg: Combined with Developer's Foresight. There are multiple missions in the open world that first require a protocol droid to translate for an alien citizen to learn what kind of quest they want you to do. Since this is the first voice-acted game in the series and there are multiple protocol droid characters in the game, each one had to have scripted dialogue for the translations because any could have been used. The nature of the dialogue is different for each droid and missionnote  though, and it is impossible to replay the quests on the same file, so each of the droids' scripts you didn't see can become an Easter egg to find on another playthrough.
  • The Faceless: Captain Phasma. Even when she encounters a Dianoga who stole her helmet after she's thrown into garbage chute, she still manages to cover her head with a bucket, becoming a literal buckethead, until she shoots the Dianoga and steals her helmet back.
  • Fanboy: The game turns Kylo Ren into a literal Darth Vader fanboy. Everything in his bedroom, and we do mean everything, has Vader's visage plastered over it. He even has Vader slippers at one point!
  • Mundane Utility: Palpatine's threatening and evil Force lightning can also be used to... charge switches in lieu of a BB unit.
  • Nap-Inducing Speak: One Stormtrooper apparently finds General Hux's maniacal speech to be boring enough to fall asleep to, and a fellow trooper wakes him and punches him for it.
  • Post-Final Boss: After Final Boss Kylo Ren is... an easy level with no hazards or enemies.
  • Precision F-Strike: The game surprisingly retains the audio of Finn's "one hell of a pilot" line from the movie.
  • Samus Is a Girl: The First Order has a lot of female stormtroopers, though you can only tell by their voices. Or their heads, if you manage to knock one of their helmets off.
  • Self-Deprecation: In a flashback to Return of the Jedi, the scene where Luke unmasks Vader is parodied by having his face revealed to be that of Hayden Christensen. Luke panics and quickly swaps his head with that of Vader's actual head. The scene is an obvious jab at the infamous addition of Hayden to the ending of Return of the Jedi in the 2004 DVD and subsequent 2011 Blu-ray.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Suddenly Voiced: While previous LEGO adaptation games had already given characters voices, this still counts as the first of the LEGO Star Wars series to do so. This includes characters that had appeared in past games in the series.
  • Take Cover!: One of the new mechanics in this game are sections where you need to hide behind chest high walls, or walls that you stand behind, and engage enemies with cover based shooting. It gets changed up every so often, like for instance when instead of shooting enemies you need to throw a bomb at a silver object to make it explode and take something out.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman:
    • Even when including DLC, BB-8 is the only character capable of using ball switches. This isn't too bad since you get him after Chapter 1, but that still means you can't 100% the DLC or prologue levels as soon as you reach the first hub. There's also the fact that BB-8 has no real use besides that ability which can't be done better by other characters.
    • Admiral Ackbar's two versions are the only characters which can use water pools to get special items. (Unless you get the DLC packs including Kit Fisto or Jar Jar Binks.)
    • Some racing challenges on the open world require certain characters or vehicles to play them.
  • Tickle Torture: The First Order used motorized feather twirlers to tickle their prisoners into giving information, replacing the Cold-Blooded Torture and screams with tickling and laughter.
  • Turbine Blender: Working on an engine in the D'Qar open world will activate it and suck several GNK droids through it. This will get you a gold brick.

    LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga 
  • Actor Allusion:
  • Adapted Out:
    • Seasee Tiin and Agen Kolar are absent during Windu's attempt to arrest Palpatine in Revenge of the Sith, with only him and Kit Fisto present in the game.
    • The pilots of the Republic Cruiser Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon are on at the start of The Phantom Menace are absent, with the Jedis flying the ship themselves. They are present in the original game.
    • Two/thirds of the Jawa Sandcrawler from A New Hope is left out, as is Endor and Mustafar in the sequel trilogy missions.
    • The Imperial Spy, and Tarkin from A New Hope are missing, as is General Veers and Admiral Piett from The Empire Strikes Back, but it can be considered played with by Jerjerodd, who sort of appears in the first cutscene of Return of the Jedi.
  • Anachronic Order: The player can invoke this trope like with The Complete Saga, but with some caveats: you can start from the beginning of whatever trilogy you want instead of having to start with The Phantom Menace, but simply finishing a level doesn't immediately unlock all the Episodes at once- each trilogy has to be played in proper order. You are still allowed to halt your progress mid-Episode and hop to one of the other Trilogies whenever you want, though.
  • Adaptational Badass: Thanks to the reworked combat system, most playable characters are now even more competent fighters in comparison to both the previous games and the movies they come from. This is especially true to most droids since they too are now capable of performing counters and full combos in melee combat when they can't do much in both the movies and previous games in terms of direct combat.
  • Adaptation Expansion: Thanks in part to the open world elements, the story campaigns of The Skywalker Saga cover several events that were Adapted Out of the other titles, meaning that scenes and characters that were ignored in the games covering the first seven episodic installments (including the Gungan Sub chase in The Phantom Menace, Obi-Wan and Jango Fett's dogfight over Geonosis in Attack of the Clones, and Yoda and Palpatine’s duel in Revenge of the Sith) are now explored and featured here, and the remaining two that are being adapted for the first time are given the same amount of embellishment. Likewise, characters like Darth Maul and Palpatine, who were Giant Space Fleas From Nowhere in the original games, are given much more screentime and development here. The game itself also often expands upon existing stories, such as giving Finn a larger role in the campaign for The Rise of Skywalker.
  • Adaptation-Induced Plot Hole: The scene where Obi-Wan claims to Luke that Vader betrayed and murdered his father is omitted, as Obi-Wan avoids the subject when it is brought up, yet when Vader is about to make his Luke, I Am Your Father revelation, Luke stills says that Obi-Wan told him Vader killed his father.
