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Bottom left, Alicia Melchiott; bottom right, Welkin Gunther; above, Selvaria Bles.

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Valkyria Chronicles, known in Japan as Valkyria of the Battlefield: Gallian Chronicles is a video game made by Sega for the PlayStation 3 and released in 2008. A PC version including all previously released DLC was released on Steam on November 11, 2014 (where it proceeded to smash all sales expectations). A PlayStation 4 version was released on February 10, 2016. A Nintendo Switch version was released on Fall 2018 as promotion for Valkyria Chronicles 4.

The story is set in a fictional Europa, in 1935, when two large blocs, the Atlantic Federation and the East Europan Imperial Alliance, are at war over control of the continent in what is called the Second Europan War.

Caught in the middle of the warring alliances is the Principality of Gallia, a small neutral nation famed for its rich Ragnite mines. Gallia is also known for its policy of Universal Conscription: in lieu of a standing army, every citizen is required to undergo basic military training with the provision that they can be drafted into the army at any time to defend Gallia against an external threat.

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When the Imperial Alliance launches a surprise attack against Gallia, the policy of Universal Conscription is activated and every able-bodied man and woman is drafted into military service. Three of these new recruits are Welkin Gunther, an animal sociologist and son of a famous general; Isara, Welkin's Darcsen foster sister; and Alicia Melchiott, a young woman who dreams of becoming a baker.

Along with a wide and eclectic cast of other civilians, they are organized into Militia Squad 7 and put on the front lines to defend their home against the Imperial offensive. Together they must face not only the advance of the Imperial army — including the dreaded "War Witch" known as Selvaria Bles — but their own internal disputes as those in the Gallian military seek to manipulate or use Squad 7 for their own ends.

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Like many JRPGs, Valkyria Chronicles is very story heavy and contains many themes. The most evident are the tragedies of war, racism (of the hair color variety), fighting to defend one's homeland, friendship, family bonds, and love. Every character you can control (and a good deal of NPCs, too) has their own personal biography, special traits, likes and dislikes, and personality quirks, making it feel like you are actually controlling real people in an actual war. However, unlike many JRPGs, Valkyria Chronicles chooses to avoid a high fantasy setting and instead opts for a very World War II themed world with light fantasy elements.

Gameplay-wise, Valkyria Chronicles is unique, as it is a mix of Turn-Based Tactics, Real-Time Strategy, Eastern RPG, and Third-Person Shooter. During battle, players use a pool of Command Points to directly take control of individual units so they can move and attack. While the player is controlling a unit, enemy units will automatically fire on them if they pass through their line of sight, making cover and strategy in approaching your target much more important. All characters the player controls are separated into five classes: Scouts, Shocktroopers, Lancers, Engineers, and Snipers each with their own strengths and weaknesses. In between battles, players can use experience and money earned from battles to level up specific classes and purchase new weapons and upgrades for their troops. There are also tanks, which do not level up but can be upgraded.

Valkyria Chronicles has received generally positive reviews from critics. The main selling points are its beautiful graphic design, engaging story, and unique gameplay based on a unique blend of elements from various video game genres.

In addition to the game, there is also an anime adaptation produced by A-1 Pictures, simply called Valkyria Chronicles which first aired on April 4, 2009. There are also manga adaptations in print as well. Extra downloadable content was released in Japan after release, and is now available for download in North America as well and Europe. Available are a mission where you play as Edy, 4 missions playing as Selvaria & controlling Imperial forces, an extra hard skirmish setting and "Challenge of the Edy Detachment", a set of seven skirmishes tailored to the various classes, as well as the tank unit and a final, specially-designed skirmish bringing them all together.

There is a sequel for the Playstation Portable, called Valkyria Chronicles 2: Gallian Royal Military Academy. It is set two years after the first game and involves civil turmoil as students are drafted in to fight the threats within the country.

A third game, Valkyria Chronicles 3: Unrecorded Chronicles, has been released in Japan. It is a Gaiden Game on the PSP, taking place at the same time as the first game. This game has also gotten an anime adaptation.

A web-based online card game, Valkyria Chronicles Dnote  went live on 19 July 2012 and was shut down on April 22, 2015.

In 2017 an alternative universe spinoff to the series, Valkyria Revolution, was released. Depicting Europa in the titular event shaped after the Industrial Revolution, but based on the usage of ragnite instead. It was released on the Playstation 4, Xbox One, and Playstation Vita.

Following Revolution, Valkyria Chronicles 4: Eastern Front was released for Playstation 4, Xbox One, PC, and the Nintendo Switch in 2018. It returns to the setting of the Second Europan War, but this time focusing on a Federation operation to end the war in one swell swoop.

This series is not to be confused with Valkyrie Profile.


This series provides examples of:

