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  • Accidental Innuendo: This exchange between Din Djarin and Cobb Vanth in the Season 2 premiere definitely raised some eyebrows. It Makes Sense in Context, but it also sounds a lot like the intro to a gay porno (especially with Pedro Pascal delivering Din's lines in a voice he's admitted sounds "strangely like a bedroom voice?"):
    Din: Take it off. Or I will.
    Cobb: We gonna do this in front of the kid?
    Din: He's seen worse.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
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    • What was the Nikto mercenary company's purpose in keeping the child prisoner? Were they exploiting or protecting him? They hadn't turned him over to the Imperial Remnant for the reward. Kuiil said they'd been in the valley for a long time, but he'd never seen the child before, implying they weren't making use of his Force abilities. Finally, the hideout didn't show signs of scientific equipment that could have been used to experiment on the child.
    • The Client's statement of returning the natural order can be taken in at least three ways. 1. He's being genuine and believes that the Mandalorians should be allowed to reclaim their heritage. 2. He's secretly mocking the protagonist because it was the Empire that purged them in the first place (probably because they sided with Maul and their general independent streak). 3. He's trying to broker a friendship with the Mandalorian and draw parallels between his people and the Empire in a bid to get them on his side and reestablish the Empire with their help.
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    • The Client wishing for the termination of the Asset and Dr. Pershing's insistence on it being alive. Was this because the Client is just that callous and Pershing had a heart, or because Pershing is aligned with Gideon, who definitely wants the child alive, and the Client knows what that will result in and is simply sacrificing the asset to prevent some yet unknown worse horror? Chapter 12: "The Siege" suggests the latter motivation as Pershing mentions in a decrypted log that he wants to keep the child alive to provide further blood samples for future experiments.
    • In Episode 3, when Greef Karga survives being shot because of the beskar ingots in his coat, was it just a stroke of good luck that the title character shot him there? Or did the Mandalorian deliberately spare his life, since he knew that Greef was carrying them around in his coat?
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    • Cara Dune says she deserted after the Empire officially fell and she was forced into peacekeeping duties, including suppressing riots against the newly installed officials. Did she desert because she was a Blood Knight who wanted to keep the war going, or because her new duties were too Empire-like for her tastes? Or does she have a very personal grudge against the Empire that even Princess Leia would not tolerate as another survivor of Alderaan?
    • The "monster droid"note  in the Season 1 finale. Did it genuinely not understand when Cara told it to stop? Or did the Imperials program it to lead them to the ambush sometime after they massacred the Mandalorian coverts just in case someone would try to escape through the lava river? Alternatively, was the lava river's current simply too strong for it to stop the boat?
    • It is unclear whether Boba Fett has done a Heel–Face Turn or if he saw Gideon's Cruiser, realized the Empire was back, and decided the Mandalorian and his allies were useful tools at the moment. Or hell, even if the latter, whether that's still a face turn. The only thing that's certain is that Boba sees the return of the Empire as a negative. Whether this is based on pragmatism or morals is entirely left to the viewer. This is further clouded by the very end of Season 2, where he establishes himself as a crime boss, a position that presumably would be encumbered by any galactic governing body, but at the same time he would likely be a better boss than the alien he killed.
    • In "The Believer," the raiders are only referred to as pirates and treated as such by the narrative. However, they were notably not trying to steal the rhydonium but instead seemed to be far more interested in destroying it. This has led to many fans to assume that they're actually anti-Imperial freedom fighters, either natives of the planet or perhaps mercenaries hired to hinder the Imperial force on the planet.
    • At first, it looks like Mayfeld was terrified of being recognized by Valin Hess, but as the scene carries on, you start to see the simmering anger and rage in Mayfeld bubble over as Hess insults the troops and civilians who died during Operation: Cinder. Was Mayfeld genuinely afraid of being recognized, or was he afraid of jeopardizing the mission because of what he might do to his former commanding officer?
      • Extra credibilty can be lent to this explanation by the fact that Mayfield looks surprised for a second after he impulsively shoots Hess.
    • In the Season 2 finale, Bo-Katan refuses to let Din simply give her the Darksaber, despite her having gotten it in the first place by Sabine simply handing it over. Some fans got the idea that her losing it to Gideon after that was taken as a sign that she needs to take it the proper way or shouldn’t have it at all.
    • Why did the Mandalorian grow a mustache, if the Way forbids him from showing it to other living things? The simplest explanation would presume that Mando simply doesn't feel the need to shave, between his refusal to remove his helmet, and Pedro Pascal's apparent inability to grow a full beard. However, some viewers believe that Mando grew his mustache just for himself, or because it reminds him of his late biological father's facial hair.
  • Angst? What Angst?: The Child is hardly fazed by all the death and destruction around him, even when Mando is the one doing the killing, even though he seems aware enough to understand it to a degree. Even when Mando burns a Stormtrooper alive, he hardly makes a sound, or when Mando kills Q9-0 in front of him to save him. However, his using force choke on Cara when she is arm wrestling Mando means he may be more affected than he lets on. Ahsoka confirms this after using the Force to communicate with him: in addition to everything he's experienced within the series, he was a youngling in the Jedi Temple during Order 66.
  • Arc Fatigue: After Chapter 6 marked the third consecutive self-contained episode, many fans expressed frustration that nothing had happened regarding the main plot since Chapter 3. Some, however, contend that the episodic nature of the story was intended, pointing to Filoni's previous work on The Clone Wars, and expectations for a heavily serialized narrative, as is common with streaming shows, were mistaken.
  • Award Snub: Pedro Pascal proved that he can convincingly love a puppet like a living son, and deliver emotionally powerful performances both with and without showing his face. Even though these sound daunting, the Golden Globe and Emmy judges have refused for two consecutive years to give him any acting nominationsnote , or to award the show any Golden Globes at all. Season 2 earned him some nominations at smaller award shows — some of which hosted their first ceremonies that year — but he didn't win.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • After spending most of his screentime happily recalling the war crimes he committed during Operation Cinder and gleefully anticipating being able to commit them on a larger scale with a shit-eating grin on his face, it's hard not to cheer when Mayfeld snaps and shoots Valin Hess dead.
    • Moff Gideon spends two seasons running circles around Mando and friends, hurts Grogu, and is insufferably smug and self-assured for most of Season 2, up to and including when he's defeated and apprehended by Mando. And it all serves to make the look of sheer terror on his face when Luke Skywalker arrives and shoots his escape plan to hell immensely satisfying. And getting bitch-slapped by Cara Dune, foiling his attempt to off himself when he realizes he's screwed, is icing on the cake.
    • For fans of Boba Fett who hated that his badassery was an Informed Ability in the movies, the sight of him crushing Stormtrooper skulls and blasting Imperial ships out of the sky with his back-mounted missiles over thirty years later is too satisfying for words.