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes: Defeating enemies sometimes has them drop their individual components (torso, hat, legs) for the player to unlock as a costume.
  • Art Evolution: Similar to The Force Awakens, it enhances the character and vehicle modelling compared to The Complete Saga, bringing the Episode I-VI characters into line with their present day counterparts.
  • Artificial Brilliance:
    • Enemies will make use of buildable LEGO blocks in the middle of shootouts, usually assembling whatever it is they're near as cover to hide behind, and usually their allies will provide covering fire to keep you pinned so you can't stop them.
    • Enemies will also keep track of what you're using as an attack combo and will start countering it if you spam it.
  • Ascended Meme:
    • In the Gameplay Overview trailers, as the narrator talks about how players can live out their greatest fantasies in the Star Wars universe, the camera cuts to a Gonk Droid walking around in the desert, referencing the Gonk Droid's wild popularity among fans of the original games.
    • In the game itself, the new version of the Super GNK Droid bonus makes an invincible, fast-moving golden Gonk Droid with a moustache available in your character pool in any level.
    • The game makes running gags out of Anakin's hatred of sand and Chewbacca never getting a medal, two aspects of the series which fans have joked about for years.
    • Heck, when it comes to the Prequel Trilogy, this game may as well be one big tribute to Prequel memes in general. Besides all the references to Anakin's sand hatred, there's also various lines of small talk during Free Play (see the Funny Moments page for those), and three of the levels of the Revenge of the Sith campaign are each named "So Uncivilized", "Droid Attack on the Wookies", and "The High Ground".
    • The Boss Subtitles for the Sovereign Protectors are "They protec but they also attac," referencing a particular meme format that started out as a Star Wars reference.
    • One of the vats on Exegol that otherwise contains half-formed parts for Palpatine is briefly shown to instead contain Jar-Jar Binks, referencing the "Darth Jar-Jar" half-joke theory that preceded the premiere of The Force Awakens.
    • The unlock quest for Greedo involves you asking witnesses about if he or Han shot first. The results are tied.
    • Willrow Hood's unlock quest sees you protecting him as he delivers a datacore to an ice-cream server so she can get the local Cloud City ice cream system up and running. This odd little quest references the prop held by film Willrow- later canonically referred to as a "camtono" when it reappeared as a nod to this fandom in-joke in The Mandalorian- obviously being a Hamilton Beach ice cream maker, the absurdity of which is what made Willrow a meme to begin with.
  • Big Eater: Padmé is shown gorging herself with cake when she confronts Anakin on Mustafar, which is pretty understandable since she’s about to have twins. Truth in Television is that women develop cravings during their first month of pregnancy, but since Padmé was most likely close to giving birth, she would have most likely dropped the phase in reality.
  • Bilingual Bonus: Of a sort. The Skywalker Saga gets a ton of mileage out of the Aurebesh alphabet to hide verbal gags and add flavor in a multitude of locations. Some puzzles using Aurebesh characters can even be solved more quickly if you know the alphabet, like a puzzle in Dagobah asking you to find four stones with characters and note the number of spirits floating next to them so you can place them in the corect order...but if you read the characters provided for each button, you can recognize they're a selection of A, D, O, and Y. The answer then becomes obvious without needing to hunt down the combination—just spell YODA.
  • Black Comedy:
    • Talking to the side characters nets jokes about:
      • Alderaan blowing up and killing everyone on it
      • Anakin murdering everyone in the Jedi Temple
      • A protocol droid has this to say in the Jundland Wastes, parodying a quote from Anakin after murdering an entire camp:
      Protocol Droid: This is a Tusken Raider camp. Home of not just the men, but the women and the children too. What a fascinating bunch.
      • A puzzle in Echo Base opens with this dialogue about racial profiling:
      Astromech: They wanted me to wire up the doors for four of the rooms back there. Just 'cause I got wires INSIDE ME doesn't mean I know how to handle all wires! It was droid-profiling!
    • Padmé has a line in Episode II in which she says "Do I have to get captured by Tusken Raiders to get a little help over here?" just after Anakin's murderous rampage of them.
    • Villains will usually have a respawn quote poking fun at how they died.
    Maul: No more half measures.
    Dooku: I nearly lost my head there...
  • Black Comedy Cannibalism: When Luke infiltrates Jabba's Palace, we see Bib Fortuna about to snack on a green hot dog. After Bib is influenced by the Jedi Mind Trick, Luke hands the hot dog over to one of the Gamorrean guards, who freaks out after getting a closer look at it.
  • Boss Rush: The final quest in the Jawa quest line, "Battle Droid Royale", sees the player fight all the droids they fought throughout the quest line again (except the Sith Probe Droid).
  • Bowdlerise:
    • Several characters who had onscreen deaths in the movie are given a Spared by the Adaptation treatment before never being seen in-story again, or are killed in less graphic ways.
    • Boba and Jango Fett's starship is now called "Boba/Jango Fett's starship" instead of its canonical name, Slave I, or by the name of its model (Firespray), as some canon media opted to use.
    • The Guavian Death Gang are only ever called "Gauvian Security Soldiers".
    • In the adaptation of A New Hope, Wuher's speech to the droids omits the line "We don't serve their kind here!" to ditch the explicit Fantastic Racism subtext.
    • In a stark contrast to how it was handled in The Force Awakens LEGO game, Finn's line is properly changed to "one heck of a pilot" instead of the more profane version of it.
    • Jango is not decapitated in this version. He is, however, trampled by droids, trampled by the Reek, crushed by the clone gunship as it lands on top of him, and then left to fall from said gunship mid-flight, with his helmet flying off and serving as a symbolic decapitation. Unlike other characters more clearly Spared by the Adaptation, his fate is left uncertain.
