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"When one chooses to walk the Way of the Mandalore, you are both hunter and prey."
The Armorer
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Star Wars: The Mandalorian, more commonly known and marketed as The Mandalorian, is a Space Western series set in the Star Wars universe, and the first live-action television series in the history of the franchise. It is created by Jon Favreau, executive produced by Favreau, Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson, and co-executive produced by Karen Gilchrist. The directing team for the first two seasons includes Favreau, Filoni, Rick Famuyiwa, Deborah Chow, Bryce Dallas Howard, Taika Waititi, Peyton Reed, Carl Weathers, and Robert Rodriguez.

Set five years after the fall of the Galactic Empire, the show follows a Mandalorian Bounty Hunter (Pedro Pascal) operating in the lawless Outer Rim, as he works to support his clan's hidden enclave. Known simply as "Mandalorian" or "Mando" to most, his name is later revealed to be Din Djarin. After accepting a shady job from a group of Imperial holdouts, he is shocked to discover that his target is a strange alien infant with supernatural powers.

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Despite some initial reluctance, the bounty hunter ultimately decides to go on the run and safeguard the innocent child from the sinister forces hunting it. But soon enough, he realizes that protecting this child will be far more complicated than it first seems, and that the Imperials hunting it are more than your average remnant...

The show began airing exclusively on Disney+ as the platform's launch day flagship on November 12, 2019. Season 2 premiered on October 30, 2020, and was renewed for a third season before Season 2 finished airing.

During the second season in December 2020, it was announced that two spinoffs of the series had been ordered: Ahsoka note , and Rangers of the New Republic. All three series will eventually come together for a crossover event at some point in the future. A third spinoff, The Book of Boba Fett note , was teased in "Chapter 16: The Rescue" and confirmed the following week, set to premiere in December 2021.

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On May 4, 2020 ("Star Wars Day", as in "May the Fourth be with you"), Disney+ launched a behind-the-scenes documentary series titled Disney Gallery: The Mandalorian, covering the making of each season.

Previews: Trailer, Trailer 2, Special Look, Season 2 Trailer Season 2 Recap Sizzle


The Mandalorian provides examples of:

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  • 24-Hour Armor: As part of the Tribe's adherence to the ancient tenets of Mandalorian culture, they never remove their armor or helmets in front of others, even if it means not eating or bathing for extended periods of time. And if necessary, they will resort to violence to prevent the removal of their helmets. Further, even their children are required to go around in helmets to remain part of the Tribe. In season 2, Djarin meets Bo-Katan and her crew; since they are not part of his extreme fundamentalist group, they obviously do not adhere to this rule and casually take off their helmets, causing Djarin to have a mini Freak Out and a No True Scotsman attitude towards them before the situation is explained more.
  • Absurdly Spacious Sewer: The Mandalorians in Nevarro hide in wide, well-lit sewers. Compounded by the fact that a backwater town in the middle of desert has any sewer at all. Justified trope in that the sewers were obviously improved by the Mandalorians specifically to serve as their living area and hiding place, with stairs, lighting, and other features not generally found in a sewer. Further justified since “The Redemption" reveals that part of their function is to contain, divert and allow transit via lava flows.
  • Actor Allusion:
    • Once again a Giancarlo Esposito character realizes too late that he's in close proximity to an explosive device and shouts a Big "NO!" before it goes off. This time, however, he survives the explosion with his face intact.
    • Former MMA star Gina Carano plays a character who, at one point, is making her living by competing in basically mixed martial arts fighting in the local bar.
    • Chapter 11 introduces us to Koska Reeves, played by WWE Superstar Sasha Banks, who takes a page right out of her actress's playbook with a jetpack-assisted DDT in Chapter 16.
    • The Mandalorian acquires a Beskar spear in Chapter 13, a weapon that former wushu student Pedro Pascal should know how to use.
  • Aerith and Bob: In addition to the usual fantastical Star Wars names, we also have the real but unusual Cara (albeit short for "Carasynthia"), Gideon, and the very mundane-sounding "Mayfeld."
  • The Aesthetics of Technology: Both of the Mandalorian's primary weapons have a distinctly 1890s look to them. His blaster is based on a Bergmann 1894. His rifle is a trapdoor action using removable cartridges with brass fittings, a removable scope, and a butt in the style popular at the time.
  • Against My Religion: When asked to drop his weapon during parley, the Mandalorian objects in a deadpan that, "I'm a Mandalorian. Weapons are part of my religion." He relents in the interest of smooth negotiations.
  • Aggressive Negotiations:
    • Djarin tries to use his flamethrower to get the Jawas to see things his way in the second episode, after they insult his attempt at speaking their language.
    • Subverted in the fifth episode, where the trainee's first instinct is to fight his way across Tusken territory, whereas Djarin successfully negotiates passage.
    • The Mandalorian once again uses his flamethrower to get everyone's attention when Marshal Cobb Vanth is arguing with the Sandpeople in chapter 9. For once, it works.
  • The Alleged Car
    • In the first part of the first episode, Djarin hires a taxi speeder that is falling apart and backfiring even as it pulls up. This is because hiring a sleek new taxi would require putting up with a droid pilot, which he is not down for.
    • Djarin's Razor Crest is noted to be old as hell (pre-Imperial, by his own admission), and, unlike the Millennium Falcon, not secretly a super-badass ship with custom parts (though it is competent enough in a dogfight). In "The Prisoner", it's used because it's so old that it's unregistered on Imperial or New Republic systems, allowing it to be used as a blind spot for a prison break. The droid piloting it that episode complains that it's woefully inefficient and has numerous power-leaks. Being stripped by Jawas and welded back together again in the middle of nowhere in chapter 2 probably did it no favors.
      • In the season 2 episode "The Passenger", the Razor Crest is left in even worse shape than it's ever been after crashing on an uninhabited ice world and being attacked by a giant spider-like creature. With no means to seal the hull breaches and his ability to affect other repairs limited, Djarin is forced to take off with only the cockpit pressurized, one engine sputtering, and the hangar door flapping open.
      • Season 2 episode "The Heiress" has Djarin paying a Mon Calamari dock worker to repair the Razor Crest while he's off on his mission. The results of the repair leave the Razor Crest looking like a hodgepodge of scrap metal barely held together by duct tape and netting, but flightworthy for the most part.
        Dock Worker: Fix it? Nah. But I can make it fly.
      • Unfortunately, its luck runs out in "The Tragedy" when the Empire blows it up before kidnapping Grogu, leaving nothing but a blackened crater and a few random parts scattered about.
  • All There in the Manual: Going by this recipe from the Star Wars: Galactic Baking cookbook, the cookie sandwiches that Grogu stole in Chapter 12 are blue because they used blue butter, which of course is made from the blue milk of Banthas.
  • Anti-Climactic Unmasking:
    • After spending the entire first season just being called "Mandalorian" or "Mando", Moff Gideon reveals the character's real name, Din Djarin, completely in passing. (Admittedly it had been spoiled by pre-release materials already.)
    • The Mandalorians make a very big deal of never letting anyone see their faces without their helmets after they get their first armor. When the helmet finally comes off in the last episode of the first season, it's... Pedro Pascal. What else would anyone have suspected? (Even if you don't know the actor or recognize his name in the credits, it was already shown in several flashbacks that he was an ordinary looking human child, so there wasn't even any question if he could be some kind of alien.)
  • Arc Welding: Starting in season two, characters from previous Star Wars Expanded Universe media begin to appear and continue their story arcs. The two biggest shows pulled from are The Clone Wars and Rebels.
  • Arc Words: "This is the Way."
  • Armor Is Useless:
    • Averted hard with the titular character. The armor he starts with is of notably lower quality, covered with damage and able to be scratched with a normal knife or torn apart by animal jaws, but in the first fight of the show he gets shot in the chest by a blaster and hardly seems to notice. He gradually replaces his armor piece by piece with proper beskar, which can take a blaster shot with barely a mark (though he notes it probably wouldn't have withstood Fennec Shand's rifle shot at closer range).
    • In the first episode's big battle, IG-11's armor plating can shrug off small arms blaster fire, but is vulnerable to the E-Web heavy cannon that the Nikto mercs bring in and Djarin's point-blank blaster shot goes clean through his head.
    • As is normal for the franchise, this trope is played straight with the Imperial Stormtroopers, who usually go down in one hit despite wearing armor (although Djarin will usually Double Tap them to make sure they stay down). Stormtrooper armor also shatters like cheap ceramic when hit by The Armorer's hammer. Later in season two, Djarin has to wear some transport trooper armor on an infiltration mission and is obviously caught off-guard by how shoddy it is; he instinctively tries to use his right pauldron to block an enemy attack, only for the blow to completely shatter said pauldron.
      • According to the art book, Djarin’s pre-beskar-windfall armor was partially sourced from scavenged stormtrooper gear. No wonder it fell to pieces!
    • Averted again in the season two premiere. A suit of Mandalorian Armor (heavily implied, and later revealed to be, Boba Fett's) allows the Marshal to take on an entire gang of thugs who took over the town.
    • Averted in Episode 11 when Djarin charges up a corridor into withering blaster fire including a repeating blaster. He is knocked down because he was being buffeted by the sheer volume of repeating blaster fire but his armor protects him long enough to deliver two grenades.
    • Episode 13 shows that beskar is strong enough to withstand a lightsaber. No wonder everyone wants Djarin's suit.
    • And finally, taken to new levels in the Season 2 finale. After demonstrating that the Dark Troopers are strong enough to open blast doors with their bare hands, one grabs Djarin and starts punching him in the face. The wall behind it dents and breaks, but the helmet isn’t even scratched. For that matter, whatever the Dark Troopers are made of effortlessly shrugs off everything Djarin bring to bear on them (excepting his disintegrator rifle, which was presumably desroyed with the Razor Crest, or his beskar spear, which pierces them nicely)...but can't stand against the Absurd Cutting Power of a lightsaber.
  • Artificial Gravity: True to the trope, even when the Mandalorian's ship has lost all power, the gravity generators keep working until he can restart the engines.
  • Ascended Meme:
    • When Fennec Shand is shooting at the title character and Toro Calican, the Mandalorian notes that she has the high ground.
    • "Chapter 6: The Prisoner" and "Chapter 8: Redemption" both reference the Imperial stormtroopers' notoriously terrible aim. The former also throws in some mocking towards Gungans, the species of the infamous Jar-Jar Binks.
    • The container used to hold and carry the beskar in the first few episodes was based on an ice cream maker, in reference to a invokedMemetic Bystander in The Empire Strikes Back who was carrying one as he escaped Cloud City.
    • When asked why Djarin should trust him, Greef replies, “Because I’m your only hope.”
  • Aspect Ratio Switch: The series as a whole has a default aspect ratio of 2.39:1, but Season 2 Episode 1 expands the frame to 16:9 for the fight with the Krayt dragon.
  • Ask a Stupid Question...: In "The Siege", Carson Teva identifies Cara Dune as a native of Alderaan and asks her if she lost anyone during the war. Cara bluntly replies that she lost everyone.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Djarin has a hidden flamethrower in one of his gauntlets. It's very deadly, but he has successfully defeated only one enemy with it. The rest of the time it's either been used as an intimidation factor against giant beasts or Jawas, and often he only deploys it when he's already in the middle of getting his ass kicked. He uses it twice against the giant spiders. While both times it looks admittedly cool, it doesn’t seem to help a whole lot.
    • Djarin's rifle (referred to as an Amban phase-pulse blaster in some places) is capable of disintegrating organic lifeforms, making fights ridiculously one-sided. Unfortunately, it's cumbersome and ill-suited for close-quarters combat (electrified bayonet notwithstanding), it can only fire one shot at a time, and it eats up an entire energy cell per shot. The Mandalorian chooses to leave it behind more often than not, relying on his blaster pistol and other weapons instead.
  • An Axe to Grind: A group of Trandoshans armed with vibro-axes ambush the Mandalorian in the second episode.
  • Back for the Dead: Poor hapless Bib Fortuna reappears in the second season finale...for all of about a minute before being shot dead.
  • Bad-Guy Bar: Djarin grabs his latest bounty in one in the Batman Cold Open. Greef Karga runs his business out of another on Nevarro, mostly frequented by Bounty Hunters looking for work. The bar at the black market port on Trask is another example.
  • Badass Adorable: The Child is acknowledged by everyone who meets him to be criminally cute. He can also pick up a beast roughly analogous to a rhinoceros, but bigger, with the power of his mind.
  • Badass and Child Duo: Overlapping with Badass and Baby. The Mandalorian gets paired with an infant of Yoda's species, and the two contend with the dangers of Arvala-7.
  • Badass Cape:
    • Djarin switches out the traditional Mando jetpack for a fashionably ragged cape. The end of the official trailer even features the cape unfurling to reveal the show's title. When he does receive a jetpack of his own in the Season 1 finale, he goes on to wear both the cape and the jetpack at the same time, with the cape fluttering dramatically behind him while he flies yet somehow never catching on fire.
    • Luke Skywalker mows down a hallway of enemies with his cloak flapping behind him, like his father before him.
  • Bait-and-Switch Gunshot:
    • The climax of the first episode is an extreme close-up of the Djarin's face as the blaster is being fired, giving the impression that IG-11 succeeded in executing the Child. It's in the very next shot, as IG-11's body hits the floor, that we realize Djarin killed the bounty hunter droid before the baby could be harmed.
    • The fourth episode similarly ends with another bounty hunter lining up a scope with the Child, then the sound of a blaster and the villagers and Djarin reacting. Then the bounty hunter crumples to the ground, revealing Cara Dune shot him in the back first.
    • Used again in episode 6, with a slight twist: it initially looks like The Child reflected the gunshot with the Force, but it turns out the Mandalorian shot the droid in the back.
  • Base on Wheels: Jawa sandcrawlers were always implied to be such, but here we see it really is a fortress, complete with holes for them to stick their heads out of to shoot at invaders or drop junk on them. After an arduous attempted one-man Storming the Castle scene, the Mandalorian gets stunned and thrown off the top, and he's forced to admit it's impregnable. (The one the stormtroopers destroyed in A New Hope was probably thwarted by them having an army.)