  • Complete Monster: Moff Gideon, known for his war crimes even among the horrible Empire, is a mild-seeming man who helped lead the attack on Mandalore. Dubbed the Night of a Thousand Tears, Gideon led a mass slaughter and bombing campaign that saw the abject genocide of Mandalore's population with the survivors scattered. Intending on harvesting the infant Grogu's blood and willing to kill even his own men, Gideon orders one of his own ships to sacrifice itself and all aboard to buy time, later plotting to kill Grogu's rescuers and rise to even greater power.
  • Contested Sequel: There's been quite a divide on whether or not Season 2 is an improvement or step back compared to Season 1. The former camp prefers Season 2 for its stronger sense of pacing and cohesive narrative flow. While detractors feel that tying the show closer to the franchise's myth arc not only creates Continuity Lockout but strips the show of its identity being a Western that takes place in the Star Wars universe but is divorced from the Skywalker Saga.
  • Continuity Lockout: Although the show didn't quite start out this waynote , familiarity with various works of Expanded Universe media became increasingly necessary as the story progressed.
    • Those who haven't watched The Clone Wars or Rebels will be very confused as to what the Darksaber that Gideon wields is or just how important it is to the Mandalorians. Season 2 also begins the introduction of central characters prominent in the animated series without formal introductions to their biographies or motives that assumes familiarity with other media, including Bo-Katan and Ahsoka Tano. Grand Admiral Thrawn is also later mentioned as a major part of Ahsoka's motives and is set to make a future live-action appearance.
    • Many viewers were confused and curious as to what is Operation: Cinder.
  • Creator Worship: Jon Favreau and Dave Filoni, like you wouldn't believe. Until The Book of Boba Fett, some of the more vocal members of the fanbase were asking for Disney to give them complete control of practically every future Star Wars projects, and some even went as far as to ask for a Continuity Reboot of the Sequel Trilogy directed by them.
  • Crosses the Line Twice:
    • The scene with the two Scout Troopers (who are played by comedians Jason Sudeikis and Adam Pally) at the beginning of Chapter 8 is both appalling and hilarious. It's appalling because they physically abuse the Child, but it loops into being hilarious when one of them worries that they might have accidentally killed him by hitting him on the head, finds out he's still fine, gets his finger bitten, and then punches the child in the face (it also helps that the scouts get brutally killed by the Child's nanny IG-11 shortly after). The complete bored indifference with which they react to Moff Gideon killing his own men just makes it all the more hilarious. To make it even more hilarious, many Twitter users, including the Second City account, jokingly treated hitting the Child (who at that point had become an internet superstar) like both actors' Moral Event Horizon, despite the fact that the Child is portrayed by a puppet.
    • Chapter 10's running gag where the Child, repeatedly, breaks into the incubator of the episode’s client to swallow her eggs whole. It's dark, but he does it so often when her entire lineage is on the line that it's hilarious.
  • Diagnosed by the Audience: Din Djarin's meticulousness, straightforward dialogue, and difficulties interacting with others have resulted in some viewers speculating that he has autism and/or social anxiety.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Has its own page here.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Although the show seems to be focused on bounty hunting, the title and the titular character led to speculation that other Mandalorians will appear such as Bo-Katan Kryze (who actually did come back in "The Heiress") and Fenn Rau, especially since these two are played by experienced screen actors and even resemble them. Helped in that both of their actors follow the show's official account on Twitter.
    • There was speculation that Ming-Na Wen was cast as a live-action version of Ursa Wren. This one wound up jossed, however, when a trailer revealed she's actually playing an assassin named Fennec Shand.
    • Observant viewers have noticed that the patch on Dr. Pershing's uniform matches that on Kaminoan doctors that worked on the Clone Troopers. Whatever that and First-Episode Twist mean have been tossed around on social media, most popularly that either the Empire is trying to make Force-sensitive clones or Palpatine is trying to study Yoda's species' in order to achieve immortality. Assisted is that the given age of the child (50) means that he was born the same year as Anakin Skywalker.
    • With the big deal the show makes about Mandalorians never taking their helmets off, there was some speculation that eventually the Mandalorian would get his helmet forcibly taken off and it wouldn't be Pedro Pascal underneath. Some even suspected the show would pull a Samus Is a Girl, given the long hair the character has in childhood flashbacks. When the character was finally unmasked in "Redemption" he turned out to be Pedro Pascal after all.
    • The fifth episode ends with a mysterious individual (only seen from the knees down) approaching Fennec's (probably) dead body. Many have noted that the jingling sound of their spurs and the radio transmission that heralds their arrival sounds exactly like Boba Fett's from The Empire Strikes Back, not to mention that this occurs on Tatooine, which was where Fett seemingly met his doom 5 years prior. Others, however, see this as a deliberate misdirection, and have speculated that the mystery person is a returning Greef Karga, an Early-Bird Cameo of Moff Gideon or Mayfeld, or (in the case that it is actually a previously-established character) Cad Bane. Chapter 14, "The Tragedy," would reveal that the mysterious individual was indeed Boba Fett.
    • A Variety interview with Ludwig Göransson, released a few months before the second season premiere, showed a picture of Pedro Pascal attending a scoring session while wearing a battle-worn variant of Boba Fett's helmet. It helped spark a few new theories about Season 2 events, such as Din Djarin getting shot in the head, or Boba Fett coming Back from the Dead after falling into the Sarlacc Pit. However, it ultimately turned out the helmet came from Göransson's personal collection of Star Wars memorabilia.
    • After the reveal of Boba Fett at the end of the Season 2 premiere, some fans remained skeptical that it was actually him, and suggested Temuera Morrison might actually be playing another popular clone character like Rex or Echo, though these are unlikely as any clone sans Boba would be well into their eighties due to their speeded aging factor. Chapter 14, "The Tragedy," would show that this figure was indeed Boba, as he looks the same, is wearing the same clothes, has the same weapons, and openly states that he is Boba Fett.
    • There have been pervasive rumors pushed mostly by some vocal fans who disliked the sequel trilogy, that this series either takes place in an alternate timeline, or is setting up a Cosmic Retcon that would negate the events of the sequel trilogy.
    • Quite a few fans have taken the fact that Plo Koon was the Jedi the actors were told was coming for Grogu as evidence he survived Order 66, with Disney Gallery episode #10's (fake) artwork of him rescuing the party only adding fuel to the fire.
    • Some viewers speculate that the show's title actually refers to Grogu, whom they predict will someday take up Din's Mandalorian customs.
    • News that Christopher Lloyd had been cast for Season 3 drove many fans to speculate which role will he play, with some saying he'll play Joruus C'baoth or Grogu's voice.
    • The Book of Boba Fett shifting focus to Din in the last few episodes, to the extent that Boba went two whole episodes without saying anything, prompted Boba fans to either predict or insist that at least one Mandalorian Season 3 chapter would focus entirely on him instead of Din, to balance things out.