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  • Ace Custom: The Edelweiss, which starts as an advanced prototype tank hand-crafted by a mechanical genius, and winds up with an assortment of upgrades and custom parts that make it far superior to standard Gallian tanks. It's also fitted with communications equipment that allows Welkin to give orders to his squad.
  • Action Girl:
    • Pretty much every girl in the game, with Alicia, Rosie and Edy being particular standouts plot-wise.
    • Susie is the only real exception to this trope, thanks to her super pacifistic nature and "Humanitarian" potential.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: Chapter 16 has the Marmota - a gigantic land battleship - serve this role, slowly advancing through the stage while your units run ahead of it and cause landslides to delay and redirect its path.
  • A.K.A.-47:
    • The Ruhm, a high-powered Imperial machine gun, is basically the real-life MG-34 used by Germany chambered for 7.62mm instead of 7.92mm. The Gallian basic infantry rifle, indicated by the game's encyclopedia, is based on the G43.
    • The Imperial Light Tank is basically a Soviet BT tank with a secondary turret.
    • The Imperial Medium Tank is closely modeled on the Soviet T-28 medium tank.
    • The Imperial Heavy Tank is essentially a Char B1 bis that's been scaled up to the point that it uses the same gun as a KV-1 in its turret and a 122mm howitzer in the hull.
    • The Imperial Tank Destroyer, despite being built on the Heavy Tank chassis, is closely modeled on the Jagdpanther and armed with the same gun as the SU-85.
    • The Lupus's turret it clearly based on the IS-2's and the tank as a whole resembles an IS-2 re-arranged as a rear-turreted tank. However, in story, it's more like an expy of the Tiger tank, acting as a powerful boss tank and getting an uparmorer upgrade called the Lupus Regnum (literally Royal Wolf), closely mirroring the name of the Königstiger, which was often mistranslated as King Tiger or Tiger Royalnote .
    • The Edelweiss is based on the Panzerkampfwagen E-50 series prototype with specs copied almost word by word.
    • The T-MAG is a near exact copy of the Sturmgewehr 44.
    • In fact, most weapons sport by the Gallian forces match WWII German weapon caliber sizes & specifications.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: Selvaria turns out to be a Tragic Villain who was experimented on for her entire life and was only loyal to Maximilliam because he was the only person to ever show her some sympathy. And this revelation comes shortly before he orders her to take out part of the Gallian Army with a Suicide Attack. The DLC focusing on her only makes this worse, as she is depicted as a caring commander who leads from the front and treats the men serving under her as human beings. She even goes so far as to allow her engineer, Johann, to rest in her cot after he collapses after the first battle of her DLC — though she does freak out for a moment and slaps him when he points out that her breasts are pressing against his arm. One can say she's A Mother to Her Men.
  • All Your Powers Combined: Selvaria's gun, the Ruhm, combines the accuracy of a good sniper rifle, the range of a good scout rifle, and the damage potential of a good stormtrooper's machine gun. Once it's unlocked (By completing Selvaria's bonus missions), the stormtrooper who equips it can destroy just about any non-tank target that can't dodge or isn't crouching in one round - and if said trooper can get behind them and target the radiator, all but the heaviest of tanks are doomed, without need for any special orders, which means that it can also do the job of an anti-tank lance.
  • Amazon Brigade: It's possible to customize your squad so that it is almost entirely female.
  • A Million Is a Statistic: The vast majority of the regular Gallian Army is lost at Ghirlandaio.
  • Anti-Armor: Lancers are soldiers carrying rocket launchers, which are so heavy that it slows them, making them unpractical against other soldiers. However, they're the most useful units against tanks and other armored enemies.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Skirmishes are replayable missions that allow the player to grind XP and money, in case they screw up on allocating either during the main missions.
    • Rather than spending your XP leveling up individual units, you level up a class and every unit of that class, both present and future, benefits from it. This prevents individual units from falling behind everyone else (unless you neglect a specific class, which is a bad idea in general) and helps take some of the sting out of high-level units getting killed.
  • Anyone Can Die: Downed units can die permanently if they aren't rescued in time, or if an enemy reaches them before one of your able units can. In the case of the storyline, Isara's comes out of the blue.
  • Applied Phlebotinum: Ragnite is a multi-purpose mineral, useful for making fuel, weapons, and even medicine; arguably a case of Truth in Television, as oil can be used for all these purposes.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: Typically, you can only take about nine or ten members of your twenty-member squad into combat. Some missions, depending on circumstance, cut it down to even fewer. On top of this, while you can choose to leave out any of the main characters except for Welkin, you gain another Command Point for having Alicia, Rosie, and Largo on the field.
  • Arc Number: The number seven seem to play a role in this universe: Squad 7, Class G (seventh letter of the alphabet), Number 7 is the main character of the third game, etc.
  • Aristocrats Are Evil:
    • The Gallian generals, and especially Prime Minister Borg, are a bunch of corrupt jerkasses who are not afraid to backstab or insult their own allies if it benefits them. Princess Cordelia is the only exception.
    • The Imperial High Command (particularly Maximilian) are this by virtue of being the game's main antagonistic force, but even then their actions later on are far more cruel than warranted.
  • Armor Is Useless:
    • In an early cutscene an Imperial is shot by an ordinary rifle straight through his armor. It's even lampshaded by the artbook, which states that the heavy armor favored by Imperial troops is actually rather outdated, being worn more for tradition's sake rather than anything else.
    • Averted in gameplay: the more armored the class, the more hits they can take. Tanks cannot be damaged by small arms unless hit in the heat sink. Selvaria makes do through sheer Valkyria toughness. Isara was likely shot for being the only person without protection, since she spends most of her time inside a tank.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: The "Penetration" order makes all attacks done by a single unit bypass enemy armor. This also means that small arms fire into the hull of a tank will do full damage as if the armor didn't even exist.
    • Units that are crouching or prone are both immune to crits and more resistant to damage overall. Unless explosives or flamethrowers are used against them, which does the full amount of damage to them regardless (though if the explosion happens in front of a sandbag wall it'll often absorb a good deal of the damage.) Explosives also have the added benefit of knocking crouching and prone units out of this state, setting them up for a follow-up attack.
  • Artificial Stupidity: The computer will often waste turns moving units back and forth, send wave after wave of their own infantry to certain death by interception fire, will almost always fail to make proper use of cover, and is completely unable to coordinate its units in a meaningful way. On top of this, most enemy units will stop right where they stand if they get fired at. Useful for making the enemy waste command points for some missions. Much of the game's actual difficulty comes from having to face far larger numbers of units occasionally supplemented by powerful elite units and obstacles like fortified bunkers or mortar fire. And the fact that they can make shots from halfway across the map.
  • Artistic License – Military:
    • By American military standards, as a 2nd Lieutenant, Lt. Gunther should have been a Platoon Leader and been given command of a Platoon rather than a Squad. The role of Squad Leader is usually given to the NCOIC (Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge), which means Largo or Alicia, both having the rank of sergeant, should be commanding squad seven instead. This is due to intentional translation or translation error on the overseas release. In the original Japanese version, the organization we come to know as Squad Seven is appropriately designated as Platoon Seven (第7小隊 Dainana shōtai). After all, a full platoon does fall under your command.
    • Varrot appears to be the only officer above the rank of Lieutenant in the 3rd Militia Regiment, and is shown reporting directly to the commanding general on multiple occasions. Which would imply that she's holding down a Colonel's job while only a Captain, and Captain of a militia force at that.
  • Asshole Victim:
    • Geld is a torturer and coward that Captain Varrot has spent years hunting down. Though Varrot is ultimately convinced by Largo to not kill him, Maximilian executed him when he returned due to him torturing (non-Darcsen) hostages.
    • General Damon really deserved what he had coming to him when Selvaria used her Final Flame on him.
  • A-Team Firing: General Damon's men were unable to kill Selvaria before she could unleash a devastating suicide attack, despite their target standing perfectly motionless only five yards or so away from them. Not that they didn't hit, but heart or headshots might have been useful; she completely ignored hits near her center of mass.
  • Attack Its Weak Point:
    • Tanks have a radiator exposed on their backs that, if hit with an armor-piercing round, will blow them up in one shot. At higher levels, a burst of fire from a shocktrooper into the radiator will do it. At very high levels, a scout, engineer, or sniper can blow up the radiator with a single burst as well.
    • Squad 7 also uses the hole caused by Alicia's Valkyria lance to successfully attack and disable the Marmota.
  • The Atoner: Faldio, even so far as to kill himself together with Maximilian out of guilt.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking:
    • Alicia subverts this. She's only second-in-command in Squad 7 and she still owned Selvaria effortlessly. Although, to be fair, she's a Valkyria.
    • Definitely applies to the leaders of the Imperial invasion; defeating each one is among the hardest tasks in the game. Selvaria, even when she isn't a Valkyria, has a Big Friggin' Machine Gun with huge range; Jaeger has an incredibly powerful tank with a sheet of armor that needs to be blown off before you can even Attack Its Weak Point; defeating Maximilian's Batomys is ridiculously long and involved, and Maximilian himself goes One-Winged Angel and absorbs all the powers of the Valkyria and then some.
  • Authority in Name Only: Princess Cordelia is a figurehead ruler at the start of the game, and everyone knows it. Her job basically consisted of giving speeches supporting her Prime Minister's decisions. She was sixteen when she first used her royal authority to make a decision for herself - to change her usual breakfast order.
  • Awakening the Sleeping Giant: Gallia was just supposed to be a staging area and supply depot in The Empire's fight with The Federation. What it turned out to be was a nation of ass-kickers.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Compared to the World War II style tanks of the period, the Edelweiss has the appearance and capabilities of a modern battle tank. However, its construction and engineering is incredibly complicated and there is currently no way to mass produce it. Background material, however, makes clear that as it was initially built, the Edelweiss was, in fact, practical for mass production—-it simply did not jibe with the overall strategic thrust of Gallian defense spending. By the time the player gets ahold of it, though, Isara's modified it enough that it's rather improbable that they manage to keep it repaired between battles. By game's end, it's a damnable mystery how the thing can move under its own weight. In-game, the Edelweiss' low mobility and high CP cost mean that on many missions that don't explicitly require a tank to accomplish the mission (Like driving through a barricade), it will probably just stay at its starting point for the entire engagement.
    • Extra ammunition magazines for tanks may seem like a good idea at first, but become considerably less desirable later on, when mortar shells don't always pull off one hit kills on enemies and are more useful for dislodging them from cover. Radiator plates aren't that useful either, since they only really affect how much damage you can take from gunfire to your radiator, and any regular tank shell or lance rocket is capable of blowing you up in one hit.
    • Lancers as a class in general can come across as this due to their limitations. Every other class besides snipers has much better movement, and even in the case of snipers at least they can attack from far away while the lancers are more or less stuck as short-range infantry. Besides movement issues, they have limited ammo (basically requiring an engineer to take up a unit slot to be of much use), aren't really any more effective than your tank at taking out enemy tanks (though they cost one less command point), have absolutely woeful aim without royal weapons or heavy upgrades, and can't counterattack whatsoever. They look cool and it's awesome when you can perform a one-hit kill on a tank with them, but chances are you'll rarely use them besides having Largo parked at base for an extra command point per phase to use on much more versatile characters. Late game additions like the Attack Weak Point Order (meaning you don't actually have to get behind tanks anymore) and anti-infantry hand-held mortars can make them a bit more useful, but don't be surprised if Lancers are your least used class overall.
      • Then you have the Lancer weapon itself. It's basically a rocket attached to a lance (or rather, an oversized Panzerfaust). In terms of accuracy, it's already difficult to hold such a long and unwieldy object with pinpoint precision from your hip. Now add holding it out with one hand with a heavy explosive on the end. It takes a lot of strength and damn good hand-eye coordination to hit something with that. Shoulder mounted rocket launchers were around as early as World War 1, so even in an alternate history like this, it would be more practical and accurate instead of holding the explosive out on the end of a long pole (this is somewhat justified by lances being culturally significant to the Europan peoples because of the Valkyria). When crouching down, Lancers do fire from the shoulder, but it doesn't provide any bonus to accuracy.
    • For gameplay purposes (the Weaponry tab in-game describes them to be almost strictly stronger than early Gallian weaponry), the earliest captured enemy weapons. The ZM MP varieties in particular drop the already low range of Shocktroopers to even lower values despite boasting of accuracy for a boost in already-high damage. The later enemy varieties, notably from the Challenges of the Edy Detachment, tend to avert this, and can be farmed halfway into the game.
    • In accordance to their Nazi Germany inspiration the Empire loves this trope with their superweapons. The Batomys is an unstoppable supertank, but it is extremely slow, easy to board by assaulting infantry once its point-defense machine-guns are taken out, and it's main guns, though extremely powerful, have dreadfully low rate of fire and expose the vehicle's very obvious weak points after every shot. The Equus, while heavily armored and carrying a huge gun, doesn't have the guns to properly defend it should the enemy get close and, as a train, is vulnerable to whatever happens to the tracks under it. The Marmota is ridiculously colossal and virtually unstoppable, but is even slower than the Batomys, relatively undergunned for a dreadnought and utterly helpless against enemy boarding, having no deck guns to defend it. Even the Lupus Regnum, which in-game appears as a clear upgrade fixing many of the game tank's weaknesses, is this if you read the Glossary, as it turns out that all that extra plating severely overloads the tank's engine and covering the radiator runs the risk of cooking the crew alive after prolonged operation, making it completely reliant on immobile support camps. Of course all those war machines are depicted as completely undefeatable until the Militia comes to exploit their rather obvious design flaws.
    • The extra armor General Jaeger puts on his tank just barely avoids this. While insanely durable the vehicle slows to a crawl, and obscuring the radiator runs the risk of cooking the crew alive. Requiring a series of support camps to perform maintenance and cool its engine mid-battle. Once the plates are destroyed it becomes much more effective.
  • Aw, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: Karl and Lynn. So much that their (in-game) death quotes are entirely of one of them calling out to another. Welkin and Alicia get several of these moments as well, especially during side chapters.
  • Babies Ever After: Alicia and Welkin, aptly naming the kid Isara.
  • Badass Army: Squad 7 may be a bunch of misfits from all walks of life, but put them in the battlefield and wait a few hours...
  • Badass Boast: When the members of Squad 7 start bickering over Fantastic Racism and their youthful, inexperienced leader, Welkin declares that if he takes a heavily-defended bridge (the squad's next objective) in 48 hours, the squaddies have to shut up and like it. Then he takes the bridge and drops all the enemy tanks on it into the river.
  • Badass Bookworm: Welkin is a huge fan of biology, and dreams of being a teacher. He can do logistics and field medicine, and he's a better strategist by leaps and bounds than anyone else on the continent. By the end of the game, the Gallian Militia's standard response to unwinnable situations is basically "point Welkin at it and wait".
  • Badass Grandpa: Coby is the oldest soldier in the squad at 65.
  • Bad Guys Do the Dirty Work: After what Giorgio did resulted in the gruesome death of Captain Varrot's lover, she was very eager to submit him to a firing squad, but Squad 7 talk her out of it and Giorgio walks free back to Imperial territory. Upon his arrival, however, an Imperial soldier arrests him since he's going to be court-martialed for his war crimes which later ended in his execution, meaning that Varrot unknowingly got what she wanted.
  • Bait-and-Switch Gunshot: This happens in chapter 2, when it appears an Imperial soldier has shot Welkin, but in fact Isara has shot the soldier.
  • Bash Brothers: Incorporated into the combat system. If squadmates are near your selected character when you attack, they add supporting fire too, and some of the potentials give bonuses depending on the type of person the selected character is around. Furthermore, your troops also have favorites which they prefer to have around them - although some of them also have potentials that specify people they hate.
  • Band of Brothers: Down to various quotes from the game calling the platoon a family.
  • Battle Aura: Activated Valkyria look like they are constantly being consumed by blue flames.
  • Battle Couple: Other than the obvious pairing of Welkin and Alicia, the units Karl and Lynn are shown to be in a relationship.
    • Vyse and Aika are this as well, just like they are in their game of origin.
  • Battleship Raid: The game's final arc is centered around the squad trying to destroy the Marmota, a giant war machine designed to tap on the Valkyrur's power.
  • Beach Episode: Extra Chapter "Squad 7 R&R", between chapter 9 & 10. As a reward for rescuing Princess Cordelia, the squad is invited to a private beach owned by the royal family.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Welkin. Usually a nice guy, but he bursts into a tantrum when he discovers that Faldio deliberately injured Alicia.
    • Do not mess with Largo when vegetables are involved.
  • The Bet: Welkin makes one with Largo concerning the success of Operation Cloudburst. If he retakes the bridge in 48 hours, the rest of Squad 7 will take his orders without hesitation as well as to stop bullying Isara. Otherwise, he and Alicia will resign, leaving leadership to Largo.
  • Beta Couple: Largo and Eleanor to Welkin and Alicia, though it doesn't become apparent until later.
  • BFG:
    • The Ruhm (Selvaria's Signature Weapon), and the game's sole automatic rifle (the rest of the shocktrooper weapons are merely sub-machine guns).
    • Everyone in the Lancer class carries a lance-shaped Rocket Launcher which seems to be an attempt to at least replicate a Valkyur's main weapon in a realistic and physical manner. Maximillian has a man-made one which acts even closer to a Valkyrian lance to the point where he has near-identical powers through artificial methods.
  • The Big Guy:
    • Hannes, he's either a Class 1 or Class 3.
    • Largo is a Class 4.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: The Valkyur are religiously worshipped across Europa, even though they attacked the Darcsens, razed the land and blamed it on them.
  • Bi the Way: Ted, a scout, has both 'Fancies Women' and 'Fancies Men' as potentials.
  • Bittersweet Ending: At the end of EW2, Gallia and the Imperials formed a truce after the death of Maximillian. Squad 7 disbanded after this and the surviving members left to lead normal lives, such as Welkin finally becoming a teacher and marrying Alicia, who went back to baking. They now have a daughter named Isara, who, like Faldio, most of the Gallian Militia and potentially members of Squad 7 never got to see the end of the war.
  • Bling of War:
    • The Gallian officers have some pretty classy dress uniforms to wear with whatever medals they've earned. General Damon wears his all the time, which probably serves to highlight his vanity and military incompetence. Welkin can also earn medals and weapons from the royal armoury as rewards for in-game accomplishments.
    • On the Imperial side of things, most Imperial generals and officers are soberly dressed in a dark gray uniform, with some gold trimmings. The exception is Maximilian, who pretty much holds the title for having the most bling of all. He even puts on a very flashy helmet when he breaks into Castle Randgriz and makes his presence known to Princess Cordelia.
  • Bond One-Liner: Every character in the game has a Badass Boast ready for when they kill an enemy.
  • Boobs of Steel: Selvaria probably needs a Custom Uniform because she couldn't fit her chest into a standard one. She could also have won the entire war on her own, if not for Alicia. Even without her Valkyria powers, she's still a formidable opponent, not to mention the fact that she's essentially a nuke that walks on feet. This is right up character artist RAITA's normal area anyway (most of his works feature big-breasted badass females).
  • Boom, Headshot!: The preferred way of dealing with most enemy troops. With enough accuracy upgrades, you can headshot enemies - even blast-resistant Lancers - with the Edelweiss's main cannon.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Sure it's cool to make use of potentials and lucky shots and status effects for victory, but chances are you'll have a much quicker victory if you just park more mobile units like scouts and shocktroopers close to an enemy and point blank headshot them for a guaranteed kill. (And if they're in cover, a simple grenade or two will flush them out.) This becomes less of an issue over time as weapon accuracy improves and you can attack from further away (even being able to more reliably use snipers for their intended purpose), but just using multiple commands on scouts and shocktroopers alone remains a pretty viable path to winning and even top ranks, especially if you can form team attacks to counteract weak attack power.