  • Batman Cold Open: The first episode opens on one of the Mandalorian's typical bounty runs, which he handles with cool and casual ease, before moving onto the actual first arc of the show, involving taking a mysterious job for a surviving group of Imperials...
  • Bayonet Ya: Djarin's rifle has a sort of fork bayonet. The twist is that it's not sharp and stabby, but rather carries an electrical charge and functions as a sort of taser.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: The Imperial transport captain in Chapter 11 kills himself with an electric Suicide Pill to avoid facing Moff Gideon's wrath for failing him. Karmically flipped around in Chapter 16, when Gideon finds his own back against the wall and tries to shoot himself to avoid being taken into the custody of the New Republic... only to get knocked out.
  • Big Bad: The first two seasons have Moff Gideon, the leader of the Imperial remnants after the Child.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • At the end of season 2's "The Tragedy", Boba Fett appears via jetpack after retrieving his armor and, using his skill with a blaster and the full capabilities of his suit, singlehandedly wipes out the Stormtrooper platoon that was managing to overwhelm Djarin and Fennec Shand through sheer numbers.
    • At the end of the season 2 finale, right when all hope seems lost Luke Skywalker and R2-D2 show up out of nowhere to save the day. Luke proceeds to defeat Gideon's entire platoon of Dark Troopers singlehandedly.
  • Big "NO!": Another bounty hunter says this right before Djarin blows up his ship with him in it.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The storyline of seasons one and two ends this way. Djarin succeeds in his quest, Grogu is theoretically safe with Luke Skywalker, Moff Gideon is brought to justice, and the Mandalorians have a Mand’alor again. But Kuiil and IG-11 are dead, the Razor Crest has been destroyed, Gideon's superiors are still out there, a conflict with Bo-Katan over the Darksaber seems inevitable, Boba Fett is poised to pick up where Jabba the Hutt left off, Grogu doesn’t seem happy to be leaving at all, and Djarin is more alone than ever, with his Covert gone and his chances of ever seeing Grogu again slim.
  • Bizarre Alien Biology: The Mandalorian's first bounty in the series is a fish-guy being bullied by a bunch of thugs who say that his musk glands will fetch a good price. He later tries to play the "I'm an alien with weird biological needs" card as an excuse to get to use the toilet on his ship. ("It might take a while because I'm molting!") He's probably making most of it up so he can look for a way to escape.
  • Bizarre Alien Reproduction: While a couple of frog aliens having eggs that need to be fertilized separately isn't that bizarre, as it occurs in the real world, having the offspring from said fertilization hatch and grow to the size of its parents' hands in less than a few days certainly is. This suggests a very quick reproduction cycle.
  • Black Comedy: The show contains a decent amount of this, usually with unnamed characters (mostly enemies) getting offed in disturbing yet humorous ways.
    • A particularly noteworthy example occurs in the Season 2 episode "The Passenger". A Running Gag in the episode has The Child become fixated on the unfertilized eggs of the frog-like passenger that Djarin is escorting. He scarfs down several of them over the course of the episode, despite all the trouble Djarin and the mother go through to protect them.
  • Black Swords Are Better: The Darksaber, despite its unique look, is stated by Moff Gideon to be more or less a typical lightsaber in terms of its abilities. However, the myth and legends associated with the Darksaber, and its association with the Vizsla lineage, makes it a symbol of Mandalorian rulership.
  • Blade on a Stick: The Mandalorian is given a beskar spear by former Jedi Ahsoka Tano. He uses it to defeat foes including a Dark Trooper and the evil Moff Gideon, while the latter is wielding the Darksaber.
  • Blessed with Suck: Djarin's beskar armor. It offers resistance against blasters and lightsabers, and is incredibly durable. It's also incredibly rare and expensive, easy to spot when unpainted, and it has enough gaps to give him trouble if he gets shot or if someone has bladed weaponry. All of this means that almost every single unscrupulous character Djarin runs into tries to double-cross him in some way to steal his armor and make a fortune.
  • Bling of War: A full suit of Mandalorian beskar armor shines silvery-bright—and the Armorer points out to the Mandalorian that he's making himself stand out very much by upgrading this way. Considering the number of times he's vulnerable to stray shots, it's really less fashion and more cold function. This stands in contrast to other Mandalorians, who usually paint the armor in some fashion to personalize it and make it less distinctive, even if it is obvious at a glance that it's beskar from the design. Boba Fett's armor has a drab (and heavily chipped) paint job (until refurbished, of course), while Bo-Katan's armor is painted with a colorful and stylized design evoking the image of a predator.
  • Body Horror: Fennec Shand manages to survive being shot in the stomach with the help of Boba Fett, but has to have all the organs in her midsection replaced with cybernetics to do so.
  • Bottle Episode: "The Prisoner". Most of the episode takes place in a single location, a Republic prison transport (and most of the rest takes place on the Mandalorian's ship).
  • Brick Joke: The unlucky Mythrol that Djarin catches in the very first episode turns up again halfway through season two; turns out, it was actually Greef Karga himself who hired Djarin to bring him in, as the Mythrol was his accountant who tried to embezzle funds from him and is now doing clerical work for Greef as a form of community service.
  • Bring It:
    • From the end of the second trailer.
      Imperial: Mandalorian, look outside. They are waiting for you.
      The Mandalorian: Yeah? Good.
    • At the initial negotiation in Episode 1 when things get tense.
      Stormtrooper: We have you four to one.
      The Mandalorian: I like those odds.
  • Broken Pedestal: In Chapter 11, Djarin finally meets another group of Mandalorians... and in doing so learns that not only is his clan viewed as a fundamentalist cult, but the Mandalorian group present is not nearly as noble and honorable as he expected them to be, with Bo-Katan repeatedly changing the terms of their deal without consulting him and exploiting the fact that he has no other way to find a Jedi.
  • The Bus Came Back:
    • From Star Wars in general:
      • Boba Fett himself is revealed to be alive in Episode 9, and makes a full return in Episode 14 to reclaim his armor.
      • Bo-Katan Kryze returns after her most recent appearance in The Clone Wars, and Rebels revealing she survived the Great Purge and is working towards finding Moff Gideon. She's later recruited in Chapter 16 to help save Grogu.
      • Ahsoka Tano reappears following Ezra's rescuing of her in Rebels and the final season of The Clone Wars, searching for Grand Admiral Thrawn.
      • Luke Skywalker himself comes in to rescue Djarin and his allies from the Dark Troopers in Chapter 16, bringing R2-D2 along with him. This is only a year after his last appearance in The Rise of Skywalker, but his first appearance as a young man in live action since Return of the Jedi.
    • From the show itself:
      • The Mythrol whom Djarin captured in Episode 1 returns in Episode 12, spending his time paying off his debt by working for Greef.
      • Fennec Shand, who was last seen in Episode 5, is revealed to have survived thanks to Boba Fett himself.
      • Koska Reeves, a member of Bo-Katan's Night Owls, is recruited alongside her leader to help rescue Grogu.
      • Mayfeld, who was captured and imprisoned in Episode 6, is brought back in Episode 15 to help rescue Grogu.
  • Call-Back:
    • A blurrg abruptly pops up in the Mandalorian's scope before attacking him in a shot that's framed identically to Luke Skywalker being ambushed by Tusken Raiders in A New Hope.
    • Once again, a Mandalorian warrior finds himself on the receiving end of a beatdown from a rhino-like alien, though this time his gun is not enough to take it down.
    • Attack of the Clones gets another Call Back when Boba Fett, in response to being asked if he's Mandalorian, says that he is "just a simple man making his way through the galaxy" (paraphrasing Jango Fett's "I'm just a simple man trying to make his way through the universe"). He then adds, "Like my father before me".
    • In the season two finale, Luke Skywalker cuts his way through a bunch of Dark Troopers in a way that deliberately mirrors Darth Vader's hallway massacre in Rogue One. It's also reminiscent of Anakin's wading through the Trade Federation's battle droids on Mustafar in Revenge of the Sith.
  • The Cameo: A few Tatooine droids from the movies appear in the Mos Eisley cantina in "The Gunslinger". EV-9D9 (from Jabba's palace in Return of the Jedi) is now running the bar, while R5-D4 (the astromech that Luke almost buys from the Jawas instead of R2 in A New Hope) appears as an extra.
  • Canon Immigrant: Dark Troopers appear in season 2, having first appeared in the video game Dark Forces.
  • Captain Obvious: There are a few of these. One of the best moments is the droid Zero during the prison break; "It seems comms are no longer functioning. Therefore, you cannot hear me."
  • Casting Gag: Cobb Vanth first appeared in the Aftermath novels, whose author stated that he was based on the character Raylan Givens from Justified. When he finally made a live-action appearance in this show, he was played by Timothy Olyphant — the actor who portrayed Givens.
  • Catchphrase:
    • Kuiil's is "I have spoken", meaning that he's said all he's going to say on a particular topic and isn't going to waste time on any further debate.
    • The Mandalorians have one of their own in a similar vein, saying "This is the Way" whenever they reach a resolution in a conversation about their culture.
    • The Mandalorian uses "I can bring you in warm, or I can bring you in cold" in the first episode. In the fifth one, another bounty hunter uses it against him, much to his annoyance. He doesn't kill the other hunter because he stole his line, but he does bring it up before pulling the trigger so it probably was extra motivation.
  • The Cavalry:
    • Episode 3 has the Mandalorian be bailed out by the Mandalorians of his enclave, who proceed to rout the horde of other bounty hunters that had been chasing him.
    • Episode 11 has Djarin rescued by Bo-Katan and her Mandalorians, twice.
    • Episode 16 has Luke Skywalker himself, arriving to cut down the Dark Troopers after having sensed Grogu’s message from Tython.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • The beskar ingots that Greef Karga received as his cut from the job and shows the Mandalorian in Chapter 3 after completing the assignment save his life at the end when Djarin shoots him in the chest.
    • In the fourth episode of season 2, Djarin, Cara, Greef and Mythrol—their landspeeder driver—enter an Imperial base to destroy it. As they enter through the garage, Mythrol points at an armored speeder under a tarp and says: "Look, it's a mint Trexler Marauder!" Nice job hanging that lampshade on Chekhov's Gun, Mythrol. (Yes, they later use it to escape with. And it does have mounted guns on it, which come in handy.)
    • When he meets Ahsoka, Djarin manages to deflect a blow from her lightsaber with his beskar armor, and it is later affirmed that even the strongest of lightsabers cannot cut through pure beskar. This fact not only means the Magistrate with her beskar spear can put up a fight against Ahsoka, it also ends up saving Din's life when Moff Gideon tries to cut him down from behind with the Darksaber in the season two finale.
  • Chekhov's Skill: In "Chapter 1", IG-11 has a self-destruct protocol as part of his programming in order to prevent capture. He uses it in "Chapter 8" to clear out a score of stormtroopers while taking his life in the process.
  • Chronically Crashed Car: Djarin doesn't have the best luck keeping the Razor Crest intact and flying. It gets stripped for parts by Jawas in Episode 2; crashes into a glacier in Chapter 10; crashes into the ocean and has to be fished out with a crane in Chapter 11. And then in Chapter 14 it finally gets destroyed completely by a turbolaser salvo from an Imperial cruiser.
  • Cliffhanger: Two in a row. Chapter 7 ends with the Djarin, Cara, and Greef trying to cover from a large regiment of stormtroopers led by Moff Gideon while some scout troopers capture The Child after attacking Kuiil. The episode immediately afterwards ends when it's revealed that Moff Gideon survived the crash of his TIE Fighter, and is currently in possession of the Darksaber.
  • The Coats Are Off: Immediately before her dramatic duel with The Magistrate, Ahsoka Tano sheds her cloak in a manner highly reminiscent of Obi-Wan Kenobi's trademark pre-fight move.
  • The Comically Serious: The Mandalorian is a stoic, Proud Warrior Race Guy but he still has trouble riding a blurrg, speaking Jawa, caring for a baby solo, or socializing with anyone who's not Mandalorian.
  • Concept Art Gallery: The end credits, of all things, serve as this, scrolling through multiple pieces of concept art the staff put together in pre-production to hash out the story beats and visuals of the latest episode.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • Blurrgs first appeared in Ewoks: The Battle for Endor and later appeared in The Clone Wars, ridden by the Twi'lek resistance on Ryloth.
    • Mandalorian armor is made of beskar steel, a rare and valuable metal that is mined from their moon of Concordia.
    • Given that it's made out of something rare (which is implied to have become rarer still since the Empire did something called the Great Purge against the Mandalorians), Mandalorian armor is sacred; Djarin earns a pauldron not for completing his most recent job but just for bringing back a sufficient amount of the beskar.
    • The Mandalorian tradition of adopting outsiders is referenced; the Mandalorian himself is a foundling.
    • The Child is fifty years old because it is the same species as Yoda. Since Yoda stated he was 900 years old, it makes sense that the babies take time to mature.
    • While both the new and old expanded universe made heavy mention of vibroblade weapons, and they have technically appeared on screen before, this is the first time we've seen the vibrating effect in action.
    • Some of the Mandalorian's armor pieces in his first set come from various Imperial troopers. For example, there are the gauntlets and pauldron of the shore troopers in Rogue One.
    • The Mandalorian appears to have been a child at the time of the Clone Wars. Flashbacks in Chapter 3 show his village being destroyed by B2 Super Battle Droids and a droid gunship.
    • A white, bucket-shaped object like the one carried by a fleeing Cloud City citizen in The Empire Strikes Back is shown here to be a secure lockbox and carrying-case called a “camtono".
    • A loth-cat makes its first live-action appearance in "The Sanctuary".
    • Except for the Cold Open, the fifth episode takes place entirely on Tatooine.
    • The docking bay in episode 5 is staffed by Pit Droids, and implied to be the same ones employed by Ody Mandrell (themselves inspired by The Three Stooges).
    • In episode 6, the prison warden is wearing the same egg-shaped helmet as the rebel soldiers on the Tantive IV.
    • Cara Dune's opponent in the prize fighting ring is an Iridonian Zabrak.
    • Episode 7 reveals the name of Cara's homeworld: Alderaan.