  • Estrogen Brigade: The Mandalorian Din Djarin has many fangirls, who find that his voice, attitude, swagger, and devotion to his adopted son make him the sexiest man ever to don 24-Hour Armor. Gina Carano, Rosario Dawson, and Ming-Na Wen are all part of this brigade.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Moff Gideon combined the best (worst?) aspects of BOTH Grand Moff Tarkin and freakin' Darth Vader into one awesome Brains and Brawn package. On the Brain side, he's smart, cruel, unflappable and enjoys Gun Boat Diplomacy much like Tarkin. On the Brawn side, he's a capable pilot and battlefield commander like the Sith Lord. For bonus point, he's also a wellknown Bad Boss and wields the Darksaber, further channeling Vader himself. Oh, and he has a squad of Death Troopers backing him up (who also qualify for this status themselves, as always.) It really says something that the fans are largely okay with losing a villain played by Werner Herzog in favor of this guy. Giancarlo Esposito went on to earn Emmy nominations for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for Season 1, and an Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for Season 2.
    • Many fans and critics alike have noted that Carl Weathers' performance as Greef Karga is so naturally warm and charming that it's hard not to like him even when he's trying to intimidate the title character into giving up the Child. (Granted, he doesn't actually stay evil for long.) This performance actually convinced the show's crew to keep the character around, when he was originally planned to be killed three episodes in.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot:
    • The gai bal manda was the traditional Mandalorian adoption ritual used in Star Wars Legends publications; fanfic writers quickly embraced the gai bal manda as the preferred method for the Mandalorian to formally adopt the Child as his son.
    • To a lesser degree, Mandos adopting other characters as Foundlings started appearing with increased frequency once the show came out. This can range to canon characters like Rey to others like Tali.
    • Fanart of Sabine meeting the Mandalorian and the two having a Culture Shock (mostly jokes about one being baffled by the other's beliefs about helmets and Sabine wondering what the heck "the Way" is) is plentiful. Something similar happens for real when Bo-Katan shows up and removes her helmet in front of Djarin, leading to a brief argument about "The Way".
    • The Mandalorian and Poe Dameron apparently bending time and space to hang out provides a recurring subject for fanart, as a tribute to Pedro Pascal's friendship with Oscar Isaac; Pascal even referred to the Sequel Trilogy co-star as "the voice of, 'Make sure it works out,'" when Lucasfilm pitched The Mandalorian to him. Bonus points if the fanart takes direct inspiration from a photo of Pascal and Isaac.
    • "Haunted Din" fanart and fanfics have become pretty common among viewers who explore the possibility of the Darksaber corrupting him.
    • Boba Fett's dedication to helping Din rescue Grogu at the end of Season 2 convinced several fans to mine the comedic potential of him becoming Grogu's Honorary Uncle.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • "The Baby Yoda Show" is a common joke name for the series due to the astounding popularity of Grogu (who was known as "Baby Yoda" to most people until his Given Name Reveal in Season 2).
    • Two for the titular character: The Mandalorian With No Name, and one coined by Carl Weathers, "The Mando".
    • In addition to the ubiquitous "Baby Yoda", the Child has also been dubbed the "Yoda baby", or "Yoddler", and "Yodito" by Latin American fans.
    • The "Daddalorian" or "ManDADlorian" for the Mandalorian being a Papa Wolf to the Child. Also called "Space Dad".
    • Owing to the actor's best known role, Moff Gideon is sometimes referred to as "Space Gus" or "Darth Fring".
    • "Corn on the Cobb" or "Corn Cobb" for Cobb Vanth, for obvious reasons.
    • "Frog MILF" for the Frog Lady. Her husband is "Frusband" (Frog Husband). And as of Season 2, fans on Twitter generally like calling various characters MILFs or DILFs for some reason, even if said characters aren't parents in any way.
    • The crewmember seen in the background in Chapter 12 is called “Jeans Guy”.
    • "Space Bill Burr" or "Billy Blaster" for Migs Mayfeld.
    • "Bo-Karen" for Bo-Katan, since some fans find her too condescending or haughty towards Mandalorians brought up differently than her.
    • After Din defeated Moff Gideon and took the Darksaber, the fandom has adopted the title Mand'alor the Reluctant for him.
    • Dubstep Troopers for the Dark Troopers, thanks to their leitmotif being a dubstep piece.
  • Fountain of Memes:
    • Grogu (AKA The Child, AKA Baby Yoda) spawns new memes with every new episode that's released.
    • The Client, too, to a lesser extent, thanks to his intimidating aura from Werner Herzog's darkly charismatic performance and the amusing Herzoginess of nearly all his lines.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • There is considerable overlap between Mandalorian fans and Metroid fans, since Metroid fans can easily appreciate a gritty sci-fi series about an awesome armored bounty hunter adopting an adorable alien infant. Crossover fanart tends to show Samus and the Baby Metroid in the roles of Mando and the Child (or vice versa), such as these examples.
    • By the tail-end of 2019, there is also significant overlap with The Witcher (2019) — especially taking into account the lone-wolf main characters seeking to find (and protect) children they aren't related to.
    • There's also plenty of overlap with fans of Goblin Slayer, another show about a badass armored warrior who never removes his helmet and travels around with a younger magical companion
    • As always, there is a healthy rivalry going with the Trekkies, especially with The Mandalorian's second season streaming at the same time as Star Trek: Discovery's third season. The fact that both shows are members of the Space Western genre also helps somewhat.
    • There is a LOT of cast/crew overlap between The Mandalorian and a lower-profile Disney scifi series, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. SHIELD fans enjoy both recognizing familiar faces and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. gaining renewed attention through the Star Wars fandom.
    • Speaking of the MCU, the fans of this show also joined up with fans of WandaVision particularly since both have a beloved former character returning in an unexpected way.
    • Some fans of this show also developed an interest in Moon Knight (2022), in which one of Pedro Pascal's buddies plays another surprisingly sensitive masked fighter.
    • Every other released TV show or movie in which Pedro Pascal plays a single father also shares some fans with this one; most notably Prospect and The Last of Us (2023), for having similar stories to The Mandaloriannote , and We Can Be Heroes (2020), which shares Mandalorian Chapter 14's director, Robert Rodriguez.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Redemption", Mando suffers a fatal head wound, requiring IG-11 to unmask and heal him. Pedro Pascal later recalled that before filming "Redemption", he suffered an actual head wound, when some plywood hit him on his way out of the makeup trailer. The hospital personnel rushed him into ER, since they couldn't initially distinguish the makeup from his real injuries.
    • The Running Gag of IG-11 trying to self-destruct when his situation goes remotely south in the first episode turns into this after Chapter 8, where he uses his self-destruct mechanism for a Heroic Sacrifice in a scene that isn't played for humor.
