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DJMAX is a Rhythm Game franchise by Pentavision, spanning different versions across consoles.

  • DJMAX Online — The original game, released as a freeware game on PC with additional pay-to-play content. The game plays suspiciously like beatmania, though this is due to be being a clone of Ez2DJ, which was even more like beatmania (complete with turntable) to the point where Konami stepped in and sued. Suffers from a partial case of No Export for You; you couldn't play the Korean version since you need a Korean residence number (which is a crime to falsify); you could play the Japanese and Chinese versions, but the Japanese version... is... well... in Japanese, with mostly Japanese players (which means good luck communicating to other players if you don't speak nihongo), and the Chinese version ran on a rather slow server. The latter two versions shut down some time ago.
    • DJMAX Trilogy — a recent PC game revival with music from DJMAX Online and early DJMAX Portable games, but due to some Executive Meddling (namely, its producer, Forte Escape, leaving Pentavision), updates to it have been put on hold indefinitely, and the inclusion of certain features and bugs further drove it into the ground.
  • DJMAX Portable — By far the most popular DJMAX series, partly for being one of the first—if not the first—successful portable Rhythm Game series. Originally released on (as its title implies) the PSP in 2006, it saw success not only in Korea, but non-Korean countries as well, leading to an "International" release with English text (albeit with poorly-censored songs and the replacement of the song Dreadnought, whose background animations mocked former U.S. President George W. Bush).
    • DJMAX Portable 2 — released in 2007 and held up its ever-growing fanbase.
    • DJMAX Clazziquai Edition — released in 2008 as a somewhat Licensed Game with songs from the Korean band Clazziquai, and is geared towards newer players.
    • DJMAX Black Square — released about a month and a half later, and is targeted at more experienced players.
    • DJMAX Fever — released in late January 2009 as the first DJMAX Portable title to be released outside of South Korea, and its songlist is a mix of the first two Portable titles.
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    • DJMAX Portable 3 — the first Portable game since Fever to be released outside Korea (and on the same release date, too). With around 40 songs to choose from (a mix between old returning songs, Technika 2 songs, and new Portable 3 songs), the game is meant to be a return to the roots of the Portable series, hence the numerical naming. The game also features a new mode that utilizes the analog nub to switch to two "turntables" at appropriate times to in a sense remix the song. It was released on October 14, 2010 for the UMD version and October 19 on the PlayStation Network.
  • DJMAX Technika — The Gaiden Game (gameplay-wise) to DJMAX. Taking a departure from its beatmania-like sibling series, its gameplay is a combination of Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan / Elite Beat Agents and Lumines — a "timeline" passes over notes on the screen, which you touch as the timeline passes over them. Brings in songs from all DJMAX games, with a few new ones. A sequel appropriately named DJMAX Technika 2 reworks the system, making overall improvements and updates while adding two new modes and many brand new songs alongside more oldies that weren't in the first game.
    • DJMAX Technika Tune — A sort of Gaiden Game to a Gaiden Game, released on the Playstation Vita in 2012. While the touch screen allows for standard Technika gameplay, the rear pad allows players to perform hold notes and repeat notes without letting go of the Vita. Due to the small screen, the number of lanes on screen is reduced to 3 from 4, with brand-new charts to match.
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    • DJMAX Technika Q — A spin-off developed for the iOS and Android systems and released in Korea in October 2013 and internationally in March 2014. Like Tune above, the number of lanes in gameplay is reduced to 3, but also supports a two-lane mode. Unlike Tune, Q features a new UI. New charts have been made for returning songs to match the altered gameplay, although they are more akin to their arcade counterparts this time around.
  • Tap Sonic — Another spinoff, released for iOS in 2011 and later to Android. Gameplay is similar to the main series, but with the addition of slide notes, where the player slides from one key to off to the side or to another key.
    • DJMAX RayThe sequel to Tap Sonic in all but name, released in 2012 for iOS.
    • Tap Sonic World Champion — Released in 2017, this installment visually resembles Deemo with variable-sized notes and diagonal slide notes.
    • Tap Sonic Top — Also released in 2017, this installment is closer to Love Live! School Idol Festival than its parent series, complete with a button layout resembling the former and an emphasis on requiring gacha pulls for the best ranks.
    • Tap Sonic BOLD — Released on Steam on October 2018 (but technically still in Early Access), BOLD eschews the usual touch screen gameplay in favor of a home row key layout (SDF and JKL), much like the original DJMAX Online and DJMAX Trilogy.
  • DJMAX Respect — The first DJMAX game to be released on home consoles. The title of the game is meant to pay “respect” to the creators of the original DJMAX game, as well as the fans who have been waiting for a new entry in the series, and serve as a "revival" of the franchise. The studio is hopeful this will have high sales, which would mean more entries. So far the songlist includes all songs from the first 2 Portable games as well as some originals. Songs from the other games in the series will be released as DLC.
    • Trilogy Pack - A DLC add-on that adds songs that were first introduced in its namesake game. Also adds one Trilogy-themed gear skin and main menu theme. Lastly, one new song for Respect, "Nevermind", is also added to the song list.
    • Guilty Gear Pack - Originally a Pre-Order Bonus exclusive to the Japanese version, this pack is the first of many third-party collaborations. Adds three songs from the series - two songs from the Guilty Gear Xrd series and one from Guilty Gear 2: Overture. Also adds a gear skin and note skin, both named "GUILTY".
    • Clazziquai Edition Pack - Adds most songs from Clazziquai Edition, minus a few non-Clazziquai licensed songs note . Also adds one new gear skin and note skin based on the song "First Kiss", which was not in the original Clazziquai Edition. This pack also comes with one new Respect song, "Rising the Sonic".
    • Technika Pack - Adds songs from the first Technika game, a Technika-themed UI skin, a gear skin based on "Son of Sun", and one new song for Respect, "Do You Want It".
    • Black Square Pack - Adds songs from Black Square, one gear skin based on the music video from "Fermion", and one new Respect song, "ANALYS". The patch that made this DLC available also added two songs free of charge - "Always" (new to Respect) and "Fly Away" (from Technika Q).
    • Girls' Frontline Pack - The second third-party collaboration. Adds three songs from the titular game along with multiple note and gear skins themed after various factions. The DLC also comes with a menu UI skin that is modeled after the mobile game's main menu.
    • Technika 2 Pack - Adds songs introduced in Technika 2, a Technika 2 UI skin, a gear skin based on the song "D2", and one new Respect song, "End of Mythology".
    • Christmas 2018 - Patch 1.20 added one new song from Tap Sonic Top, "Tok! Tok! Tok!", as well as a Tap Sonic Top gear and note skin, all free of charge.
    • Technika 3 Pack - Adds Technika 3 songs, a gear skin, a UI skin, and a new song for the Respect tab, "Alice". Unusually, the new gear skin is based off the new song rather than a Technika 3 song.
    • Groove Coaster Pack - Adds ten songs from the franchise, a main menu theme, and a gear skin (with fancy Tron Lines appearing whenever Fever is activated). Unlike the other collab DLC packs, this one is priced closer to the main series of DLC to match its content (14,800 won), and is the first of many to be treated as such.
    • Deemo Pack - Adds ten songs, a main menu theme, and a gear skin resembling a piano. The same patch also added two songs free of charge for all players - "Over Your Dream", Trilogy's opening theme, and "Void", one of Brave Nine's opening themes.
    • ESTiMATE Pack - The last of the second wave of collaboration DLC, announced on their Facebook page on November 2018.
    • Chunithm Pack - Announced on April 2019 as a future project.
  • DJMAX Respect V — An Updated Re-release of DJMAX Respect for Steam, teased on November 2019, with the official trailer following shortly after. Released as an Early Access title on December 19, 2019, with the official release sometime in Q1 2020. Mostly a direct port of Respect's base game, save for the returning Super Crazy difficulty, which features charts designed specifically for keyboards. The game also supports 7 player online play, a la DJMAX Online, and a 1v1 "Ladder Match" mode that forces both players to play a song of the game's choosing. Lastly, the new "Air Mode" adds a Nico Nico Douga-like chat overlay over the music video, and an optional Autoplay mode can be enabled, should the player simply wish to socialize with their audience.