    • The Mandalorian warriors that rescued a child Din from the battle droids destroying his village are clearly identifiable as related to Death Watch, thanks to the mark of Clan Vizsla on their shoulder pauldrons.
    • The last episode of Season 1 ends with a whopper: Moff Gideon cutting his way out of his wrecked TIE fighter...with the freaking Darksaber no less.
    • The Mandalorian's first bounty in Chapter 1 mentions "Life Day," the fictional holiday around which the infamous holiday special is based.
    • The yellow and red Rodian disintegrated in "The Sin" has been confirmed to be Chussido, one of the Cloud Riders from Solo.
    • Episode 9 features Cobb Vanth wearing a set of armor that once belonged to Boba Fett, as the Aftermath series depicted him doing.
    • Cobb's speeder is built out of one of the engines of Anakin's pod racer or a similar model.
    • The Empire operates a Gozanti class cruiser,note  a ship type first seen in a background shot of The Phantom Menace and utilized heavily in the animated series.
    • The teacher droid's lesson is essentially a giant series of these in terms of the stellar layout of the galaxy. For example: the maelstrom around Kessel and the roving capitals of the New Republic being in the Hosnian system.
    • Ahsoka Tano's appearance in season two picks up where her last chronological appearance left off; she is still searching for Grand Admiral Thrawn and, presumably, Ezra Bridger by extension. Sabine Wren is notably not with her at the moment, despite leaving to aid Ahsoka in her hunt at the end of Rebels.
    • Chapter 15 reveals that Mayfeld served in the Empire during Operation: Cinder, a major event in Star Wars Battlefront II (2017).
    • When Boba Fett is being pursued by TIE fighters in Chapter 15, he uses one of the blue seismic charges that his father Jango used against Obi-Wan Kenobi in Attack of the Clones, complete with the same sound effect.
    • One of the prisoners on Chapter 6 is an Ardennian like Rio from Solo.
    • The Slave I makes the same distinctive engine noise it made on Attack of the Clones, which was also modified into the DVD and later releases of The Empire Strikes Back.
  • Contract on the Hitman: After the title character rescues The Child from the Imperial Remnant he delivered him to earlier in the episode "The Sin", all the bounty hunters on Nevarro come after him on the way to his ship. The Bounty Hunter's Guild puts a bounty on Djarin's head, which at least one character will try to collect on per episode until the end of the season, when the head of the Guild, Greef Karga, basically pardons him when The Child saves his life.
  • Creative Closing Credits: The first part of each episode's credits is played against a backdrop of paintings depicting key moments from that episode.
  • Creator Cameo:
    • Co-director Taika Waititi voices IG-11.
    • Showrunner Jon Favreau voices the "Heavy Infantry Mandalorian" Paz Vizsla, presumably a relative of his Clone Wars character, Pre Vizsla.
    • The three X-Wing pilots at the end of "The Prisoner" are played by directors Dave Filoninote , Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow. Filoni's character makes another appearance in the season two episode "The Passenger".
  • Cryptic Background Reference: The Great Purge. The Empire went after the Mandalorians, forcing them into hiding while looting their beskar. When this happened and how complete it was is currently unknown, though the overall timeline suggests that it was some time between A New Hope and Return of the Jedi. Season 2 shows there are other Mandalorians active, including Bo-Katan Kryze, and Boba Fett states that the Empire "glassed" Mandalore, though how many Mandalorians of which sub-sects survived and how thoroughly Mandalore is "glassed" remain unknown.
  • Cult: The Mandalorians of the covert on Nevarro are something of a benign cult, in many ways more like a small tribe of refugees, mostly made up of survivors and foundlings brought into the fold during the Clone Wars. The first season portrays them heroically, flying to the rescue when the Empire lays siege to the town. Highly secretive, they consider themselves the Last of Their Kind and ascribe religious trappings to their weapons, armor, and the rare alloy known as beskar steel. They also never remove their armor in front of anyone, including each other, especially their helmets. The second season reveals that other surviving Mandalorians consider sects like Djarin's to be religious extremists — Bo-Katan calls them the Children of the Watch (suggesting a possible connection with Death Watch), and she and her followers freely unmask in public and, at least in Bo-Katan's case, are far more pragmatic about abiding by the terms of their deals.
  • Culture Clash:
    • An internal one between Djarin and the other Mandalorians in Chapter 11. He is not happy to see them take off their helmets, accusing them of being Mandalorian pretenders, while they are surprised yet bemused to realise that he's from a fundamentalist offshoot of their culture. Owing to their subsequent untrustworthy behavior, he doesn’t move much past an Enemy Mine arrangement.
    • Another internal one in Chapter 14, when he meets Boba Fett. The latter was not raised among Mandalorians, and evidently never swore any creeds to them, but is quite insistent on being entitled to his father's old armor which Djarin got from Cobb Vanth. Granted, Djarin accepts this unorthodox connection to the culture pretty easily.
    • Numerous external examples, between Djarin and non-Mandalorians, between New Republic pilots and skeptical Outer Rim residents, between the Sand People, Jawas, and the settlers on Tatooine, and so on.
  • Culture Shock: When he finally encounters another clan of Mandalorians, Djarin is dismayed to learn that they view his covert as an extreme fundamentalist cult, and that many other Mandalorians don't do stuff like wearing full combat armor at all times in public. Later, he meets the much-more-polite Boba Fett, who was never directly raised in the Mandalorian culture after his father was killed fighting the Jedi.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle:
    • In Chapter 3, it's made perfectly clear that a ragtag group of bounty hunters who've probably never worked together as a group are absolutely no match for a team of Mandalorians who act as a unit, support each other, work the terrain to their advantage, and fight using infantry tactics.
    • In Chapter 8, the Armorer gives a No Holds Barred Beat Down to five Stormtroopers, using only her forge hammer and tongs.
    • In Chapter 13, Ahsoka Tano absolutely massacres the Calodan city guards. Djarin doesn't even have to do anything except stand by the gate to stop Lang from interfering, and when he tries to pull an I Surrender, Suckers Djarin guns him down instantly.
    • In Episode 14, Boba Fett gets his armour back and proceeds to single-handedly rout the stormtroopers who had pinned Fennec and Djarin.
    • Episode 16, the Season 2 finale. On one side: an entire platoon of Dark Troopers, the latest and most advanced model of battle droid. Not the joke enemies seen in previous outings: just one of them nearly killed Djarin earlier, and they're strong, resilient and patient enough to punch their way through a steel door if it stands between them and their objective. On the other side? Luke freakin' Skywalker. Poor droids didn't stand a chance.
  • Cute as a Bouncing Betty: The Armorer makes "whistling birds" using some of the excess beskar the Mandalorian brought in as reward for bringing in the Child. Coming from a conversation about signet animals and reserving some whistling birds for the foundlings, you'd expect something innocuous, but the Armorer soon makes clear they're a weapon: micro-missiles that automatically seek out and kill nearby enemies, which make a whistling sound as they fly.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Mayfeld was an Imperial soldier during Operation Cinder, serving under the command of the sociopathic Valin Hess. He watched in horror as the population of the planet he was stationed on was pointlessly slaughtered just because the Emperor said so, while the rest of his squad was butchered in the fighting with him as the Sole Survivor. After all that, it really isn't that surprising that he went AWOL and became a selfish, cynical criminal.
  • Darkest Hour: By the end of Chapter 14, Baby Grogu has been captured and then is shown using his force powers to force-choke and bodyslam stormtroopers under Moff Gideon's approving eye on the Imperial Remnant cruiser, and Djarin's ship, the Razor Crest, has been obliterated by Orbital Bombardment.
  • A Day in the Limelight: The series takes numerous "background" species and characters of the World Building of the films (particularly the original trilogy) that saw little use in them and makes them center stage for one or several episodes, often using them for awesome action setpieces. It includes IG droids (IG-11), Tusken raiders, Krayt Dragons, Boba Fett himself and more.
  • Decapitation Presentation: In a slightly less gruesome and more symbolic variation, one of the bars (the Mos Eisley Cantina) that Djarin walks past is decorated with a line of (presumably empty) Stormtrooper helmets impaled on spikes.
  • Deconstruction:
    • A minor one for the kind of Bounty Hunter that Boba Fett and his invokedcountless imitators pioneered. In Legends, bounty hunting was usually shown to be a glamorous, high-risk/high-reward job full of danger and excitement, with high-profile hunters chasing after even more high-profile targets for bounties that ran in the thousands of credits or more. When meeting with Greef Karga to collect on his bounty, the title character's reward is barely enough to pay for fuel, and the vast majority of targets Greef has to offer him are all petty criminals and bail jumpers. Even the best job Karga can offer him in Chapter 3 is a noble's son on the run... who is also a bail jumper.
    • Toro Calican just wants to be seen as a cool bounty hunter but his naïveté and inexperience makes him completely unprepared to deal with a far more experienced and deadly target. Fennec Shand would have killed him several times if not for the Mandalorian. Toro also attempts to go after the Mandalorian's bounty and takes the child hostage, so he could make a name for himself. All with disastrous consequences.
    • The latter part of Season 2 has some deconstruction of the fan opinion embodied in the Rooting for the Empire trope. Chapter 15 makes you root for the Empire a bit... and them reminds the viewership that they are malignant, tyrannical, terroristic, and murderous when an Imperial officer casually and callously talks about meatgrinding troops and committing terrorist acts to destabilize the Republic. In Chapter 16, they even put in-universe the usually silly fan claim that the Rebels "murdered millions on the Death Stars" and dismissal of the billions that were obliterated on Alderaan by the first one, showing it for all its Moral Myopia, and how it's not funny at all in-universe to those in the Alderaanian diaspora.
  • Dodge by Braking: Djarin pulls this on a bounty hunter who attacks him in space in the Cold Open of "The Gunslinger".
  • Doomed Hometown:
    • Flashbacks in the first, third, and eighth episodes show that when the title character was a child, his village was destroyed by Separatist droids during the Clone Wars.
    • Retroactively revealed to be the case for Cara Dune, when it's revealed her homeworld was Alderaan.
  • Doom Troops:
  • Dragon Ascendant: Played for Laughs in the season two finale when we learn that Bib Fortuna has taken control of Jabba the Hutt's palace after Jabba's death in Return of the Jedi. His court is pathetically tiny compared to Jabba's and he's gained so much weight he can barely move on his own. Oh, and he only holds onto the throne for about a minute before Boba Fett arrives to kill him and take it for himself.
  • Dramatic Half-Hour: All episodes so far have been between 31 and 46 minutes including credits (most under 40 minutes), making it either a a long half-hour or a short Dramatic Hour Long.
  • Dramatic Irony: Unlike the audience, Djarin doesn't recognize the Child's species and has little idea why the Imperials are so desperate to get their hands on him. In parts of the galaxy, including his, “the Force" is just a myth that not a lot of people have even heard about. The Empire spent a long time expunging knowledge of the Jedi as well; most of the younger generation don't know them at all (like how Luke didn't way back in A New Hope) and many who do thought they were weird martial artists or "sorcerers".
  • Dramatic Unmask: Zig-zagged: in Chapter 4, Omera slowly moves to unmask the Mandalorian while persuading him to stay on Sorgan, but he gently stops her hands and states that he doesn’t belong in the peaceful village. Technically not an unmasking, but very dramatic!
  • Driving Question:
    • What are the Imperial Remnant's plans for the Child? Why is the "Way" of the Mandalorian's tribe different from what we've seen of other Mandalorians so far? What is the Great Purge and what happened to Bo-Katan's Resistance? And just who is the Mandalorian?
    • The final episode of season one answers, or otherwise heavily implies the answers to the last two. The Mandalorian’s name is Din Djarin. As for Bo-Katan’s resistance, after Djarin causes his TIE to crash, Moff Gideon is revealed to have survived and escapes his now upside-down wreck of a ship by cutting out the side of the cockpit with the Darksaber, last seen in the hands of Bo-Katan as she rallied the clans against the Empire. We don't yet know how he got his hands on the Darksaber, but Season Two reveals that Bo-Katan has spent the years since trying to find him and retrieve it.
    • Season Two also reveals that the Mandalorian's tribe are actually an offshoot, known as the Children of the Watch, who are akin to hardcore militant religious fundamentalists, and seem to be largely dismissed by other Mandalorians out-of-hand for their beliefs.
  • Enemy Mine: Towards the end of season two, Djarin is forced to seek out the aid of Mayfeld, since a former imperial sharpshooter will be of great help rescuing Grogu from an Imperial Remnant. Initially the team-up is fraught with tension, but by the end of Chapter 15 the two have come to understand and respect each other, no longer considering themselves enemies.
  • Ennio Morricone Pastiche: The theme song.
  • Establishing Character Moment: The Cold Open serves as one for the title character on a typical bounty run. He demolishes some goons threatening his quarry in a brutal (but not sadistic) manner, gives his target a choice of coming in "warm or cold", and completely blows off the quarry's attempts at making small talk or bargaining for his freedom before casually freezing him in carbonite. A secondary moment comes at the end of the first episode when he shoots IG-11 to protect the Child, showing that despite his amoral ruthlessness, he's not all bad deep down.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep":
    • For much of the series, the titular character is only referred to as the Mandalorian, or more informally "Mando", and that's when he isn't simply getting the Hey, You! treatment. It's eventually revealed that his name is Din Djarin.
    • There are currently three other characters that are only known by their description - the Client, the Armorer, and the Child. As of Episode 13, the Child's name has been revealed to be Grogu.
    • Luke is only ever referred to as the Jedi, to the point that he's credited as such in the closing credits of the second season finale.
  • Everyone Has Standards:
    • Paz Vizsla nearly comes to blows with the title character for accepting payment in Imperial-stamped stolen beskar, viewing it as a disgrace to their culture and the memory of those who were murdered by the Empire. The Armorer resolves the argument by pointing out that at least the beskar is now back in Mandalorian hands, and that Djarin displayed plenty of courage in retrieving it.
    • When Djarin comes across the remains of the Mandalorian Covert's armour in Chapter 8, he angrily asks Greef if this is the work of him and his bounty hunters after their confrontation in Chapter 3. Karga is aghast, pointing out that the men who attacked him and the Child were mercs, who got the hell out of dodge not long after he escaped, since there's no money in picking a fight with a clan of Mandalorians.