    • When Cobb Vanth asks Din whether they're gonna shoot it out over Boba Fett's armor in front of Grogu in "The Marshall", Din replies that Grogu's "seen worse". Then we find out that Grogu was at the Jedi Temple when Order 66 was carried out; "seen worse" likely doesn't even begin to cover it.
    • Chapter 16 builds up Luke Skywalker as the perfect Jedi teacher for Grogu, only for The Book of Boba Fett to reveal that he uncharacteristically requires the baby to let go of attachments. Grogu's inability to detach from Mando helps result in his training ending sooner than expected.
  • He Really Can Act:
    • Though Pedro Pascal is a very capable actor, critics doubted in early episode reviews that he could be a compelling protagonist without facial expressions. Mando's ability to display a variety of emotions with only body language and changes in tone became more evident as Season 1 progressed, with the caveat that Pascal's busy schedule during production often reduced his involvement to dubbing over a body double. When Season 2 brought a larger number of scenes with Pascal portraying Mando both vocally and physically, critics found the character even more expressive, a trajectory Pascal credited to his years of learning through stage performances how to use his whole body and intonations to express himself. Additionally, longer moments of Mando appearing unmasked allowed Pascal to convincingly depict psychological effects of hiding his face for decades.
    • Bill Burr is a stand-up comedian by trade, but puts in an impressive performance as Mayfeld. Fans were quick to compliment his Tranquil Fury acting during his second appearance in "The Believer", when his character confronts his old commanding officer.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: Din's promise in the Season 2 finale to see Grogu again feels less bittersweet after The Book of Boba Fett has Grogu gain Luke's permission to return to Din, removing any uncertainty that Din could keep his promise in future Mandalorian seasons.
  • He's Just Hiding: Not everyone believed that Fennec Shand was actually dead. Considering that Toro shot her in the stomach (where she could have easily been wearing body armor under her clothing) instead of the unprotected head, and the last scene of Episode 5 showed a mysterious figure approaching her body, a lot of fans suspected it wouldn't be the last we saw of her. Sure enough she came back in Episode 6 of Season 2, with it being revealed that Boba Fett found her and helped her back to health with cybernetics.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Kuiil's first objection to the thought that the Child is an artificially created lifeform is that it is too ugly. The Rise of Skywalker revealed that Snoke was an artificial lifeform, and good looks definitely were not included.
    • The Cold Open of Chapter 14 has Din lament to Grogu, "I can't train you. You're just too powerful." In The Book of Boba Fett, Grogu's training under Luke ends unexpectedly early, partially because Luke can't keep up with the evolution of Grogu's powers.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Din and Cobb Vanth share some interactions that feel very flirtatious.
    • Some viewers have romanticized Mayfeld's apparent obsession with Din's eyes, from demanding a look at them en route to the prison raid, to improvising "Brown Eyes" as an alias for an unrecognizably helmet-less Din. In the French dub, Din's alias is "Beauregard", which means "beautiful view".
  • It's Short, So It Sucks!: What's probably the most common criticism towards the show is the length of each episode. Many were expecting the standard 45ish minute long episodes similar to shows on cable television that take up hour long slots. Instead, it ended up catching people off-guard when they realized that almost every Mandalorian episode has been clocking in around the 30 minute mark. However, some viewers prefer the shorter runtime, as it fits the pacing of Star Wars better and doesn't require any filler.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Many viewers watch this show for the Child, a.k.a Baby Yoda, AKA Grogu.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Din Djarin, due to his state as a Magnetic Hero who seems very lonely without his foundling.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • Right, you're really going to give Gideon all that buildup and then kill him in the Season 1 finale without any explanation of why he wants the Child.
    • Similarly, Ming Na-Wen's character would die in her first episode when a mysterious figure (later revealed to be Boba Fett himself) shows up.
  • Love to Hate: Moff Gideon is an insufferably smug villain who wants to do horrible, horrible things to young Grogu, but his frightening competence and Giancarlo Esposito's excellent performance make him an incredibly fun villain to root against.
  • Memetic Badass:
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Cobb Vanth is otherwise well-liked among fans, though this hasn't stopped jokes that he's a "Boba Fett cosplayer" and that he looked wimpy in Boba's armor.
    • In an example of this being applied to a vehicle rather than a character, the Razor Crest being repeatedly crashed (and then finally destroyed) has led to a reputation among fans of being the unluckiest and trashiest ship in the franchise, with many jokes comparing it to a beat up junkyard station wagon or joking that it makes the Millennium Falcon look like Padme's Naboo royal cruiser.
  • Memetic Mutation: Your meme will be legendary.
  • Memetic Psychopath: The Child has taken this role in the eyes of fans that perceive him as a greater threat than Palpatine, as well as approving Mando's shooting Jawas, destroying unsuspecting planets while pressing buttons on The Mandalorian's ship, and being a Creepy Child with all the death surrounding him and not even flinching. The notorious egg gag, and how much the show leans into it (including a Call-Back the next episode), only enhanced this further.
  • Misaimed Marketing: Whoever designed and approved a Bop It game modeled after The Child greatly overestimated how many of the show's fans would want to "bop" a baby, as well as the chance that Mando would order someone to "bop" the Child.
  • Moe: Grogu's wide eyes and precocious mannerisms have irresistibly endeared him to many viewers to a degree unseen since maybe Gizmo in the Gremlins movies, whom Grogu happens to very strongly resemble.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • Din Djarin's guttural growling voice, one of his important means of expressing himself without showing his face, sounds surprisingly tantalizing during several of the character's soft-spoken lines.
    • Grogu cooing "Patu!" beginning in Chapter 10 sounds adorable, and hints that he's matured during his adventures with Din, even if one can only guess whether it means anything in his language.
    • The Seismic Charge makes its glorious return in Chapter 15.
  • Narm: See here.
  • Narm Charm:
    • The Child may be an obvious animatronic puppet instead of CGI, but that just adds to his infantile charm.
    • At the beginning of Chapter 5, the Mandalorian kills another bounty hunter by blowing up his fighter after delivering a Pre-Mortem One-Liner. The bounty hunter screams in an over-the-top manner as his ship explodes around him, with his screams echoing even after he should have been vaporized. It wouldn't be out of place in a cheesy 1980s action movie, but since The Mandalorian aesthetically feels like a 1980s film, it feels fitting.
    • Chapter 10 features an antlike alien named Dr. Mandible. Any goofiness is offset by how amazing the puppet is, plus serving as a fun nod to director Peyton Reed's prior work.
    • And the froglike aliens from this and the next episode. Two adults going around in frog costumes may seem like something from a B-movie, but their sheer joy at being reunited just warms the heart.
    • When Boba dons his armour again in Chapter 14, he clearly *ahem* fills it a bit more than he did when he was younger. However, this in no way diminishes the awesomeness of his massacre of the stormtroopers. In fact, it may enhance it to see him kicking so much arse at an older age and post-sarlacc pit.