    • League of Legends Pack — Respect V's first DLC pack, featuring two songs from the game, "Get Jinxed" and "POP/STARS", along with a LoL-themed gear skin and note skin. Exclusive to V due to licensing issues.
    • Emotional Sense Pack — A small DLC pack consisting of eight songs from DJMAX Online, containing a mix of returning songs and songs not represented by any prior DJMAX game besides Online.
    • V Extension Pack — DLC pack featuring 20 songs. Unlike prior mainline DLCs, this one is mostly comprised of original music and crossover songs from TAP SONIC BOLD. Also includes new missions and a UI and gear skin based off of one of the new songs, "Dream It".
    • "The Clear Blue Sky" Pack — Despite its price point of $9.99, this pack actually contains no songs, only a gear skin, note skin, and nameplate based on the titular song. This pack coincided with the re-release of the Clazziquai Edition DLC for Respect V.

In December of 2008, Konami filed a lawsuit against Pentavision for infringing on Konami's patents with the DJMAX series. While Konami had successfully used lawsuits to terminate Ez2DJ and In The Groove, it doesn't look like anything progressed in Konami's favor. The two corporations settled out of court, apparently letting Pentavision off the hook and Konami retaining the rights to distribute Technika in Japan.

Eventaually, Pentavision was bought by Neowiz sometime before Clazziquai Edition, and sadly, it marked the fall of the franchise. While each installment was still well regarded and highly praised, eventually Neowiz dissolved Pentavision assigning everyone to different areas. Planned DLC for Technika Tune was dropped and Neowiz switched development to focus only on mobile games. Thankfully Techinika Q is getting new updates, and hopefully averted for good if Respect sells well enough.

Though it should be noted that the DJMAX team has quit Neowiz, and have created Nurijoy. Under this new name, the team created two Spiritual Successors to DJMAX. One is known as Beatcraft CYCLON, an arcade game that has gameplay similar to maimai. The other is called Superbeat XONIC for the PS Vita (which contains all the songs from CYCLON plus a few new ones, and songs from Arc System Works games), which Nurijoy released worldwide. A version of XONIC on Playstation 4 and Xbox One (with a Nintendo Switch version upcoming as indicated by the ESRB's website) with all the Vita version's DLC songs (minus the Arcsys songs, and Rackin Gravity, which the latter was later added as free DLC), and new DLC to be released as well, with the Switch version getting the first 2 packs free.

NOTE: Due to the similarities and them being successors to the series, please put all tropes from Beatcraft CYCLON, Superbeat XONIC and Tap Sonic here.


TRY YOUR ABILITY! DO IT!

  • All There in the Manual: The names of Respect's Mascot characters, Play and (El) Clear (and her Darker and Edgier counterpart, Fail), are only mentioned on the PlayStation Network store in avatar names and in-game DLC concept art.
  • Animesque: The vast majority of animated MVs feature an anime aesthetic despite being a Korean franchise.
  • Announcer Chatter: While almost all games have this, they're usually relegated to the menus and the result screen, except the multiplayer battles, where it'll call out whenever you hit higher fever levels, overtake your opponent, or take a combo bonus.
    • Trilogy has the announcer comment when you reach certain combo milestones, and reach certain combo multipliers (As a part of a "Live Mode" that you can turn off) as well as your grade in the results screen.
    • Ray has the announcer call out the Fever level when it is activated.
    • Respect has no announcer whatsoever, except in its Portable 2 and Trilogy-themed DLC menus, and even then, it's only on the main menu. Interestingly, Black Square's announcer is also present when choosing which button mode to play in Arcade Mode.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Holding a note for too long will simply give you a MAX 1% instead of a Break. Black Square and Clazziquai Edition have the "Easy Long" effector that makes these overheld notes 100% instead.
    • In Trilogy and Respect, The player's freestyle combo counter doesn't reset when restarting a song, unlike past games where one had to reset the game to preserve their combo, and even then, it didn't work for Portable or Portable 2. (It still gets reset when switching songs in Respect, though you can change freely in Trilogy.)
    • In Trilogy, going up to x3 or x4 Fever will increase your speed multiplier to the next step, unless you are already at speed x5.0 or above, in which case your speed multiplier will not be affected.
    • Everything can be unlocked at some point simply by racking up the number of songs played, avoiding impossible-to-unlock songs (For example, in Respect, unlocking MASAI for playing 10 online matches when the lack of a PlayStation Plus subscription makes that impossible).
    • In Respect, The final song in mission mode, We're All Gonna Die XB (10 buttons), is preceded by a mission unlocked right before it with relatively easier XB notecharts, giving players a chance to get used to the gimmick. There's also a popup briefly illustrating what L2 and R2 notes will look like in-game, so nobody is caught by surprise. Other missions with a possibly Unexpected Gameplay Change have similar popups, like the 4BFX and 5BFX songs in the Clazziquai Edition and Black Square packs and the TB songs in the Technika packs.
    • Two of the three Guilty Gear DLC songs had their BPM changed to half of the original (200+ BPM) so that players didn't have to deal with insane scroll speeds.
    • Respect has had a number of quality-of-life changes added over its various patches:
      • One update saves the Hi Speed option you last used on a specific song so you won't have to change it whenever you change the song. If the speed is different from the saved one, or if there is none saved, it'll be grayed out on the options menu.
      • v1.08 added the ability to favorite songs by pressing R3 and have easy access to them from the Favorites tab in Freestyle mode.
      • The Black Square patch (v1.14) added a truckload of them, with notable changes revolving around mission mode - players can practice individual songs they've seen at least once (very handy for mission-exclusive button modes) and restarting a mission places the player at the beginning of the current song rather than at the beginning of the mission's playlist.
      • The Arcade mode song list was changed from a fix selection to random songs per stage in order to make "play 3 songs from the same game" Trophies not Unwinnable by Mistake.
      • The Groove Coaster update moved Crossover songs in Freestyle mode from the rather lengthy Respect tab to its own dedicated "Collaboration" tab to make them easier to find.
      • A future update will add song categories to the rather lengthy Freestyle list of songs.
      • By turning off the "Freestyle Combo" toggle, you can freeze your current combo and then pick it back up later by turning it back on.
    • Respect V threw a bone to both ends of the Casual/Competitive Conflict. For the casual end, there are 7 player lobbies and "Air Mode" which facilitates socializing, and for the competitive end, the 1v1 multiplayer from Respect was expanded upon to include stat tracking and a more structured best-of-three match format.
  • Ascended Meme: Enemy Storm SP/MX in Technika was so reviled that in the background video for "Raise Me Up", a character can be seen screaming "ENEMY STORM SP PATTERN IS DIRTY I HATE THAT PLEASE HELP ME".
  • Affectionate Parody: Someone at Pentavision is playing too much League of Legends.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: Respect V's opening video has Fail turning into a giant monster and decimating the Game Graveyard from Respect. Clear goes on to fight the thing, while Play is cowering helplessly behind some gravestones watching the battle unfold.
  • Attract Mode: Technika 2 has a very interactive attract demo.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Fever in Technika 2. Normally, green MAXes have the point value of rainbow MAXes but minus 1 point. In Fever, you get 1 point of Fever bonus for each green MAX you hit basically making it a rainbow MAX. Useful for reaching 300,000 points, the maximum score for a song. The impracticality comes in trying to activate Fever while dealing with a lot of notes, probably messing up your play for what's basically a tiny amount of additional points. Even one COOL renders the bonus useless, as it's not enough to offset the potential score lost.
    • Plus, Fever mode is disabled in Crew Race. Any Fever bonus is disregarded when submitting a course for Crew Race, so there's really little point in activating Fever if you're making such a course.
    • Auto Fever mode pre-Respect. It does Exactly What It Says on the Tin, auto activating Fever when the gauge is filled. However, it lowers the rate the gauge is filled, making it harder to chain Fevers together, something vital to getting high scores in the game! While you can totally play the game without any regards to score, just focusing on combos or accuracy, for example, you might as well play it with the option turned off, if possible.
    • The ability to build up Fevers in CE and BS. This essentially means that instead of unleashing a fever after the gauge is full, you can fill it up again to make it so that you can go straight to Fever 3, instead, and so on. However, it becomes harder to fill after you fill it up the first time, plus it makes it more difficult to score more points until then. Not to mention the Fever 7 effector in BS prevents you from doing this period. This was probably why this mechanic didn't stick after the games, since it didn't appear in Hottunes or Fever.