    • On the other hand, once you get Orders like Awaken Potential, suddenly character potentials can start mattering a lot more because they are much more likely to trigger. Alicia with all her unlocked potentials is a particularly powerful choice for this order as Double Movement and Resist Crossfire can allow her to move to basically anywhere on the map, while Mysterious Body and Valkyria can make her a nearly unstoppable killing machine.
    • Another very boring but very practical application of shocktroopers is pairing them with the Penetrate Order. By using shocktrooper machine guns while ignoring enemy defense, they can fairly quickly take out even the toughest armored targets in the entire game, albeit only by basically spending all your command points per phase on them.
    • Smoke shells prevent your troops from being hit by interception fire. They are required for the Marberry Shore mission (where they are first available) and are useful on several other occasions.
    • The Retreat skill will always be the first order the Old Gentleman in the War Cemetery teaches Welkin, and it will bail you out regularly. As the name implies, any unit that currently is not unconscious is immediately put back into reserve, regardless if they are in a camp or not. Scout overextended and staring down a bunch of enemy troops and a tank or two? Retreat. A Shocktrooper took a bit more of a beating and you aren't too comfortable about safely getting them or an engineer to use Ragnaid? Retreat. Lancer or Snipers out of ammo far from a camp or Engineer or need to be quickly repositioned from near their starting area to a forward camp? Retreat.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Certain enemy units can cross into this territory, with Aces being the prime candidate for this title. If no one else counts, at least Ty the Immortal should in his many appearances as he can wreck your units quickly and takes a lot of damage to kill. Interestingly enough, an Ace tank can be an Anti-Climax Boss because they can still die to one hit to their radiator.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall:
    • In the final mission, Welkin takes the place of Captain Varrot during the mission briefing where he hands the player their final orders.
    • Edy does this in the add-on if you get a D on the mission, calling the player "sloth fingers". Homer, next to her, wonders who she is talking to. The nature of this mission makes it very hard to do this badly without getting a game over, making this something of an Easter Egg.
  • Breakout Character: Selvaria is defeated far before the game's climax, but her storyline had such an impact on the players that her popularity eclipsed not only the main villain, but the heroes as well.
    • She was so well-loved for being a sympathetic Anti-Villain with a cool design and a caring attitude towards her squadron that she not only got a DLC for her own, but also personally reappeared in the third game to fight Kurt's squad.
    • She was later chosen to appear in Project X Zone as the representative of the first Valkyria Chronicles, meeting up with VC3 characters (Kurt, Reala, Imca), though still as an enemy.
    • Selvaria is playable in the console version of Dengeki Bunko Fighting Climax, which also features Alicia. The catch? Selvaria is the one playable, while Alicia is the support.
    • Selvaria, along with Alicia, Welkin and Largo, appears as a playable character in SEGA Heroes.
  • Breast Plate: Literal ones. Some of the troopers have them, and they cover exactly what they say they do on both men and women.
  • But Now I Must Go: Vyse and Aika leave Gallia in search of adventure, never to be seen again in their ending. The medic triplets, being based on Fina from the same game, go with them, as does Alex, who's friends with Vyse, while Musaad goes his own way and is similarly never seen again.
  • The Cameo: Major cameos by Vyse, Aika, and Fina of Skies of Arcadia. Vyse and Aika appear as two playable soldiers while Fina appears as a medic (along with her two sisters, Gina and Mina, though these two never existed in Skies Of Arcadia).
  • Camp Gay: Not all of the gay men are campy, but this trope still shows up. Jann is the poster-man of this trope though.
  • Cannon Fodder: The general perception of the militia by the regular army. Squad 7 sure proves them wrong, though...
  • The Captain: Captain Eleanor Varrot, obviously. Although of lower rank, it also applies to Welkin; he's the one in charge of Squad 7, and although he's easygoing and amicable, do NOT question his orders. He's in charge for a reason.
  • Cel Shading: Rather notably, the entire game's is rendered in a unique art style that made it look like it was drawn in watercolor. Justified, as the events of the game are taking place with you reading about them in a history book.
  • Chekhov's Boomerang: The hole that Alicia punches into the side of the Marmota with a Valkyrian lance becomes the key to defeating it later on.
  • Child Soldiers: Due to Gallia's policy of universal conscription, military training is a part of general education and citizens as young as fifteen may be conscripted. Then there's twelve-year-old Aisha Neumann, a Shocktrooper in your Squad, who apparently begged to serve and had it granted if her bio in the game is to be believed.
  • Clean, Pretty Childbirth: A woman gives birth in a tank - during a battle - with no signs of a mess being made, and without any noises or medical complications that would require the two people crewing the tank to divert their attention away from the battlefield. Judging by Welkin's bug-eyed expression, he found it just as absurd as the audience. But considering that the outcome could have been a hell of a lot worse, no-one's complaining.
  • Cold Sniper:
    • Zigzagged with Marina. She is not the only sniper, but is by far the best because of her potential "Ultimate Accuracy" which is always activated. Her potentials imply she is a sociopath, but Edy's Brigade reveals that she has a soft side. Apparently she just doesn't like being around other people.
    • Cezary plays this trope a little straighter, although, in his case, it's less cold sniper and more selfish asshole sniper. His profile states that he grew up in isolation and is not used to social interactions, so he chose to be a sniper to avoid being on the front lines.
  • Color-Coded Armies: The good guys are blue, the bad guys are dark gray and red, especially the officers.
  • Competitive Balance
    • Fragile Speedster: Scouts. Terrible durability and fire rate, but they have more AP than any unit in the game, making them great for hit-and-run attacks against exposed infantry and flushing enemy units out of cover.
    • Jack-of-All-Trades: Shocktroopers. All around good stats and best suited for mid-to-close range attacks
    • Mighty Glacier: Lancers: Slow as hell, but one of the only infantry units who can go toe-to-toe with tanks (and pretty much nothing else.) Tanks themselves also fall under this camp, obviously.
    • Glass Cannon: Snipers. Less AP than lancers and less health than scouts, but have incredible range.
    • Utility Party Member: Engineers. Capable of healing and resupply other units and repairing tanks, and have AP rivaling scouts.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard:
    • Enemy tanks, in particular, appear to have freakishly good accuracy and can make pinpoint shots with their shells from halfway across the map. Good luck making equally-impressive shots without Save Scumming.
    • Enemy Aces are also incredibly annoying in their ability to dodge long-range sniper shots - from behind - as well as point-blank barrages.
    • There's also the Lancers. If your tank's radiator is visible at all, it's likely to take a shot. It doesn't matter if they can only see 1 cm of it, and they're firing from the other end of the map; they will hit that radiator. This is especially painful because losing your tank means game over.
    • In the PC version the way interception fireworks was tweaked slightly. Before, the enemy would stop shooting the moment you hit the 'aim' button, but in PC they will keep firing while your character raises their gun and only stop when the crosshair appears, which gives the AI several free shots that you can do nothing to avoid, which can be extremely painful in the Extreme difficulty skirmishes. Unfortunately, this doesn't apply to you, and your men will politely stop firing the second the AI decides to shoot, which makes interception fire a lot more effective for the AI than the player.
    • Selvaria has a unique version of the Heal All order that heals all units to full. When you use the Heal All order, it only heals 80 HP to each unit.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: In a good number of the game's levels, chances are your squad will be horribly outnumbered by the Imperials. Plus, unlike you, they literally have infinite reinforcements they can continually call on until you capture their bases.
  • Cooldown Hug: Preceded by a speech and followed by a kiss. Welkin to Alicia when she decided she'll go kamikaze on the Big Bad's land battleship.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Pretty much everybody calls Welkin's plan in chapter 4 nuts. The Militia is ordered to take back the Great Vasel Bridge, which everyone is expecting to end up looking rather like Burnside's Bridge: an incredibly bloody frontal assault through a natural chokepoint. Welkin instead does an impromptu amphibious assault to outflank the enemy bridgehead, a plan which includes waterproofing the Edelweiss and driving it across the river bottom.
  • Crew of One: Zaka seems to be the only person in the Shamrock. The Edelweiss isn't much better, being crewed by only two people when most real WWII-period tanks of comparable size tended to have about five guys running them.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: Every class is restricted to certain types of weapons. This means that Lancers can't carry a carbine as a backup weapon for dealing with infantry. Later on, Lancers can have the option of taking mortar lances that are more effective against infantry, with the obvious tradeoff in mortars being less effective against tanks.
    • More to the point, Lancers and Snipers don't carry any weapon besides AT Lances and Sniper Rifles respectively — not even a handgun. This means that during the enemy's turn, they don't lay down interception fire or return fire when shot at.
  • Critical Hit Class: The Sniper class can only shoot once per turn, but has very high accuracy and range, making them ideal for headshots.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle:
    • Squad 7 pretty much does this every level, especially once you learn to correctly utilize each class and their strengths/weaknesses.
    • Selvaria does this on almost every map she shows up on.
    • Alicia delivers one to Selvaria later on as well, while in a half-weakened state no less.
  • Cursed with Awesome: Alicia works herself into a suicidal frenzy over her powers and the effects they'll have on her, but her fears are grossly exaggerated compared to the likelihood of any of them actually happening, and entirely based on assumptions about Selvaria.
  • Custom Uniform: While Squad 7 mostly uses Nonuniform Uniform, the Imperial generals each have their own unique uniforms. Gregor's has a very long cape, Selvaria's suits her body, Jaeger's has a cow skull on one of his shoulders and notably wears a brown coat (in comparison with others' black uniforms), while Maximilian's is best described as a slightly militarized form of a royal attire.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: Where the hell were any of the three medics hanging out when Isara was shot?!?
  • Damage Over Time: Certain negative potentials cause slow, steady damage to a unit under certain conditions. For the "Allergy" potentials, it's reliant on standing on a certain kind of terrain, while with the "Aimophobic" (aka fear of sharp objects) potential they have to be standing near a lancer for it to activate.
  • Darkest Hour: The first half of the Battle of Naggiar Plains. The Imperials have combined all their occupying forces together, and the Gallians have come out to meet them in battle. It's declared that this battle will be the definitive battle to decide who wins the greater conflict. Unfortunately, Selvaria is also there and continuing to be an unstoppable One Woman Army, and no one on the Gallian side is particularly hopeful about their chances. And then Alicia is suddenly shot down by a mysterious sniper. Fortunately, things suddenly turn right around when Alicia's latent Valkyria powers are activated, allowing her to defeat Selvaria in a duel, which in turn allows Gallia to turn the fight back in their favor.
    • Chapter 16: "The Maiden's Shield." Gallia defeats and captures Selvaria at Ghirlandaio, and it seems like the Imperials have finally been driven out of Gallia completely. Then Selvaria sacrifices herself to activate her Final Flame, not only turning Ghirlandaio into a crater, but obliterating General Damon and the majority of the regular army. And then the militia gets word of the Marmota, a tank so massive that it's described as a battleship on legs, barreling through Gallian territory on a direct course to the capital, with only the Militia and the Royal Guard left to stop it. And wouldn't you know it, Prime Minister Borg has decided to take this opportunity to launch a coup and sell out Gallia to the Empire in exchange for being made King. Oh, and the titular operation to halt the Marmota by diverting it into a canyon full of mines? It fails, and only leads to the destruction of most of the Royal Guard as well. It's little wonder that by the end Alicia - already suffering a crisis of purpose over her status as a Valkyria - tries to activate her own Final Flame to take out the Marmota in a last ditch effort.
  • A Day in the Limelight: In one of the downloadable content packs, Edy gets a mission that is entirely focused on her. Also included are a slew of secondary characters you may or may not have used in the main game.
  • A Death in the Limelight: Isara certainly gets a lot of focus in Chapter 11, just before her death.
    • DLC mini-campaign "Behind Her Blue Flame" focuses on a random Engineer named Johann who's assigned to be Selvaria's personal Engineer during The Empire's conquest of Ghirlandaio. While he survives the campaign, the end reveals that he's the enemy ace Ozwald the Iron, who appears in the first part of the Fouzen mission, and if you've been hunting down ace weapons you've likely killed him at least once already.
  • David vs. Goliath: Figuratively speaking, this applies to the tiny nation of Gallia's defense against the massive East Europan Imperial Alliance's invasion.
  • Dead Man Walking: Captain Giorgio became this once he was defeated. Captain Varrot was willing to subject him to a firing squad because of the atrocities he committed which involved the death of her lover, but is talked out of it. Giorgio happily walks back to Imperial territory, only to find out that they were waiting to court martial him because of said atrocities which even they found disgusting and earns him an execution.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: You can destroy a tank with a scout by firing enough bullets into its radiator. As for targeting personnel, the entire body is equally vulnerable (not counting the head, naturally). Twenty shots to the chest or crotch do as much damage as twenty shots to the foot.
  • Defense Mechanism Superpower: The powers of the Valkyria, descendants of the Valkyrur, are activated only in life-threatening situations. Selvaria was revealed to have stabbed herself to activate her powers. This is also the reason why Alicia was shot - the sniper was trying to activate her powers as well. In gameplay, that means that Alicia's Valkyria potential only activates when her health drops below 50%.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: Squad 7's defeat of Maximilian. He had equipment that mimicked the powers of the Valkyria and unlike the fight with Selvaria, Squad 7 decided not to rely on Alicia's Valkyria powers.
  • Didn't See That Coming : Maximilian's plan to hold Europa hostage with the power of the Valkyrian bloodline was kind of derailed by the minor detail of Cordelia and her ancestors actually being Darcsen. He rolls with the punches, though, because he treats everyone who is of use to him equally, and since Cordelia, while Darcsen, was still the lawful ruler of Gallia, she was of use to him.
  • Difficulty Levels: The main campaign has fixed difficulty, but skirmishes can be fought on Easy or Normal. On a New Game+, Hard and Expert become available. The harder difficulties can have different objectives than the easier ones.
  • Disk One Nuke:
    • The ZM Kar 8(g) from the scout challenge skirmish in the Challenges of the Edy Detachment DLC. The scout challenge is much easier than the other maps in the DLC to the point that it can easily be done with the equipment you have when you unlock skirmish maps and the ZM Kar 8(g) is far more powerful (if shorter-ranged and less accurate) than any rifle you can develop or be gifted by Cordelia and trivializes most infantry (and tanks if you can get to their radiator) for almost the entire rest of the game. The map's large ducat and exp reward amplifies its Disk One Nuke status, as completing it even a few times will allow you to buy all the weapon upgrades you want and level your troops well past their intended levels for the early game.
    • Marina is available from the beginning and strong throughout. With her extreme sniper rifle range, a potential that gives her a permanent 90% accuracy boost, and high damage potential, Marina can easily become the soldier with the highest kill count by the end of the game by picking off one or two soldiers every turn with headshots.
  • Dodge the Bullet: Aces can do that with disturbing regularity unless the attacking soldier has the Undodgeable Shot Potential - even under circumstances when they shouldn't be aware that someone is shooting at them. Selvaria can dodge bullets as well. In the stage where you meet her in human form, she stands on top of a wall very far away but is just reachable by sniper fire. The first shot will hit (if you aim well enough), but the second onwards she'll dodge (unless you use special commands). It takes you 3 shot to finish her in that stage (and it's the victory condition), if you manage to do it, it saves you a lot of trouble climbing up the wall to defeat her.
  • Doomed Hometown: Bruhl is invaded and ransacked in the first chapter. Subverted in that Welkin's squad launch a counter-attack to reclaim it later on.
  • Doomed by Canon:
    • Johann of the Selvaria DLC is promoted into Oswald the Iron, one of the Elite Mooks of the main game, at the end of his story, implying that chances are that he's fated to eventually die by the protagonists' hands. Though considering he appears at least twice in the game, (three if you have the Challenges DLC) it's likely that the Imperials also have a habit of only falling unconscious when grievously wounded.
    • There's also a mook on your side named Fritz, who may or may not be the same Fritz that died in front of Alicia and Welkin in the main game. Some of the other mooks also share names with aces in the main game, implying that they're also doomed.
  • Downloadable Content: The Edy Detachment mission, Behind Her Blue Flame (a pair of missions featuring Selvaria), and the Edy Detachment challenges, which are skirmishes tailored to a specific class.
  • The Dragon:
    • Selvaria is Maximilliam's most reliable and formidable general.
    • Jaeger, gameplay-wise, since he's the last of the three Imperial generals you face in a real showdown.
  • Dramatic Gun Cock: In the earliest part of the story, no less!
    Welkin: Um, uh, my name is Welkin. ...And you are?
    Alicia: The one with the gun.
  • Drill Sergeant Nasty:
    • Drill sergeant Clavaro's existence hinges on his ability to insult you as you level up your troops. He's the epitome of the trope, really.
    Drill Sergeant Clavaro: Good job maggots! You're one step closer to being human!
    • Jane also becomes a drill instructor at the end of the game, and is even stricter than her predecessor.
  • Dubtitle: While hardly unusual for a game with a bilingual soundtrack, the English script used for the subtitles only matches the English dub. While it hardly alters the game's plot in any way and the English script and dub is faithful to the plot and the characters, it can create a strange dissonance with the Japanese track on. Most notable is a moment in which Welkin simply says "Faldio", and the script reads "I don't know what to tell you, Faldio."
    • While it is true that the overall plot is, on face value, faithful, the differences in the minor details can lead to a very different impression from the characters, which may or may not change the resulting flavour of the ending. The best example would be Faldio in the fully unlocked (New Game+) scene "Awakening"; in the Japanese audio, he comes off as far more sinister, and his words are a few notches more brutal than what the subtitles actually say.
  • Due to the Dead:
    • When Welkin and Alicia are separated from Squad 7, they encounter a critically wounded Imperial soldier that they try to help, and then bury him when he dies anyway. When the rest of the dead man's unit finds them the next day, they let the two go as thanks for their attempt to save the late Private Fritz.
    • When Isara dies, Rosie sings at her grave to fulfill Isara's wish.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Despite beating back the Imperials pretty much by themselves, Squad 7 is constantly given the insanely dangerous missions while the main army gets the fairly easy jobs. If not for the actual callousness of the high command, this would actually make sense because Squad 7 is by far the most capable formation in the Gallian military, and with their proven track of astounding successes, it would only make sense to give them the more difficult jobs. This is Lampshaded in the briefing for the assault on Ghirlandaio.
  • Dungeon Bypass: The best (sometimes only) way to get A ranks on missions. Easy to do in New Game+ when your units are way overpowered, but even before then, a scout with the right Orders placed on them can often just walk past the enemy and capture their base.
    • Special mention also goes to the final encounter with Selvaria, where you're supposed to fight your way through a huge fortress and an entire army to reach her and fight her to the death... or you can just have your snipers shoot her in the head from the starting position. She'll dodge many of their attacks, but not all of them.
    • Similarly in Chapter 17's battle against Jaegar, you can simply destroy his otherwise-regenerating armor as soon as possible; it won't be repaired by enemy camps after it's destroyed and top-rank Lancers just barely have enough firepower to take it down with full Command Point usage, so you can completely ignore the tedious recommendation of capturing the four guarded camps around the map.
  • During the War: The entire game takes place in a small but significant sideshow of the Second Europan War, a war with elements of World War I and World War II.