    • And just one episode later, Boba has somehow perfectly cleaned up the armor so it looks fresh from the blacksmith. Even with the mystery of how he did it, and how popular the armor's well-used look was, many fans took to loving this look just as much.
    • The Child's name turning out to be... Grogu, initially casted doubts on fans on catching on in favor of his memetically popular moniker, "Baby Yoda", but it did anyways since it was pointed out that the only two other members of his species are called the equally unserious Yoda and Yaddle, and the name Grogu had its own cute, shorter charm to it.
    • In the Season 2 finale, the de-aging on Mark Hamill shows the franchise still has a ways to go before it can match the MCU in this technology. But you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who cares that much, as it comes along with a Big Damn Heroes scene against a whole platoon of Dark Troopers like many were disappointed we didn't get in the sequel trilogy, plus the emotion of Din and Grogu's parting.
  • Older Than They Think: The Mandalorian doesn't mark the first time Pedro Pascal performed in a mask, as he previously portrayed a commedia dell'arte actor in the 2009 play Miracle at Naples. Emily Swallow also learned how to act behind a mask years before she became the Armorer, and reportedly proved more skilled than Favreau expected during filming.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • The two scout troopers from the opening of Episode 8 are widely considered to be one of the funniest scenes in Star Wars history, thanks to the sheer hilarity of them reacting to Moff Gideon arriving in town and murdering his own allies like it's another bad day at the office with a particularly irritating coworker. Not to mention their failed attempt at target practice. And the whole time, one of them keeps pestering the other to let him see Baby Yoda.
    • The "Monster Droid" (the Astromech with limbs) is well-liked by some fans for leaving quite the impression, due to how unique it is and the strange aura it exudes. Some fans lamented its death at Cara's hands.
    • Eternally reliable character actor Richard Brake pops up for one scene as an especially slimy Imperial officer on Morak.
    • The 'Unlucky Shoretrooper' who was shot by Mayfeld not long after he breaks his cover by killing Valin Hess in "The Believer". Thanks to the Episode humanizing the rank and file members of the Imperial Remnant who nevertheless becomes nothing more than Cannon Fodder and unavoidable casualties in the protagonists' quest, this particular Shoretrooper gained a lot of viewers' sympathy and lamented his death at Mayfeld's hands even though he was just about to have a nice meal. It almost pushes him straight into The Woobie status.
    • In "Chapter 16: The Rescue", who should come to the main characters' rescue but Luke Skywalker?
  • Out of the Ghetto:
    • Broke out of the Minority Show Ghetto by becoming an early hit for Disney+, despite its racially diverse array of cast and crew members.
    • Broke out of the Sci Fi Ghetto when Season 1 earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Drama Series, and acting nominations for Giancarlo Esposito and Taika Waititi, in addition to recognition in 12 technical categories. Ultimately, it won seven of its technical nominations.
    • Broke out of the Girl-Show Ghetto by giving Cara Dune, the Armorer, and Fennec Shand their own toys and shirts, bucking precedence of women receiving minimal presence on sci-fi merchandise.
  • Pandering to the Base: Season 2 was hit with criticism regarding this due to the increased significance of characters from past parts of the Star Wars franchise — increasing the amount of Continuity Lock-Out for newer fans and arguably shrinking a galaxy that Season 1 had expanded.
  • Periphery Demographic:
    • Within weeks of debut, the series developed a strong social media following of Native American and Indigenous fans creating memes and crafts about the Child, as these fans enjoyed both the show's postcolonial themes and the Child being "so darn cute."
    • The show has also gained a number of Jewish fans who are drawn to the parallels between the Jewish and Mandalorian people. Both are exiled from their homeland and living in diaspora, survivors of a great genocide, and divided into sects with different levels of devoutness. Jon Favreau and Taika Waititi are both Jewish, with Favreau hailing from a more devout family than Waititi, but neither have confirmed if Favreau intended these similarities.
    • Other marginalized fans living in diaspora found the season 2 ideological disagreements between Mandalorians resonant as a diaspora story: "This purity testing and cultural infighting are the hallmarks of any diverse diaspora community, and the criteria by which the Mandalorians measure each other is hardly unfamiliar to anyone who’s rusty in their 'mother tongue' or been told to go back to a country they’ve never seen."
    • The irresistibly cute and endearing Grogu ("Baby Yoda") has attracted a much wider audience than just Star Wars fans and kids.
  • Play-Along Meme: After Chapter 15, the fandom collectively agreed that Mayfeld was caught up in the exploding Imperial refinery, per Cara's cover story.
  • Poison Oak Epileptic Trees: Some viewers have considered the chance that Season 3 would break the tradition of Din Djarin revealing his face at least Once a Season. The Book of Boba Fett confirms that he no longer believes that an exposed Mandalorian should stop wearing their helmet afterwards, and sets up a journey of atonement for his unveilings. Pedro Pascal's obligations to The Last of Us (2023) added a meta reason for this theory, since principal photography overlapped with that of The Mandalorian Season 3. Pascal kept up his fans' hope for another unmasking by returning to Los Angeles during a few months of Mandalorian production, partially to help Vanity Fair promote the series. Later, Katee Sackhoff teased that Lucasfilm shot additional Mandalorian scenes after production wrapped on The Last of Us.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name:
    • "Mandomera" for the Mandalorian/Omera.
    • "Dincobb" for Din Djarin/Cobb Vanth.
    • "Bobadin" for Boba Fett/Din Djarin.
    • "Dinluke" for Din Djarin/Luke Skywalker.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Boba Fett was never unpopular by any means but he had gotten his own portion of the fanbase who frequently mocked him for his lackluster performance in the original trilogy as an Anti-Climax Boss, known for standing around with little personality shown and being easily taken down by a blinded Han unintentionally. The Mandalorian finally gives him some credence to his ability and fleshes out his personality, winning him many fans, and causing his fans from before his reappearance to be very pleased with the result, not to mention that it shows Jango Fett's badassery living on in him.
    • Migs Mayfeld was never an outright hated character but was seen as just a one-note Jerkass-type in his Season 1 appearance, with his popularity only really stemming from meta factors such as his actor being popular comedian Bill Burr and the novelty of being a Star Wars character with a Boston accent. When he returns in Season 2, his character is given far more depth and nuance, and fans grew to love the actual character for his honorable traits and moral complexity rather than just for surface details such as his accent.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Ismael Cruz Córdova plays a minor character named Qin, which gained a lot of attention now that he was casted as Arondir in The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Viewers who would've preferred Season 2 to end with Din keeping Grogu sometimes accuse Luke of kidnapping Din's foundling. This in spite of Luke only taking Grogu after both he and Din permit it, and never denying the chance of the clan reuniting someday.