      Greef Karga: They're mercenaries, not zealots!
    • Djarin is in a standoff against Boba Fett and Fennec Shand, two very dangerous people with scores to settle. When Imperial stormtroopers arrive, everyone immediately turns their attention to defeating them, and Boba Fett is dismayed to realize The Empire is back in force.
  • Exact Words:
    • Episode 9: Djarin uses this on Gor Koresh when the latter is captured while trying to escape. Koresh promises to tell him where another Mandalorian is if Djarin doesn't kill him, and Djarin promises, "You won't die by my hand". After getting the info from Koresh, Djarin then leaves him to be devoured by the local wildlife.
    • Episode 13: Ahsoka offers Djarin the beskar spear the Magistrate promised as payment. Djarin tells Ahsoka he did not complete the task the Magistrate gave him, which was to kill her, and thus has not earned the promised payment. Not only did Djarin not explicitly agree to the job in the first place, he made no effort to kill her at all. Ahsoka still hands him the spear, saying it belongs in the hands of a Mandalorian.
      • Djarin and the Magistrate bears elaboration. He's allowed into the town in the first place because of his beskar armor and status as a licensed bounty hunter. The Magistrate immediately has him brought to her and offers him the beskar spear in exchange for killing the troublesome Jedi. Since Djarin is looking for the Jedi specifically as a potential teacher for the Child, he appears to take the job, but only asks "Where can I find this Jedi?" thus never exactly agreeing to kill the Jedi in exchange for payment. Djarin leaves the town with the Magistrate thinking her problem is solved (since she's just sicced a Mandalorian on a Jedi), Djarin leaves thinking he only has to find the Jedi, hand the Child over, and his problems are solved. The reality turns out to be a mite more complicated.
    • Chapter 14: Boba Fett offers a deal to Djarin to receive Fett’s armor in exchange for Grogu’s safety, but Moff Gideon’s forces interrupt before the deal is explicitly agreed to. By the end of the episode Fett has his armor back (retrieved from the Razor Crest before its untimely demise), but since the Child has been kidnapped, he vows to help retrive Grogu to hold up his end of the bargain.
  • The Faceless: The Mandalorian and his tribe never remove their helmets in public, as part of their code.
  • Fake Shemp: During the filming of Season 1, scheduling conflicts with Pedro Pascal's other projects resulted in a nondescript amount of the Mandalorian's scenes — including every one from Chapter 4: "Sanctuary" — actually consisting of one of the credited doubles, Brendan Wayne and Lateef Crowder, with Pascal's voice performance dubbed in. Pascal finished those other projects before Lucasfilm began shooting Season 2, resulting in more scenes in which he portrays Djarin both vocally and physically.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture:
    • The Mandalorians:
      • The Mandalorian tribe bears some resemblance to pre-20th century European Jews. Left stateless by the Empire's purge of their homeworld (c.f. the Roman sack of Judea), they exist in an insular society alongside the rest of the planet's inhabitants, valued for their skills (fighting in this case) but much mistrusted and periodically massacred.
      • The series in general draws heavily on Samurai tropes, giving the Mandalorians a strong warrior code of honor and treating their armor as being similar in importance to a samurai's swords, with their forging a sacred rite.
    • The Tusken Raiders are again used similarly to Native Americans in Westerns, though the Mandalorian treats them with more respect, pointing out that they were there first and bartering passage through their land using a Signed Language.
  • Fantasy Metals: Beskar steel. Originally mined on Concordia, the moon of Mandalor, it is both incredibly valuable as bullion and can be forged into extremely durable armor capable of withstanding direct blaster strikes. During the Imperial "purge" of the Mandalorians, much of the remaining beskar was seized by the Empire and is seen by the surviving Mandalorians as the equivalent of Nazi Gold. Djarin's reward from the Client for retrieving the Child is a lockbox full of beskar ingots, which the Armorer forges into new armor for him. It repeatedly saves his life while remaining unblemished.
  • Fantastic Racism:
    • The Mandalorian doesn't like to work with droids, and isn't keen on bargaining with the Jawas either. The droid thing is at least understandable given his background, and he seems to get over it pretty quickly once he’s interacted with a given friendly droid more than once.
    • When the Mandalorian is on Tatooine, he's shown to treat the Tuskens with respect in contrast to how the locals (who view them as murderous raiders) do. In contrast the Tuskens despise ‘’the settlers'' for being intruders on their planet who are stealing valuable water.
    • "Mando" seems to double as a term of respect and a term of disgust depending on who's saying it and how. Given the amount of times the Mandalorians switched sides during the Clone Wars and the years following it topped off with jealously of their skills and their less than stellar social skills, is anyone really surprised?
    • Bo-Katan and her crew are downright hateful towards Boba Fett for being both a clone and the son of the outcast Jango Fett.
  • Fauxba Fett: The titular character himself. A Mandalorian bounty hunter clad in armor, covered with weapons, and almost never seen without his helmet. Amusingly the actual Boba Fett himself would show up in Season 2 and team up with Djarin.
  • Fictional Currency: Comes up prominently at the beginning of the first episode. Due to the collapse of the Empire, reduced to a handful of warlords out on the galactic fringe, Imperial Credits aren’t considered a very reliable currency anymore. It doesn’t seem the fledgling New Republic has been able to fully step up to fill the void, at least not in the Outer Rim. Karga gives the Mandalorian a choice between full pay in Imperial Credits or half pay in a local currency called “Calamari Flan”: he grudgingly accepts half pay rather than accept Imperial Credits.
  • First-Episode Twist: The Mandalorian's bounty is a baby from the same species as Yoda.
  • Flight Is the Final Power: Djarin is a trained warrior with multiple weapons, but is inexperienced with something referred to as "the rising phoenix." Towards the end of Season One, the Armorer presents him with the rising phoenix: a Mandalorian jetpack, which he uses to engage Moff Gideon's TIE-fighter.
  • Foreshadowing: The Mandalorian's client specified his target in the first episode should preferably be taken alive, while IG-11's contract specified "dead". IG-11 So they were hired by different parties...
  • Five-Man Band: Even though we never see all five together at once, the characters fit the roles of the traditional Five-Man Band.
    • In Season One:
      • The Leader: Din Djarin.
      • The Lancer: Cara, who follows his lead.
      • The Smart Guy: Kuiil is a gifted tech, with the experience of three human lifetimes.
      • The Big Guy: Bounty droid IG-11.
      • The Chick: The Armourer defuses conflicts, offers sound advice, and is The Heart of the Mandalorian covert, and therefore of Djarin's group as well.
    • Come Season Two, the lineup has shifted a bit, though again not all of these characters are present at the same place at the same time:
    • The Season Two Finale features a proper Five-Man Band, though most of them are actually women:
      • The Leader: Din Djarin, as always. It is his show, after all.
      • The Lancer: Bo-Katan, who strategizes their main assault and leads the distraction force.
      • The Smart Guy: Koska, though she doesn't have much to do in that department in a smash-and-grab raid, still knows her way around Imperial warship systems.
      • The Big Guy: Cara Dune, as the largest of the crew wielding the biggest gun and being the most willing to go hand-to-hand.
      • The Chick: Fennec, though significantly more badass than usual for the role.
  • Forging Scene: The Armorer forges a new pauldron for the title character on being presented with an ingot of beskar steel. It happens again in Chapter 3 where she forges a chestpiece for him.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: Some fan reactors saw an R2 unit in the X-Wing coming to the heroes' rescue.
  • Gatling Good:
    • The thugs the Mandalorian faces in the first episode use an E-WEB heavy cannon mounted on a hover platform. The Mandalorian manages to turn it on them.
    • During the ultimate battle of episode 3, the formerly-antagonistic Mandalorian in heavy armor fights alongside the Tribe to save the protagonist; using a rotary blaster cannon to eliminate swaths of mercenaries.
    • The E-WEB comes back in episode 8, with Gideon using it to threaten the good guys. Before they can fire it, Djarin gets his hands on it and uses it against the Stormtroopers — just like he did with the Nikto in episode 1 — but ultimately it comes back to bite him when Gideon shoots the gun's massive power cell, causing an explosion that nearly takes Djarin out for good.
    • Gideon's troops really love the E-WEB, which also turns up briefly in Chapter 14. One giant, heavy boulder quickly makes short work of it.
  • Gambit Pile Up: Things are starting to head this way in season two; The Imperial Remnant is trying to track down the Child for their experiments, Bo-Katan and her Nite Owls are trying to retrieve the Darksaber from Moff Gideon, Grand Admiral Thrawn is apparently back in action, Ahsoka Tano is hunting Thrawn, Boba Fett and Fennec Shand are searching for Boba's armor, the New Republic are trying to secure their power base in the Outer Rim, the inhabitants of the Rim are resisting their attempts to settle the region, and Djarin's quest to find someone who can train the Child has placed him smack dab in the middle of the whole mess.
  • Gangland Driveby: Two troopers, just minding their own business in town, looking through a Jawa's junk for sale, barely get a chance to react before a speederbike piloted by IG-11 rips past, blasters blazing. They fall to the ground dead, leaving the Jawa looking back and forth at the two bodies in confusion.
  • Genre Roulette:
    • "Chapter 4: Sanctuary":
      • While the show is mostly a space western, the attack on the backwater village feels like something out of The Lord of the Rings. The raid, carried out by a gang seemingly composed entirely of Klatoonians, looks more like an orc attack then anything you would see in sci-fi. The blaster shots and Droid being destroyed contrasts with the screaming raiders and the leader carrying a blaster based on a sawn-off Winchester 1887.
      • It's also the classic The Magnificent Seven Samurai plot in which desperate villagers hire an experienced warrior to save their town from recurring bandit raids, and the warrior does so by training the people themselves to fight.
      • Djarin's pursuit by the AT-ST in the woods, meanwhile, is framed very much like a chase from a dragon or some kind of horror movie monster.
    • "Chapter 6: The Prisoner" takes place entirely in space and mostly on a pristine-looking ship, in contrast to the usual gritty towns. It's much more heavily sci-fi classic with a dash of horror thrown in.
    • "Chapter 10: The Passenger" also leans more sci-fi and less western, mostly since they land on an ice planet and are attacked by vicious monsters.
    • "Chapter 13: The Jedi" shifts toward a Feudal Japanese Samurai/Ninja flick feel, with the town looking like a small Japanese town and the Magistrate's home having a version of a koi pond with what looks like oversized Bonsai trees. This makes the scenery more fitting for Ahsoka, who as a quick Jedi favoring ambush takes notes straight from Kurosawa movies. And when Ahsoka faces down with the Magistrate, Elsbeth fights with a traditional Spearmaiden style historically used by female Samurai. Just in the case the subtlety is lost by episode's end, the celebration after the Magistrate is taken care of is a cover of the series' main theme played with traditional Japanese instruments.
  • Giant Spider: Djarin, the Child, and their passenger crash-land in an ice cave in Season 2, then discover a nest of giant spiders in said cave. They range in size from tiny to 30+ feet tall. Luckily for arachnophobic fans, they look more like squid with spidery legs (still scary) than most versions of the trope.
  • Gory Discretion Shot:
    • At the beginning of the first episode, the camera angle changes just before an unfortunate Quarren mook is bisected by a closing door. All we see is the lower half of his body fall to the floor.
    • Subverted at the end of the first episode. The blaster fire reflected on the Mandalorian's helmet seems like one of these for IG-11 killing the Child. In actuality, it's the Mandalorian shooting IG-11.
  • Guns Akimbo:
    • Justified with IG-11, who is built so it can both shoot and aim in two different directions at the same time.
    • Mayfeld triple-wields with a third blaster on a mechanical arm on his back.
    • In the season 2 episode "The Heiress", Bo-Katan dual-wields a pair of blaster pistols when saving Djarin from the Quarrens and when assaulting the Imperial cruiser. She later repeats this in "The Rescue".
  • Half-Arc Season: The series follows this format. Roughly half of the episodes are episodic, character-driven adventures, while the other half advances the ongoing Myth Arc with the Child being hunted by the Imperial Remnant led by Moff Gideon.
  • Handy Cuffs: While he's otherwise a highly-skilled bounty hunter, Mando doesn't seem to realize that it's much more effective to cuff people's hands behind them.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: A Quarren mook at the opening scene has this happen, courtesy of the cantina's irising mechanical door the titular character shoots the controls of.
  • Hard-Work Montage: When he finally gets his ship parts back from the Jawas, the Mandalorian gripes that he still needs a full maintenance facility to repair the damage. Or they can just knuckle down and have a montage of Building Is Welding.
  • He's Back: Boba Fett has spent several years as a drifter on Tatooine. As of Chapter 14, he's got his ship and his armor back and he's as badass as ever, routing several squads of stormtroopers and destroying two transports with one missile.
  • "Hell, Yes!" Moment: Team Mando is trapped on the bridge of Moff Gideon's cruiser, Dark Troopers pounding on the blast doors. A single X-Wing flies past the windows and lands, and we see a black cloaked figure get out. Then Luke Skywalker activates his lightsaber and starts tearing through the Dark Troopers like they were made of tissue paper.
  • Hey, That's My Line!: Chapter 5 begins with a bounty hunter telling the Mandalorian "I can bring you in warm, or I can bring you in cold," which the Mandalorian used to threaten his own bounty in Episode 1. The Mandalorian turns the tables on him and then uses this phrase as a Bond One-Liner before blowing the guy away.
  • Heroic Suicide: IG-11 chooses to self-destruct and take out a whole squad of Stormtroopers so that Djarin and his friends can escape.
  • Hidden Depths:
    • The Mandalorian. In the first episode alone, he acknowledges the request of Kuiil, the Ugnaught rancher, to learn how to ride a blurrg, possibly because Kuiil makes a reference to his ancestors’ legendary history of riding mythosaurs. He also doesn't want to kill the baby alien at the end of the episode.
    • Chapter 5 reveals that he is at least reasonably fluent in Tusken Sign Language, when he successfully negotiates with a pair of Sand People for passage through their territory.