  • Balance Buff: Auto Fever was improved in Respect to no longer have a penalty to the rate at which the Fever gauge increases.
  • "Blind Idiot" Translation:
    • The English language options in every DJMAX game. And then there's any number of songs with English lyrics or text in the vids, such as "Fallen Angel": "Don't walk you away!"
    • Wordof God stated that the team aimed for accurate translations with the international release of Portable 3. However, there are a few typos in the menu, and the videos still had their Engrish text.
    • Tap Sonic Top is plagued by grammar errors and figures of speech that are interpreted too literally, from the loading screen tips to the story mode. Also, character and location names are inexplicably rendered in ALL CAPS.
  • Bonus Boss: CnP in DJMAX Portable, Your Own Miracle in Portable 2, both accessible by getting a high enough accuracy in the four stages. Your Own Miracle has a True Final Boss form (in the form of a Hard chart) with not-exactly-known requirements.
    • In Technika, if you can get 95% MAX judgment overall in Technical mode for the first three songs (not 95% for each), you can play a different boss song than you normally would. For example, you would normally get "Come To Me" as a boss song in First Step, but achieving 95% MAX will give you "Lover" instead.
      • The Conquerer Set has two bonus bosses. The first one, "Thor" [Technical] , is unlocked at 95%. The second one, "BlythE" [Technikal] is unlocked at 98%.
      • However, some songs' alternate bosses actually have less notes, so you deliberately need to avoid getting a high enough accuracy to play the higher scoring song.
    • Technika 2 changed the way bonus songs appeared. Instead of requiring 95% MAX, it is based on which songs are selected to play within each set. The songs are "numbered" from 1-6 based on the order they are listed in the set. Each set has a total number related to the difficulty, such as First Step having an 11. If the three songs chosen total to a number below that set number, the first boss song is chosen. If the total is equal or higher, the second boss song is chosen.
    • Technika 3 has (or had) a true Bonus Boss: a 2011 rendition of Supersonic (of S4 League fame). It's playable in one of two ways: as a boss in the Sound Lab Club Mixing set or in one of the three Summer Special Missions.
    • Respect has a couple:
      • Under certain (currently unknown) conditions, Mulch will appear on the third stage of 8B Arcade Mode.
      • The Black Square DLC has this with the mission "Enter the Rocky Studio". After completing the mission proper, players get a shot at Son of Sun (Extended Mix) XB. See it in action here.
  • Boss Rush: The Conqueror Set (sort of); all of the songs that can be used for the first 3 stages are boss songs from other Technical sets.
  • Bowdlerization:
    • The MV for Funky People was originally more smoother animated, but it also had large homosexual overtones, so the US version is changed although some of the original appears in the Song Select and MV screens.
    • When "Dreadnought" was resurrected in Respect, it got a completely new music video due to the original video being a mockery of former U.S. President George W. Bush.
    • The original MV of Vortex for DJMAX Technika Q has animated red blood sprite and amputations in the scene when the heroine on the carriage slayed zombies using her chainsaw, finally the game released version have put a mosaic filter of zombie body part scattering scenes and the red blood sprites removed with particle bits of black dots.
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory
    • A very, very mild example in Respect - the "glory day"-themed gear and note skins are awarded as a Bragging Rights Reward for clearing 60 missions. Considering how Nintendo Hard those missions eventually get, this is no small feat. Fortunately, the game is pretty Literal-Minded and counts the comparatively easier DLC missions for the unlock requirement.
    • A more straightforward (but still relatively mild) example would be the "Unlock All Songs" DLC for Respect, which automatically unlocks every song and mission in the base game.
    • Tap Sonic Top plays this trope completely straight. Like the game it borrows heavily from, the player's score is determined by the number of points each Star in their unit gives, plus whatever skills they may have, with priority often going to score-increasing and accuracy-increasing skills. Unsurprisingly, the best Stars only come once in a blue moon in the Star Casting gacha.
    • Also specifically parodied in the background video for "Don't Die".
  • Bruce Lee Clone: The star of the Astro Fight and Kung Brother MVs.
  • Canon Discontinuity: Respect does not seem to acknowledge DJMAX Online. Tracks that debuted in Online instead are categorized by the next oldest they appeared in (for example, "Miles" first appeared in Online, but it did not appear again until in Portable 2, so it's classified as a Portable 2 track). Respect V eventually rectified this by introducing the Emotional Sense DLC (and retroactively offered for Respect), and it's meager offering of eight songs just goes to show how few Online songs were left unrepresented by either game by then.
  • Censored for Comedy: Some DLC missions in Respect use a gameplay modifier that causes the screen to get more and more pixellated the higher the player's combo climbs. A later update made this a Fader modifier in other game modes, calling it "Pixel". There's also a "Pixel 2" modifier that makes the pixellation even worse, to the point where the game looks like something that came out of the Atari 2600 era. Playing anything harder than 4 button mode becomes an exercise in futility when everything is an unidentifiable, jumbled mess.
  • Comeback Mechanic: Portable 2's multiplayer mode causes the losing player's fever gauge to increase at a faster rate, while the winning player's has their fever rate reduced.
  • The Computer Is a Lying Bastard: In Online, the BPM for "ON" is listed as 72. However, the chart scrolls as if it's a 144 BPM song, causing unexpectly fast scroll speeds for many players.note  Recitified in Respect, where it has a display BPM of 144 to match the scroll BPM.
  • Crossover:
    • Respect's initial song list has two (eventually three) songs that cross over from other games that fall under Neowiz's publishing umbrella. "The Lost Story" is lifted straight from the now-defunct Bless Online's OST, complete with gameplay footage from said game as its music video, while Lena from Tap Sonic Top appears very briefly in "Don't Die". One of Lena's image songs, "Tok! Tok! Tok!", is also in the game. There's also the V Extension Pack in Respect V, which has TAP SONIC BOLD songs mixed in.
    • Both Superbeat XONiC and Respect feature Guilty Gear songs as DLC. The crossover even extends into the gameplay elements, with the GG gear skin's health bar being exactly as it appears in Guilty Gear Xrd and the GG note skin's visual effects using the same ones that appear when landing a hit in Xrd.
    • Respect also has a Girls' Frontline-themed DLC. Like the Guilty Gear crossover above, the crossover extends into the gameplay elements, with the G&K Girls gear skin changing the featured character portraits into their "critically damaged" versions when the player has less than full health.
    • Starting from Respect's second year of support, Neowiz and Rocky Studio seem hellbent on crossing over with every popular East Asian music game under the sun. The full list of these crossovers is in the game list at the top of this page. In preparation for an ever-expanding list of crossover songs, the patch that introduced the Groove Coaster pack added a "Collaboration" tab to Freestyle mode.
    • Sega has included at least two songs from Respect in maimai (no word yet on whether this will be reciprocated by Neowiz).
    • Cytus α released with an unlockable DJMAX chapter containing ten songs spanning the series from Portable 1 to Respect. It remains to be seen whether or not Respect will have Cytus songs as future DLC in return.
    • Groove Coaster received "U.A.D." and "Don't Die" upon the release of 4EX, with a later event adding "I Want You", "Fermion", "Oblivion", and "Glory Day", as well as letting you unlock El Clear, El Fail, and Suee as avatars and navigators. Respect received a DLC pack containing 10 songs, and a UI, note, and gear skin.
  • Copy Protection: Trilogy comes with a USB drive, which contains data needed to run the installation and the game itself, as well as save data.
    • The Portable games, save for Portable 1 and its International Version, have a feature that won't load save data if it wasn't on the PSP it was created on.
    • Portable 2 has a particularly memorable one - if the game detects that you're not playing on official PSP firmware (e.g. homebrew or on an emulator), the game becomes an increasingly glitchy mess until it just flat out freezes.
  • Darker and Edgier: Black Cat's MV is exactly like Glory Day, but El is a bit more sinister. The crown and Respect logo are more red in the video, as well.
  • Design Student's Orgasm: A few different MVs qualify, but Kensei is a beautiful, colorful mess of typography and vector graphics.