  • Sacred Cow: The fact that it's widely considered to be a return to what many loved about the Original Trilogy and a "course-correction" in the wake of the much more divisive Sequel Trilogy, as well as the massive explosion in popularity of its little green mascot, Grogu (or "Baby Yoda"), have all helped The Mandalorian become universally adored to a level not seen since The Empire Strikes Back. Saying that the show is bad is a good way to start a Flame War.
  • Salvaged Story:
    • This show does for the Tusken Raiders what Star Wars: The Clone Wars did for the Toydarians. Rather than showing the Tuskens as mindless savages, it shows them as still ruthless, but also capable of being reasoned with, and willing to let people cross their land so long as they ask permission and pay a fair price. The Season 2 premiere goes further, with the Sand People tribe bordering Mos Pelga agreeing that, in exchange for the offworlders' help slaying a krayt dragon, they will keep the peace with them for as long as the Mos Pelgans do the same.
    • To explain why the titular character and the Mandalorian covert he was raised in are so different from the ones fans have seen in previous works such as in The Clone Wars and Rebels, Bo-Katan and her group tell us why in Chapter 11. She explains how his group is known as "The Children of the Watch", religious fundamentalists who seek to bring Mandalorians back to their ancient values. Bo-Katan says how the Watch broke away from Mandalorian society in order to do this, while other clans (like hers) believe such "ancient" traditions no longer apply.
    • Chapter 12, "The Siege," seemingly gives more context towards Palpatine's resurrection, as the episode heavily implies that Moff Gideon is working towards this goal via using The Child's DNA (courtesy of bodies in bacta tanks that appear to be, and have the leitmotif of, Snoke).
    • Chapter 13, "The Jedi," revealed that those with force sensitive gifts who aren't trained simply lose the ability over time, explaining why more emotionally unstable force wielders are refused training when giving them said training seems to be the lesser of two evils.
    • One criticism of the Prequel Trilogy was how Obi-Wan essentially took on Anakin as a student despite having barely completed his own training as a Padawan, thus making him a rather inexperienced teacher. When faced with a similar situation in Chapter 13, Ahsoka outright refuses to train Grogu because she senses of the darkness within him, and knows she doesn't have enough wisdom to steer him on the right path.
    • Chapter 14 does quite a few wonders for Boba Fett:
      • The episode applies a great deal of his personality from Legends by showing he does have a sense of honor, and will always hold up his end of the bargain.
      • Moreover, after Star Wars: The Clone Wars left his (and by extent, his father Jango's) status as true Mandalorians ambiguous, Boba provides proof that Jango was a foundling, much in the same way Din was, proving that Prime Minister Almec was lying and that the Fetts were of Mandalore.
      • Perhaps the biggest contribution was to his reputation, which was largely based on his status as a Memetic Badass outside of the series. He not only effortlessly destroys an army of Imperial Troopers without his armor, him reclaiming his suit shows precisely why he's the most feared of all bounty hunters.
    • On another note, the show got some serious flack for killing of Fennec Shand, who had proved to be very popular with audiences. This episode not only brings her backnote , but in the following weeks, confirmed she would be appearing in not just one, but two major series after: Star Wars: The Bad Batch and The Book of Boba Fett.
    • Migs Mayfeld's credentials as a former Imperial sharpshooter were mocked both in-universe and out in his appearance in Season 1, with Din stating "that's not saying much" when learning that the man wass an "Imperial sharpshooter" and viewers pointing out that if Mayfeld was such a good shot, he wouldn't need to spam fire with a trio of blasters. In Chapter 15, he nails the open hatch of a rydonium truck, from a few hundred meters, out the back of a moving spaceship, with a Tusken cycler rifle that is decidedly not state-of-the-art; even Fennec Shand and Cara Dune are impressed.
    • There was a historically infamous fandom controversy in how Luke Skywalker killed millions of Imperials by destroying the first Death Star and never showed any remorse for it or faced any charges or social implications. This led to many debates and memes whether Luke Skywalker is a sociopath given many, many Legends and canon media explore various Imperials as sympathetic or pitiable human beings. Chapter 16 addresses the matter in a darkly comedic way with an outlandish Empire loyalist ranting at Cara Dune over the Rebel Alliance being mass murderers over the Death Stars while mocking her over Alderaan's destruction and subsequent billions of civilian deaths that necessitated the Death Star's destruction, to begin with.
    • Chapter 16 also manages to really up the ante by featuring the appearance of Luke Skywalker himself in his traditional role as the Ideal Hero, after his depiction in The Last Jedi proved to be highly divisive. They even managed to get Mark Hamill to reprise the role, and had him bring R2-D2 along for good measure.
  • Shipping: Fennec Shand and Boba Fett after they surprisingly reappear working together. The Book of Boba Fett steers their canonical relationship more towards something between business partners and Platonic Life-Partners.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Even if Din and Luke never see each other again after Chapter 16, some fans still like to ship them. One factor includes the appeal of Grogu having two daddies, who can teach him to become both a Jedi and a Mandalorian.
  • Shocking Moments:
    • From the first episode alone, that the mark would be a baby from the same species as Yoda. This is notably significant as the franchise up to this point wasn't allowed to explore Yoda's past or give background of his species. In fact the last expansion of lore in relation to Yoda or his species in canonnote  was in The Phantom Menace, which featured Yaddle, a female member of the species and part of the Jedi Council. Even then Yaddle never made any other appearances after that.
    • In Episode 7, the appearance of Death Troopers and a whole legion of Stormtroopers. Up until this point the story had been a lower deck episode involving mercenaries and small-scale, personal conflicts. The fact a Moff shows up with a platoon of Death Troopers imply that there is far more going on than a simple dad and son relationship.
    • Chapter 8 now ties the live-action show to the animated shows by revealing that Moff Gideon is in possession of the Darksaber, a Mandalorian relic last seen in the hands of Bo-Katan Kryze.
    • After having spent the last six years under an unknown fate, Chapter 9 ending with the reveal that Boba Fett is alive.
    • Chapter 11, Bo-Katan is back and she's after the Darksaber.
    • Chapter 13, Ahsoka is revealed to still be hunting Thrawn.
    • Chapter 14, Boba and Jango are officially revealed to be Mandalorians, after years of Canon stating that they weren't — although it should be noted that the individual who stated that was an Unreliable Narrator who had plenty of reason to say that Jango wasn't Mandalorian. And then they turn around and further clarify in Chapter 16 that Jango was an ethnic Mandalorian but Boba doesn't identify as such.
    • Chapter 15 has Din Djarin intentionally violate the Creed for Grogu's sake, removing his helmet when the Imperial terminal requires a facial scan to avoid shutdown.
    • Chapter 16 ends on one, with none other than Luke Skywalker himself coming to the group's rescue and taking Grogu to be trained.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The ending of Chapter 1, where the Mandalorian and IG-11 discover their quarry is a baby from Yoda's species.