    • Finn's bloodied helmet from the intro scene of The Force Awakens is changed to cake smudge.
    • Han isn't stabbed by Kylo Ren in this version's retelling of The Force Awakens. Rather, he accidentally creates a hole in the walkway both of them are standing on when trying to fix Kylo Ren's lightsaber and falls to his doom.
    • In the adaptation of The Rise of Skywalker, Palpatine says, "Stand together, fall together" instead of "die together". Other instances of "die" are kept, however, such as the "I'll be careful," "You'll be dead!" exchange in A New Hope.
  • Breaking Old Trends: In relation to the unlockables system.
    • Datacards can be traded for any cheat, instead of specifically being linked to a particular level's Brick, allowing someone to unlock cheats like a stud multiplier from the very beginning.note 
    • Specific cheats like Stud Magnet are now part of the unlockable skill tree, meaning they're traded for Kyber Bricks and not included at all in the Datacard unlocks.
  • Call-Back:
    • The very first story mission of Episode I is titled "Negotiations", much like the very first level of the original Lego Star Wars. Also, fixing the chairs in the trade negotiations room, which is what the game uses as a tutorial for moving objects with the Force, will cause them to start dancing as the Cantina Theme plays, replicating an early famous Easter Egg from the game.
    • The Tantive IV level contains stormtroopers bathing in an escape pod, just as they did back in the original Episode IV Tantive IV level in LSW II: The Original Trilogy. Unlike in The Complete Saga, these stormtroopers are back to being shirtless instead of being covered with bathing suits, though they have clear white swimming trunks on their lower halves this time.
    • While he doesn't appear in this game's adaptation of Episode IV, you can still unlock and play as none other than Rebel Friend, who was created specifically for The Original Trilogy.
  • Call-Forward: The redone boss fight against Palpatine at the end of Return of the Jedi now involves deflecting his force lightning attacks back at him, evidently referencing how Rey beats him at the end of The Rise of Skywalker.
  • Camera Abuse: Occasionally, a crewman from a destroyed capital ship will be flung forwards. The same happens to a 21-B droid in a sequels level acting as a camera-man for Poe, and winds up causing a broken screen effect.
  • Canned Orders over Loudspeaker:
    • The Rebel Base on Hoth has a new guy doing it. He's not terribly popular, and he's not enjoying himself, being a fill-in for the droid who used to do it, smashed up by the Empire.
    • The capital ships all have chirpy messages congratulating the player character on their violent takeover of the ship, and reassuring the survivors.
  • Circling Birdies: Meat shanks or X-Wings and TIE Fighters will fly over unconscious NPC's heads.
  • Clickbait Gag: The holocrons you recover in Jocasta Nu's sidequest contain information like "How to build your own lightsaber," "Yoda's top 10 Force powers (number 5 will shock you)," and "Obi-Wan's guide to snappy one-liners."
  • Compressed Adaptation: Downplayed. Due to covering nine movies' worth of content, the pacing of the cutscenes are often breakneck, and certain events happen slightly out of order in order to streamline the narrative. Nonetheless, all of the major story events are still depicted.
  • Cutscene Boss: The final battle with Palpatine in The Rise of Skywalker is a series of QTEs in which Rey blocks and then overpowers his Force Lightning.
  • Developer's Foresight:
    • Depending on which episode you choose to play, the Wide-Open Sandbox that is the galaxy will change so that it appears as it does during said Episode.
    • If you load up the game after leaving in the middle of an episode, before you get back into gameplay, you get a unique text crawl recapping the events of the most recent missions you played.
    • If you play the Boonta Eve Classic podrace in co-op mode, Player 1 will play as Anakin, and Player 2 will play as Gasgano. If Player 2 ends up winning the podrace, a special cutscene plays where the protagonists despair as it looks like Anakin is about to lose, only for Jar-Jar to fall out of the spectator gallery, resulting in Gasgano crashing into a wall as he swerves to avoid him, allowing Anakin to come in behind him and win anyway.
  • Did Not Think This Through: A ditzy NPC in Echo Base mentions mailing snow to her cousin on Tatooine, who had never seen it before. Naturally, it melted by the time it arrived. But the NPC thinks "some low-life" stole the snow and swapped it out for water.
  • Diegetic Interface: During the second section of "Dameron’s Defiance", the game switches to a first-person perspective akin to X-Wing and TIE Fighter, with some aspects taken from Star Wars Trilogy Arcade.
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation:
    • Instead of being decapitated, Jango Fett is repeatedly crushed by a tumbleweed, the passing Jedi, a monster in the pit, and a gunship. He seems to survive even that, but finally plummets to the ground after peeling off the ship in midair and (likely) dies on impact.
    • Rather than being stabbed by Kylo Ren, Han Solo accidentally cuts a hole in the ground with his lightsaber. As the floor doesn't immediately give upon doing this, Kylo Ren instead deliberately kicks it out, sending Han to his doom.
    • Anakin's mortal wounding of Padme happens because he accidentally hits her head with a wedding topper, rather than intentionally Force choking her.
    • Instead of getting strangled by the chain that he holds Leia with, Jabba gets the snot beaten out of him by Leia and ultimately blown up with the sail barge.
  • Disney Villain Death: Han Solo is subject to this instead of being stabbed by Kylo Ren; while trying to fix his lightsaber, Han accidentally cuts out a hole in the floor, and Kylo Ren, in a rather literal Kick the Dog moment, pushes it out with his foot to send Han to his death.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: This is actually a game mechanic. Certain enemies will drop pieces of their outfit upon completion and if you're playing as a Hero character you can put these pieces on. A full set allows you to use the basic Villain abilities (a thermal detonator and certain access panels) in addition to your own abilities.