    • BLACK GOLD isn't nearly as colorful (as the title implies), but focuses on an elaborate Art-Deco pattern that gets increasingly, incredibly complex as time goes on.
  • Difficulty Spike: If you have to use the easiest 3 songs in a Technical set to get to the 4th stage, the 4th stage will probably decimate you.
  • Disc-One Nuke: In Trilogy, reaching Level 24 unlocks a mission that in turn, upon completion, unlocks one of the best pieces of equipment you can buy: the LPG Note. Its enhancements are +2 in Tech (the judgment window) and +3 in Fever (which increases the rate the Fever gauge is filled). With it, acquiring SSS ranks becomes a complete breeze. Not only that, but getting to that level is much easier than it seems, and in addition, the mission is not that difficult to pass at all.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: Some songs' videos feature some pretty hot ladies, which might make you stare at them instead of the notes you're supposed to be playing.
  • Do Well, but Not Perfect:
    • Several discs in Portable and Portable 2 require getting a particular Rate on a track, such as 66.0-66.9% or 77.0-77.9%. One disc in particular requires you to have less than 10%, and it still counts as this trope because your Rate is nullified if your Life Meter drains out.
    • Trilogy has the Self-Injury mission, which requires the player to clear each song with an accuracy rating between 60-70%.
    • SUPERBEAT XONiC has several missions where the player needs to get to the end of the course with more than a set number of Breaks.
  • Double Play: One of the instructional cabinet attachments for Technika 2 explains that in addition to using Duo Mixing as a 2-player mode, you can also play both sides by yourself.
  • Double Unlock: Portable 2, Fever, and Trilogy have you leveling up and completing missions to unlock new characters, interface styles, and notes... or rather, the right to unlock them! You then have to use Gold to be able to use them.
    • Trilogy is the worst example of this. You'll need to complete many different songs just to get the gold and points needed to unlock one avatar, let a lone notes and gear! Not to mention that you need to buy songs, but at least those are the cheapest unlocks...
  • Dramatic Disappearing Display: On some songs in Clazziquai Edition and Black Square, there are note-free sections in which the HUD vanishes, giving you a clear view of a climatic part of the song's MV.
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • Online is far different from the later games:
      • There's no 4- or 6-button modes, due to the game being designed around keyboards.
      • 5- and 7- button modes have cosmetic configurations designed around using the spacebar for the center column, and only one key can be mapped to center. The next two PC DJMAX games instead have two regular keys used for the center column in odd-number button modes.
      • There's no Fever mode.
      • Hold notes are counted as one note each.
      • The default timing windows are stricter.
      • You have to pay a fee to play MX and SC charts.
      • When playing MX and SC charts, pressing keys without notes to hit results in a "FAULT" judgement that decreases your health.
      • There are two receptables that are positioned at the last two columns you hit. Notes that land in these receptables without being pressed will become MAX 1%'s.
      • There are missions you can play in which, among other things, you have to avoid "mine" notes that decrease your health a lot if hit (keep the aforementioned receptables in mind!).
    • From Portable 1:
      • Still no Fever mode or combo inflation with hold notes.
      • There's no level system, and there's nothing to spend your MAX currency on. Instead, you get unlocks as you build up MAX, making it effectively a form of Experience Points.
      • There's no mission mode; the closest there is is courses of several songs in a row.
      • It is the only PSP DJMAX game to lack some sort of protection against copied saves.
    • Online, the first two Portable games, and Trilogy use background animations that are rendered in real time, saving on storage space at the expense of higher CPU usage and limitations imposed by hardware and the game engine. Clazziquai Edition onwards, as well as songs introduced in Trilogy updates, instead use video files, allowing for a greater range of visual styles.
    • Technika also lacked Fever, instead having the options to boost music and note sounds. Its scoring system was also different, not having a basic scoring cap of 300,000 points, making higher note charts imperative to getting a high score.
  • Earn Your Fun: With the exception of Portable 1, you need to play songs in Arcade/Stage Mode to unlock it in Free Style. Trilogy unlocks the song for every mode once cleared in stage, but you'll need to unlock each song in each button mode separately in Portable.
    • Portable 3 requires you to unlock the Hard Style charts by clearing Normal Style charts first, provided the song has one to begin with. Same goes for Turntable Sets to unlock a song's Sampler Set chart, and Workstation Sets require you to clear a specific mission or unlock it via leveling up.
    • Respect requires you to unlock the song itself to play it in Free Style, but most of the songs are available to play in Arcade Mode from the start.
    • Technika's unlocks are temporary; unlock a song or course via a Platinum Crew mission and you'll get three chances to play it. Once you're out of chances, you have to unlock it again, via the same manner. From Technika 2 onwards, unlocks were made permanent.
  • Easier Than Easy:
    • On Technika machines with Platinum Crew enabled, charts on Lite Mode have three lanes instead of four.
    • A fanmade chart makes fun of this by having only one lane of notes.
    • It may have become a Fake Difficulty due to the notes not fully on beat with the wipe, so it can get a bit difficult the first time for people who already play Technika if they decide to give Lite Mode a shot.
    • Clazziaquai Edition had 2 button mode.
    • Portable 3 had 3.2 Trax, where both the main chart and the remixing segments are controlled with the same three buttons to ease players into the game's exclusive Remix Mode gimmick.
  • Easy-Mode Mockery:
    • The "Easy" difficulties from Portable 2 onward. While it'll increase the judgement window, as well as make the life meter more lenient to mistakes, it locks you at Level 30, decreases how many points you earn, and prevent you from unlocking certain songs on free play. Games after Portable 2 remove the level and song unlock limit, but they still dock you points, so you might as well just stick to Normal Mode unless you're really struggling.
    • Using Auto Fever (With exception to Respect) lowers the rate at which the Fever Gauge increases.
  • Elegant Gothic Lolita: Featured in the music videos of Oblivion and Heart of Witch.
  • Every Episode Ending: Almost every installment in the series closes out an Arcade Mode run with a ten-second snippet of "Yo Max".
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows:
    • DJ Max Technika 2. From the teaser to actual gameplay, DJ Max Technika 2 just SCREAMS this. This extends even to the Technika 2-themed note and gear in Respect, replacing blue notes with rainbow ones and the normally black background with a rainbow splash.
    • With the opening of the Crew Race online system, players can buy items to modify the game interface... and this includes notes with rainbow-colored explosions.
  • Fanservice: Elle's Absolute Cleavage on the box art of Portable 2, Panty Shots in the animation for "Memory of Beach," Gainaxing in "Star Fish"'s animation, just to name a few examples...
  • Fake Difficulty:
    • Technika's Technical/Club mode requires you to finish the first stage with more than 75% life, the second stage with more than 50%, and the third stage with more than 25%. When you combine this with a Life Meter that gets harder to recover each stage...
    • Some missions screws around with the notes and the gear, sometimes in the form of effectors that activate/deactivate when Fever occurs, or just ones that aren't regularly selectable at all. Hope you enjoy having your gear constantly shift back and forth, or have it spin in a circle!
    • SUPERBEAT XONiC on Switch, due to the Switch's controller not being horizontally symmetrical (the left stick is above the D-pad/buttons, the right stick is below the ABXY diamond), meaning that it's easy to shift your thumbs in the wrong direction and miss directional notes as a result. You'll have to purchase a symmetrical third-party controller to get around this.
    • Some of the series' installments crank up the scroll speed as your Fever multiplier goes up. Usually, it goes up by 0.5x at 4x or 5x Fever. Portable 3 takes this a step further by increasing it by another 0.5x at 7x Fever, making it necessary to start a song at a slower scroll speed than one may be uncomfortable with (or just unequipping the 7x Fever to sidestep the issue completely). Fortunately, Trilogy and Respect completely drop this mechanic.
    • In the older games, the timing windows are tied to track BPM, rather than being based on a timer. The faster a song is, the more accurate you have to be for a MAX 100%.
  • Fake-Out Fade-Out: Out Law does this. It seems to end, but the final verse of the song occurs after about a second of dead air.