    • Mando rescuing the Child in Chapter 3, particularly the Mandalorian cavalry near the end.
    • The scene in Chapter 4 where the Child plays with the buttons on the Razor Crest, largely for being a Fountain of Memes in its own right. Most of them are YouTube videos that edit the scene to make it look like the Child is messing with the radio.
    • Moff Gideon holding the Darksaber, the very last scene of the first season.
    • At the end of the first episode of Season 2, Boba Fett watching the Mandalorian speed off.
    • Chapter 15 has the tense and uncomfortable round of drinks between Mayfeld, "Brown Eyes", and Valin Hess, the last of whom reveals himself as overly-passionate over rebuilding the Empire.
    • Chapter 16 features Luke Skywalker himself utterly destroying the very same Dark Troopers that had given the heroes a hard time with just one of their numbers, in a manner similar to his father.
    • After Season 2, the bulk of whichever promos and merchandise expose Din Djarin's human face either features or takes inspiration from the moment in Chapter 16 when Grogu tenderly touches it.
  • Special Effects Failure:
    • For all the genuinely-earned praise over The Child being portrayed by and large through a truly stellar application of old-fashioned puppetry and animatronics, the illusion of him being a living, breathing creature is shattered somewhat every time he's picked up and held; as more often than not he resembles a doll or stiff statue when in the arms of the adult actors.
    • Some of the Child's movements (such as blinking) can look overly stiff and robotic at times, making it clear that he's an animatronic. This is likely intentional on the part of the special effects artists, as making the Child move too smoothly or realistically would result in audiences not connecting with it on an emotional level, per Herzog's own comments. Rather, their challenge is to ensure the special effects they do use match the physical limitations and movements of the Child puppet.
    • Mandalorian body double Brendan Wayne becomes an Obvious Stunt Double if viewers notice instances of Mando lacking Pedro Pascal's broad shoulders, among other inconsistencies.
    • "The Jedi" gives a good idea of why Togruta rarely appear in live action. Ahsoka's montrals (the horns rising above her head) are too small while her lekku (the blue and white head tendrils) are very clearly artificial as they badly crinkle and just hang lifelessly. The smaller prosthetics were required because anything larger have would have restricted the actress' movements during stunts, a detail confirmed by Orli Shoshan who played fellow Togruta Shaak Ti in the prequels. The news that Ahsoka would be getting her own show had a lot of fans saying they could overlook this for just a single guest spot, but Rosario Dawson would hopefully be getting an improved prosthetic as a lead star.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
    • A bounty hunter who wears high-tech upgradeable armor, prefers to walk on his own and is guarding a small, powerful, and potentially hazardous baby that follows them around in a capsule and is in constant threat of being stolen by others for their personal gain? Definitely sounds like a Super Metroid adaptation. Although, considering the series' overall adventurous tone and story involving planet-hopping, defending small civilizations from greater threats, and competing with rival bounty hunters, it can also be seen as a loose adaptation of the Metroid: Samus and Joey manga.
    • Its story of a proud, mostly silent Proud Warrior Race Guy trying to reclaim his honor, protecting a youngling from those that would harm him and traveling to different locations and having different adventures, has led many to call this show the best live-action Lone Wolf and Cub adaptation that one could hope for.
    • Some have even compared the series to Samurai Jack for having a ronin protagonist roam from place to place and scenes that have long stretches without dialogue.
    • The Scout Troopers in Episode 8 were quickly embraced by the Rooster Teeth fandom as basically Red vs. Blue in live-action.
    • The show has drawn comparisons to Firefly given that it's a Space Western about a Determinator who travels from place to place in his beat up old ship, taking whatever jobs he can to make ends meet, while trying to protect a younger crewmate with mysterious abilities from a powerful and nefarious authority.note  The biggest difference is the significantly smaller crew, with The Mandalorian focusing on supporting characters who come and go an episode at a time.
    • Those thoroughly unimpressed by Halo (2022) have said that this show is far more faithful in spirit to the video game series than its own adaptation.
  • Stoic Woobie: The Children of the Watch have it pretty rough, but their helmets very effectively hide their emotional turmoil. The tribe must live underground after the Great Purge, bear the emotional burden of their numbers dwindling, and suffer a shortage of Beskar metal. When they form a cavalry to save Din Djarin and the Child from rival bounty hunters, breaking their rule to only leave the Covert one at a time, the Imperial Remnant either slaughters them offscreen, or informally banishes them off of the planet. Din never even gets to properly mourn the victims of the slaughter. As he begins meeting Mandalorians from other tribes, he sadly finds out that the Children of the Watch are a group of religious extremists to them, and are looked down upon as a result.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: The main theme bears some resemblance to that of Blake's 7.
  • Sweetness Aversion: Despite the show generally being darker in tone and having less kid-oriented humor than, say, the Prequel Trilogy, some fans feel like it's trying a little too hard to make the Child seem cute. While he has been shown to have Force abilities that move the plot of the first season forward, there's not much else to the actual character himself other than that he is a Ridiculously Cute Critter, which, in the Star Wars series, usually means being explicitly designed to appeal to kids and sell merchandise (and sure enough, many were actually surprised that Disney didn't jump on the marketing train right away). Unfortunately, since the Child has also become unexpectedly popular and a huge Fountain of Memes, this has resulted in the very people swearing off The Mandalorian who would have been most pleased by the scene near the end of the first season where the Child is revealed to have a darker side, force-choking one of the protagonists.
  • Theme Pairing: Din Djarin / Boba Fett gained popularity as a romantic pairing of two badass Mandalorian bounty hunters who follow a personal code of honor and who were both involved in loving father-son family relationships.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Thanks to The Book of Boba Fett hastily reuniting Din and Grogu, The Mandalorian Season 3 begins not with a lengthy and heart-wrenching look at the clan struggling to adjust to their separation, but with one of Season 2's major alterations to the status quo already reversed.
  • Too Cool to Live:
    • Naturally, an IG-series unit is incredibly lethal and efficient at what it does, and IG-11 more than lives up to their reputation with how easily he cuts through swathes of Mooks. However, while a glorious spectacle to behold in action sequences, it's clear that IG-11 alone would make most fights a cake walk if he stuck with Mando unless inflicted with The Worf Effect, and had to be taken out of commission early on; his second life as a nurse droid only lasted a little longer as he would greatly diminish any threat to the Child if he were to guard him at all times.
    • Kuiil, a kindly Ugnaught rancher who's gruff, friendly, and won't take crap from anyone, but helps the Mando in his time of need out of nothing but frontier hospitality. After a mostly lighthearted season where hardly anyone who didn't have it coming got killed, his tragic offscreen death is a blaster bolt to the heart.