  • Dueling Player Characters: If the final level of Return of the Jedi, "Fulfill Your Destiny," is played in co-op, Player 2 controls Darth Vader and the objective is to "Fight!" However, the only boss health bar is Vader's and Player 1 has to deplete Vader's health bar to progress through the level.
  • Enemy Chatter: Stormtroopers and battle droids will banter with each other and chirp at the player in almost any given scenario.
  • Epic Fail: An AT-TE on Kashyyyk has sunk into the bog. Apparently this came about when the clone pilots decided to wire up the caf machine to the engines... afterwards, they decide it's best to never speak of what happened again.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: Lama-Su decides that the best replacement for Jango Fett is woolamanders, monkey-like creatures. Somehow cloning an army of monkeys and giving them access to rifles and flamethrowers goes... well, it goes pretty much how you'd expect.
  • Foregone Victory: During The Last Jedi when fighting Kylo Ren as Luke Skywalker. While you still have to dodge Kylo's attacks to advance the fight, he can never land a hit on you as his blade passes through Luke's body, which he'll even cry foul over. Of course this is because Luke was never actually there in the first place.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: Anakin's Episode III idle animation has him pull out his lightsaber, only for it to come out as red instead of blue; it takes him a few tries, but he manages to smack it back to blue before putting it away.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Normally, protocol droids are the go-to characters for translating alien languages (until you unlock the universal translator datacard). However, some non-protocol droid characters are capable of understanding certain languages based on their backgrounds and character relations. For example, characters that speak the same language will naturally understand each other, Obi-Wan understands most alien languages, most Rebel and Resistance pilots understand astromech droids, most characters in Han Solo's circle of scoundrels understand Shyriiwook, and being a protocol droid turned bounty hunter (being listed as the latter by character class), 4-LOM can translate all languages.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • If you play as Jango Fett and go to Kamino in Free Play, no one recognizes him or acknowledges it's him that they're talking to (possibly because he has his helmet on), but he doesn't react to being talked about, averting the I'm Standing Right Here trope. For example, the premise for the mission "Woolamander Business" is that with Jango gone, the Kaminoans need new cloning material from a woolamander. But as shown in Bombastic's video here, you can potentially accept the mission as Jango because he's in the required Bounty Hunter class. Bombastic's voicover provides the appropriate I'm Standing Right Here reaction in Jango's stead.
    • The scene with Unkar Plutt in Episode VII generally follows the movie. But if Rey (at least the Scavenger version) collects a Kyber Brick, one of her potential Item Get! sayings is that it could fetch her a fair few portions. And depending on how many stud multiplier upgrades the player has at that point and/or how much of the rest of the game was already played by then, they could have well over a million studs. Never mind that neither currency can be spent that way.
  • Hope Spot: Just when it looks as though Qui-Gon will be Spared by the Adaptation after Obi-Wan decapitates Maul, the Sith apprentice comes back with a vengeance and does him in.
  • I Wished You Were Dead: It is visually implied that Anakin wishes that the entire Jedi Order was wiped off the face of the universe, as seen when he scribbles all over the front cover of his coloring book during the council meeting. After forming his alliance with Palpatine, his wish comes true.
  • Ignored Epiphany: After knocking Padmé out cold with the wedding topper of himself, Anakin holds it in his hands with remorse. Just when it looks as though he’s about to consider changing his ways for good, Obi-Wan snaps him out of his trance and the rest is history.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Oddly enough, the Trope Namers are as competent as anyone else, but during the opening cutscene of Episode III's Invisible Hand level, Anakin and Obi-Wan are looking through a holographic chat log between Grievous and a battle droid to locate Chancellor Palpatine, while battle droids keep firing at them and missing, despite the Jedi standing completely still. They don't even react to the shots hitting around them.
  • Is This Thing Still On?: One of the PA system messages during Episode IV's Best Leia'd Plans mission has the officer remind himself on the air that he's strong and independent. He then asks if the comm is on.
  • It's a Wonderful Failure: Lose in the Boonta Eve Classic and you’ll get a cutscene of Anakin's friends looking despaired at his loss while Sebulba smugly holds up a trophy.
  • Kick the Dog: An unaware variation. As Anakin and Obi-Wan rush to the Wizard’s Tower to save Palpatine, one of the battle droids taunts “Nice robes Jedi, did your mommy buy them for you?”. At this point, Shmi is dead. If the droid addresses this to Obi-Wan, the effect is less severe, as Obi-Wan has not known, let alone seen his own mother since he was an infant.
  • Laughably Evil: LEGO Vader is equal parts terrifying and hysterical, getting to do his Hallway Scene on the poor Rebel soldiers, but later on in the Tantive IV level, he hijacks the Tantive IV's intercom to pretend to be the in-flight captain.
  • Later-Installment Weirdness:
    • This game uses health bars instead of the traditional four-hearts health system used in every other LEGO Adaptation game. While LEGO Marvel Super Heroes 2 had a similar thing for bosses, it still used the four-heart system for player characters.
    • This is the first LEGO Adaptation in decades (not counting the crossover LEGO Dimensions, which was a Toys-To-Life Game) that doesn't have a custom character creator, a feature that was a staple for the series since it was first introduced in LEGO Star Wars II.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • The cloning facility on Kamino is a LEGO manufacturing plant in this version.
    • Part of Ben Solo's boss banter with the Knights of Ren is complaining about how now they chose to do something.
  • Left the Background Music On: "Better Call Maul" has a Battle Droid orchestra perform "Duel of Fates".
  • Literal-Minded: In The Last Jedi, when Poe Dameron tells BB-8 to "punch it", the latter literally does so with a boxing glove.