  • Flawless Victory:
  • Foregone Conclusion: In Divine Service MV, the fans expected Joe Nevious (the main protagonist) to die at the end and reunited with his wife in the afterlife, after the beginning shows that Joe’s wife was already passed away and the ending shows that Joe was dying after his severe injuries resulted after a struggle to defeat a demonically possessed deceased man. It’s confirmed to be true, the Word of God from MV artist, S.R. (a.k.a. Grandyoukan) stated that in a form of An Old Story from EZ2ON, the continuation for Divine Service. Also it’s confirmed that he’s the same guy from former song mentioned above.
  • Game-Breaking Bug:
    • In Portable 2, DEF UP gear actually reduces your defense (i.e. you lose more health when you miss notes).
    • In Clazziquai Edition and Black Square, the current song will occasionally skip, becoming clearly out of sync with the chart. And just to make things more insulting for those who play with UMDs, these bugs don't happen if you're using an ISO to play.
    • In DJMAX Trilogy, "Remember" is off-sync to begin with.
    • Portable 3, at least the digital version, can cause the chart to go off sync when you pause or go into sleep mode.
    • An unknown bug in Portable 3 creates an issue regarding unlocks from missions and the alternative method for obtaining them being playcount. If you reach a playcount number that would unlock something that a mission would also do, the game may bug out and you don't get the unlock. Even if you get the mission, the unlock will still not appear and is Permanently Missable.
    • Inserting credits during Technika 2's tutorial attract demo can cause the machine to freeze up.
    • Drag notes in Technika Tune have a nasty habit of randomly killing all the keysounds, leaving players with nothing but the background music for the remainder of the song. Doubly so if a drag note shows up with a hold note.
    • Respect had a few, although they've long since been fixed by patches. One annoying bug that was around during the game's launch turned MAX 90% through MAX 10% judgements into MAX 1%, making high accuracy clears harder than they really should've been.
    • Respect V's launch reportedly had some players being completely unable to play the game as it would consistently crash with certain video cards, although thankfully it was fixed during the first week of Early Access.
  • Gainaxing:
    • "Trip", my goodness.
    • The opening to DJMAX Portable 3 has a bit of this from the middle of the three cover girls.
    • The original music video for Ray of Illuminati was filled to the brim with this.
  • Get Out!: A song title.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: The background animation for "Light House" features a cameo of Hitler. Averted in Technika Tune and later, in which the track gets a new animation.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: The NB Rangers ("NB" being a pun on "envy"). A group of men presumably unable to get themselves significant others, they spend their days putting on Sentai transformations and beating the loving hell out of couples. The NB Girls are similar in origin, but their methods involve trickery and causing couples to break up due to the resulting miscommunication; at least the Rangers make it obvious that it's them causing trouble.
    • Despite both these games aren’t made by Neowiz, O2Jam and EZ2DJ (now EZ2AC) also have their own envy-based squads, O 2 Jam has their own spiritual successor, Couple Breaking, Where the girl in the middle of the eyecatch image seems to be the leader or founder of the envious squad where her underlings are victims of being forever-single men. While EZ 2 DJ has Envy Mask as a predecessor of NB Rangers, who is a solitary envious superhero who will ruin every couple’s life when he saw a couple... and he even became a cameo in DJMAX’s NB Power BGA!
  • Groin Attack: In "NB Rangers: Returns", NB Red is about to show off his affections to the villain (a woman wearing a pink version of the NB Rangers outfit, presumably some sort of warrior of romance) when all of the other Rangers kick him in the crotch all at once.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • Unlocking Heart of Witch in DJMAX Trilogy. In Free mode, break your combo at 2011.
    • One of the Anti-Frustration Features in Respect allows you to dim the background with the touch pad, though the game didn’t tell you this until a later update added a tip that can appear in the loading screen, subverting this example.
    • The Technika DLC for Respect has a trophy that involves clearing all songs with a TB pattern at least once. Problem is, the last stage's song selection is pretty iffy, unlike the more straightforward Technika, since you can't pick the songs you want to play in Respect's mission mode - making it unnecessarily hard to even get to every TB song. Turns out it relies on whether the combo counter is odd or even.
  • Hard Mode Perks: Hard Mode, in most games past Portable 2, is a setting in the options menu that makes the timing window stricter, as well as severely increase the damage taken to your life bar, but it not only gives you more points, it will allow you to play 8 button mode (and in Portable 3's case, 6.2 Trax) before you unlock them on Normal Play, which takes quite a bit of level grinding.
  • Harder Than Hard:
    • MX (Maximum) and SC (Super Crazy) in Online, Trilogy, and Respect V MX and RD (Redesign) in Portable, SP (Special Pattern) in Technika, and WS (Workstation Set) in Portable 3. SC Style in Respect V deserves a special mention, as while existing charts are designed not to break the limitations of the PS4 controller (such as no simultaneous left+right or square+O), SC charts can and will throw any kind of chord at you since keyboards are not bound by the same ergonomic restrictions.
    • DJMAX Respect has 6 songs in Mission mode that's in "XB" mode. As in 10 button mode. It's like the 8 button mode, except with L2 and R2 on top of that. Granted, the first 5 are mainly there to get the player used to the mode, but they're still pretty complex.
  • Have a Nice Death:
    • "YOU NEED MORE PRACTICE! NEVER GIVE IT UP!"
    • Technika 2 and 3 go with the more brutally honest "YOU FAILED! GAME OVER!"
    • Ray's announcer tells you to "TRY AGAIN!"
    • Superbeat XONIC tells you "STAGE FAILED"
  • Inconsistent Dub: "Ask to Wind" was originally called "Ask the Wind" in the International Version of Portable. Trilogy's is the worst for this in terms of the titles originally written in Korean, like "Every Morning" into "Morning Person", as well as "Ask to Wind" being called "Ask to the Wind", among others.
  • Internal Homage: Lots of MVs in the DJMAX universe contain references to previous songs. Examples include:
    • The "Taekwonburi" duck as a statue in "Son of Sun".
    • The "Hard to Start" apple on a book in "First Kiss".
    • "NB Power" in Portable 2 is chock full of cameos, from the "Light House" animals to "Ladymade Star STORM".
    • Remixing mode in Portable 3 is full of this, sampling songs from all over the series (including Portable 3 itself).
    • The current background for "Cherokee" borrows the background sky from "Rain+" a song exclusive to the Korean version of Online. It also includes several references to "Electro Sensibilibity", another Online exclusive.
    • Hello Pinky has Pinky turning into characters from Ask to Wind and Luv Flow.
    • BEE-U-TIFUL from Technika 2 follows suit, with references to the wolves from both parts of Proposed, Flower, Wolf, the aforementioned Blyth E, Dark Envy, Eternal Fantasy and even a few of the series' composers.
    • "glory day" in Respect, the game's opening song, as well as "Black Cat", has characters from several MVs rising from a "Game Graveyard". The most obvious one and the one with the most screentime is a zombified El, the girl who appears as the "lead singer" in Portable's opening movie. According to Word of God (and some unlockable Clazziquai Edition DLC gallery pictures), the "glory day" version of El is called El Pass, while the "Black Cat" version is called El Fail.
      • El and the girl exploring the graveyard take Instant Cosplay Surprise up a notch and flat out replace certain characters in a quick montage of old MVs at the end of the video.
      • Those with a keen eye will notice that the gravestones are marked with a variety of artist and illustrator names throughout the series's history.
      • The "Game Graveyard" also appears in the menu's 8 button background, with the gravestones engraved with Portable 1, Portable 2, Portable 3, and Technika.
    • The MV for Rolling Girl has the seal penguin... thing from Raise Me Up.
    • Respect has gear and notes based on almost all of the previous entries, excluding Ray, and Online. Trilogy's skin requires the DLC. There's even UI skins for the title screen!
    • Outside of the DJMAX series, Tap Sonic Top has a few DJMAX characters appear as Stars the player can use. Namely, Suee from "I Want You" (as Sui), the two girls in the music video for "In My Heart" (as Shirley and Lupine, in their original art style, no less), and the rapping duck in "Taekwonburi" (as Hip Duck).
  • Idiosyncratic Difficulty Levels: This series has quite a few...
    • Online, Portable, and Trilogy had Normal Style (NM), Hard Style (HD), Maximum Style (MX), Super Crazy Style (SC, Online and Trilogy only) and Redesign (RD, Portable only).
    • The original Technika had the difficulties based on the modes: Lite Pattern (LP), Popular Pattern (PP), Technical Pattern (TP), and Special Pattern (SP). They could only be played on their respective mode.