  • Hollywood Tactics:
    • Subverted; IG-11 tries to apply this doctrine when assaulting the mercenary compound in episode 1. He's able to blow away all the mooks out in the open in the courtyard easily, but is promptly locked out of the base, flanked by rooftop snipers, and pinned down by a turret as a consequence. The Mandalorian is clearly pissed at the droid's recklessness throughout the scene.
    • Although the show does a sterling job at lampshading and averting this trope, we still have a moment in episode 3 where the Mandalorian enclave fly to the protagonist's rescue on jetpacks. Although the ability to fly can seriously boost your mobility, there is zero cover or concealment in the air. Actively engaging in a firefight from on high gives every enemy on the battlefield a clear line of sight to gun you down. Ultimately downplayed, wearing armor practically immune to the small arms wielded by the bounty hunters makes it a much more viable tactic than it first appears.
    • Also subverted in Episode 4, where the Mandalorian and Cara Dune tell the villagers to stick behind their barricades and make use of a trap to lure in the AT-ST, rather than having it be a full-on brawl. The Klatooinian raiders however, play it straight, charging right at the barricades and being gunned down by the villagers without any effort to seek cover. However, they were expecting to receive cover fire from the AT-ST, and had the advantage until it was taken down.
  • Homage: Continuing the tradition of Star Wars taking inspiration from classic samurai stories, The Mandalorian'’ — particularly the dynamic between Djarin and the Child — are inspired by Lone Wolf and Cub''.
  • Homage Shot:
    • The Mandalorian and the Child's first meeting has them reaching to each other until their fingertips nearly touch, emulating E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial's iconic image, though in a long-shot instead of a close-up.
    • The Jawas ramming their Sandcrawler against a rock to try to squeeze the Mandalorian is straight from the tank chase in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, although mirrored.
    • Paz Vizsla using his jetpack to fly alongside the Mandalorian's ship and saluting him is framed to reference the shot of Cliff Secord flying alongside a passenger plane and saluting the passengers in The Rocketeer. Although Paz doesn't accidentally shut off his jetpack.
  • How the Mighty Have Fallen: By the time of the show, the Galactic Empire, who once ruled most of the galaxy with an iron fist, have been completely removed from power and much of the show is spent demonstrating this. Several of their former rank-and-file soldiers and officers have been imprisoned and/or executed for their crimes by the New Republic, others are reduced to lording over a planet or two and thus becoming high-priority targets for New Republic forces, Imperial Stormtrooper helmets are impaled on wooden pikes or the subject of anti-Empire graffiti and even those who are still free are still reduced to operating with limited equipment and working with whatever they have to hand. A major part of Gideon's Imperial Remnant's plans is to get back into power at any cost.
  • Human Popsicle: The Mandalorian makes delivery of several figures frozen in carbonite for hibernation, in the same manner as Han Solo when Boba Fett delivered him to Jabba.
  • Hypocrite: Bo Katan mocks Djarin for supposedly being a part of an extremist Mandalorian splinter faction, despite the fact she helped found the splinter faction that possibly gave rise to Djarin’s, and Djarin’s group is transparently dedicated to honoring their roots compared to Death Watch’s terrorism.
  • I Like Those Odds: When the Mandalorian is meeting with the Client, he almost gets into a fight with the Client's Stormtrooper escort. One trooper says that they have the Mandalorian outnumbered four to one. He responds with this trope, verbatim.
  • I Surrender, Suckers:
    • In Chapter 13, Lang tries to win his Mexican Standoff with Djarin by pretending to surrender, only to pull his sidearm. Unfortunately for him, Djarin is quicker on the draw.
    • In Chapter 16, Moff Gideon, now alone after the heroes have killed his henchmen and taken control of his ship, holds Grogu hostage with the Darksaber. He pretends to have gotten everything he needs and claims he will let Djarin take Grogu and leave peacefully... then tries to cut him down from behind when Djarin turns away from him. Thankfully, Gideon was unaware that lightsabers can't cut through beskar, and his blade just bounces off Djarin's armor.
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine:
    • Pedro Pascal and Emily Swallow previously met first through the New York theater district, and again on the set of The Mentalist.
    • Ming-Na Wen, Titus Welliver, Simon Kassianides, Katy M. O'Brien, Thomas E. Sullivan, and Brendan Wayne all previously portrayed recurring characters in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. Chapters in which the Mandalorian interacts with either Fennec Shand or Axe Wolves reunited Wayne with either Wen or Kassianides. Both shows have Molly Pinto as their casting director.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: Almost every episode is named "The [single-word noun]".
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy:
    • Referenced when the Mandalorian is introduced to a former Imperial sharpshooter. He immediately comments that this isn't an impressive claim at all before said sharpshooter angrily retorts that "I wasn't a stormtrooper, wiseass."
    • Demonstrated when the Scout Troopers who have just captured the Child try to pass the time by shooting at a piece of debris a few feet away from them... and both missing horribly. Shortly after this they are killed by IG-11, whom they also completely fail to hit with their blasters despite the tall droid standing a couple feet away from them.
    • Almost unbelievably subverted by these very same troopers moments before, when they manage to kill Kuiil and his blurrg while moving at high speed, skid to a halt, scoop the Child off the ground and roar back off towards town, all in a matter of seconds.
      • Which is attributed to the weapons on the speeders, which have a track record of being accurate. The scout troopers are trying to fire on the debris using hand-held blasters, which they then shake and listen to as if the weapons were broken. Careful listening will show that there are the sounds of parts moving loosely in the weapons, which is never a good thing in a professional piece of equipment. Perhaps the tools were to blame the whole time?
      • Zigzagged overall. Most heroic characters don't get hit due to Plot Armor. Djarin gets hit quite often... after he gets his beskar armor, which is mostly immune to blaster fire anyway.
    • Averted with the guards in The Jedi. These soldiers look appear to behave professionally and have good trigger discipline. They'd probably be extremely effective were it not for the nature of their opponents.
    • Also averted with the Dark Troopers; it looks like a good 80% to 90% of their shots are dead-on headshots. It's just that this is ineffective against a Mandalorian with a beskar helmet, or a Jedi who can dodge or deflect blaster fire.
  • Innocent Bystander Series: The series takes place outside the Myth Arc of the Skywalker Saga, focusing on a Bounty Hunter who minds his own business in the post-Galactic Civil War underworld.
  • Internal Reveal: Though the audience already knew Moff Gideon survived crashing his TIE in the season 1 finale, Djarin and the other characters don't learn that he's still around until four episodes into season 2.
  • Ironic Echo: In Chapter 15, Djarin gets to turn Gideon's "You have something I want" lines against him in regards to the Child and getting him back.
  • Irony: Djarin kills IG-11 in the first episode when he threatens to kill the Child. Later a reprogrammed IG-11 performs a Heroic Sacrifice in the eighth episode in order to save the Child.
  • It Began with a Twist of Fate: The first episode gives us a glimpse of the Mandalorian's life as a bounty hunter, living paycheck to paycheck until he takes up an especially curious job that ends up turning everything inside out.
  • Jabba Table Manners: This trope could easily be renamed "Jawa Table Manners." When presented with a rare mudhorn egg they consider a delicacy, they just chop it open and eat it raw in a gaggle, covering their fingers in the sticky yolk.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: The Mandalorian himself, seeing that, despite how callous and ruthless he can get, he refuses to let IG-11 kill the baby at the end of the first episode, despite the fact that his own commission would still allow him to collect a smaller fee upon presenting proof of death. He later ends up turning his back on the Bounty Hunter's Guild in order to save the child from its Imperial captors, despite being fully-aware that this would draw a massive target on his back.
  • Killer Rabbit: Jawas are surprisingly tough customers. The Mandalorian tries to fight them, but their Sandcrawler is surprisingly hard to penetrate and when he finally does, they overwhelm him with numbers that ignore armor and he is forced to negotiate instead.
  • Klingon Promotion: In the Season 2 finale, Boba Fett assumes control of Jabba the Hutt's remaining assets by shooting Bib Fortuna as he sits on the former master's throne.
  • Knife Nut: Xi'an, who managers to be highly effective with them even in a world of combat droids, blasters, and futuristic armor.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Moff Gideon. When he shows up Kuiil and the Client are killed and the Child is captured. His men also apparently wiped out the Mandalorian Enclave in the sewers, which causes Djarin to suffer a breakdown when he sees the aftermath of the massacre. He is also the first villain in the show to seriously injure Djarin, to the point he actually thought he was going to die.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Two scout troopers get a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown by the Child's "nurse droid" minutes after punching the Child in order to try to get him to stop making noise.
  • Lawful Pushover: In Chapter 12, Carson Teva reveals to Cara Dune that the New Republic is very aware that something bad is brewing in the Outer Rim, but they're having enough trouble as it is securing the Core Worlds and Mid-Rim that they can't really crackdown on warlords like Moff Gideon without local support. And given that nobody in the Outer Rim really takes the New Republic seriously, its leading into a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy where the Republic can't help or stop criminals because they aren't able to build up or enforce the infrastructure the area needs.
  • LEGO Genetics: Averted. The reason Moff Gideon wants the Child is because he's trying to see if he can imbue normal people with Force powers through blood and organ transplants from a Force-wielder. His efforts so far, however, have all failed thanks to the bodies of his test subjects rejecting what little of the Child's blood Dr. Pershing was able to harvest before Djarin saved him.
  • Loophole Abuse: Djarin would rather die than let any living being see his face and break his vow to the clan, but he's obviously dying of a terrible head wound that needs to be healed. So what's the solution? IG-11, a droid, points out he's not a "living thing" and proceeds to remove Djarin's helmet and apply Bacta spray to save his life. Either Djarin was too weak to stop it, or he considered that a good enough loophole to keep going
  • Made of Indestructium: Djarin's Beskar armor can take a lot of punishment and doesn't even get dented, from blaster fire of all sorts to lightsaber blades and punches from Dark Troopers.
  • The Magnificent Seven Samurai: Episode four "Sanctuary" is this trope, including bandits raiding a peaceful village, a Training the Peaceful Villagers montage (complete with spear drills), a temptation to give up the life of the wandering warrior and settle down with a local beauty, and the warriors deciding they don't belong and moving on at the end. The creators are even caught offhandedly referring to it as "the Seven Samurai episode" in Disney Gallery.
  • Mexican Standoff: Chapter 13 climaxes with one between Djarin and Lang, the Magistrate's right-hand man. Lang tries to pretend to surrender to get a shot in, but Djarin is quicker on the draw and guns him down.
  • Merchandise-Driven: Seemingly defied. Status Quo Is God is averted faster than toymakers can act:
    • Likely the most obvious example is The Child. The Child was revealed in the series premiere November of 2019 but because of maintaining the reveal of the character, no toys were released until May of the next year.
    • The Mandalorian's original armor only exists for a few episodes and his second set of armor is upgraded before it can ever receive a toy. Not that most fans could even find the original figure as it was off shelves before the series aired.
    • Before the $300+ Razor Crest toy was released, the ship goes through many struggles and is modified and destroyed, along with Djarin's signature Disruptor Rifle, which had a $100+ NERF gun in the works.
  • Mid-Season Twist: The third episode has the Mandalorian winding up with a bounty on his head, and at odds with the rest of his guild.
  • Moral Myopia: With a hefty dose of Self-Serving Memory. Every major charactor from the Imperial Remnant up to and including Moff Gideon himself can't shut up about how the galaxy is worse off without the Empire and the Rebel Alliance were dangerous terrorists and the New Republic are a bunch of posers. Because evidently, in their eyes fighting back against an oppressive dicatorship makes you a scummy terrorist while bringing order to the galaxy justifies literally anything. One pilot's rant to Cara Dune about how the galaxy cheered for the destruction of the Death Stars, the planet-kabooming superweapon that destroyed her homeworld and its successor, pretty much boils down to, "But what about our losses?!"
  • Mook Horror Show:
    • In "The Prisoner", after Malk's crew betrays him, the Mandalorian takes out two of them this way. While Burg, the Deveronian gives him a decent fight due to being The Brute and uniquely suited to countering Djarin's arsenal, Xi'an and Meyfeld are taken out by Djarin shrugging off their weapons until he gets close enough to subdue them and approaching the latter in a hallway with flickering lights like something out of a horror movie, only to turn around at the last second and scream in terror when they find that find Djarin has flanked them so they couldn't fight back.
    • Ahsoka Tano battling Morgan Elsbeth's henchmen is a downright terrifying Perspective Flip that shows what its like being a normal Mook going up against a Jedi; Ahsoka is portrayed like a vengeful, unstoppable wraith that sweeps through the area, ruthlessly cutting down anybody who dares stand in her path.
    • After finally getting his armor back, Boba Fett decides to show some hapless stormtroopers why he's considered one of the greatest bounty hunters to ever live, slaughtering almost the entire battalion single-handed and then going the extra mile of blowing the survivors out of the sky when they try to retreat.
    • In Chapter 16, Luke Skywalker practically wades through the previously indestructible Dark Troopers in the hallway of Gideon's ship without even breaking stride, like his father before him.
  • Myth Arc: While the series is episodic in nature, the ongoing storyline that permeates the series is getting The Child back to his species, or to someone who can properly take care of him, where they can be safe from the various factions that wish to use them for their own nefarious plans.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The rifle used by the Mandalorian is almost identical to the stun rod used by Boba Fett in The Star Wars Holiday Special. The special is directly acknowledged when the Mythrol tells the Mandalorian that he's heading home for Life Day (which is apparently not just a Wookiee holiday).
    • Additionally, the fact the rifle is capable of vaporizing its targets is a nod to Vader's orders of "no disintegrations" when hiring the bounty hunters in The Empire Strikes Back.
    • The Mandalorian's assault on the Jawa Sandcrawler references the frustrating platforming of the Sandcrawler level of Super Star Wars. The Jawas also attempt to crush Djarin between the Sandcrawler and the rock wall, just like Vogel to Indiana Jones in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.
    • Djarin's backstory as being orphaned when a war reaches his hometown is largely a reference to Jango's backstory in the Jango Fett: Open Seasons comic. A young Din is also carried away by his Death Watch savior in the same way young Jango was carried away by Jaster.