  • Mood Whiplash:
    • How the Order 66 scene plays out. Palpatine accidentally initiates Order 67, which causes all the Clones to break out into dance. After frantically flipping through his manual, he initiates Order 66 in earnest, with the correction earning an annoyed grunt from the Clones. Cue the extermination of the Jedi across the galaxy.
    • Vader's death scene at the end of Return of the Jedi is played straight...until a Gonk Droid steals his helmet and zooms off.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The first Episode of each trilogy, whether in a level or the open world, is hiding crates with physical copies of the LEGO game that film initially appeared in: the original LEGO Star Wars for The Phantom Menace, The Original Trilogy for A New Hope, and the standalone LEGO adaptation of The Force Awakens. Hitting them even causes their discs to pop out.
    • Although Rogue One content is not in the base game, parts of that movie’s ending are integrated into the opening mission of A New Hope. Vader makes his entrance in a way similar to the infamous hallway massacre sequence, while the final exchange between Raymus Antilles and Leia is added in word-for-word moments before he arrives. Similarly, a line of dialogue from Lando ("we made the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs with that ship!") off-handedly references Solo.
    • A portrait of the Towani family from the Ewoks television films is seen.
    • The first time Emperor Palpatine attempts to use Force Lightning in both Revenge of the Sith and Return of the Jedi, he accidentally uses the lightning-shaped LEGO pieces that his minifigure comes with before opting for real lightning. This also applies to Rey, after Kylo reveals her parentage.
    • The game has a Mumble Mode option, which replaces all of the voice acting with Voice Grunting like in the original games.
    • The Flametrooper mini-boss you fight while capturing the Executor is named TT-2005 - a double nod to the full name of the developer (Traveller's Tales) and the release of the original game.
    • There are "Classic" characters available as Downloadable Content, which use the original, circa-1999 toy models, complete with yellow skin. To be more specific, they're based on the special classic-style minifigs created for sets celebrating the 20th anniversary of the LEGO Star Wars theme back in 2019, the same year this game was announced.
    • During the level "Hunk of Junk" from the A New Hope campaign, Han tells Chewie he wants the Falcon to take off in one piece instead of seven thousand little ones. This is very likely a nod to the massive Ultimate Collector Series set released in 2017, which, even taking into account the minifigs and other characters included, is built of roughly 7 and a half thousand individual LEGO pieces.
    • When confronting Rey and Ben Solo on Exegol, Palpatine expresses a dislike for the name "Rey" and mentions that he wanted her to be named "Kira" — which was one of Rey's names in George Lucas’ original outlines for the Sequel Trilogy, and one that Daisy Ridley actually filmed some scenes using before they opted to stick to "Rey".
    • Grievous's final defeat is based loosely on an unused storyboard of his death in Revenge of the Sith, where Obi-Wan cut off all four arms, ripped out his gut sack (which primarily included his brain instead of his heart and lungs), and then shot it with Grievous's blaster to be sure he stayed dead. Here, Obi-Wan again totally disarms him, overloads his body to make his head rocket off, and then uses Cody's blaster to trick-shot it out of the air.
    • When speaking to him, Dexter brings up his "best waitress, Wanda," a character who was only named as such in the infamous canceled Star Wars Detours.
    • Willrow Hood's unlock quest revolves around helping him escort a component to fix an ice cream machine, referencing the original datacore prop used in the film visibly being an ice cream maker.
    • Obi-Wan has an interact line with Darth Maul where he informs the Zabrak that he looks taller, in reference to a similar line he used when speaking to Maul in Star Wars: The Clone Wars.
    • The game dives deep into Star Wars video game history for some levels.
      • Episode 1 Level 2, "The Boonta Eve Classic", is a faithful recreation of Star Wars Episode I: Racer, but with nods back to the original LEGO Star Wars level, like boost pads.
      • Episode 8 level 1, "Dameron's Defiance", features a section where the player is pulled into Tallissan Lintra's cockpit, in a sequence that hearkens back to the days of X-Wing and TIE Fighter, especially with the cockpit interface inside. On top of that, game play switches to an on-rails shooter and TIE Fighters start coming out of nowhere, recreating gameplay from Star Wars Trilogy Arcade.
      • This even applies to out-of-level stuff too. One quest involves you fighting a Krayt Dragon which heavily resembles the one from Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic as opposed to the new version seen in The Mandalorian. This is likely partially due to practical reasons as the canon version of the Dragon is absolutely huge.
  • Never Say "Die": A strange version with the Guavian Death Gang. Any spoken mention of them instead uses the name "Guavian Security Soldiers" (the individual Mooks), but Bala Tik's description still calls him the leader of the "Guavian Death Gang."
  • Nothing Is Scarier: Shmi Skywalker's death and Anakin's slaughtering of the Tuskens inside her tent is depicted off-screen, just like the film.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: As with previous games, several segments were tweaked to involve at least two playable characters. For example, Luke's fight against the rancor lets the second player control Jubnuk, a Gamorrean guard who was originally eaten by the rancor, while Obi-Wan and Anakin's infamous duel also features R2 and C-3PO providing support. Captain Typho meanwhile provides support for Yoda and Palpatine's duel, while BB-8 accompanies Rey to the Death Star ruins.
  • Production Throwback:
    • Copies of Lego Star Wars: The Video Game, Lego Star Wars: The Original Trilogy, and Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens can be found in levels from their respective trilogies.
    • The Boss Subtitles for Speedy Snoke during "Attack of the Clones (Again)" are "Gotta Snoke Fast". Of course, this isn’t the first time TT Games have been involved with the Blue Blur.
  • Puzzle Boss: Unlike her LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens iteration, Captain Phasma is not directly fought in this game's retelling of the film's events. Rather, you drain her health by luring her into a series of traps for her fight during the story of The Force Awakens, and weaponising the environment against her (Like dropping TIE Fighters on her) for her fight during the story of The Last Jedi. One of the bonus objectives for the latter actually requires the player to find all the possible ways to do damage to her.