    E to M 
  • Early Game Hell: Some of the early missions can be rather challenging, especially if you aren't used to strategy games. One year after the release of the PS4 version, only about 28% of players had achieved the first storyline Trophy, which is awarded after chapter 9 of 18. note 
  • Easter Egg: If you look around a bit in the Docks map (in Chapter 8 and the Engineer trial) you can find a sign on the wall in broken English telling you to be careful with spoilers:
    READING AN ARTICLE
    The details of a story can be included in an article about the story. Please avoid that I read these articles before really appreciating a work if I think that fun is spoiled when I know these. Warning of material Barre is a few article, but such a thing is possible. Please be careful to these.
  • Elite Mooks:
    • As the game progresses, you'll eventually start facing tougher enemies, who aptly have the title "Elite". By reaching a certain level, your own soldiers can also attain this status, which confers new potentials and subweapons for particular classes.
    • Also in the spirit of the trope are black-armored Imperial units, who are stronger than ordinary soldiers, and aces, who have preternaturally good accuracy and dodging skills. An ace will frequently duck bullets from a sniper stationed half a mile away, before the rifle actually goes off.
  • Empathy Doll Shot: Rosie finds a child's doll in the burnt ruins of a Darcsen concentration camp that the Empire razed with the prisoners locked inside before retreating.
  • The Empire: As the name suggests, the East Europan Imperial Alliance's main goal is the domination of the remainder of Europa, securing any reserves of Ragnaid to themselves.
  • The Engineer: Loads of them, but Isara, Leon and Kries are the most prominent, storywise. Leon fits the young engineer stereotype to a tee: enthusiastic, hot-blooded and with a little bit of an inventor stripe. Sometimes borders on Mad Scientist territory. In battle, engineers are essential for building and breaking fortifications, repairing tanks, disarming land mines and resupplying fellow soldiers.
  • Encyclopedia Exposita: For all the weapons, characters, major world events and landmarks.
  • Enemy Chatter: You'll hear comments from the Imperial's radio quite a bit during battles, but it might be hard to make it out due to the allied radio chatter at times.
  • Epic Fail: If you earn an A rank on the Edy Detachment mission, Edy decides to reward her teammates by singing a song. A giant yellow FAIL appears on the screen as she sings horribly off key. Her singing is so bad, that... well, it's not made clear if her singing actually killed her teammates, or if they're just really dramatically overselling it.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • In one of the side chapters, an Imperial war criminal who is infamous for taking civilian hostages in battle is court-martialed by his own superiors. Maximilian may be a bit of a royal bastard who treats even his most loyal subordinates as pawns, but even he expects his troops to stick to the rules of war.
    • In Selvaria's DLC mission, the Imperials are horrified that General Damon used chemical weapons to try and recapture Ghirlandaio since because of the events of EW1 resulted in them being used a lot, both sides signed a treaty to never use them again.
    • Even if what he did played in his favor, Maximillian orders the execution of Borg since he easily gave up his country to save himself.
  • Evil Chancellor: Borg, as expected by both the trope name and the character's general demeanor throughout the game (including in his past actions detailed in the Personnel tab). It'd be more surprising if he didn't try to make a power play.
  • Eyes Always Shut: Leon the Mechanic rarely, if ever, opens his eyes. Even when he's flying a plane!
  • Exact Words: Vyse's bio has some In-Universe speculation that he's from a land far-removed from Europa. If you know where he and Aika are from, it's also far-removed from surface level.
  • Faceless Goons: Generally speaking, soldiers in both the Gallian and Imperial Armies. Played with a bit between mission 8 and 9, though, wherein Alicia and Welks comfort a dying Imperial grunt (removing his helmet in the process) and then have a civil chat with his commanding officer; more obviously played with in the Selvaria DLC. Cutscenes involving Imperial soldiers may sometimes show them leaning back, exposing their eyes to the camera. Regular Mooks in the Galian Army generally have their helmets blocking their eyes while their lower face is exposed, but camera angles show their eyes underneath now and then.
  • Fan Disservice:
    • The breastplates on the shocktroopers. Just... it's not strictly for women.
    • Welkin's old-timey swimsuit can count as this, especially as out of place as it looks when the other women around him are wearing extremely modern and Fanservice friendly swimsuits.
  • Fanservice:
    • Many of the girls of Squad 7. If they're not in pants, they wear skirts and REALLY HIGH knee socks. Rosie tops all the others by having a gap around her midriff (and having a much shorter skirt). The girls with skirts are prone to what looks like Panty Shots at first glance (although it's really short shorts) as the their evasive maneuver is to drop to the ground. Guess where the camera points. And then there's the Beach Episode. In particular, Alicia has a very revealing bikini.
    • Selvaria is the prime source of it until the Beach Episode. She even has (mild) Gainaxing when she makes fast movements.
  • Fantastic Racism: The Darcsens are a vague analogue for the Jews/Romani in World War II and their experiences, although this is muddied by how they are visualized in Anime/Manga style. They are human but what sets them apart is their dark blue hair. Darcsen hatred is quite common in Europa, as it is commonly held and mistaken belief that the Darcsens were responsible for a great calamity that occurred long ago. This hatred is institutionalized in the Empire, and rounding up Darcsen families, burning down their homes and sending them off to work camps is official policy. One of the bad guys in Varrot's side missions is court-martialled for "torturing non-Darcsen civilians". Even the Gallians, the good guys, have a few examples of this: Rosie initially hates them because her parents were accidentally killed by a Darcsen-hating mob that set fire to the home of their Darcsen neighbors and often takes out her prejudices on poor Isara, and while Rosie eventually gets better, several other playable squadmates retain the Darcsen Hater trait.
  • Fantastic Nuke: The Valkyria's final flame is very reminiscent of a nuclear bomb, complete with a mushroom cloud.
  • Fantasy Conflict Counterpart:
    • The First Europan War appears to be based on World War I, as it was started by the assassination of the crown prince of the East Europan Imperial Alliance, featured the first use of tanks, and became bogged down in trench warfare. It diverged at the point where the trench warfare became so inconclusive that the Empire and the Atlantic Federation basically gave up and signed a ceasefire.
    • The Second Europan War that forms the backdrop to the game is based on World War II. Like the Entente and Central Powers of World War I, The Atlantic Federation and the Imperial Alliance were both unsatisfied with the postwar balance of power and began to rearm as the resumption of hostilities came to be seen as increasingly inevitable. Thus, a new continent-wide war breaks out some twenty years after the first. The Empire invades three of the Federation's border republics, an act of aggression mirroring Adolf Hitler's invasion of Poland in 1939, using new techniques of mechanized warfare and rapid advance to quickly overwhelm everything in its path.
      • The Federation soon returned the favor, initiating Operation Northern Cross, or the in-game version of Operation Barbarossa.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: The following could be said of the countries and peoples that appear in the game:
    • Gallia is loosely based on the nations geographically associated with Gaul (or Gallia in Latin) and more specifically the Rhineland, including a mix of Dutch, French, Belgian and German traits. (In his review of Valkyria Chronicles, Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw referred to Gallia as: "a small, idyllic country that resembles a mashup of Holland, Belgium and Switzerland as depicted by Winnie-the-Pooh".)
      • In terms of organization, Gallia is unmistakingly based on Finland. A small country locked between two major rivaling factions with a population of no more than 5 million, a country that lacks significant heavy industry, but nonetheless possess a proud militia tradition and retained independence despite facing overwhelming odds.
    • The Atlantic Federation is essentially akin to NATO and the Western Allies of the world wars, sans North America and Australia.
    • The Imperials are a mishmash of Imperial Russia, Austria-Hungary, Imperial Germany, the Soviet Union, and Nazi Germany. Imperial soldiers have names to match this, such as Johann, Hanz, Otto, etc. If Jaeger's any indication, his homeland within the Empire bears at least a passing semblance to Hungary.
    • The Darcsens, meanwhile, are basically European Jews with some cultural elements of the Romani.
    • The map maintains the general shape of the Europe, with almost all the borders redrawn. There are two isles to the Northwest, one big and one small, just like the British isles. A peninsula extends from the South of Europa, much like Italy. The map still marks the seas around Europa as North Sea to the North, Mediterranean Sea to the South, and the Atlantic Ocean to the West. Gallia is located in the Low Countries, fitting its basis of design, while the East Europan Imperials appears to encompass both German and Soviet territory, fitting their hybrid design.
  • A Father to His Men: Welkin sees himself this way, as does the commander of the Imperials he and Alicia meet in Chapter 8. Selvaria is also like this towards her subordinates.
  • The Federation: The Atlantic Federation is one side in the Europan conflict. However, they are not played up as heroic by any means.
  • Feelies: The "Europa Edition" on PS4 comes with a small-format art book, and a poster that folds out to A3 size (12" x 17") with all of Squad 7 on one side, and Selvaria Bles on the other.
  • Final Death: Except the main characters, a Squad 7 soldier whose HP hits 0 will be gone for good if you don't get a medic to help them within three turns or if the enemy gets to them first. Even during skirmish missions and side-story battles, they can still be killed permanently if you're not careful.
  • Fire-Breathing Weapon: Man-portable and vehicle-mounted flamethrowers are available. They ignore cover, can hit multiple enemies who are clumped together, and are capable of destroying bunkers with a single shot.
  • Five-Man Band: The main characters of Squad 7:
  • Foreshadowing:
    • When Rosie goes on a tirade against Darcsens directed at Isara about the "Darcsen Calamity", Isara points out that there is no archaeological evidence supporting this. She’s right. That’s the one thing the Valkyur couldn’t fabricate.
    • In the book you and the narrator are reading which chronicled the events of the game, Ms. Ellet gets an entire chapter to herself. Given that she wrote the book...
  • Fragile Speedster:
    • Scouts go down easy. The trade-off is that their insane movement range makes them one of the most valuable units in the game, especially when going for A ranks.
    • Zaka's tank, the Shamrock. While not as tough as the Edelweiss, it has a higher movement range and can choose between three different primary weapons: the standard mortar/cannon, a Gatling gun, or a flamethrower.
  • Framing Device: The game proceeds as if you're reading through the history book Irene Koller/Ms. Ellet wrote about the events of the war; cutscenes and battles are played by selecting them in the book's chapters and most of the game's extra content can be accessed through "tabs" to other sections.
  • Game-Breaking Bug:
    • During the final stretch of the first Ghirlandaio mission, you are supposed to use ladders to climb up a fortified wall and destroy the gatling guns that are stopping you from reaching the final switch. However, in the PC version, only the right-most ladder will function as intended, and the others will place the unit you're controlling slightly lower than they were supposed to, causing them to fall endlessly through the floor.
    • You might escape from some of the bugs, but the PC version does not like unlocking the frame rate to beyond 60 FPS. In fact, the FPS option seems to be touchy in general; capping it too low results in noticeable slow-down, and somehow changing FPS can even affect if the in-game clock (seen when saving the game) works or not!
      • Some users report that enemy fire rate is tied to the FPS — set it to unlimited, and watch enemy shocktroopers melt anything that's not a tank in two seconds or less.
      • In Chapter 18 part A, you're required to lower a ramp made of debris. If your framerate is 144 Hz, units may get stuck.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • A squad is awarded the Splintered Horn when one of their own falls in the line of duty. You don't get it automatically when Isara dies, though, since it happens in a cutscene rather than in gameplay.
    • You level up the class's level rather than the characters themselves. This results in seasoned vets and Child Soldiers being the same level.
    • You can pop back to headquarters at any time even late in the game where you shouldn't logically be able to. Even getting rewarded by the Princess while she's kidnapped is possible.
    • Cutscenes show the Gallian Militia is equipped with pistols, but at no point in the game can you use them.
    • Despite her open bigotry and antagonistic attitude towards Isara, Rosie doesn't have the Darscen Hater potential. This is averted after Isara dies. Rosie finally lets go of her prejudice and becomes more sympathetic to the Darscens, getting a new potential in the process to reflect it.
    • Alicia's full powers are activated after she nearly dies in a story event. If she nearly dies during combat before then, the only consequence is that she needs more healing to fully recover.
  • Gameplay Grading: You get a rating for each battle, depending on speed. This affects how much experience you gain:
    • A: Base XP plus 200% bonus.
    • B: Base XP plus 150% bonus.
    • C: Base XP plus 100% bonus.
    • D: Base XP only.
  • Gender Is No Object: In Gallia at least, men and women alike seem to share the same rights and opportunities. In fact, no one seems to mind the idea of female soldiers apart from General Damon, but no one agrees with him.
  • Generation Xerox: Played with, everyone thinks Welkin is following in his father's footsteps while the only thing he wants is to become a teacher.
  • Gentle Giant: Walter, Hector, Jann, and Largo. Note that they're all Lancers, a class you'd expect to be populated with Dumb Muscle. There's not a single one who fits that description, with the exception of Theod who's a small-town bully and bigot.
  • Get a Hold of Yourself, Man!: Certain characters, especially in the side chapters and DLC, start to go a little crazy before their Love Interest snaps them out of it.
  • Glass Cannon: Snipers; they can kill most opponents with one hit, at ranges far beyond what any other unit can manage, but they have very low health and ridiculously little movement range.
    • Tank Destroyers have weaker armor than even Medium Tanks, and lack a rotating turret, meaning they have to turn completely to face their target before firing, but they're also the strongest anti-tank unit in the game.
  • A God I Am Not: Alicia finds it unsettling to see common citizens begin to worship her after word gets out that she's a Valkyria.
  • Good Flaws, Bad Flaws: The negative potentials some characters have basically come in two varieties: mild annoyances (either frequent but minor, or infrequent and modest), and those that render the character near useless.
    • In the former category, [Environment] Allergy and [Name] Hater will never hurt you so long as you stay away from that environment/character. Desert Allergy is particularly minor, as only two chapters and one optional skirmish in the entire game take place in desert terrain. Similarly, Metal Allergy is actually only relevant when characters stand on the very infrequent metal bridges, and they're otherwise fine with hanging out with tanks (unlike Tank Hating characters, who again have an infrequent flaw).
    • On the opposite side of the scale certain character-specific traits, like Herbert's 'Moody' (occasionally flat out refuses to follow orders), Hermes' 'Chronic Fatigue' (as a scout, if he uses his full movement his turn may completely end), Cezary's 'Acrophobia' (a Sniper who's afraid of heights??), Susie's 'Humanitarian' (will occasionally completely end her turn if ordered to shoot, and unlike Hermes this isn't controllable) completely ruin those characters' ability to do their jobs properly.
    • It even works in reverse: some 'good' potentials aren't all that great. Sure 'Dud Mine' is good and all but couldn't you have just, you know, not stepped on the mine in the first place? Similarly, "Desert Bred" relates to the most infrequent terrain.
  • The Good Kingdom: Gallia. Even though the country is actually a Principality and ruled by a Archduke/Archduchess, it fits the archetype to a tee.
  • Green Rocks: Ragnite. Used in anything humanly possible from first-aid kits to ammunition, including, but not limited to, street lamps and engine fuel. Apparently, the Valkyrian weapons are made of Ragnite as well. Aside from the latter, it’s practically the game’s counterpart to oil.
  • Grenade Launcher: Elite Scouts gain access to a grenade launcher attachment for their rifles that shoot grenades much further than they can be thrown by hand.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • Some of the enemy aces spend the entire battle hiding someplace where most people wouldn't think to look if they didn't already know they were there.
    • It's pretty much impossible to ace missions where the objectives change partway through if you don't know that they're going to change and put some units in a place where they can rapidly act on the new objective in advance. For example, the initial objective of the Edy's deployment DLC is to defend a certain spot for three phases. Then you get a new objective to move Edy to the exit on the south side of the map. Acing the mission requires that this be done by the end of phase 4. It will take at least two phases worth of movement to get Edy there, so acing the mission requires Edy getting at least partway to the second objective before there is an in-story reason for her to leave the bunker she was defending.
    • Characters' Potentials activate on a situational or random basis. The game does not tell you how strong the effect is, or what the random chance is, leaving the player in the dark about how much effort they should put in to triggering or avoiding the effects.
    • Some of the more infamous levels have this in spades. Like knowing about potential map shortcuts or destructible objects. Chapter 7's battle against the Batomys mentions you can target the ruin walls to slow down the tank only the turn before it shoots down the first barrier, and doesn't explicitly say which ones are targettable (all of them show up with hp bars, and you only need to shoot the tall standing ones once). It also implies that you should use the Edelweiss's cannon and your Lancers entirely for dealing with the massive siege tank, starting with the machine gun turrets then the armored radiator vents, which will take multiple shells/rockets to destroy. What you're better off doing after destroying the machine guns (and left unmentioned) is instead running anyone with grenades up to the radiators and tossing one inside of the vents, which destroys it instantly (if you aim correctly), and then using the Lancers and Edelweiss to finish off the Batomys.
  • Happily Married: Welkin and Alicia, in the end. Also Largo and Eleanor. Karl and Lynn, two of the otherwise faceless units, are lovers by the time the game has started and get married after the war ends.
  • Harder Than Hard: EX Hard Mode. As an example, the first mission pits a tiny squad smack-dab in the center of a huge Imperial ambush.
  • Hate Sink: Two of the generals, General Gregor of the Imperials and General Damon of the Gallians, are among the most immoral characters of the game, with few redeeming values. Both of them treat people as commodities to be used and expended. Even Selvaria killing General Damon is shown in a positive light, relatively speaking.
  • Heads I Win, Tails You Lose: Operation Maiden's Shield. The Marmota is barrelling straight towards Randgriz, and Squad 7 need to divert its path into a trap laid by the Royal Guard. Fail, and the Marmota continues on to Randgriz. Succeed...and the trap fails, and the Marmota continues on to Randgriz, only you're allowed to move on to the next chapter this time.
  • Heel Realization: General Jaeger has one after his second battle with Squad 7. Realizing that helping Maximilian invade Gallia in exchange for the liberation of his own country makes him a hypocrite and leaves.
  • Heir-In-Law: Prince Maximilian's plan to take over Gallia involves forcing its princess to marry him.
  • "Hell, Yes!" Moment: Several throughout the game, typically when you win a battle. But one particular scene, when Alicia first awakens as a Valkyria. Made more notable by the fact that she delivers a Curb-Stomp Battle to Selvaria in her Valkyria form, who up until this point in the game is invincible.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: None of Squad 7 wears a helmet, but unnamed Gallian mooks do. In fact, the armor they do wear is highly impractical in general. They have protection on their shoulders, hips, knees and (in the case of the shocktroopers) pectorals, but leave the rest of their center-mass, neck, head and groin protected only by cloth uniforms. This may be justified in the fact that they are a civilian militia, which is often undersupplied and considered cannon fodder by the military brass, rather than army regulars.
  • Heroic BSoD: Welkin, and all of Squad 7 really, experience this when Isara dies and when Alicia is shot.
  • Hidden Depths: Turns out Nadine is quite the writer, Largo is highly knowledgeable about agriculture, Jann is good with kids, and Walter enjoys cooking and gardening.
  • Hidden in Plain Sight: The ancient Valkyrian superweapon, the massive Valkof, has the tower of Castle Randgriz built around it. Even Maximilian lampshades this.