      • Later arcade variations use the original difficulty names, and let you change the difficulty regardless of mode..
    • Portable 3's Remix Mode used Turntable Set (TS), Sampler Set (SS), and Workstation Set (WS).
    • Technika Tune once again used the game modes for difficulties: Star, Pop, and Club, and they could only be played on their respective mode and Free Style.
    • Technika Q had Original, Premium, and Signature. They could also be played on 2 or 3 lines.
      • The reboot of Q averts this with Normal, Hard, and Expert, though the 2, 3 and, for certain songs, 4 lanes are still available.
  • Idol Singer: The Identical Twins starring the Ladymade Star MV are this.
  • Later Installment Weirdness:
    • Clazziquai Edition and Black Square had many differences.
      • First Portable games to have full motion videos.
      • Replaced Mission with a Club mode, where you go through in game clubs to earn songs, gear, notes, and effectors.
      • Changed the analog notes so they do not have to be spun, though it's still the best way to hit them.
      • You can build up Fevers before activating them, as well as limited to 3 in Clazziquai Edition, and up to 7 (Though it can't be built up) in Black Square. They also have auto variations, but the gauge will go up more slowly when using them.
      • Notes, Gear, and Characters are purely cosmetic. The Auto bonus is a separate effector.
      • Effectors, with the exception of the basic speed ones, are locked until you unlock them in Club Mode, whereas previously, they were available from the start.
      • 8b has been renamed to 6bFX, so as not to confuse it with 4bFX (Left, up, Triangle, Square, L, and R) that's in the game. (6bFX is only available in Black Square)
      • The only game with 2 button mode. (Clazziquai only)
    • Portable 3 has many differences, as well.
      • Removed the ability to build fevers up.
      • Like CE and BS, the Notes and Gear are cosmetic. Unlike those games, however, characters have abilities, once again. 2 characters can be equipped at once to balance out the lack of bonuses on Notes and Gear.
      • Speaking of abilities, Auto Fever and Fever Plus (Increases the maximum Fever level to 7x) have been added to characters.
      • The shop system has been replaced by a random drop system when you level up. Clearing a mission gets you that item immediately.
      • MV Edition, OST, and Album are merged into a Lounge menu.
      • Removed Analog notes completely.
      • The Buttons have been renamed to Trax. 5 and 8 button modes have been removed.
      • Added the Remix Mode in 3.2, 4.2, and 6.2 Trax modes, which allows you to remix the music with the analog stick.
      • MX (Maximum Style) is absent.
      • With exception to the basic Speed modifier, you need to unlock the different effectors.
    • Technika Tune also had plenty of differences.
      • First game in the Technika subseries that isn't an arcade game.
      • Only has 3 lanes instead of 4, due to the Vita's size.
      • Note Skins and Characters have bonuses, like Portable.
      • The difficulty names have been renamed to Star, Pop, and Club.
    • And then there's Respect...
      • The first, and so far, only DJMAX game on a console.
      • Once again, Gear and Notes are cosmetic.
      • Completely removed announcer from the menus. (The Retraux DLC main menus still have it on their title screens, though.)
      • Fever can be turned off altogether or set to auto, similar to BS and CE.
      • Fever also got a few tweaks. It's no longer a score multiplier like usual, but you no longer need to get Max 100% to fill the gauge. Any judgement works. Auto also doesn't decrease the rate the Fever gauge fills, but you can't strategically use it while it's on.
      • The "Auto" modifier, which automatically hits a certain number of missed notes, was removed completely. Good luck with missions requiring high combo counts!
      • The "Mirror" modifier, which mirrored the chart from left to right, and the "Random" modifier, which shuffled the song's notes around, were both also removed - probably to dodge the issue of attempting to press left and right on the DualShock 4's d-pad at the same time.
      • The caps for level and combo have been increased.
      • Scoring got drastically reworked, most likely for a fairer multiplayer experience. Like Technika, every song scores exactly 300,000 points at 100% accuracy and no Fever usage, no matter how many notes are in the song. 5x Fever and 100% tends to average 320,000 to 350,000 depending on the song.
      • The first, and so far only game featuring the XB mode, only available in the last two missions of the game
      • While all songs are unlocked in Arcade mode, playing it there won't unlock it in Freestyle, like before. You need to fulfill an accomplishment of some kind to unlock the song for Free Style.
      • The only game so far to have paid DLC. (Technika Tune on the Playstation Vita was supposed to have it too, but that got canned.)
  • Level Grinding: Portable 2 and Trilogy had you unlocking some things (including songs) through a level system.
    • Portable 3 dialed this up to eleven, with the first unlockable song appearing at Level 30, not including the RNG you need to get it. Enjoy your 30-song songlist for the first 10+ hours.
    • Technika's Platinum Crew works the same way, with the DJ level determining the bonus Max Points acquired and the Challenge Missions that become available.
  • Licensed Game:
    • DJMAX Portable Clazziquai Edition. Interestingly, like the single-band-centric Guitar Hero games, Clazziquai isn't the only licensed band to appear in the game; other licensed musicians include 015B, Garion, and Cooly's Hot Box.
    • Clazziquai and company would appear again in Technika.
    • Technika 3 brings us songs from KARA and Liberty Music Trax.
  • Living Toys: The MV for Seeker is full of this trope
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • The Randomizer Set in Technika, which randomly picks 4 songs for you to play. Somehow, it has local and international leaderboards, so getting a high-scoring set is a matter of praying that you get songs with high note counts.
    • Games with Mission Modes typically have at least one mission that randomly chooses songs for you.
  • More Deadly Than the Male: The NB Girls. Sure, the NB Rangers use violence on couples, but at most, the couples just find them a pain in the ass and presumably go back to enjoying each other's company. The Girls, on the other hand, manipulate the environment around couples in order to create miscommunication scenarios that lead to couples breaking up, without ever knowing why, for example, that bottle of perfume the boy gifted ended up being feces-scented or why that other woman got a photo message from her boyfriend of some other woman. The Girls also easily kick the Rangers out, as if to show them who's the real masters of envy.
  • Multiplayer:
    • Portable 2, Black Square, Clazziquai Edition, Fever, and Hot Tunes allow a two player battle mode.
    • Trilogy and Online allow more than 2 players in a lobby, but only the latter allows you to play with all players at once.
    • Respect allows online and local multiplayer modes
    • Technika 2 had two variants:
      • Duo Mixing is Co-Op Multiplayer, in which the screen is split into two and the two players have their own parts to play with the music. The option to play by one's self with both screens is available.
      • Crew Race is Meta Multiplayer, where players challenge various courses set up by other players. Crews are formed with up to 10 members each, and they all race to top the leaderboards of the best crews by earning Crew Points, which are earned for simply playing or beating a crew's course (which is created by a crew member's best Pop Mixing set and score).
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: "D2" stands for "Dance of Death".
    • Technika 3's hardest club set is called "Fatality". If its name doesn't make you run, then maybe its skull-filled logo will.
    • "We're All Gonna Die" in Respect. The hardest version of it appears in Mission mode, with a playlist of other songs throughout the series that are notorious for being That One Boss. It's also the hardest song in the game utilizing the mission-only XB (10 button) mode.
  • Nintendo Hard:
    • Pretty much any song in any game that's level 11 or higher. Before the release of Clazziquai Edition, the highest possible difficulty was 12. Nowadays, it's 15.
    • DJMAX Technika 2's Crew Race mode. Most of the crew courses so far consist of level 8-10 songs, so good luck passing any of them. Barring that, good luck beating any crews' scores, unless you've been playing for many months.
      • Except if you know where to look. Sometimes crews design "Low Score Attack" courses, wherein the director of the course intentionally got as low a score as they could without failing. Challengers are intended to try and score even lower, but the game still counts a higher score as a win and a lower score as a loss. As an added bonus, the extra challenge of skirting failure encourages the players making these courses to use easier songs than they normally would play. However, there are also low score sets which use those 8-10 difficulty songs people have been avoiding, and some crews even use effectors in such courses, sometimes in conjunction with these high-tier songs.