  • Quirky Miniboss Squad: The five defective Snoke clones fought as part of the sidequest "Attack of the Clones (Again)", consisting of Droid Snoke, Intellectual Snoke, Speedy Snoke, Backwards Snoke, and Funky Snoke.
  • Repeated Cue, Tardy Response: If playing The Rise of Skywalker in co-op, Rey stops speaking her "I am all the Jedi" response to Palpatine so that Ben can throw a lightsaber to her. Seen here at 1:26:13.
    Rey: And I... I said, "And I..." [to Ben] What are you waiting for?
  • Retirony: The opening of the Episode III Invisible Hand level has a battle droid celebrating his retirement, only to get destroyed by Anakin's starfighter crashing into him.
  • Rule of Symbolism:
    • While not decapitated here, Jango's ridiculously brutal defeat in this game includes his helmet popping off in a symbolic reference to said decapitation.
    • Anakin and Padmé’s crumbling wedding cake serves as an Allegory for their relationship... Which is on the threshold of dissolving and will soon lead to their ultimate fates.
      • The cake could also represent Padmé’s heart, which is breaking as Anakin progresses further into Palpatine’s clutches.
    • Anakin’s purple teddy bear could also count as his own personal Rosebud, as it represents a time when he was happy and innocent.
    • After being denied the rank of Jedi Master, Anakin goes to his seat, which is attached to a school desk, and takes out a coloring book with three crayons. The whole scene allegorically represents two ideals from Anakin’s perspective. The desk and coloring book are based on how he feels the council treats him as, while the crayons represent lightsaber colors (red, green and blue). Anakin picks the red one and scribbles furiously all over the cover, foreshadowing his fall to the dark side and becoming lost in his anger, hatred and lust for power. Additionally, the coloring book depicts Yoda and a teenaged Padawan on the front cover. Since the color red symbolically represents death and anger, Anakin’s scribbling somewhat implies that he wishes all the Jedi were dead. Come the Great Jedi Purge and Operation: Knightfall a few evenings later... and his wish is granted.
  • Rule of Three: Palpatine using lightning-shaped LEGO pieces when attempting to use Force lightning only to realize that they're having no effect and tossing them aside to use Force lightning for real shows up in the first two trilogies. Then Rey, his granddaughter, unwittingly gets in on it in the sequel trilogy after Kylo Ren reveals her true parentage to her.
  • Race Lift: Young Boba Fett, Jango Fett, and the Clones are given darker skin tones than in previous games to match up more with Temuera Morrison, a New Zealander of Māori ethnicity.
  • Running Gag:
    • Chewbacca being upset at not getting a medal at the end of A New Hope comes up whenever medals are being handed out.
    • Anakin's infamous hatred of sand comes up a lot, even long after he's dead.
  • Self-Deprecation:
    • Many jokes are made about Chewbacca not receiving a hero's medal at the end of A New Hope, something which was addressed more seriously in the sequel films as well due to longtime fan confusion.
    • Return of the Jedi features Luke (and R2) being shocked and disgusted by the revelation that Leia and Luke are siblings, poking at the decades-old jokes about how strangely their relationship evolved over the films and how the sibling twist caused no visible alarm for the previously-flirting characters in the film.
    • One civilian muses about how kids love long scenes of political debate, a joke on a common critique of The Phantom Menace.
    • The mission "Ma Clounkee Most Foul" is an extended joke on the "who shot first?" debate. One witness claims that Han has an incredibly flexible neck, referencing the rather clumsy editing in the Special Edition. Additionally, the mission's name itself references the infamous "Ma Clounkee/Maclunkey" dialogue given to Greedo in the 2010s edit of the film.
    • An NPC in the Resistance base on D'Qar talks about how it was also used by the Rebels during the Galactic Civil War, before proclaiming that there's "nothing like reusing old ideas," a very common criticism of The Force Awakens.
    • In The Force Awakens when the heroes return to D'Qar and Rey embraces Leia, Chewbacca is visibly frustrated and confused by the interaction, acknowledging fan confusion as to why Leia would hug the new girl who knew Han for less time instead of her old friend and Han's oldest companion.
    • When Rey explores the ruined Death Star in the adaptation of The Rise of Skywalker, she at one point muses that she would have thought any remains of the second Death Star would have landed on the forest moon rather than a completely different moon it wasn't even orbiting around, and that she has a lot to learn about physics.
    • Dark Side Rey's dialogue is primarily composed of jokes about how Obviously Evil her design and character is.
  • Serious Business: Many quests have characters acting like what they're dealing with is a matter of life and death, if not moreso.
    • Trampolines have to be smuggled across the Galaxy, and pirates went them so bad they'll shoot down any ship they think might have previous, precious trampolines.
    • One Empire official insists all "arm-related weirdness" requires official permits. He might not be telling the truth, given a TIE fighter pilot's confused reaction to this, but either way...
  • Shout-Out:
    • A handful with regard to the names of individual missions. To wit:
    • In the first episode of each trilogy, you can find inventories containing boxes of 2005's LEGO Star Wars, 2006's LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy, and 2016's LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens.
    • Palpatine gives Order 67 before correcting himself.
    • Max Rebo's voice and side mission is one big reference to the skit from the third Robot Chicken Star Wars special.
    • A disco patron voiced by Adam Howden exclaims that he's really feeling it!
    • When Qui-Gon comes across a Kyber Brick puzzle he can access, he notes that "I have a particular set of skills that will come in handy here." Doubles as an Actor Allusion.