  • Holy Ground: Prince Maximilian von Regingrave didn't want to kill off Gallian militiamen present in the ruins of a Valkyrian temple, which is considered to be holy grounds.
  • Hollywood Tactics: The level ranking system actually encourages this - the ranking is based entirely on how many rounds it takes to complete the mission objectives, with bonuses added on to the rank reward for how many officers, aces, and tanks are defeated, with no regard for how many regular enemy units are defeated or friendly casualties taken. As a result of this, you get more XP and money for taking ridiculous risks to take/kill the primary objective as quickly as possible than by fighting intelligently and taking an extra round or two to wipe out the enemies between the starting point and the objective (Who will be shooting at the soldiers charging recklessly for the objective all the way).
  • Hopeless Boss Fight:
    • The first tank you encounter is impossible to destroy with any gun other than the Edelweiss's (a Lancer could presumably also do it, but there's no way to have a Lancer at that time), even in New Game+. This is because it has a much lower than normal critical damage multiplier on its radiator, which also means that even on a New Game+, the Edelweiss can't take it down in one shot to the radiator like it could to any other tank in the game.
    • Selvaria in all but her last battle is pretty much "run away and get the stage goal accomplished before she kills everyone."
    • You can, interestingly, defeat Jaeger's Tank when it first appears in the forest stage. Beating him sends all other enemies running with their tails between their legs, and Jaeger himself comments on your skill. Although curiously you get no experience credit for it.
  • Hysterical Woman: Alicia and Varrot. Despite spending most of the game being calm, collected, and competent, the culmination of their character arcs see them becoming so consumed with their emotions that they become dangerously, suicidally self-destructive, and require a male love interest to save them from themselves. Welkin and Largo both step up to talk Alicia and Varrot down.
  • Ignored Enamored Underling: Selvaria is blatantly in love with Maximilian. He knows this, but sees her as nothing more than an expendable soldier.
  • Infinity -1 Sword:
    • The ZM Kar 8(g) and 9(g) are the strongest scout rifles in the game and the ZM Kar 9(g) is trivially farmed, especially once you've got one of it. They're obtained by defeating the Ace soldier in Susie's and Homer's skirmish missions. They trade off range and accuracy for significantly improved power (more than twice the damage of the best Gallian rifle and with seven shots per action instead of five), but the trade-off is worth it.
    • The Royal weapons, which start getting gifted to the Squad a little bit before the midway point. Effectively upgraded versions of standard Gallian weapons, and tend to be significantly powerful to boot, without the captured Imperial Aces weapons crippling range and accuracy loss. They are categorically superior to the R&D weapons they're based on (with the odd exception of range for rifles), but they only follow one of the three development paths (Gallian-S rifles, MAGS MXX machine guns, GSR-XX sniper rifles, and Theimer lances, meaning that if you prefer status effect weapons, higher damage rifles and sniper rifles, the T-MAG machine guns, or mortar lances, there are no royal weapon options for those) and drop randomly after missions, meaning they can't be reliably obtained.
  • Infinity +1 Sword: Ruhm, Selvaria's weapon, which can only be obtained by completing her DLC missions. B-rank accuracy, 20 shots per attack, and the range of a sniper rifle. It turns Rosie (or any of the other shocktroopers if you give it to them) into a One-Man Army.
  • Informed Ability: Welkin's supposed to be a genius, large and in charge, but there are places where the story doesn't bear that out. The one time he's pressed for a solution to a major crisis, he flubs it, and when the problem is solved by means he doesn't like, he can't offer a better solution or argue with the logic behind it and just punches the guy who did it. Deducing that a river is shallower where plants are growing out of it is more common sense than knowledge, and Isara's death occurs because Welkin gives the orders to break formation and start repairs on the tanks without securing the area or posting watch. Downplayed in that, canonically, EVERY mission Squad 7 has undertaken was in one way or another difficult to the point of suicidal. Despite that, Welkin manages to pull it off every with some ingenious tactics.
  • Injured Player Character Stage: In the Trapped Behind Enemy Lines mission that follows the successful defense of desert Valkyrur ruins, Alicia's leg is injured, her movement animation is that of limping, and her maximum movement per turn is penalized greatly. The map has several spots with wild herbs, which can be used for injury treatment, effectively reducing the penalty.
  • Insurmountable Waist-Height Fence: Not everywhere, but particularly bridge handrails. Kinda subverted: while Snipers can easily shoot over them, Lancers apparently can't (because they're literally waist-height; a sniper rifle is held to the shoulder, and snipers don't crouch in this game unless they're in grass — but lancers hold their lances near the hip.)
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Completely inverted, enemies are FAR more accurate than you are.
  • Interface Spoiler:
    • When you first meet Rosie, she's prejudiced against Darcsens, but doesn't have the "Darcsen Hater" potential, hinting that she'll get over her prejudice eventually. In fact, she later unlocks a potential that's virtually the exact opposite.
    • In Book Mode, cutscenes are displayed as a greyed-out still of the scene, which are colored after you watch them. But it's often easy to guess the content of the scene from the still:most egregiously, one in Chapter 11 shows the main characters looking very sad, with one member of the group suspiciously absent...
    • Also, Alicia in the center of a sniper crosshair makes for one anxious approach to the episode.
    • The early episode where you receive your father's legacy has the image of a large tank on it, thus ruining the surprise.
    • In a meta sense, the name of the game is Valkyria Chronicles. Were you really surprised when someone turned out to be a Valkyria? Additionally, lots of promo and marking images spoil the surprises for both of the Valkyrias.
  • Internalized Categorism: Alicia's character arc, in a nutshell. Her thoughts on her Valkyria powers are only informed from the most extremely negative outside sources. She ''is'' the nail that sticks up. And in the end, she hammers herself back down to earth.
  • Interservice Rivalry: There is a lot of friction between the soldiers of the militia and the high echelon officers of the regular military.
  • Istanbul (Not Constantinople): While we really only see three political entities, the continent of Europa seems to have a lot of countries loosely corresponding to real life countries that are allied to either one of two political alliances. Europa is of course, an alternate name for Europe in real life, while Gallia is named after the historical region of the Gauls.
  • It's Up to You: Subverted. Squad 7's exploits are part of the wider war effort. Those very exploits as well as Welkin's background, however make them increasingly prominent, eventually becoming Gallia's last hope against Maximilian.
  • I Want My Mommy!: A dramatic variation, after being separated from the rest of Squad 7, Alicia and Welkin come across a mortally wounded Imperial Soldier named Fritz, crying out for his mother. Alicia, in sympathy and compassion, comforts the young man in his dying moments, pretending to be the delirious Fritz's mother and staying with him till the end.
  • Jerkass:
  • General Damon, who views the militia as expendable cannon fodder, uses illegal weapons and claims all the credit for things he wasn't remotely responsible for.
  • Cezary. At one point in the manga he is shown telling Oscar not to give the Darcsens fighting alongside them backup (thankfully Oscar refuse to obey him) and lets an Imperial Sniper take aim at Nadine without bothering to help, and she probably would've been shot if Marina hadn't killed the sniper before he had the chance. Cezary is considered such a Jerkass that he's often portrayed as a downright evil character, or even a traitor, in fanfictions. Ironically, the only person that does like Cezary in the manga is not other than Nadine herself, who mistook Cezary as the one who saved her from the Imperial Sniper.
  • Theold, although he apparently gets better after the war, when he falls in love.
  • Jiggle Physics: Used extensively with Selvaria's breasts. Other characters utilize it as well, but it's mostly limited to their hair. Alicia's pigtails sway back and forth when she moves.
  • Jumped at the Call: When Isara dies, Kries instantly volunteers as the Edelweiss's pilot to honor her memory. He proves just as skilled and courageous as her, and Welkin is honored to have him in her place.
  • Karmic Death: Most of the morally corrupt characters on both sides suffer a well-deserved demise. When not literally it comes symbolically, through loss of status or motivation.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • In Selvaria's side chapter, Damon kicks the dog when he uses poisonous ragnite gas against the Imperials even though both sides are under a treaty that specifically forbids the use of such weapons. Not only that, but after he loses the battle, Damon covers for his failure by accusing the Imperials of illegally using chemical/biological weapons!
    • Your very first encounter with Imperial troops starts with them gunning down unarmed fleeing civilians.
  • Killed Off for Real:
    • Isara is shot by a sniper at the end of chapter 11.
    • If any of your soldiers are downed in combat and are not rescued before an enemy soldier touches them, you lose them permanently. Except for plot-critical characters who will "retreat" instead, despite the fact that they were unconscious seconds before and have an enemy standing over them. In battle, if Alicia, Largo or Rosie "retreat" from battle, they cannot be summoned back.
  • Land Mine Goes "Click!": Not a noise you want to hear - the only units that won't be immediately caught in a fiery explosion after that click are the engineers, the only ones capable of disarming them. Sustaining the trope, the mine never blows up until you step/roll off of it. If you end turn as soon as you hear the click, an engineer can still disarm the mine.
  • Law of Inverse Recoil: The degree of steadiness with which Shocktroopers can hold the Ruhm beggars belief. However, the high recoil exhibited by Lancers (in comparison with real life RPGs, which have little to no recoil) can actually be explained - the lances do not have a rear exhaust for the back blast, so recoil is expected.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Cezary's profile reveals that he loses his cynical nature after falling out of a tree following the end of the war.
    • The corrupt General who mistreated Squad 7 throughout the story tries to steal the credit for conquering Ghirlandaio and taking Selvaria prison. He and the rest of his men end of being vaporized when Selvaria uses the Valkyria's final flame.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: Imperial rifles, machine guns, and sniper rifles are all much more powerful than their Gallian counterparts, with the best captured rifles and machine guns putting out around twice the damage of the most powerful Gallian weapons in their class at the cost of having about half the range and accuracy. Imperial lances however, are much weaker than Gallian lances to the point that they may not be able to bring down late-game tanks with a single radiator shot, but they are by far the most accurate, and in the case of the VB PL X3(g), longest-ranged lances.
  • Let's Fight Like Gentlemen: The last ever fight you have against Selvaria has her pick up a normal rifle and not use her Valkyur powers.
  • Lighter and Softer: Despite the fact that Anyone Can Die and that virtually every horrible war-related trope comes into play, the whimsical art style and the numerous light-hearted moments manage to make this a lot less depressing than most war stories. Averted in the manga, which is brutal.
  • Light Is Not Good:
    • Don't assume the Atlantic Federation are your allies just because they have a brightly-colored flag and are fighting against the Imperials, they're just as eager to take over Gallia.
    • Selvaria uses the power of the Valkyrur against her enemies. Then it turns out that the entirety of the Valkyrur were assholes to begin with.
  • Limited Advancement Opportunities: Apart from Welkin and Alicia getting promoted from militia inductee to 2nd Lieutenant and Sergeant, respectively (Which is due entirely to their education levels), nobody gets promoted over the course of the war. Given the horrific casualties that are suffered over the course of the war, you'd think that Welkin and Varrot would warrant a battlefield promotion or two for their achievements, but the subject never even gets brought up. Made even more apparent given how both seem to be commanding forces way above their grade already.
  • Little Hero, Big War: The Gallian conflict is a small part of the second Europan War. The Empire and the Federation are still at war with each other after Gallia drives out the fragment that invaded them, having convinced them that it's not worth it.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Squad 7 has about 50 characters in its roster that you can choose from, and there are even more story-important characters. The games in the franchise border on Suikoden levels.
  • Logical Weakness: While the armor plating on Jaeger's tank offers more protection, the weight slows it considerably. Obscuring the radiator protects it from harm but makes it a lot easier to overheat, requiring support camps to deal with it.
  • Lost Superweapon: The Valkof is completely hidden in the guise of a castle Spire in Gallia despite having the potential to raze entire nations.
  • Love Martyr: Selvaria to Maximilian, although she has little, if any, interest about changing him.
  • Lower-Deck Episode: The downloadable chapters featuring Selvaria are focused around Johann, an Imperial soldier who is saved from mook status by the fact that he is assigned to be Selvaria's personal aide. Selvaria's personality is expanded upon through Johann's experiences with her.
  • Low Fantasy: The land is dotted with Precursor ruins, and a few women still have traces of their ancestry in their blood and thus the potential to be able to use their technology and become One Woman Armies. But apart from that, the game's setting is something resembling Europe circa 1940, with different borders and armies: most fighting is done by infantry with rifles and tanks are starting to become a dominant force on the battlefield.
  • Luck-Based Mission: Minor example — it is possible to beat the final boss in one turn if you Google up the correct strategy and get lucky with the Potential that sometimes allows certain characters to make extra attacks.
  • Lull Destruction: Utilized in the English dub, usually when the camera looks elsewhere (though occasionally when the speaker's noticeably unmoving lips are visible).
  • Luminescent Blush: Let's see here. Japanese RPG: check. Anime-style: double check. Romance plot: check, check, check. Nope. No reason not to see this trope in it.
  • Magikarp Power: Top-rank Engineers. Unlike the other non-Lancer classes they need to be fully maxed to get their final Battle/Class Potential. The same Potential that makes Lynn one of, if not the, strongest Shocktrooper (Hard Worker, letting her occasionally have two actions in a turn) is unlocked as shared trait for all Engineers. Give them the same killer Rifles you'd give a Scout, and suddenly they jump from a mediocre support unit to something halfway between a Shocktrooper in deadliness and a Scout in speed and range.
    • Snipers are the worst class in the game to start with. Abysmal AP and health, can only fire once per attack (and like Lancers their basic weapon has limited ammo,) and their accuracy is so bad that they aren't really worth using most of the time (meanwhile, enemy snipers can effortlessly headshot your units from across the map even in their earliest appearance.) Take the time to level them up and give them decent weapons, as well as pairing them up with an Engineer to keep their ammo replenished and taking care to position them near sniper nests, and they become death on legs and every bit as dangerous as the aforementioned CPU snipers.
  • Magitek: Downplayed. Ragnite does have peculiar properties that enhance those with Valkyrur blood, but is otherwise a mineral and fuel source vital to industrial civilization.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: Edy and Homer in Edy's DLC. Homer is a frail masochistic boy, taking sublime pleasure in every punch and kick Edy sends his way, while Edy is an aggressive woman.
  • Medal of Dishonor:
    • There is the Crimson Heart, which requires you to rescue one of your downed soldiers (like the real-life Purple Heart), but a bigger example would be the Splintered Horn, which requires a member of your unit to die permanently during combat (Not saved by a medic in three turns or has an enemy soldier touch their unconscious form).
    • The player will most likely develop a retinue of troops they always use and couldn't bear to be without, so for 100% completionists they have to look at their roster, decide which of their unused men they like least, put them in a battle, control them by hand into enemy fire, and sit there for three turns (more than enough to save them) while they lay there dying, before listening to their final words. Or, even worse, leave them in the path of the Marmota - when they get run over, there's no coming back from that.
  • Medieval European Fantasy: Played with. A good chunk of the aesthetics, whether it's Gallia's castles or the lance-shaped rocket-propelled grenades, suggests that this is what happens when this trope is put on fast-forward. Meanwhile, ragnite is a fuel source vital for industrial civilization that would otherwise be a mystic ore in some other fantasy setting.
  • The Medic: When one of your soldiers is down and another one manages to get to him on time, the cute little medic will pop up to get them back in shape!
  • The Men First: Welkin's first priority in every single mission, beyond its completion, is the safety of his soldiers.
  • Metaphorgotten
    Largo: Vegetables are like bombs packed tight with all kinds of important nutrients! Kids gotta eat 'em to grow up right... and the body's practically made of vegetables!
    Rosie: Which are like bombs...?
  • Mighty Glacier: Lancers; they're great against tanks and can weather most incoming fire like it's nothing. Unfortunately they have trouble keeping up with everyone else.
  • Mildly Military: The Gallians in general. Early in the game Captain Varrot gets away with calling a general a lousy soldier to his face with not much more than an angry "HEY!". A chapter later Rosie and Largo are openly insubordinate to their commanding officer and also get away with it.
  • Military Mashup Machine: The Marmota. Think "Battleship on wheels" or "insanely armed and armored hovercraft". The Weaponry tab even states that it was a joint creation effort between the Imperial army and navy.
  • Military Maverick: Welkin usually comes up with incredibly unorthodox strategies to win his battles, such as instead of normally sieging the occupied bridge for an operation, he instead asks Isara to waterpoof the Edelweiss so he can drive it under the river to the other side for a suprise attack, which works. Varrot also embodies this trope to some extent.
  • Mistaken for Spies: The first thing that happens to Welkin upon his hometown to Bruhl is that he gets arrested by Alicia after being spotted sketching the wildlife, mistaking this as collecting intel for the Imperials. This gets cleared up when Isara finds out.
  • Money for Nothing: Money is rewarded for successfully completing missions and skirmishes, but the number of upgrades is finite at any given moment. Thus, you're likely to find yourself up to your eyeballs in unspendable ducats by the mid-game, particularly if you play a lot of skirmishes for Level Grinding.
  • Mook Horror Show: The victory cutscene of the chapter 4 battle has the heroes raising a drawbridge underneath an Imperial armor company. There's shots of the enemy tanks scrabbling to stay on the bridge and an infantryman hanging onto the bridge for dear life before the slope becomes too steep and they fall off.
  • Mook Maker: Enemy camps. In later stages, they'll spawn one unit per camp every turn, on average, if not always (thankfully, they cannot spawn tanks). Though this can be a double-edged sword: spawning a unit takes two turns, one to summon the unit and one for it to appear. If the camp is taken before the unit appears, the CP spent to summon the unit will have been wasted.
  • Morality Pet: Selvaria appears to be this to Maximilian for much of the story. His respect and kindness toward her are the primary signs that he's not all bad, especially once it's revealed that he saved her from an agonizing life as a scientific test subject. However, this ultimately gets subverted near the end of the game, as he decides that she needs to take the "I value you more than my life" thing more literally.
  • More Dakka: The Stormtroopers employ machine guns that can fire up to 35 shots at a time.
  • Multi Form Balance: Both the Shamrock and fully upgraded Edelweiss can be switched between different configurations between missions. The Shamrock can swap its main gun between a snub version of the standard cannon, a heavy flamer and a Gatling gun. The Edelweiss, meanwhile, gets more radically altered Max Gun form (self explanatory), Max Armor form (ditto) and Max Body form (which is basically a beefed up version of the non-upgraded form).
  • Mundane Made Awesome: The actual premise of the game is you reading a history book about the events of EW2.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: The Imperial soldiers who used to make fun of the now-deceased Fritz for being a "momma's boy" realise how much of a Jerkass they were after finding out from Welkin and Alicia that he died.
  • Mystical White Hair: Selvaria and Alicia when their Valkyria powers are active. Edy as well, although hers is a darker silver and it doesn't come from being a Vakyrur.