  • No Ending: The MV of My Jealousy ends with the image consists of title of the song itself with the silhouette image of Marin (the blue angel girl) right after the scene where Marin rushed in to rescue the man (whom she always follow) when the truck was moving fast towards him on the street and he helplessly stared at the truck. Leading many fans to guess the ending by their own interpretations if the man survives, thanks to Marin or she fails to save him.
  • No Fair Cheating:
    • Portable 3 doesn't allow you to do missions with Fever requirements while Auto Fever's equipped, but the lower rate that the Fever gauge fills while it's equipped makes it harder, if not impossible, to obtain, anyway.
    • Respect locks you into Manual Fever for missions that allow it.
  • Non-Indicative Difficulty:
    • Some of the SP charts in Technika are easier than their TP counterparts. "HEXAD" [SP] is regarded by some to be easier than [TP] as a result of the easier beginning and ending.
    • Compare "End of the Moonlight" TP and SP.
  • Not the Intended Use: Air Mode in Respect V has an autoplay mode that can be switched on and off at will and is primarily intended as a tool for more social DJMAX players to interact with their audience. However, players soon found out that all Air Mode songs still net EXP, even if the whole song was on autoplay. Certain players took advantage of this by leaving the game on autoplay for hours and coming back to a level 99 account, unlocking all of the songs with virtually no effort on their part.
  • Oh, Crap!: Encountering a song that players either find very difficult or are unfamiliar with as a boss in Technika's Randomizer set will evoke this. Even if you play a set consisting of nothing but NM charts, you might be unlucky enough to run into something like Cypher Gate MX.
    • In Technika Tune, starting up the Club version of "Emblem" may invoke this, as it moves 2.5x as fast as its Star and Pop charts.
    • The Three-Lane Signature/Expert chart in Q for "Leave Me Alone" is a similar case, with the timeline scrolling at a speed that matches the song's actual BPM in the chorus.
    • How about getting to the penultimate mission in Respect and feasting your eyes on XB mode (10 buttons)! And even that doesn't compare to We're All Gonna Die's chart in the last missions...
  • Old Save Bonus: This series has quite a few examples, often in the form of a "Link Disc" feature:
    • Owners of Portable 2 and Portable 1 can play the latter's songs using the former's game mechanics.
    • Similarly, owners of both Black Square and Clazziquai Edition can play CE songs with BS's game mechanics, complete with new MX and 8 button charts (which the original CE lacked both of). Running any of the other prior games through the Link Disc feature nets the player some exclusive unlockables in both CE and BS.
    • The patch that brought the Black Square DLC for Respect introduced a few extended versions of existing DLC songs, depending on which DLC packs the player already owns. There's also a hidden set of "White Disc" and "Black Disc" missions unlocked when players complete all of the Clazziquai and Black Square missions.
  • One Stat to Rule Them All: Auto in the Portable games; it determines how many Breaks (missed notes) will be converted to MAX 1%. A MAX 1% is only marginally better than a Break in terms of contributing to your accuracy rating, but at least it doesn't break combo, in a series where several elements (namely Fever mode and score multipliers) rely on maintaining a combo. This carries over to SUPERBEAT XONiC, where the Shield stat is Auto in all but name and missing a single note not only kicks you out of Fever mode if you're in it but also takes away the 10,000-point All Combo bonus. Shield also trivializes Break- and combo-related missions, as you regain all of your Shield at the start of each new song (for example, if you're using a 30-Shield character, and you're playing a three-stage mission, you can go a total of 90 Breaks and still All Combo the entire thing).
  • Overly Long Gag:
    • The ending of "The Guilty".
    • The second half of "SuperSonic (Mr. Funky Remix)" consists almost entirely of "SUPERSONIC!"
  • Perfect-Play A.I.: VS AI missions in Respect. The AI works the same way the AI in StepMania does - it randomly misses notes based on a percent chance. Unfortunately, in the one and only VS AI mission in the base game, that percent chance is zero and the player would have to Max Combo every song in the playlist just to have a chance at winning. Fortunately, it's averted in DLCs; one mission in the Trilogy pack has an AI that breaks its combo often (it's even lampshaded by being explicitly called an AI prototype), and another in the Black Square pack that only breaks its combo when the player does to give some semblance of an even match.
  • Product Placement: In the Korean, Japanese and East Asian versions of Respect, the song "Only On" can be downloaded for free. You know, just in case it wasn't obvious what platform the game was on.
  • Randomly Drops: The leveling system in Portable 3 works differently. Instead of currency, every level up lets you choose one of 3 blocks, which contains either a new note, a new gear, a new character, a new MV, a new background, or a new song, though, some unlockables require you to reach a specific level, first. Once the player reaches the level cap of 99, any locked items are immediately unlocked.
  • Random Event: In Respect, when picking certain songs, there is a small (about 10%) chance that the BGA will be replaced with an alternate one, usually an older BGA of the track (like in "WhiteBlue") or an unused version (like in "A Lie"). If you then get Max Combo on the song, the alternate video will be made permanently available in the Collection.note 
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: The last two missions of the Clazziquai Edition DLC in Respect have song lists that are based off the tournament and live concert held during the DJMAX G-STAR 2017 event.
  • Retraux:
    • A number of games in the series has gear skins that are lifted almost wholesale from older entries' default gear skins. Respect takes this to its logical conclusion, being a celebration of the entire series in game form - main menu themes, truckloads of gear and note skins, and an expanding song list that will eventually represent every game.
    • The DLC missions in Respect feature gameplay throwbacks to their namesake game whenever possible.
      • The Clazziquai pack has a few missions that are played in 4BFX modenote .
      • The Technika pack has TB charts, which have a UI similar to the real Technika, with a Superbeat XONiC control scheme standing in for the touch controls. It even shows your profile information in the top left corner of the screen. The Technika 2 and Technika 3 packs bring the concept closer to the authentic arcade experience by adding in joystick-controlled "drag" notes and one bar of Fever like the original game. These missions even make it so the judgment line moves and the notes don't, unlike the Technika missions.
      • The Black Square' pack has one mission that brings back all of the RD (Redesign) songs from the original Black Square, sounding exactly as they did in its namesake game.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge:
    • A popular one is playing Technika with "Left Swipe" enabled and getting a group of players to take turns hitting notes, in what is known as "Roulette" play. Results range from clearing the song or set to near-completion to failing Stage 1 of a Technical set.
    • Playing with one hand. This is occasionally taken to new heights when the player decides to multitask, in particular eating with one hand while playing with the other.
    • Playing Technika not with hands, but with other objects.
  • Sequel Song: Never Die is a direct follow-up to Don't Die, with the same composer, BGA artist, and genre.
  • Serial Escalation:
    • Thought Customizer Set in Technika was the end of the game's challenges? Well, thanks to the Platinum Crew system, you can unlock even more agonizing courses, such as the Challenger Set and the Conqueror Set. The latter of which consists entirely of boss songs.
    • Thought "Son of Sun" was the fastest a chart could go? "D2" is 75% faster than "Son of Sun".
    • How hard can the Crew Race missions get? Take level 8-10 songs, and add forced mods.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Socialization Bonus:
    • Portable 2 has Network Battle mode, which allows you to battle against another player. Doing this will allow you to play all songs, no matter how many you have yet to unlock, as well as play the normally Extra Stage Exclusive Your Own Miracle whenever you want. It's also how you unlock certain images without having to rack up play counts.
    • Respect has an entire category of unlockables dedicated to playing Online Matches. Once again, these can be obtained via Play Counts as well. Players can also play every DLC song while online even if they don't own the appropriate DLC pack, as long as their opponent picks the song for them. Open lobbies even show what DLC packs the host owns to facilitate this. This feature gets carried over to Respect V, although it doesn't apply to the 7-player Lobby Mode.
  • Some Dexterity Required: Obviously, since it's a music game, but Respect has a more straightforward example. XB mode. Good luck having your pointer fingers on L1 and R1, your middle fingers on L2 and R2, your thumbs on the face buttons, and trying desperately not to have the DualShock 4 controller slip through the remaining ring and pinky fingers.
  • Spiritual Successor: SUPERBEAT XONiC was this until DJMAX Respect was released; now XONiC is more of a Gaiden Game.