    • Also perhaps as a reference to the same comic, The Mandalorian introduces a tradition in old Mandalorian culture where one cannot remove their helmet in the presence of others lest they be excommunicated. In Open Seasons, Jaster is always seen wearing his helmet even when others has theirs off, until his dying moments, when Jango takes it off.
    • When the Mandalorian visits the Bad-Guy Bar in Mos Eisley, the bartender is a droid. Either the casino's under new management or Wuher relaxed his policy on droids.
      • The droid itself is a refugee from Jabba's Palace. It is the same one that ordered R2-D2's 'reconditioning' in Return of the Jedi. This suggests the change of ownership wasn't peaceful.
    • After a mercenary is mentioned to be the best ex-Imperial sharpshooter, Djarin makes a crack about that not being hard, to which Mayfeld defensively responds he was not a stormtrooper.
      • Later, a pair of Scout Troopers try shooting at a stationary can out of boredom, and they both repeatedly miss. After a few shots they start smacking their own weapons in annoyance.
    • Djarin grudgingly forced to transport the blurrgs on his ship recalls a bit in Star Wars (Marvel 2015) comics when Han Solo was grudgingly forced to transport nerfs on the Falcon. At least the blurrgs didn't appear to suffer messy motion-sickness issues like the nerfs did.
    • The first season finale features an appearance from an Incinerator Stormtrooper, a class of enemy originally created for the now-decanonized Star Wars: The Force Unleashed video game.
    • In "The Marshal", the group's tactics for dealing with the massive Krayt Dragon are identical to those used in the Legends video game Knights of the Old Republic, planting mines and then luring the beast out into the ambush. Unfortunately, it doesn't work in this instance because the thing is tough enough to survive the blast.
    • Chapter 13 prominently features a pair of assassin droids serving as bodyguards to the Magistrate, which are stated be HK-87 models, in a clear nod to HK-47 from the aforementioned Knights of the Old Republic. The droids in question even look like taller, slimmer, more advanced versions of HK-47.
    • Chapter 15 has Mayfeld complain that he can't see with the stormtrooper helmet on, like Luke did in A New Hope. He also complains the armor smells, which hearkens to a more obscure part of the franchise: in the Star Wars Radio Dramas, Han snarkily asks if the guy Luke took his disguise from bathed once in a while because Han says the suit he took smells like the guy lived in it.
    • An Imperial pilot in Chapter 16 provides a Perspective Flip on the destruction of the Death Star, calling out how many millions of blameless soldiers and workers died when it was blown up. While it hasn't come up a lot in the new canon, a major theme in Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor was the guilt and shellshock Luke felt over that very subject. More humorously, it also mirrors the famous Death Star debate in Clerks.
    • Chapter 16 also uses Ion Cannons very much like the X-Wing Series: Firing blue bolts (instead of red or green for Rebel or Imperial lasers) and disabling the target. Many an X-Wing mission involved using Ion Cannons to disable priority targets, often Lambda-class shuttles.
    • The second season finale has a deliberate homage to Darth Vader's infamous hallway massacre - performed, appropriately enough, by his own son, Luke.

    N-Z 
  • Nazi Gold: The Imperial equivalent is revealed to the Mandalorian as his down payment: an ingot of beskar steel stamped with the Imperial logo. Since Imperial credits are garbage these days, giving him an ingot of precious metal is more practical. However, the logo indicates that it's something the Imperials stole from the Mandalorians during "the Great Purge", and it's of both cultural and practical value to them. This makes the payment irresistible to the pragmatic Mandalorians but it also makes it morally repugnant as the beskar was stolen from their murdered kin.
  • Never Found the Body: invoked — "The Siege" involves Djarin, Karga, and Dune destroying an Imperial base that's still on Nevarro. While there, they find a hologram recording mentioning Moff Gideon and assume that it's an old one, but it was actually only from three days ago, revealing to them that Gideon is still alive following the crash of his TIE fighter in the Season 1 finale. All of them legitimately thought that he'd died in the crash and didn't bother checking to see if he really had been. This isn't really a shock to the audience, though, since we saw that Gideon survived and saw a live transmission from him in the previous episode, to boot.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The first Official Trailer seemed to imply that the series would be a grim and gritty, even horrific take on the Star Wars universe, what with the ominous music, oppressive editing, and Stormtrooper helmets on pikes being one of the first images we see. No mention of Baby Yoda/Grogu was ever made, and certainly none of the more lighthearted, high adventure stuff.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: The are a few times Djarin becomes his own worst enemy.
    • It's because Djarin panicked and broke comm silence during the confrontation with Gideon that the Scout Troopers were able to shoot Kuiil and capture the Child.
    • If he hadn't tried to run away from the X-Wing patrol, he wouldn't have crashed on the ice planet and destroyed half his ship. And almost get eaten by spiders. Though he ‘’might'' have gotten arrested.
  • No Body Left Behind: Anyone shot by the Mandalorian's disruptor rifle is instantly disintegrated, with nothing but a few scraps of clothing left behind. He has to reload it after every shot, which is one reason he didn't bust it out during the shootout with IG-11, but it's a hell of a sniper rifle.
  • No Honor Among Thieves:
    • Most of the other bounty hunters, mercenaries, and crooks the Mandalorian encounters try to kill him, rob him, or otherwise betray him.
    • Members of the Bounty Hunter's Guild view each other as competition as only the one who brings in the bounty gets paid. This is normally kept in check by the Guild by giving out bounty "pucks" to the hunters, and only the hunter with the puck can pursue/claim the bounty (though they can voluntarily team up). However, due to the incredible value of the Child bounty, as well as the fact that it came directly from the client instead of through usual Guild channels, numerous hunters attempt to claim it, with one group even attempting to steal it from Djarin. Later, after Djarin betrays the Guild by rescuing the Child, nearly every member of the Guild turns out to hunt him down.
    • "The Prisoner" has three separate betrayals. First, the Mandalorian's teammates lock him in a prison ship cell after they rescue the titular prisoner. Second, the prisoner chooses to leave all of his rescuers behind in favor of trying to escape on his own. Third, after paying him for the mission the fixer who arranged it tries to have the Mandalorian killed.
  • No Name Given: In keeping with the Spaghetti Western theme, the titular protagonist spends most of the first season unnamed, being referred to as "Mando" or simply getting a "Hey, You!" reception. Likewise, the Child is not given any sort of name, until halfway through season two. In both cases, there's no big, dramatic reveal of their names, nor are said names really important to the plot.
  • No OSHA Compliance:
    • Iris doorways like the one seen in the first episode's cold open are apparently sharp enough and can close hard enough to bisect human-size beings.
    • The lack of guard rails in Imperial facilities is still a common problem.
  • Normal Fish in a Tiny Pond:
    • The raiders' AT-ST in Episode 4. Compared to other Imperial tech, an AT-ST isn't crazy powerful, but if all you're planning to do with it is plunder one small unarmed village, it'll make you practically unbeatable.
    • Similarly, Moff Gideon's TIE fighter in Episode 8. In a dogfight against other space superiority fighters, it's a barebones fighter relying on its flitting maneuverability and sheer numbers. Against enemies on foot with only small arms, it's an aerial terror.
    • One set of badly beat-up Mandalorian armor and weaponry is enough to run a whole gang of thugs with blasters out of a small town.
    • Moff Gideon in a nutshell really. He wasn't in charge of a particularly large contingent of the empire and only has a light cruiser for a mobile command base. Compared to, say, Moff Tarkin, who was in charge of the empire's crowing achievement the Death Star and had Star destroyers to spare chasing down the plans, he doesn't have that much resources. In a galaxy recovering from war and dealing with a single Ragtag Bunch of Misfits he's an imposing problem even Boba Fett doesn't want to straight up fight.
    • The entire cast may be madeup of a bunch of badasses but Episode 16 shows just why a Jedi Master was the one who took down the Empire. Djarin nearly died fighting a single Dark Trooper and everyone is expecting an entire squad of them to be their Last Stand. And then Luke Skywalker shows up and tears through the entire platoon without breaking a sweat while the main team is left watching in shock at how easily he's tearing them apart.
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: After season 2, Grogu and Djarin go their separate ways. After having reevaluated his code multiple times in the defense of his charge, it remains unclear what will become of Djarin from this point forward.
  • Not So Different:
    • The series increasingly insinuates this of the Mandalorians and Jedi. Despite ostensibly being diametrically-opposed rivals, the similarities between them are striking. They are both ancient, powerful cultures/religions that have had tremendous influence on galactic history only to be brought low by the schemes of their shared enemies, internal betrayals, and their own dogmatism.
    • In Chapter 15, Mayfeld points out to Djarin that it wasn't that long ago on a galactic scale that Mandalore was a brutal, expansionist government just like the Galactic Empire. He goes on to say that he and Djarin are themselves Not So Different, remarking that for all of Djarin's talk of tradition and following the Way, he is awfully willing to reinterpret said traditions in the name of doing what he has to, just like Mayfeld. Of course, protecting foundlings is a central Mandalorian tradition, and Djarin himself has certainly never committed Imperial genocide, so it falls a little flat — especially when Mayfeld himself explosively evaluates the Imperial Remnants as unforgivable later in the episode.
  • Not So Stoic: After the Tribe slaughters most of the bounty hunter guild to cover Djarin's escape in episode three, one of them uses his jetpack to fly up to the Razor Crest's window to give him a salute as he leaves. Djarin's response is an admiring, "I gotta get me one of those."
  • No True Scotsman:
    • Due to being raised in a traditionalist and secretive commune that strictly adheres to the ancient ways of Mandalore, our hero is more than a little shocked when he meets Bo-Katan and members of her clan, who are decidedly more casual in attitude. Djarin is so dismayed by how they casually disregard ancient customs like always wearing helmets in public that he can just barely refrain from declaring them traitors to the Mandalorian Way, even though Bo-Katan ''was once acknowledged as the Mandalore’'. To be fair to Djarin, he’d encountered people wearing looted Mandalorian armor just a few episodes ago, so it was probably on his mind.
    • Later flipped around with Boba Fett, who does not consider himself as a Mandalorian despite being the son of Jango Fett, but is accepted as one by Djarin when he learns that Jango was a foundling and Boba his son — not to mention how very Mandalorian Boba acts!
    • Bo-Katan also falls under this trope, and accuses Boba of not being a true Mandalorian.note 
  • No Transhumanism Allowed: Subverted. The series mentions "strandcasting," that is the process of creating organisms gene by gene from the ground up. That's about as transhuman as it gets. It seems that there must be some sort of downside that makes this sort of thing less common.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: In Chapter 6, The Mandalorian slowly closes in on Mayfeld from behind; seemingly vanishing and reappearing in the flickering lights. Mayfeld suddenly turns and the camera swings around to see that Djarin has just reappeared right behind him.
  • Once a Season: The Mandalorian removing his helmet in full view of the camera. In Chapter 8, he removes it so IG-11 can heal him with a bacta spray. During the events of Chapter 15, Djarin has to pass a facial scan; unlike the previous example, his helmet actually stays off for several minutes. Somewhat subverted in that he incongruously does it again in the very next episode, to say goodbye to Grogu.
  • One-Man Army:
    • In Chapter 14, Boba Fett singlehandedly wipes out a platoon of Stormtroopers (who were managing to overwhelm Djarin and Fennec Shand through sheer numbers) using his skill with a blaster and the full capabilities of his suit.
    • In Chapter 16, the Mandalorian has a great deal of difficulty dealing with just one Phase Three Dark Trooper and would have been killed if he had not been wearing his beskar armor. When Luke Skywalker shows up a few minutes later Luke is able to quickly cut through all the remaining Dark Troopers with ease, and does not even break a sweat doing so.
  • OOC Is Serious Business:
    • In Chapter 15, it's a mark as to how far Djarin is willing to go to find Grogu, that he not only willingly changes out of his beskar armor to don a stormtrooper uniform as a disguise, he then willingly unmasks himself in order to access the computer database, in a room full of Imperials, and in front of Mayfeld, a man who he had a generally low opinion of due to his criminal background. No wonder that chapter is called “The Believer”; there’s nothing Djarin believes in more than protecting his foundling.
    • Spending most of his presence in the series being a despicable Smug Snake, Gideon visibly loses composure when a lone X-Wing shows up at his cruiser, recognizing its occupant as the man who took down the Empire itself; Luke Skywalker. His composure further deteriorates as Luke effortlessly tears his way through the Dark Troopers, to the point Gideon attempts a murder-suicide on everyone on the bridge.
  • Our Founder: After his Heroic Sacrifice in the season one finale, IG-11 gets a statue erected in Nevarro in his honor, which is visible in subsequent visits to the town.
  • Pardon My Klingon: Dank ferrik, but the characters in The Mandalorian seem to use the phrase "dank ferrik" a lot. It's the series' go-to when they want to have a character swear on family-friendly Disney+.
  • The Paragon Always Rebels: The first three episodes have pointed out how of every bounty hunter in the Guild, our eponymous Mandalorian is the best at the job. Chapter 3 shows us how, because of his conscience, he chooses to throw all that away to save the Child who saved his life.
  • Perpetual Poverty: The Mandalorian is always hustling for money from his next job, using whatever cash he gets to pay for his spaceship's massive upkeep and fuel costs, to help support the foundlings of his Mandalorian tribe, and ultimately to support himself and the Child while they're on the run. While all the Mandalorians of the tribe wear some amount of armor made of expensive beskar steel, the beskar armor is of such cultural importance to them that selling their beskar is anathema to them, and they otherwise seem to live an austere existence underground.
  • Pet the Dog: During The Stinger for Season 2, while Fennec Shand is in the midst of effortlessly disposing of Bib Fortuna's court, she takes a moment to shoot the chain off of his Twi'lek slave girl. Then she gives a "Get out of here" nod. The girl wastes no time taking Fennec up on it.
  • Pistol-Whipping: The Mandalorian disposes of a couple stormtroopers this way, in an extreme example of Armor Is Useless; they go down to the barrel of a very light gun across the helmet.
  • Pocket Protector: Greef Karga survives being shot in the chest thanks to the beskar ingot he's carrying inside his coat.