    N to Z 
  • A Nazi by Any Other Name: The Empire is both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in one. Led by an emperor.
  • New Game+: You get a bonus character during New Game Plus, some cut scenes are extended, and you can also unlock some exposition only chapters that would have been totally Spoileriffic if seen on the first play through.
  • Nicknaming the Enemy: Gallian troops sometimes call their Imperial enemies "imps", often as a pejorative. "Imp Hater" is a trait some soldiers have that grants them an accuracy boost when near enemies.
  • No Hero Discount: The game applies a variation of this in that, instead of buying better equipment for Squad 7, you pay the R&D fees to develop better equipment, which is then issued to them for no further charge.
  • No Name Given: The Medic, unless you know that she's a cameo character from one of the earlier games from the same developers. There are actually three medics who are all identical siblings. Their names are Fina, Hina, and Mina Sellers. More direct examples would be the Drill Instructor and the Aged Gentleman in the War Cemetery, though you can eventually get their names and bios after unlocking all the orders and leveling every class to level 20.
  • Non-Lethal K.O.: If a character in your squad reaches zero HP, then you have three turns to get a comrade to their position, in which case they will be "safely evacuated" by the Medic, and can rejoin the battle in a later turn. If you take too long, or an enemy reaches them first, then they will be unrecoverably dead.
  • Nonuniform Uniform:
    • If you look carefully, some of the characters, especially the main ones, have noticeable variations in their uniforms. Gallia's military has a rather relaxed dress code for the Militia. Because they're all volunteers, and not part of the official army, nobody really cares much about personal effects. Alicia and Yoko's kerchiefs in their hair, Jann's makeup, Edy's matching camo bows in her hair, Rosie's earrings, Walter's sunglasses, Isara's shawl, etc.
    • In the game's artbook, the character designer refers to this trope (from his end at least) as a "believable lie": How to give characters distinctive appearances while maintaining some semblance of military decorum.
  • No Ontological Inertia: Any mission ends in success the moment the main objective is completed, regardless of how many enemy troops or tanks are still alive or how nearly wiped out your team is. This is sometimes justified by the enemies (or your allies) retreating upon mission success, but there are numerous times when the enemy can appear to have the upper hand but still lose anyways if you just craftily occupy a certain critical base or something along those lines. This becomes most notable when going for top ranks, as winning as fast as possible often involves using a fragile scout to cross large amounts of territory while skirting around enemies that could kill them.
  • Normally, I Would Be Dead Now: You can still rescue squadmates even after they get shot in the face with a tank shell. With a little luck, tougher classes such as Lancers and Shocktroopers can even take a direct hit from an explosive round and get back up to return the favor. Also, running someone over with a tank does zero damage.
  • Oh, Crap!: Chapter 4, when Welkin's tank just appeared out of the water in front of two Imperial soldiers. Even though their faces can't be seen because of the helmets, their voices alone are just priceless. Hell, Alicia's reaction is basically this, even though the tank is on her side!
  • Old Soldier: While most of Squad 7 are teenagers, you get the odd one of these. Largo is the most prominent example and he has the personality of one, even going so far as to initially view Welkin as New Meat and refuse to take orders from him. Other Old Soldier squad members include Musaad, Catherine and Wavy. The king of this trope, however, is Coby: the previously listed characters are mostly in their 30's and 40's, but Coby is 65 years old and still out kicking ass and taking names.
  • One-Hit Kill: Unless a unit is crouching behind cover, or just has an absurd amount of HP and/or defense, one headshot from a sniper is enough to kill them. One solid hit to a tank's radiator (again, discounting powerful boss tanks) with a tank gun or a lancer rocket is similarly enough to waste it in one shot, and endgame Lancers with the Ultimate Anti-Armor potential don't even need to hit the radiator to destroy most tanks in one hit.
  • One-Man Army: Selvaria is very powerful even without her Valkyria powers. It can also be played straight if you use one character almost exclusively throughout the mission.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted in a small example. Faldio shares his surname, Landzaat, with Karl, but the two appears to be completely unrelated.
  • Only One Name:
    • Darcsens do not have last names, as part of the punishment by the Valkyrur since ancient times. Isara is an exception because she's adopted.
    • Averted by the cameos from Skies of Arcadia, even though the original plays them straight. Vyse and Aika were given the last names of Inglebard and Thompson, respectively.
  • Optional Party Member: Technically, this applies to all of the game's recruitable soldiers.
  • Orange/Blue Contrast: The orange flames of war contrasting with the Valkyria's Ragnite-induced blue flames.
  • Pause Scumming: The unit you are controlling, (and only the unit you are controlling) will be exposed to suppression fire, whether he or she is stationary, behind cover, or moving. However, enemies will mysteriously cease fire the moment you take aim. This leads to one or two different playstyles. The player will usually either run fast, shoot, and stop controlling the character; or walk, aim, walk, aim, walk, aim.... That second option isn't always a viable tactic, as many enemies will continue to fire until they empty their magazine, or the camera finishes switching to aim mode, whichever comes first. The PC version makes this tactic nonviable as interception fire by enemies has been changed such that every single enemy will be able to still get shots off at you during the transition into aiming mode.
  • Pendulum War: In the absence of Squad 7, the rest of the Gallian military doesn't seem to be able to achieve much of anything and generally get their butts handed to them by the Empire. However, once Squad 7 arrives on the field, expect to see Imperials flying across the Gallian-Imperial border in droves.
  • Peninsula of Power Leveling:
    • The Windmill Plaza skirmish can be consistently completed in a single phase to rake in large amounts of xp and money, even just on Normal difficulty. Good for starting off, until you tackle...
    • Susie's Skirmish mission. While it is DLC, this fairly short skirmish has only 8 enemy scouts to kill, including an ace scout. Beating the mission, even with a D rank, guarantees at least 23000 XP. An A-rank gives you over 60000 XP and 120000 ducat. A-rank requires beating it within 8 turns, and can be completed in as little as 3. With enough farming, you can level up all 5 classes to 20 as soon as the Skirmish tab opens up to you shortly after the start of the game. The Ace soldier also provides a ZM Mk.8 rifle for scouts to use. It provides a significant attack boost in exchange for shortened range. The trade-off is worth it, considering it can waste enemy tanks in a single volley to the radiator (weak point).
  • Permanently Missable Content: Killing enemy aces is rewarded with new weapons. Outside of the DLC missions, they only appear in non-repeatable missions, often with nothing to indicate that they're there to be defeated. Thankfully, missions are repeatable in New Game+, and many of the earliest enemy weapons are Awesome, but Impractical if not outright obsolete thanks to the DLC missions dropping the highest-ranking ones.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: The Valkyrians, descendants of the Valkyrur. Selvaria is capable of single-handedly turning the tide of an entire battle in her Valkyria form. And then there's the Valkyria's final flame, which practically turns her into a walking nuclear bomb.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • An unnamed Imperial officer lets Welkin and Alicia go after finding out that they tried (but failed) to save one of his dying subordinates and gave him a proper burial.
    • One major mission Captain Varrot sends Squad 7 on is to take back Bruhl. After Isara's death, she practically begged her superiors to let her try to take back Welkin's hometown to get Squad 7's spirits up.
  • Power Trio: Hannes (Id), Oscar (Superego) and Jane (Ego)
  • Player Mooks: More of a Take That, Audience! than anything else, but if the player loses enough squad members permanently, they get replaced with an endless series of faceless, one-size-fits-all mooks.
  • Plotline Death: Isara. And later, Selvaria. Gregor too, but everyone hates him anyway.
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality: Selvaria is a terrifying enemy until we find out Alicia's a Valkyria too. She becomes more sympathetic as the story goes on because of that kinship, and the story makes it pretty clear that her suicide is a tragedy, but the thousands of Gallian soldiers she wiped out with her final flame had it coming.
  • Punch-Clock Villain:
    • Not all Imperial soldiers are Magnificent Bastards or Jerkasses. A large majority of them are just regular joes just like the Gallians and this fact is heavily emphasized during one of the game's chapters and the Selvaria DLC.
    • Radi Jaeger has signs of this, as he's only fighting for the Empire to free his homeland. He is easily the most likable of the villains, as even the otherwise sympathetic Selvaria is truly dedicated to the Empire's cause.
    • On the Selvaria DLC, several of the random mooks in your squad are prominent Aces... and Fritz, that one mook from the cabin.
  • Putting on the Reich: Both Gallia and the Empire have varying degrees of this. For example, Gallians persecute the Darcsens. On the other hand, the Empire is a mix between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union with a bit of Romanov Russia thrown in for good measure. In the Empire, Darcsens captured in Gallia are sent to death camps/concentration camps to work under inhumane conditions. Partially averted in Valkyria Chronicles III, which occurs simultaneous with Valkyria Chronicles.
  • Pyrrhic Victory: Chapter 11 ends with Squad 7 succeeding their objective of taking the enemy base, but shortly after, Isara is killed by an Imperial rifle shot, which deals an emotional blow to Squad 7, rendering the victory fruitless.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: The Gallia Militia in general, with Squad 7 standing out moreso.
  • Reality Ensues: When Welkin confronts Faldio after discovering that he shot Felicia to awaken her Valkyrian powers, they are both sent to the brig by Captain Varrot for getting into a physical altercation.
  • Really Dead Montage: As if they couldn't hammer home Isara's death enough. Rosie even sings through the entire montage.
  • Recurring Boss: The aptly named "Ty the Immortal" is a recurring Ace enemy unit.
    • Ozwald may count as one as well. There are a series of ace scouts (two in the main game, and three in various DLC maps) all named "Ozwald the X", where the X is a different metal for each appearance.
  • Red Baron: Various characters have names attached to them, most noticeably the enemy aces. They have monikers like "the Iron", "the Immortal", "the Heavy". The Selvaria DLC showed that Musaad was in the military with the name "the Mole", which he apparently had since the previous war. Also, according to her bio at the end of the game, Jane, in addition to becomming a drill instructor is referred to as "Sadistic Jane" with reverence.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: All activated Valkyria appear to have red eyes, though it seems to be Selvaria's natural eye color.
  • Redemption Equals Death:
    • Faldio seeks redemption from shooting Alicia by protecting her and Welkin from Maximilliam, giving up on his own life to simultaneously kill the emperor and destroy the Marmota.
    • Somewhat inverted in the case of Rosie, who got her own personal redemption via the death of another person.
  • Required Party Member:
    • Welkin and the Edelweiss tank are always required for battles, due to him serving as the commander of Squad 7. Even when the Edelweiss is out of commission for story reasons, Welkin is still around as an on-foot Scout.
    • Other party member requirements vary based on the mission, with Alicia being very common due to her role in the story, though Largo and Rosie are frequently required as well.
  • Rescue Romance: Welkin and Alicia don't resolve their relationship until he prevents her from committing suicide.
  • Rewarded as a Traitor Deserves: In an attempt to seize control of the Gallian throne, Borg makes a deal to surrender Cordelia to Maximillian. The emperor responds by mocking him, asking why anyone would trust a man who was willing to betray his own country, and promptly orders the Prime Minister's execution.
  • Save Scumming: You can save before battles. You can save between turns in a battle. You can save between moves in a turn. If you can't go back and try something again, then it is not the game's fault.
  • Schizo Tech: Varies widely between pre-WW and post-WW2 tech. Firearms technology is late-WW2 tech, with the standard infantry rifles of all sides being semi-automatic rifles (Gallia's is roughly based on the Gewehr 43). Airplane technology is pre-WW1. Tanks are inter-war tech, roughly. Tactics vary as well, with The Empire using a classic blitzkrieg but then also using WW1-era trench warfare.
  • Secret Character: There are five (one per class): Musaad (Scout), Lynn (Shocktrooper), Audrey (Lancer), Knute (Engineer), and Emile (Sniper). They only get unlocked by certain means, two of which involve certain characters getting KO'ed.
  • Seen It All: Largo and Rosie get this way really quick.
    Rosie: "Yeah, you sorta get used to this."
    Largo: "Huh.....so it really is a giant land battleship."
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism: The Marmota has a self-destruction mechanism on it, which Maximilian triggered when he was defeated. Because it had the Valkof on it, the resulting explosion is comparable to a mini-Valkyrian final flame.
  • Senseless Sacrifice: Attempted by Alicia when she attempts to destroy the Marmota. Deterred by Welkin's proposal.
  • Sensible Heroes, Skimpy Villains: Selvaria's outfit doesn't show a huge amount of skin (mostly on her back), but it's sexualised in a way that Alicia's isn't — Alicia could be wearing any amount of underwear beneath her jacket, Selvaria is clearly wearing none beneath hers.
  • Shed Armor, Gain Speed: Played with and justified. Once the extra armor on Jaeger's tank is destroyed it becomes considerably faster and mobile. This is due to the loss of the extra weight and it being able to move its regular speed, rather than losing all its armor.
  • Short-Range Long-Range Weapon: Gunfights in Valkyria Chronicles tend to take place at extremely close ranges, particularly in the early game when everyone's accuracy is fairly low. Most of the hidden weapons acquired by beating aces sacrifice range for power, making them even more short-ranged.
  • Small Girl, Big Gun: Most female Lancers are this, walking around with a weapon that's usually longer than they are tall. Applies to Aisha too, the 12-year-old Shocktrooper later on, where she can hold something about the size of a typical light-machine gun, or if you get the Ruhm via DLC.
  • Smug Snake: Prime Minister Borg. He tries to come up with dastardly plots, but all end up horribly backfiring on him to the point where the Big Bad knows that keeping him around as an ally wouldn't be good in the long run and orders his execution.
  • Sniper Duel: Usually the best way to dispatch an enemy sniper is with another sniper (especially in certain missions where they're perched on an unreachable sniper nest where snipers are the only units that can hit them.) Cezary even has a potential that gives him increased attack power against enemy snipers.