  • Status Quo Is God:
    • The entire plot of the video of "Dark Envy" (of the NB Ranger series) is that NB Red has left the love-hating NB Rangers and found himself a girlfriend. Naturally, the remaining Rangers are pissed off, transform, and beat the crap out of him. Red's new girlfriend, confused at all this, leaves him, leaving him dejected and rejoining the Rangers to fight romance once again.
    • "NB Ranger: Virgin Force" has NB Red doing his usual thing, although the rest of his team is suspiciously absent. After he gets chased out of town by an angry mob (supposedly his victims), he runs into a girl and has a brief Imagine Spot of living a relatively normal life with her, including a kid. Ghosts of his team show up to snap him out of his delusion and encourage NB Red to blast the girl with their superweapon. Turns out she was actually a Kaiju, which NB Red and the ghosts of the others promptly fight with their Humongous Mecha.
  • Stock Footage: Several songs in Technika share the same generic animation clips done by Kimys. It gets a little silly in "Thor"; its loading screen claims that the background animation was done by a different person, but when the song loads up, it's Kimys' generic clips that show up instead with a few shots of a sillhouette inside.
    • Most likely due to memory space issues, 8b mode in ‘’Portable 1’’ and ‘’2’’ use generic backgrounds instead of the usual M Vs
  • Stylistic Suck:
    • Manifests in the form of "Low Score Setlist". The players intentionally tries to score as low as possible without failing.
    • The MV for "Ventilator" in Trilogy has a similar style to stick fighting animations. When the song was brought back in Respect's Trilogy DLC, the splash screen gets a makeover in a crudely hand-drawn style, as well!
    • The hidden BGA for "NB Ranger: Virgin Force" is just the normal BGA's storyboard.
  • Super Mode: Fever mode. It's typically triggered manually by pressing a specific button when the Fever gauge is filled, and effects and behavior of Fever mode vary from game to game:
    • In the Portable games and Trilogy, notes hit while in Fever mode contribute extra to your combo; a x2 Fever multiplier means each note hit will raise your combo by 2, x3 means each note hit will raise it by 3, etc. However, the specifics vary from game to game:
      • In the Portable games, Fever drains on a timer, meaning that if you're in a section of the chart that's lacking in notes, you're wasting the duration. Additionally, once you get Fever to x4, your scroll multiplier will increase.
      • In Clazziquai Edition and Black Square with the Fever x5 setting, Fever gauges can be stacked and then deployed all at once (for example, you can charge up two Fever gauges and then deploy both at once to go straight to x3 Fever). In addition, the scroll rate increase will not kick in if you are using Fever x5.
      • Also in Black Square, you can change the maximum Fever multiplier from the traditional x5 to x7, but in exchange you won't be able to stock multiple Fever gauges. It also brings back the scroll rate increase, this time triggering when you reach x7.
      • In Trilogy, Fever's duration works based on how many notes it's been used on and judgements, rather than time, giving it an advantage on sparse sections but making it useless if you end up in a difficult section of the chart since your Fever duration will empty out almost immediately. Also, you not only get a speed increase at x4 Fever, but also x3, and after the patch that added speeds beyond 5.0, your speed won't increase if it's at 5.0 already.
    • In Technika 2 and 3, Fever makes your gauge recover more per note and adds 1 point for every green MAX judgement (100% of note value minus one point; a rainbow MAX instead just straight up gives 100% of note value), effectively serving as a shield against these imperfect MAXes. However, this also means that if you get even a single Cool, the Fever bonus becomes useless due to making up such a tiny fraction of your score (maximum 300,000).
    • In SUPERBEAT XONiC, Fever is activated automatically, and basically doubles the points you get while it's active. It lasts until you get a BREAK, but characters with Fever Shield will protect Fever mode for up to a set number of Breaks.
    • In Respect, it applies a subtle multiplier to the points earned from every note hit while it's active, the multiplier increasing with each Fever level (however, it is not equivalent to the current Fever level, it is much lower). It also inflates combo like in previous DJMAX games, but combo has no influence on scoring in this particular game.
  • Surprisingly Good English:
    • Every song by Ruby Tuesday features English lyrics which, despite the Narm, are actually well put together.
    • Songs featuring the rapper Mike Blunck (or "Mike B") definitely qualify.
    • JC of the R&B unit 3rd Coast also raps pretty well for someone based in South Korea.
    • The intro to the international version of Portable has the lyrics to "Ask the Wind" on the bottom of the screen, and are actually well written with no grammar errors to speak of.
  • Surprisingly Good Foreign Language:
  • Take That!:
    • The MV for "Dreadnought" makes fun of George W. Bush. When DJMAX Portable got an "International" release with English text, it got replaced by "River Flow", didn't return DJMAX Trilogy, then finally reappeared in DJMAX Respect with a completely different music video - in the middle of a big DJMAX tournament, no less.
    • The music video for "Don't Die" is basically "How mobile games can ruin your life: The Music Video".
  • This Is Gonna Suck:
    • On the loading screen for Technika's Specialist Set, a Man in Black appears to take on three Men in Black with circular target-like things. On the screen for The Specialist Set 2, the same Men in Black faces against three monsters in suits, with sweatdrops of nervousness on his head.
    • A common reaction for Technika players doing Randomizer whenever That One Song decides to show up.
  • Title Drop: DJMAX Technika 's subtitle is "Beyond the Future". Late into Technika 's "Platinum Crew" service, a song called "Beyond the Future" became available.
  • Too Long; Didn't Dub:
    • When "Heartbeat/Flutter" was introduced in Portable 2, the English translation simply left it as Seoleim. Taekwonburi is a big example, since it has yet to get an English title since it first debuted.
    • The English version of "Fate" omits the bridge portion of the lyrics.
  • Trailers Always Spoil:
  • True Final Boss:
    • Your Own Miracle in Portable 2 has a Hard Style chart, but the requirements to play this version are unknown.
    • In Technika 's Technical/Club Mixing courses, if you fulfill certain requirements, you'll get an alternate fourth stage.
    • In Respect, the song "Mulch" doesn't show up in stage 3 of 8B Arcade Mode unless you fulfill certain (currently unknown) requirements.
  • Uncommon Time: Groove Coaster's "Got more raves?" is the only song in Respect's entire song list that's in 5/4.
  • Universal-Adaptor Cast: Respect's mascot characters (Clear, Fail, and to a lesser extent Play) get this treatment in Respect V, showing up in a number of music videos in the base game and V Extension Pack in a variety of art styles and settings.
  • Unwinnable by Mistake: Respect has had a few day 1 DLC charts in the past that were impossible to Max Combo due to note placement. Namely, it was physically impossible to hit both left and right on the DualShock 4's d-pad at the same time, since they're not actually separate buttons. Some persistent players managed anyway by hitting one note, pausing and unpausing the game (which rewinds the song by 3 seconds), then hitting the other note. People with a dedicated third-party controller had an even easier time working around this.
  • Updated Re-release:
    • Portable 1 got one in the form of DJMAX Portable International. While the game is still Korea-only, it is designed to be imported, featuring Japanese and English language options. It also replaces the track "Dreadnought" with an entirely different one, "River Flow".
    • Respect V has a 7-player multiplayer mode in the works and exclusive SC charts that are designed specifically for keyboards (notice that SC charts have patterns that would not work on a conventional gamepad, such as chords on columns 1 and 3 in 6- and 8-Button modes).
  • Villain Protagonist: The "NB Ranger" series of songs features the titular rangers, who go around beating up couples out of envy.
  • Vocal Dissonance: "sO mUCH iN LUV" features a potentially lesbian couple in its animation (However, it’s more like platonic rather than romantic relationship), yet one of the vocalists for the song is male (JC).
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: "Area 7" in Technika, which has notes that follow an awkward rhythm.
  • Wrongfully Attributed: In O2Jam collaboration song pack for TWC, Please Give Me a Lover (“애인을 내려주세요“ in Korean) isn’t originated from O2Jam itself, but more like originated from one of O2Jam series game which has Audition Online style animations, called Pop Stage. Watch this for the evidence, especially if you’re not Korean.
  • Xtreme Kool Letterz:
    • SUPERBEAT XONiC.
    • Respect V, where the V seems apropos of nothing in particular. The game's debut developer livestream (translated here) has the game's lead producer say that "V" stands for "versus", which was the main focus of this installment.

Max Combo! What a Crazy Mix!
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