  • Ugly Cute: Frog Lady and her husband are human sized, slimy-looking anthropomorphic frogs, but their kind demeanor, huge soulful eyes, and adorably loving relationship make them every bit as heartbreakingly cute as Grogu.
  • Unintentional Uncanny Valley:
    • Some fans feel this way about the designs of the Trandoshans featured in one of the preview images, as their faces look a little too human-like when compared to Bossk and previous Trandoshan characters.
    • The CG used to portray a Return of the Jedi-era Luke Skywalker comes off as less convincing than no doubt intended, as he does not move very much (once his hood is removed), his eyes have a very dead, distant look to them, and his mouth moves like it was put on his face via Synchro-Vox. He less resembles a man and more a rear-projection animatronic at Disneyland.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • The show opens right with one: given the franchise usually shies away from Yoda's species, which is even still unnamed, an infant of that certainly caught everyone off-guard.
    • No one expected the wisecracking Mythrol Mando hunts down in Chapter 1 to return in Season 2, until he received new merchandise and an appearance in the "Special Look" that Monday Night Football shared two Mondays before the season premiere would drop. To boot, the merch and ad revealed that he'd become freed from his carbonite block; the show proper has Greef explain that Mythrol needs to work off a debt.
    • For a show that focused on the smaller scale of the Star Wars universe, many were definitely surprised to see Chapter 16 feature an appearance from Luke Skywalker himself, complete with Mark Hamill reprising his role! And he brought R2-D2 with him!
  • The Un-Twist: The nature of the Mandalorian's identity. Theories ranged from him being everything from a new alien to a pre-established character to a woman and in the end it turns out he's... some random human guy we've never heard of.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome:
    • Based on the trailer alone, you'd swear the show has the same effects budget as the feature films (it's actually not that far off: $120 million for the first season, which was ~4 hours long excluding recaps and credits). The puppet used for the Child has won the show a great deal of praise for how convincing and endearing it is.
    • On top of this, the series also marks one of the first major commercial uses of the Volume, the Unreal Engine-powered LED soundstage, which was used to create on-set, interactive CGI environments, most of which are so convincing that it's easy to think that they're just conventional sets and environments with some CGI enhancements. This scene is a perfect example: the only elements that are real are the actors, chairs and desk. In the behind-the-scenes documentary, Jon Favreau shares an anecdote of a crew member freaking out when an area that was on fire was put on the Volume, thinking the set was actually on fire.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • Many Star Wars discussions had been fizzling out between 2017 and 2019 thanks to the Broken Base of the Sequel trilogy and financial flop of Solo at the box office. The Mandalorian did a lot to revive interest in the franchise, capturing the interest of fans on many sides of the fandom spectrum. This continued to be the case after The Rise of Skywalker released. Several reviews for the season finale (which aired one week after the release of Skywalker) emphasized that this is how you do Star Wars, and the movies should take note.
    • This is also the case for Jon Favreau. A few months before the series came out, his CGI remake of The Lion King, which, while not critically panned, did became his second-worst received movie, with a rotten rating of 52% on Rotten Tomatoes, and received backlash from audiences for its lack of originality and facial expressions for the animals. With The Mandalorian, Favreau made a quick return to critical acclaim for its direction, writing, and revolutionary visual effects.
    • Pedro Pascal's previous TV show, Narcos, experienced a drop in ratings during its third and final season; his promotion from co-star to headliner inconveniently coincided with the start of the writers' struggles to provide antagonists as compelling as Pablo Escobar. Two years later, this show managed to raise Pascal's fame to new heights, leaving viewers impressed that not even a mask or a Fake Shemp could hide his charm and emotional range.
    • The Season 2 finale, featuring the Big Damn Heroes return of Luke Skywalker, restoring his characterization to that of the Ideal Hero everybody grew to love, instantly came across as one of the most triumphant cases of Character Rerailment following the neverending controversy of The Last Jedi.
  • The Woobie:
    • Din Djarin can come off as either a Stoic Woobie or an Iron Woobie depending on the state of his Character Development.
      • Season 1 reveals that Din lost his birth parents as a child, to a Separatist droid raid. Their death traumatized him into carrying recurring flashbacks and a hatred for droids into adulthood; Chapters 1 and 3 contrast his inexpressive visage and body language with the terror of his memories as the Armorer forges new armor for him. Some time in between the raid and the start of the show, Din had to move underground along with other Mandalorians, as the Great Purge wiped out their kind across the Empire. When the adult Din rescues another orphan himself, the two of them get essentially chased off Nevarro for Din's violation of the Bounty Hunters' Creed. Even after Din makes amends with the Bounty Hunters' Guild, and officially welcomes the Child into his clan, his new responsibilities and faster age rate compared to the Child leave it uncertain how long the "Clan of Two" can hold.
      • By Season 2, Din opens up his emotions to the Child/Grogu and their friends more often, including his fears of losing the kid forever. Even as he attempts his mission to deliver Grogu to a Jedi, he makes it apparent that he'd rather keep Grogu to himself — especially when Din hesitates giving him to Ahsoka, who fortunately refuses Grogu. By Chapter 14, aptly-named "The Tragedy", Din has lost Grogu, almost all of his arsenal, and the clan's home, but he musters up enough willpower to go rescue the kid. All of this cumulates in him succeeding, but his efforts still result in him tearfully bidding his son farewell as he gives Grogu to Luke Skywalker for training, barely able to hold back his sadness. And saying goodbye to his kid will be the least of his worries, as he now possesses the ultimate weapon of — and the rightful claim to leadership of the planet of — Mandalore, which Bo-Katan desperately wanted back.
    • The Frog Lady, whose species is on the verge of extinction, and is trying so desperately to protect her eggs, only to have a few of them eaten by Grogu, thus she is understandably a nervous wreck, trying to reunite with her spouse. It just makes the viewer want to reach out and give her a hug!
  • What The Hell, Casting Agency?:
    • A lot of people were quite surprised that Werner Herzog, of all people, was involved with this series, mostly because franchise work is so left-field for him. He stated that he's never cared about the franchise and originally took the role to finance his own work, but later grew to enjoy the experience, praising the Worldbuilding and Practical Effects. He especially fell in love with the baby of Yoda's species, calling the puppet "heartbreakingly beautiful" and shaming the show runners into going ahead with it when they were considering CGI instead.
    • The guest appearances from Bill Burr are mostly quite popular, but he was a bit infamous for not being a fan of the franchise and preferring more cerebral science fiction. When he brought this up upon being approached for the role, Favreau replied “That’s what makes it funny.” Like Herzog, he grew to quite enjoy the experience once he realized it was more akin to a Spaghetti Western, which he’s also a big fan of, than the franchise’s usual thing.
  • What The Hell, Costuming Department?: While Ahsoka's appearance was highly praised, there was a decent amount of criticism for her makeup, with the small lekku and montrals more appropriate to her teenaged Clone Wars design than her adult Rebels looks.

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