  • Sociopathic Soldier:
    • Jane. One of her potentials describes her as a sadist, and her Catchphrase when it activates does not help at all, nor does the fact that the animation shows her rubbing her face in something close to ecstasy.
    • When you first recruit Wendy, she says "Ha ha...kaboom! Ha ha..." According to the biographical material, she accidentally blew up her house making homemade explosives before joining the militia.
    Wendy: "Hehe, I upped the power!" "I seeeee yoooou!" "Here I coooommmme!"
    • Marina is initially implied to be a silent version this but is averted in the fact that she is not sociopathic but just extremely anti-social.
  • So Proud of You: Drill Sergeant Nasty gets teary-eyed and genuinely compliments the squad when every class reaches level 20.
    • He also offers genuine congratulations when each class reaches Elite status.
  • Splash Damage: Grenades deal splash damage, which makes them one of the only weapons that can easily hit more than one target. Their main use, however, is taking out sandbags so you can get headshots on the exposed troops. Strangely, standing right next to an exploding tank does not inflict splash damage.
  • Standard Evil Empire Hierarchy:
    • The Emperor: Prince Maximiliannote 
    • The Right Hand: Selvaria Bles
    • The General: Berthold Gregor
    • The Guard: Giorgios Geld
    • The Evil Counterpart: The Enemy Aces
    • The Oddball: Radi Jaeger
  • Stealth-Based Mission:
    • The first operation of Chapter 8, where Welkin and Alicia must dodge Imperial troops and make it to the other side of a forest at night.
    • The Bonus Report "Largo's Passion" tries to be this but fails — it's too easy to attack it head-on.
    • The side chapter "What Lies Beyond Hate" is a straighter version, as the mission fails instantly if your units are sighted at the end of your phase.
  • Storming the Beaches:
    • In chapter 3, the squad is ordered to recapture the Vasel Bridge. Instead of making a suicidal frontal assault, Welkin waterproofs the Edelweiss and drives across the river to secure a beachhead while the rest of the squad follows in boats.
    • In chapter 11, Gallian forces make a landing at Marberry to help secure the northern industrial region. Squad 7's landing zone is defended by several indestructible machine gun towers in addition to trenches, pillboxes, and multiple tanks. Isara's new smoke rounds for the Edelweiss prove vital for survival.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: In case grenades, grenade launchers, lance-shaped rocket launchers, and tank mortars weren't enough for you, there are also bunkers with ragnite bins behind them. Explosions beget bigger explosions!
  • Suicide Mission: Squad 7 are frequently sent into high-risk missions by General Damon, who has nothing but contempt for the militia forces and gladly sends them off to die so that members of the regular army don't have to. Fortunately, Squad 7's specialty just so happens to be insane suicide missions.
  • Super Prototype: The Edelweiss was built as a one-off for Welkin's father, but was actually submitted to Gallian High Command for evaluation. It was declared an excellent medium tank, but since it was hideously expensive to produce it never went into mass prodiction.
  • Surprisingly Elite Cannon Fodder: After establishing themselves as a Badass Army, half the missions Squad 7 gets sent on are insanely dangerous suicide missions, courtesy of a jealous General Damon.
  • Taking You with Me:
    • Selvaria took down the whole Gallian army, save the militia, in her final effort.
    • Alicia attempts to do the same to Maximilian and the Marmota, but Welkin stopped her before she could actually do it.
    • Kinda subverted when Faldio took down Maximilian together with him, since this is more of an atonement/apology than a desperate effort. Maximilian, on the other hand, was trying to invoke the trope himself at the time.
  • Team Mom: Welkin sees Alicia this way. Also helps that one of Alicia's abilities is called 'Maternal.'
  • Team Pet: Hans, the insufferably cutesy winged pig.
  • That Woman Is Dead: Alicia feels this way about being Valkyria. She's convinced otherwise.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: Using mortars to kill scouts or engineers, using anti-tank lances to kill anyone but tanks...
  • This Cannot Be!: General Gregor dies shouting about how his train is invincible. Too bad that the bridge the train was on wasn't.
  • Timed Mission:
    • Most missions will be automatically failed if you take more than 20 turns. A few have a tighter limit.
    • As detailed in Gameplay Grading, above, completing missions faster leads to better rewards.
  • Toilet Humour: Welkin investigates what Alicia at first takes to be seeds, but...
    Welkin: Alicia, hold on to these for me, will you?
    Alicia: Sure Welkin. What are these? Some kind of nuts?
    Welkin: No, actually they're longbeard goat droppings.
    Alicia: Ahhh! Gross! You made me hold poo? Are you crazy?! *Throws them to the ground*
    • The look on Alicia's face afterwards just makes it funnier.
  • Too Good for This Sinful Earth: Isara, the adorable Shrinking Violet who is a target for prejudice amongst her squad members and wishes for nothing more than Welkin's happiness, is shot dead halfway through the game.
  • Trapped Behind Enemy Lines: One of the chapters is based on this, where Welkin and Alicia are cut off from their squad during an ambush and spend two missions trying to reunite with them, the Edy Detachment dlc is also based on this premise.
  • Trial-and-Error Gameplay: A skilled player can beat most battles on their first try. However, the game rewards you for winning quickly, and you are unlikely to get the best result on your first try.
    • Chapter 14 is particularly bad about this: The briefing says your mission is to capture the enemy camp, but nothing even remotely hints that, when you do capture it two giant tanks appear from the top and bottom of the map, and your objective now is to destroy both of them. If you left your Anti-Tank units behind, or worse, gave the Shamrock one of the antipersonnel turrets, you're screwed.
    • There's also Chapter 13, where the safest path to the enemy base camp is blocked off by a minefield. If you forgot to bring an Engineer, who can disarm mines, you either have to waste a turn or two bringing one in, or make a risky frontal assault where even the best route in will leave your squad more vulnerable to the Shocktroopers guarding the camp and be exposed, even if briefly, to the enemy tank's mounted machine gun. The primary minefield between Naggiar's trenches is at least forewarned by Garrot as a relic of the last war.
    • While purely optional content, the first Hard Skirmish is particularly rough, as you start surrounded on three sides by various overpowered anti-infantry weapons (including multiple machine guns breathing down your neck immediately) and support mortar fire. Just to rub salt on the wound; the A Rank turn limit? One turn. On the one hand, the enemy base camp (which capturing is the win condition) is extremely close. On the other, unless you remember a very specific aspect of one unit's abilities, good luck.
  • Tsurime Eyes: Several of the women, though Varrot is the most obvious of them.
  • Unexplained Recovery: If you can rescue your fallen soldiers with the medic, you can bring them back into combat in the same battle using a base. It doesn't matter if they got shot in the head, blown up with a grenade, or blasted to smithereens by a tank shell. They get better (and fast!).
  • Unlucky Childhood Friend:
    • Juno has had a crush on Welkin since they went to university together, but her inability to spit it out leaves him completely unaware of her affections.
    • Noce for Alicia would qualify as well, though he instead tries to present his feelings in the form of a ballad and by the time he's finished Alicia's already been taken for.
  • The Uriah Gambit: General Damon begins to grow jealous as Squad 7's success, so he continually assigns them even more dangerous missions as Cannon Fodder in the hope that they'll get killed.
  • Valley Girl: Cherry is like, such a totally awesome example of this trope, and.. hey! Are you, like, listening?!
  • Verbal Tic: There are many of these to distinguish characters in the Japanese track. Hermes and his "-yo"s. Hannes likes to end his sentences with "-ssu" like a Prinny... Elysse doesn't really have one in particular, but talks slowly and drags out her words. (Maybe because she's a "Slow Starter?")
  • Unstable Equilibrium: You're rewarded with extra money, class xp, and eventually even powerful weapons for finishing missions quickly, which in turn allows you to field better weapons and units to finish other missions even more quickly. While skirmishes provide a means for grinding money and xp if you feel underpowered (though you're still out of luck if you miss special weapons), finishing main missions quickly can be a key component of performing well in future missions. It doesn't help that performance is ranked predominantly by number of turns, meaning that doing seemingly illogical things like keeping around certain units for extra command points without ever using them and prioritizing the main objective over killing enemies along the way or even saving allies before final death, can be the best way to play.
  • Urban Warfare: While many stages feature World War I-type trench warfare, there's also quite a few that happen in the ruins of cities, especially during the first chapters.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: Sometimes, your troopers are just too darn adorable! Really! You will go to save your squad members when they're downed.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
    • You can send units you don't like on suicide missions deliberately.
    • You can run your own soldiers over with your tank. It won't harm them at all, and you get to hear their hilarious reaction to being hit by a tank. Better yet, it's entirely possible to use this to your advantage - knocking units around with the tank while they're on an armed landmine will toss them safely away.
    • You can even use your soldiers to provide cover for other soldiers; yes, interception fire will hit another soldier if you hide your "active" soldier behind one. In certain cases, you can actually use this to your advantage against the AI. You Bastard!.
  • Villain Episode: One of the DLC packs includes chapters that are focused around Selvaria and the Imperial army.
  • Wave Motion Gun: The Valkyria's ultimate weapon, Valkof, is essentially a gigantic laser cannon capable of blowing up mountains. On a smaller scale, the Valkyrian lance.
  • Weak, but Skilled: Engineers; sure, they have bugger-all health, but the fact they can move almost as far as scouts, defuse mines (even after stepping on one), refill any unit's ammo to full just by touching them, carry three grenades as opposed to one, use healing items that are twice as effective, and are the only ones capable of fixing your tank(s) make them one of the most versatile units around. It's generally an unwritten rule to have at least one in your squad at all times.
  • We Cannot Go On Without You:
    • Welkin's death is a losing condition on pretty much every map in the game.
    • Alicia is subject to this on occasion as well.
  • We Do the Impossible: Pretty much Squad 7's motto. They are almost always given missions deemed suicidal, or at least ones the deemed unfit for the regular Gallian army to undertake. And despite the odds, they manage to succeed each time, or at the very least delay the enemy forces.
  • We Have Reserves: The Gallian Militia is almost always given the most suicidal missions with minimal support from the main army.
  • Welcome to Corneria: Each member of Squad 7 has two or three phrases for every type of action, and ambient radio chatter isn't much more varied. Be prepared to hear "MAN, GOTTA LOVE NATURE" every time Welkin gets near a tree.
  • We Will Meet Again: Played for Drama with the unnamed Imperial officer who lets Welkin and Alicia go after finding out they tried but failed to save his subordinate Fritz. He's afraid that if they do meet again, either side will have to try and kill the other. Thankfully, that's the last we see of him.
  • Wham Line:
    • After Alicia is hospitalised, Medic/Fina extracts the sniper's bullet that hit her. She and Welkin are horrified to find out that it's a Gallian bullet.
      • Shortly after, the possibility of an Imperial soldier concocting a Frame-Up by using a dropped Gallian sniper rifle is thrown out the window when it's then discovered that it was made by a top-secret experimental rifle, which got checked out by Faldio.
    • A less dramatic one occurs near the end of the game where Ms. Ellet announces to Squad 7 her plans to publish one last story under her maiden name before she loses it after getting married, then she’ll be known as Irene Koller, AKA: The narrator for the game and author of the book detailing what happened in EW2.
  • Wham Shot: When Welkin and Alicia are separated from Squad 7 and are resting in a cabin in the woods, an Imperial soldier walking in menacingly... then he flops to the floor with a huge wound on his back.
    • Princess Cordelia without her headdress, which hides the fact that she's not Valkyrur at all, but Darcsen.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: For all the main characters in the credits, and all the secondary characters in your squad when you completed the game in the Encyclopedia Exposita.
  • Whole Episode Flashback: "Signs of Awakening", a sidestory which takes place after the Battle of Barious and chronicles Faldio's discovery of Alicia's Healing Factor, the first step to discovering that she's a Valkyria, deliberately cannot be unlocked until several missions after it happens chronologically, when Alicia's Valkyria status is publically revealed, and one sidestory where Ellet discovers Cordelia's secret Darcsen heritage isn't unlockable until a New Game+ campaign.
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: Selvaria pulls off a masterful one. She makes a point of not activating her powers and then feigns exhaustion when Damon comes to capture her; it's a set-up that ends in the annihilation of the entire army. It's also one of the most obvious instances of Protagonist-Centered Morality in the game.
  • Written by the Winners: Everyone in Europa (or who studied Europan history) believed that the Darcsens were responsible for the calamity that affected the continent until the Valkyrur saved them. The real history, as recorded in the inner chamber of the desert ruins and to Princess Cordelia's knowledge, says that the Valkyrur are the actual invaders, while the Darcsens were framed as the culprits.
  • Writers Cannot Do Math: In the English release, the population of Gallia was named to be around 430,000. For a good comparison, that's a lower population than most large cities today. This is thankfully averted in the design archive, which gives Gallia a more realistic population of 4,320,000. Their army, despite its relatively small size of 30,000 can be excused, since Gallia also has a policy of armed neutrality and universal conscription, meaning that they can call up hundreds of thousands of militia troops in the event of invasion. Had the invasion gone against them they might have called up even more than the militia units seen in the game, plus Belgium (one of the Low Countries that Gallia is based on) has a regular army of around the same size.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Darcsens have either dark blue or dark purple hair. Dark-hair is a racial slur.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Maximilian does this to Selvaria when he realizes her Valkyria powers won't give his forces an advantage anymore. It may apply to Borg too, in a sense.
  • You Have Failed Me: Coincides with the above entry, as Maximilian also does this to Selvaria for losing a critical battle to the Gallians.
  • Zettai Ryouiki: Just about every Squad 7 girl who isn't in pants dresses in skirts and knee socks. This includes Alicia, Rosie, and Isara.