    • After mentioning that Shmi was kidnapped, the recap of "Droid Factory Frenzy" remarks that "Anakin will remember that", a reference to the famous "[X] will remember that" message that frequently shows up in games made by Telltale.
    • Darth Maul's Disney Villain Death is preceded by him being chopped into pieces yet still surviving and trying to fight Obi-Wan, much like the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
    • The Boss Subtitles for the Praetorian Guards are "Red guard redemption".
    • In the Death Star, when the Rebels fake a message saying the turbolifts are reopened, the Stormtroopers excitedly say they want to get to the canteen while there still are clean trays left.
      • Additionally, one of the Kyber Brick puzzles on the Death Star is called "Cake or Death" and is located in the Death Star canteen.
    • Han and Greedo have a point-blank shootout on opposite sides of the same table. When he runs out of ammo, Han throws his blaster, clocking Greedo in the head.
    • A Kyber Brick puzzle on Dagobah involving Vine Swinging is called "Swing From A Hairy Vine."
    • After a lengthy stealth segment, Finn quips, "Kept you waiting, huh?"
    • Grummgar's quest has a bounty board that quotes "The Pina Colada Song". "If you like hunting for monsters, and tracking them from long range. If you’re not into yoga, if you have half a brain."
    • The two Sith Acolytes involved in a rivalry are named Ash-Ke and Gar-Ee.
    • During the Episode V Mission "Never Tell Me the Odds", Han tells Chewbacca to "set 271". But Chewbacca gets it wrong at first and causes the Falcon to spin and shoot while vertical in a reference to the oldschool game Asteroids.
    • When the player first enters a certain room accessible only through Free Play in the Episode IV mission "Best Leia'd Plans", an animatic shows a hologram of the Emperor playing with dolls, unromantically but reminiscent of Dark Helmet doing the same.
    • When Luke learns Leia is his sister. R2-D2 sets off a red alarm on his dome, evocative of another moment in Spaceballs where Dot Matrix has a built-in "virgin alarm" that goes off when Princess Vespa gets close to Lone Starr.
    • One mission in Ajan Kloss has you helping a Resistance member cook second breakfast in secret. After completing the mission, he asks you to "Keep it secret, keep it safe".
    • One mission in Kamino is called "Teenage Mutant Ninja Woolamanders".
    • In Mos Espa, one name that Mawhonic comes up with for his podracer made from bones is "Skele-torque".
    • One of the challenges in the Episode II Mission "The Hunt for Jango" is "Do an Aileron Roll!", which references the Star Fox 64 meme while using the move's actual name, possibly courtesy of MatPat's "Reality Check" video on the topic.
  • Self-Deprecation: A quest on Takodana has the player fix up a jukebox which starts playing the Mos Eisley Cantina music. A local patron then smashes the jukebox for playing "the same old song".
  • Slapstick Knows no Gender: A few of the female characters go through some comical abuse. Padme gets covered in LEGO Kouhun guts from Anakin bludgeoning one with an anvil (earlier, the Kouhuns tried to kill her by dropping said anvil on her while she was sleeping), Paige Tico gets an assortment of random heavy objects dropped on her head (only managing to avoid a piano) while trying to get her bomber's release remote, and Rey gets some fish thrown in her face (and slips on one, too) while trying to follow Luke.
  • Spared by the Adaptation:
    • Rather gruesomely, General Grievous manages to survive as just a head after his body is blown up, though Obi-Wan then proceeds to, for seemingly no reason other than shits and giggles, throw his head in the air and shoot it with Cody's blaster. The sound Grievous makes when that happens however implies that he survived even that.
    • It is implied that Anakin gave the Separatist Council an extremely traumatic beating instead of outright killing them, as Poggle and Nute Gunray are seen to be still alive just as Anakin contacts Sidious.
    • Greedo isn't shot by Han but rather just gives up and sulks away after his blaster runs out of ammo.
    • Oola doesn't get eaten by the Rancor. Instead, she is seen cheering right after Luke defeats the beast.
    • Hux is not shot with a real blaster for his treachery, instead being socked in the head with a plunger gun.
  • Start My Own: A quest on Exegol is given by Gonkatine, a Gonk droid who was rejected by the Knights of Ren and now wishes to start his own evil knight organization, comprised entirely of evil Gonk droids.
  • Take That, Audience!: When the second gameplay trailer reveals the release date of Spring 2022, Yoda can be heard telling Luke "The boy has no patience", which could also be directed at fans who have been getting impatient waiting for news about the game.
  • Tap on the Head: Instead of choking her, Anakin accidentally bludgeons Padmé’s head with a wedding topper, which he was trying to force choke instead. The figure is him. Palpatine also implies that this still manages to mortally wound her per the film.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: How Jango meets his end.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • In the first few games, characters like Jar Jar Binks note , Yodanote , and Chewbaccanote  were outclassed by most other characters in Free Play. The Skywalker Saga remedies these issues, making them viable options.
    • Originally, most droids had no attacksnote , only existing to grant the player access to certain areas in a level. Astromech droids could shock enemies and leave them unable to move for a little while, but this dealt no damage. In The Skywalker Saga, they are given proper attacks that deal no less damage than those of most other characters.
  • Truer to the Text: As a result of the Adaptation Expansion and Art Evolution, several character’s models are far more accurate to the films than in previous games. For example, Captain Tarpals, who was a glorified Palette Swap of Jar Jar in The Complete Saga (albeit with the ability to attack), has his original design from the movie and his own distinct animations, and Palpatine, who was almost always previously depicted in his Original Trilogy appearance even in the prequels, is given several distinct costumes based on his appearances throughout the prequels.