  • Proud Warrior Race Guy: The Mandalorians of "the Tribe" that the protagonist hails from have an extreme devotion to preserving the ancient warrior ways of their culture, to the point they consider having their helmets removed a grave insult, the Mandalorian refuses to be acknowledged for what he believes is a dishonorable kill, and the lot of them are willing to engage in all manner of Honor Before Reason behavior for the sake of their warrior code.
  • Railing Kill: The Mandalorian is absolutely in love with this trope. (Both the series and the eponymous character.) In the shootout at the end of the first episode a ton of Nikto mooks get shot off buildings with a roar, and while climbing the sandcrawler in the second, the Mandalorian yanks a few Jawas poking him with tasers out the window.
  • Reality Ensues: On the Star Wars page.
  • Reconstruction: In the same vein as Rogue One, The Mandalorian reconstructs the non-force villains of Star Wars, showing how well-earned their reputation for brutality and dread are from the perspective of normal people:
    • Far from the incompetent Cannon Fodder with laughably shoddy accuracy from the movies, the Remnant Stormtroopers work well and efficiently together, nearly cornering the Mandalorian.
    • An AT-ST, the original Chicken Walker that got beat up by the Ewoks, is the trump card of Klatoonian raiders. Both the Mandalorian and Cara Dune consider fleeing a better option than fighting it without proper weapons, and only reluctantly agree to fight it. It took a high risk strategy and the near-sacrifice of Cara Dune to bring one down.
    • The Separatist droids, even the Elite Mook B2 models, only existed to be cut down by any competent Jedi and Clone Troopers. Here we see them deployed against a civilian target, where they were a very effective terror weapon. The Mandalorian's village was burned down in one such raid and he still has nightmares and flashbacks about them.
    • In previous outings, bounty hunters focused much more on exotic weaponry and mind games, and were not very efficient.note  The Guild seen here have their act together, using proper tactics and straightforward weaponry to get the job done.
    • TIE fighters are the expendable star fighter of the Empire. They normally have to mob the heroes in at least sizable numbers to be considered a threat. Just like the AT-ST, when the heroes are pitted against one without the aid of their own starship, any anti-air ordnance to speak of, and not even any adequate cover, it's treated as near-certain death. The three heroes unloading their blasters at the single fighter, including with Cara's rapid-firing BFG, struggle to even land a hit on the fast-moving ship, let alone do significant damage. The Mandalorian has to use his brand-new jetpack to get high enough to snag it with a grapple and cling to the hull, at which point he is able to slap some explosive charges on the wing to bring it down.
    • Jedi are not unstoppable superpowered badasses able to overcome any obstacle with literally just a wave of their hand. However, against forces not trained and equipped specifically to deal with their unique skill sets, they absolutely are one-being armies capable of carving through foes that give even the badassest of Badass Normals a hard time. Both Ahsoka and Luke Skywalker demonstrate this against the Magistrate's thugs and Moff Gideon's Dark Troopers respectively.
  • Recovery Sequence: The voiced-over montage of Kuiil repairing, reprogramming and re-training IG-11 in Chapter 7.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning:
    • Flashbacks to The Mandalorian's past reveals Separatist Super Battle Droids gunning his entire town down while sporting glowing red eyes.
    • The AT-ST seen attacking the village in Chapter 4 sports two red-glowing viewports, giving this impression.
    • The Dark Troopers also have glowing red eyes.
  • The Remnant: Moff Gideon's Imperial Remnant faction serves as the main antagonists of Season 1.
  • Removable Turret Gun: In the Season 1 finale. When the group fends of Moff Gideon's small army after IG-11 enters the fray, Djarin runs up to a small platform for an E-Web heavy cannnon and rips it off its stand to make use of it.
  • Reports of My Death Were Greatly Exaggerated:
    • In the first-season finale, after Djarin identifies the Imperial officer that has them cornered in the cantina as Moff Gideon, Cara Dune exclaims that can't be since Moff Gideon was supposed to have been captured by the New Republic and executed for the war crimes he committed during the Galactic Civil War. Obviously, this is not so, since he is standing outside with small army of Imperial loyalists.
    • Chapter 9 ends with a Wham Shot of a very much alive Boba Fett, who obviously survived falling into the Sarlacc in Return of the Jedi.
  • Right Hand vs. Left Hand: The Mandalorian gets a contract from the client saying "alive, preferably" while a bunch of other bounty hunters apparently only got the "dead" memo. So a whole bunch of bounty hunters from the same guild started fighting each other and Djarin for it. It seems The Client went behind Dr. Pershing's back and demanded the Child's extermination; according to overheard dialogue whoever Pershing is working for wanted the kid definitely alive. This may be why Moff Gideon, whom Pershing was presumably working for, was so willing to have the client murdered following his falling for the good guys' ruse.
  • Running Gag:
    • The Child following The Mandalorian around or pushing random buttons in the cockpit even when he's been told not to.
    • People seeing the Child and not knowing what the hell he is.
    • The Mandalorian will attempt to use his flamethrower against a foe, only for it to fail. He's occasionally able to use it effectively, but it's guaranteed to not work at least once.
    • The Child's insatiable hunger and often disturbingly carnivorous diet.
    • Bad things happening to the Razor Crest, reaching its peak in Chapter 14.
  • Sacred Hospitality: Djarin's host, the old ugnaught Kuiil, repeatedly helps him at significant cost in time and effort, but rejects all reward, saying that it was his duty because Djarin was his guest. That, and Kuiil had a good feeling that Djarin may end up cleaning house on the brigands in the area as a side effect of his job.
  • Samurai Cowboy: Star Wars has always taken heavy influence from Jidaigeki films and Classic Westerns, but this series really leans into both, as one can probably guess from this very page. The main protagonist is effectively a gunslinging ronin. Practically lampshaded by the climax of Chapter 13, which pointedly and dramatically juxtaposes an Akira Kurosawa-influenced samurai duel with a Sergio Leone-style Mexican stand-off.
  • Scarred Equipment:
    • Most of the Mandalorian's armor is old, covered in scratches and dents from blaster fire. His helmet is pristine, as it is made of beskar steel, but unfortunately his clan doesn't have enough beskar to give him an entire set of armor. In the first episode when he earns a pauldron of beskar steel he is happy to discard his old one for it. He's later able to upgrade to an entire suit of beskar armor.
    • The stormtroopers working for the Client don't have either the time or resources to keep their white armor pristine, and look like they've been on the losing end of multiple battles.
    • After 20+ years, including time spent inside a Sarlacc, Boba Fett's already-battered armor was far from pristine. It's still shown to be functionally effective, however. Chapter 15 sees it receive a new paintjob, making it look even better than it did during The Empire Strikes Back.
  • Scenery Porn: Nearly every episode is just beautiful to look at, even the scarred landscapes. Some scenes are staged like paintings.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!: In Chapter 15, Djarin ends up taking off his helmet in public to deal with an Imperial facial scanner, all in the name of rescuing the Child. A sympathetic Mayfeld responds by (though he had other reasons to do so) killing all the Imperials who saw Djain's face and swearing himself to silence. In gratitude, Djarin and Cara agree to do some rulebending and let Mayfeld go free.
  • Schrödinger's Canon:
    • Beskar, or "Mandalorian Iron," was half the reason Mandalorians were so fearsome in the Legends continuity, giving them armor which could resist even lightsaber strikes (which is also confirmed in season 2). Some of the first words spoken to The Mandalorian in the series are to ask if his armor is genuine beskar steel. Many Mandalorians in Legends had to make do with armor made from conventional materials, as true Mandalorian iron became increasingly difficult to come by.
      • This also observes true Mando'a, the Mandalorian language.
    • Mythosaurs were first introduced in Legends before being re-canonized here.
    • The mythrol in the first episode tells the Mandalorian that he's heading home to visit his family for Life Day.
    • More compact carbonite freezing devices than Bespin's large industrial facility. Though not the portable, arm-mounted version from The Old Republic MMO, a staple of the Bounty Hunter's campaign to prevent every capture mission from being an escort mission, it's small enough to fit on a fairly diminutive ship.
    • Djarin's rifle bears a striking resemblance in performance to the Tenloss DXR-6 Disruptor Rifle from the Dark Forces Saga, being slow-firing (in the show because it has to be manually loaded with shells, in the game because it had to charge up to full power), scoped for exceptional long-range accuracy, and being a One-Hit Kill Disintegrator Ray.
    • Cara mentions mopping up "Imperial warlords" after the Battle of Endor. In Legends, Imperial Warlords of a surprisingly wide variety of stripes were the antagonists pretty much up until the New Jedi Order.
    • The E-Web Repeating Blaster was first seen in The Empire Strikes Back, named in Legends, and has its name spoken in the new canon here.
    • Incinerator Stormtroopers from The Force Unleashed are re-canonized in Chapter 8.
    • The Mandalorians shown in the series follow the Legends concept of the Resol'nare pretty closely. They (or at least the sect Djarin belongs to) wear Mandalorian armor (to the point of not removing their helmets around others). They defend themselves, each other, and their family (the Central Theme of the show is the Mandalorian protecting the Child). Raising children, especially foundlings, in the ways of Mandalorian culture are repeatedly stressed as very important. And the Mandalorian himself is out in the galaxy specifically to bring in money to support the Tribe. The two tenets of Resol'nare that are not alluded to are speaking Mando'a and answering the call of Mand'alor, though the Armorer could be seen as the closest thing to Mand'alor the Tribe knows of, and when she speaks, everyone else shuts up and listens. The concept itself is heavily hinted at, as the Armorer offhandedly alludes to somebody named Mandalore the Great, while Bo-Katan mentions restoring the true Mandalore to power as one of her goals.
    • They're way too big to make serviceable lightsaber crystals without a lot of work, but Krayt Dragon Pearls are confirmed to exist.
    • In "The Siege," the Mythrol crew member is commanded a few times to "slice" things in the Imperial base. "Slicing" is Star Wars Legends vernacular for "hacking."
    • Chapter 14 finally recanonizes Jango Fett's old Legends backstory; as confirmed by Boba Fett and his chain code, Jango was indeed the foundling of Jaster Mareel and fought against Deathwatch in the Mandalorian Civil War, with the implication that his overall history is broadly the same as it was Legends. For that matter, Boba Fett surviving the sarlacc was first established in Legends.
    • Dark Troopers, originally from the Dark Forces Saga, appear in Chapter 14. Ironically, Chapter 16 refers to them as "Phase 3," in which the Dark Troopers are fully droids. In Dark Forces, Phase 1 and 2 Dark Troopers were droids, while Phase 3 was a suit of Powered Armor the architect of the project uses to fight you in a boss battle.
  • Sedgwick Speech: In Episode 15, Valin Hess delivers a particularly nasty Motive Rant regarding The Evils of Free Will, culminating in a toast "To the Empire" . Mayfeld shoots him immediately afterwards.
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism: In Chapter 1, IG-11 repeatedly threatens to self-destruct as a means of protecting himself from capture (this is forbidden by its programming). Near the end, it finally does so to help Djarin and The Child escape, taking out many Stormtroopers in the process.
  • Self Stitching: The Mandalorian shows he's Not So Stoic as he tries to Heal It with Fire.
  • Settling the Frontier: The show is almost entirely set in the Space Western equivalent of such a setting, the Outer Rim. The frontier is even more lawless and untamed than it was during the Empire's reign, and a running theme throughout the series is the clashes between the New Republic and natives of the Rim; the former is trying to bring some semblance of law and order to the area, while the latter continually reject their attempts to civilize them and mostly regard them as a joke.
  • Sequel Escalation: The first season was a relatively standalone work with an original cast and very few connections to the Star Wars universe aside from Tatooine and brief nods to the Imperial warlords and the New Republic. The second season on the other hand not only includes the Jedi homeworld of Tython and other new locations but cameos from existing characters such as Cobb Vanth, Boba Fett, Bo-Katan Kryze, Ahsoka Tano, Dark Troopers, and even Luke Skywalker.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Mandalorian's gauntlets have blue arrows pointing outwards. Dave Filoni worked on Avatar: The Last Airbender before joining the Star Wars franchise, and previous references to the show have been made in the past (such as Appo's arrow art on his armor in Star Wars: The Clone Wars).
    • When in disguise as Imperial officers, Mayfeld attempts to pull the Mandalorian away from a suspicious officer by mentioning that they must submit a TPS form.
  • Significant Wardrobe Shift: After getting his bounty from the Empire, the Mandalorian is given a nearly-full suit of beskar armor(chestpiece, both armguards, a second pauldron, and the right thighguard), adding on to than the one pauldron that he was given in the first episode.
  • Silence Is Golden: The title character rarely speaks and many of the episodes have long stretches of minimal to nonexistent dialogue, with the character development and storytelling told through visuals rather than words. In particular, the second and third episodes have almost no dialogue for the first ten minutes of their runtime.
  • Sink-or-Swim Fatherhood: While the Mandalorian takes responsibility for the Child and interacts comfortably with him, he clearly doesn’t know how to care for a child solo without the benefit of a whole covert on hand, and other people with childcare experience notice. Over time Djarin learns from experience that there’s no point in trying to keep the Child out of the way and, as of season 2, takes the Child with him wherever he goes.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer:
    • In Season 1, The Child was completely absent from all pre-release marketing in order to preserve the surprise of a new character of Yoda's species being introduced, even if said character is at the core of the show's narrative. Some shots with The Child in them were even digitally-edited to remove the character's presence from the ads.
    • In Season 2, Lucasfilm opted to hide all of the most notable cameos — Cobb Vanth, Boba Fett, Bo-Katan Kryze, Ahsoka Tano, and of course Luke Skywalker — in the marketing, in spite of several of them getting out to movie reporters months in advance. (Indeed, the trailers contained no content at all from the second half of the season.) all. This is in contrast to how they approached marketing Star Wars Rebels, where many of the show's cameos were revealed through the trailers.
  • Space Western: The show is the tale of a Bounty Hunter and Gunslinger drifting across the outer reaches of civilization, crossing paths with all manner of outlaws. Said bounty hunter also has a Spacecraft, a laser gun, and travels to all manner of alien planets A Long Time Ago, in a Galaxy Far Far Away....