The Manga provides examples of:

     Manga Tropes 
  • Accidental Hero: Nadine mistakes Cezary as the one who saved her from an enemy sniper. But what really happened was that it was actually Marina who shot the sniper while Cezary was going to let it happen. He tries to explain the truth it to Nadine but Marina gives him a Death Glare to make him shut up and not talk about it.
  • Ascended Extra: All of the Militia members in the game get their own scenes or an extra role in the manga.
  • Bloodier and Gorier: Seeing people bleeding getting shot and injured in the manga makes the anime look like child's play. But nothing compares to seeing Alicia saving an injured farmer only to learn the other half of his body has been blown off.
  • Cliffhanger: Read Volume 3.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Welkin (again), even more so than in the anime or the game. Having forgotten that the schedule for a strategy meeting was changed, he went off to watch an ant colony and collect spotted leeches.
  • Darker and Edgier: See War Is Hell.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: "Mr. Merchant" during the attack on Bruhl, much to Alicia's horror as she pulls him from some rubble.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Cezary tells Nadine to stay with him to be safe during a battle in the forest. Whether it means he's becoming less of a jerk or really does have feelings for her is up for you to decide.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: Spoofed; during the vasel engagement Jane is shown charging towards the Imperial lines (much to Rosie's annoyance), frothing at the mouth and yelling obscenities whilst firing her machine gun...only to get clotheslined accidentally by Largo's anti-tank lance when he turns around to see what Jann wants.
  • Love Dodecahedron: Welkin might have feelings for Juno and Alicia and know his best friend Faldio has feelings for Alicia. Alicia has feelings for Welkin but feels conflicted because her good friend Juno has feelings for Welkin too which in turn makes Alicia fall for Welkin's best friend Faldio. Juno has feelings for Welkin but is unaware that her good friend Alicia also has feelings with Welkin too as she thinks Alicia has feelings for Faldio. Faldio has feelings for Alicia who may have feelings for him but feels conflicted as Welkin may have feelings for Alicia but Juno too.
  • The Rival: Edy's one-sided rivalry with Rosie is finally become two-sided with Rosie seeing Edy as an idiot attention seeker that might put the squad in danger.
  • Shown Their Work: The manga author averts doing Hollywood Tactics and instead did some research on WW2 and modern combat tactics and made most of the characters do accurate and practical battle tactics like giving covering fire, taking cover, snipers working in pairs using camouflage, teamwork, etc.
  • War Is Hell: The manga doesn't shy away from how war affects everyone from civilians to soldiers on both sides.

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