  • Uncertain Doom:
    • Jango Fett's decapitation is replaced with him being repeatedly crushed by numerous things (including a gunship) and then falling from said gunship at a great height, but the story doesn't bother to make it clear whether or not he died on impact. His helmet still falls off in reference to his canon decapitation, but that's it.
    • General Grievous is shot by Obi-Wan after being reduced to just a head and survives the initial wound, but is sent plummeting into a pit from the impulse and isn't seen again, much like Jango Fett's fate.
    • Kit Fisto is sliced by Palpatine from just off-camera and notably isn't visible when Anakin enters the room, leaving it uncertain whether he's dead or severely injured.
  • Visual Pun: In Episode IV, two stormtroopers go to investigate a noise they had heard, but find nothing. One of the troopers says it was probably 'another drill'. The camera pans away to reveal Threepio holding a drill.
  • Weapon Twirling:
    • Dual-wielding stormtroopers will twirl their pistols during breaks in attacks.
    • FN-2199 repeatedly twirls his baton in his walking animation.
    • Almost all the Jedi twirl their lightsabers at various points. Special mention goes to all iterations of Ben Kenobi except his old Episode IV self, who twirls his lightsaber often while walking and running.
  • Wide-Open Sandbox: Players are able to go from planet to planet and through space for a LEGO experience unlike any other, taking any previous open-world experience offered in one of the LEGO adaptation games up to eleven. There are twenty-four fully-explorable planets in the game — which, for frame of reference, is just one short of the total number of worlds that would be relevant to gameplay in an adaptation of the nine movies.note  The campaigns for each movie make use of this by having several events from the movies take place in the open world, opting to save key sequences as story missions, similar to the original LEGO Star Wars mission structure.
  • Wingdinglish: Aurebesh, the fictional alphabet of the Star Wars universe, is utilized throughout the game, and sometimes in humorous ways, which includes the Boss Subtitles.
    • Darth Maul: Red dude with a bad attitude
    • Jango Fett: Donor for the Clone army
    • Count Dooku: Never loses his head
    • General Grievous: More sabers than sense
    • Darth Sidious: Also known as the senate
    • Anakin Skywalker: Ex-podracer and current Sith apprentice
    • Dianoga: Keep one eye open
    • Darth Vader: Loves the dark side, hates sand
    • Rancor: Jabba's pet monster, Pateesa
    • Boba Fett: The galaxy's most infamous bounty hunter
    • Jabba the Hutt: Crime lord of the Outer Rim
    • Emperor Palpatine (Episode VI): Emperor, Sith lord, senate
    • FN-2199: Traitor!
    • Captain Phasma: Chrome dome
    • Kylo Ren: Serious daddy issues
    • Luke Skywalker: Did you do it?
    • Praetorian Guards: Red guard redemption
    • Kijimi Crooks: Local enforcers
    • Sovereign Protectors: They protec but they also attac
    • Knights of Ren: Friends make the worst enemies
    • BB-9E: First Order BB-series astromech droid
    • BB-Boss: BB-9E's big brother
    • Emperor Palpatine (Episode IX): Yes, him again
    • Taxi Thief: Won’t pay fare or play fair
    • Canto Bight Boyz: Bad boyz, too
    • Plans Pilferer: The worst laid plans
    • Varacytl: Rock-climbing rampager
    • Defiant Deadbeat: Wupiupi warrior
    • Reek: Back to wreak havoc
    • Nexu: That's a lot of teeth
    • Acklay: Ack attack
    • Dine N' Dashers: The customer is not always right
    • Krayt Dragon: Krayt balls of fire
    • Sidon Ithano: The Crimson Corsair
    • Wild Aiwha: Aiwha-nna get off
    • Diane Ogre: Her friends call her Di
    • The Castastrophonator: The junker from Jakku
    • Emperor Painpatine: Bully operational
    • Lava Eel: A lava lava laughs
    • Lava Flea: Fresh from the lava eel's stomach
    • Imperial Probe Droid: Probe-ably going to regret this
    • Mad Lad Mouse Droid: Squeaky droid gets the grease
    • R-3P0: Against protocol
    • OOM-9: The real battle is in his mind
    • Sith Probe Droid: A dark eye for trouble
    • Faulty MagnaGuard: 101 malfunctions
    • Bad Bots: Almost entirely discontinued parts
    • Droids 2 Avoid: Bounty hunter
    • Gar-Ee: Would like to battle!
    • Droid Snoke: Mean machine
    • Intellectual Snoke: These smarts are gonna smart
    • Speedy Snoke: Gotta Snoke fast
    • Backwards Snoke: enokS sdrawkcaB
    • Funky Snoke: Oh, such funk
    • Bossk: Bounce-loving bounty hunter
    • Captain Nuno Tuuk: Trade Federation trickster
    • General Rothlan: Galactic might
    • TT-2005: Come get some
    • Captain Swarton: Not too happy
    • The REAL Captain Swarton: The real deal
    • Admiral Immich: Kinda scared
    • OOM-14: Don't hurt me
    • Captain Fo Skoolan: Something's fishy
    • Captain Vektol: Anger issues
  • Wrong Insult Offence: During the fight against Jango Fett on Geonosis, he calls his opponents "Jedi dogs". Kit Fisto mentions that there are no such things as dogs on his home planet, and that perhaps calling him a "Wooriid" would be more insulting.
  • Ye Olde Butcherede Englishe: The Sith Eternal Cultists on Exegol speak like this in their subtitles.
  • Zero-Effort Boss: Luke Skywalker's sequel appearance is a boss-tier enemy in The Last Jedi (as a result of Rey finding out he may have created Kylo Ren), but excluding Puzzle Bosses, he has the lowest HP among all other bosses and is easily crippled by the combo system.

 
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Crashing at the Finish Line

Poor guy didn't even get to have his cake.

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