  • Spaghetti Western: In addition to being influenced by classic Westerns, the show also is inspired by the works of Sergio Leone such as a protagonist who is (almost) always referred to by his nickname, Mexican Standoff, the desert setting, and seedy locales.
  • Special Guest: Every other episode features a celebrity/other famous actor in a side role:
    • Brian Posehn plays the skiff driver in Chapter 1.
    • Amy Sedaris as Peli Motto, the hangar proprietor that becomes an ally to Djarin when he has adventures on Tatooine.
    • Ming-Na Wen as Fennec Shand, the bounty hunter that Djarin and Toro hunt down in Chapter 5.
    • Adam Pally and Jason Sudeikis are the two Scout Troopers that take the Child at the end of Chapter 7 and the start of Chapter 8.
    • John Leguizamo as Gor Koresh, the Abyssin from the Cold Opening of Chapter 9.
  • Stereotype Flip: Previous live-action entries in the franchise have treated Tatooine's Sand People as Always Chaotic Evil (the EU portrayal has been more complex Depending on the Writer). Chapter 5 instead regards them something like Native Americans in the The Wild West. Djarin describes them as wanting all outsiders off what they see as their planet and in the meantime to stay away from the territory they've staked out. He addresses a pair he and Toro Calican encounter with the respect due an equal, and trades with them for permission to cross their land. Chapter 9 further expands on this by establishing that several violent incidents between the Tusken Raiders and the people of Mos Pelgo are the results of misunderstandings rather than active malice from either side, and forges a tentative peace with the two factions coming together to solve a problem threatening them both.
  • Stealth Pun: Mayfeld says the Razor Crest "looks like a Canto Bight slot machine," in reference to its condition. Given that Canto Bight is presented as infamously wealthy in The Last Jedi, this probably is a way of saying the ship is (jury) rigged.
  • The Stinger:
    • In the end credits of Chapter 5, we see the shins of Boba Fett approaching Fennec Shand's body.
    • Season 2 ends with one, in which Boba Fett and Fennec Shand storm Jabba the Hutt's former palace on Tatooine to kill Bib Fortuna and assume control.
  • Suicide as Comedy: The IG-11 droid keeps trying to self-destruct the second things look bad, because it's programmed to never be captured in case company secrets are discovered.
  • Suicide Attack: IG-11 self-destructs, taking out the nearby Stormtroopers to help Djarin and The Child escape by doing so.
  • Suicide Pill: The Imperial Captain from Chapter 11 uses a futuristic one to kill himself once Djarin and Bo-Katan's team take control of his ship, choosing to die rather than be interrogated by them or, worse, report his failure back to Moff Gideon.
  • Supersoldier: Moff Gideon may be creating these and he wants the Child's blood for the project.
  • Taking You with Me: When Djarin and Bo-Katan's squad manage to take near-total control of the Imperial transport in Chapter 11, the Captain calls Moff Gideon and requests back-up. Gideon instead orders them to crash their ship into the ocean and take the Mandalorians with them. The Captain proceeds to shoot his pilots and try to do exactly that, because he would rather die than face whatever torture Gideon would subject him to for failing.
  • Tall Poppy Syndrome: Due to the Mandalorian's near-flawless job performance, almost everyone in the Guild seem to be unable to make a name for themselves—breeding very understandable resentment (not helped by Greef's open favoritism). It was almost inevitable that the moment Djarin chooses to forego his Guild loyalties for the Child that every one of them would happily turn their guns on him. That said, this didn't end well for them.
  • Team Mom: The Armorer, for her clan of Mandalorians. When Djarin and Paz Vizsla start fighting, she just sits quietly, letting them get it out of their system, before speaking up calmly to remind everyone of what makes them a family.
  • Tempting Fate: In Chapter 7, Greef tells the Mandalorian "Trust me. Nothing can go wrong," right before a flying venomous monstrosity swoops out of the night from behind him and attacks.
  • Token Good Teammate: The Mandalorian, while among Ranzar's crew.
  • Too Clever by Half: Fennec tells the newbie bounty hunter how much Djarin is worth and asks him to free her so they can bring him in together. The newbie doesn't trust her and shoots her for it, knowing that she will probably try and kill him when he frees her. He then decides to take the Child hostage and bring Djarin in himself. It gets him killed.
  • Tracking Device: "Tracking Fobs" are standard-issue equipment for bounty hunters. Each one is somehow capable of homing on a target from at least several miles away with great accuracy as long as they've been programmed with enough data, called the "chain code,"note  and returning the fob is the customary way of saying the hunter has released his bounty to someone else's custody. The fact that the client doesn't give the Mandalorian a full chain code indicates the job is really sketchy.
  • Tragic Backstory:
    • The Mandalorian was originally a foundling who was adopted by Mandalorians with Clan Vizsla insignias after his village of Aq Vetina, including his parents, was wiped out by a Separatist droid army during the Clone Wars.
    • Cara Dune is a native of Alderaan who joined a Rebel cell after the Empire destroyed her home world with the Death Star.
    • The Child (real name Grogu) was a youngling who trained at the Jedi Temple on Coruscant until it was razed by the Empire, at which point he was hidden and spent the next several decades scared and alone until he was found by the Mandalorian.
  • Training the Peaceful Villagers: The plot of Chapter 4. The Mandalorian gets guilted into helping some krill farmers defend themselves against a band of Klatooinian raiders, and he pulls Cara Dune in to help.
  • Troubling Unchildlike Behavior: The Child misinterprets a friendly arm-wrestling match between Djarin and Cara, and Force-chokes her, thinking he's protecting his surrogate dad. Granted, the Child's intent probably wasn't malicious (especially given the Razor Crest’s recent “guests”), but it's still scary to see considering he's a powerful Force user who hasn't yet been taught the difference between right and wrong, or how to distinguish a game from real harm.
  • True Companions: By the end of season 1, Djarin, Cara, Greef, and even IG-11 have become this, a profound rarity for men and women in their profession. It's especially the case for Djarin and Cara.
  • Used Future:
    • As the quote from Jon Favreau on the quotes page shows, the look and feel of this series is a deliberate Call-Back to the dingy, dirty Tatooine of A New Hope.
    • The once pristine white armors of the Stormtroopers look visibly used and worn, with the collapse of the Empire preventing them from being replaced.
    • The Mandalorian's ship, the Razor Crest, is a clear nod back the Crystal Spires and Togas aesthetic of the prequel trilogy and is said to have been built around that time. Being that old, however, means it's seen its fair share of wear and tear with several external plates apparently missing, and scratches all over its once chrome exterior. It's not faring much better internally, either, as Zero describes most of its systems as being deficient compared to what they could be if the ship were adequately serviced.
    • In Episode 6, the dimly-lit, somewhat dilapidated space station belonging to Ran and his crew is visually contrasted by the bright and pristine-looking interior of the New Republic prison ship.
  • Vibroweapon: Vibroweapons have lone been a mainstay of Star Wars (and loads of other sci-fi), mostly in the Legends continuity. We see them here for the first time in live-action, complete with visual effects to actually make the blade look like its vibrating.
  • Villainous Rescue: In "The Believer,” when the Imperial transport full of rhydonium that Djarin hijacked is about to be destroyed by pirates, a group of TIE Fighters and stormtroopers come to stop them. It’s very effectively played for dissonance.
    Mayfeld: Never thought you'd be happy to see stormtroopers.
  • Wham Episode:
    • "The Reckoning". Moff Gideon's Scout Troopers intercept and kill Kuiil, capturing the Child.
    • "The Jedi". Djarin finally meets with a Jedi — Ahsoka Tano — and she reveals the Child's name to be Grogu. However, she declines to train Grogu, possibly because she senses he could end up like Anakin due to his emotional attachment to Djarin... and because she's on her own quest for Grand Admiral Thrawn.
    • "The Tragedy". Djarin and Grogu finally reach Tython and presumably contact a Jedi, only to be ambushed by Boba Fett and a still-alive Fennec Shand, as well as Moff Gideon's forces. Grogu is captured by Dark Troopers in the ensuing chaos, and Djarin is forced to team up with Boba, Shand, and Mayfeld to stage a rescue.
  • Wham Line:
    • In the eighth episode, as Moff Gideon does his Evil Gloating, he reveals Cara's origins (she's from Alderaan). Immediately after that, he reveals the Mandalorian's real name, Din Djarin.
    • Later on, the Armorer states that the Child is from a race of mighty sorcerers who the Mandalorians once did battle with: The Jedi. This is also the first live-action mention of the Mandalorians and the Jedi being old foes.
    • This exchange:
      The Mandalorian: "Who have you given fobs to?"
      Greef Karga: (raises arms to encompass the bar) “All of them. ‘’All'' of them!"
    • At the end of Chapter 11, Djarin finally gets directions to a Jedi when Bo-Katan casually tells him where he can find Ahsoka Tano.
    • Near the end of Chapter 13 Ahsoka herself drops one when she asks Morgan Elsbeth where her master, Grand Admiral Thrawn, is.
  • Wham Shot:
    • The first episode builds up to a mysterious fifty-year old bounty that is heavily protected and requires all of both Djarin and IG-11's skill, firepower and luck to get to. Nobody (in-universe or out) was expecting it to be an infant of Yoda's species.
    • The fifth episode seemingly ends on a mostly-high note as Djarin manages to save the Child and his caretaker and takes off. Then the shot cuts to a mysterious armored individual approaching Fennec's corpse...
    • The seventh episode ends with Kuiil lying dead, as the Scout Troopers who have just captured the Child speed away in the background, while Djarin, Greef and Cara are cornered by the newly introduced Moff Gideon, and his army of Death Troopers.
    • Much of the plot of the eighth episode has Djarin and his party fighting their way out of Moff Gideon's ambush. They make their way to his tribe's sewer hideout only to find a pile of badly damaged and discarded helmets. The hideout had been discovered and purged by Gideon's men, leaving only the Armorer to tend to the remains and salvage whatever she can.
    • The eighth episode ends with Moff Gideon cutting himself out of the TIE Fighter wreckage... with the Darksaber.
    • The ninth episode ends with the Mandalorian riding off into the sunset... while Boba Fett watches his speeder trail off with his old armor in tow.
    • The ending of Chapter 12. After Moff Gideon is informed that Djarin's ship is being tracked, we get a shot of his latest project — an entire battalion of Phase Three Dark Troopers.
    • A couple of minutes into Chapter 14 we get one of the Slave I approaching Tython. There is also Boba Fett donning his Mandalorian armor for the first time onscreen in thirty-seven years.
    • Episode 16 has one of a lone X-Wing approaching Gideon's cruiser, followed quickly by Luke Skywalker emerging to cut down Gideon's Dark Troopers.
    • The Stinger of Chapter 16 features Bib Fortuna, Jabba the Hutt's former majordomo, having taken over the criminal empire. Then Boba Fett and Fennec Shand arrive to depose him, with Boba taking his place on the throne.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Paz Vizsla berates the Mandalorian for taking a job from the Empire after what they did to the Mandalorians during the Great Purge. The Armorer speaks in his defense, however, pointing out that the Empire is gone and that the beskar he brought back to them matters more.
  • What You Are in the Dark: Season 1 Episode 3, "The Sin", is all about this. The Mandalorian has given the bounty over to the imperial remnants, is now fully kitted out with beskar armor, and is set to continue on with his next job, with everyone praising him for his performance... but decides to go back and rescue the kid anyway because he knows whatever the Empire is intending to do, it can't be good. He also owes the kid one for saving his life against the mudhorn.
  • Weird Currency: The series introduces Calamari Flan, which is a currency of jelly-like blue and white disks.
  • The Worf Effect: Oddly this trope applies to a weapon instead of a character. The Mandalorian's flamethrower gauntlet is deadly as heck but only gets used successfully twice, against one stormtrooper and one prison-barge droid. Every other time he uses it it's to demonstrate how outclassed he is, like Burg just shrugging it off, it being deflected during a tussle, or large creatures being intimidated but not overly hurt.
    • In Episode 16, a lone Dark Trooper gives Djarin the fight for his life unlike any foe we've seen thus far. Minutes later, the entire Dark Trooper batallion is savaged by one Luke Skywalker.
  • Would Hurt a Child: In Chapter 8, after the stormtroopers successfully capture the child, they have no problems hitting the bag they have him stored in if he makes noise.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: When the Mandalorian learns his quarry is not only a child, but the people he's working for are intent on killing him, he double-crosses them, running off with the kid. He spends the rest of the first season protecting the Child, becoming a surrogate father to him.
  • Wretched Hive: The Mandalorian travels to the original on Tatooine in Episode 5, seeking a bounty. With Jabba dead and the Imperials clearly not welcome anymore, it's less wretched than it used to be; the local bartender says there just aren't any bounty hunting jobs near here as a result. Fortunately there are plenty of other crapholes in the galaxy to fill Mos Eisley's place.
  • You Have Failed Me: Moff Gideon may just rival Darth Vader himself in terms of this trope. The very first thing we see him do is have his Death Troopers shoot through the Client and his men for falling for an obvious trick, and he subsequently follows that up by shooting an officer for interrupting him. In season 2, he orders the crew of an Imperial transport in danger of being captured to crash into the ocean to kill their captors, in a tone that obviously suggests he will make them wish they were dead if they fail to do so.
  • You No Take Candle: The Jawas in Episode 2 hoot and holler at the Mandalorian when he tries to speak to them in their language, saying he sounds like a Wookiee. Subtitles show that the Mandalorian is using correct grammar, but it's a very simple sentence and it takes him some effort to put it together, hence their mockery.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle!: In chapter thirteen, Djarin finally tracks down a Jedi in the form of Ahsoka Tano... but she refuses to train the Child, as his emotional attachment to Djarin makes her fear that her tutelage would just lead him down the same dark path as her own master, Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader. However, she does give Djarin directions to a place where he may truly be able to complete his quest and find someone who will train the Child; Tython, the possible ancestral home of the Jedi.
  • Younger Than They Look: According to the internal chronology, Boba Fett is in his early forties, yet he looks much older (Temuera Morrison being nearly 60). A rough life as a bounty hunter, plus spending some time in a Sarlacc's stomach, will do that to you.

"It is good to restore the natural order of things... after a period of such disarray, don't you agree?"

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