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  • Sabotage (2014) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $17,508,518. This was Arnold Schwarzenegger's worst opening weekend in thirty years. Its negative reviews citing its gratuitous violence and unlikable protagonists didn't help.
  • Sabrina (1995) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $53,672,080 (domestic), $87,313,761 (worldwide). This remake of the 1954 Billy Wilder classic got generally good reviews from critics, even if they didn't think it lived up to the original.
  • Safe (2012) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,142,080 (domestic), $40,346,186 (worldwide). This opened on sixth place on its first weekend and was buried by the The Avengers the next.
  • Safe Men (1998) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, $45,724. It only had a limited release spanning 20 theaters.
  • Sahara (1984) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,402,962. This was the last film MGM distributed for Cannon Films. It was mauled so badly by critics that it wasn't released east of the Mississippi. It was a Star-Derailing Role for Brooke Shields, who won a Razzie as Worst Supporting Actor (since her character disguises herself as a man).note 
  • Sahara (2005) — Budget, $241.1 million.note  Box office, $119,269,486. After a lawsuit from author Clive Cussler put several documents relating to the film's production into the public domain, the Los Angeles Times did a report using the film as a case study in Hollywood Accounting and production costs run amok (some of the said production costs were bribes to the Moroccan government to shoot there). This was the first time since Raise The Titanic! that Cussler had allowed a feature film based off his work to be made, and the fallout from its massive production effectively reinforced his stance against having his books adapted out, possibly permanently. Sahara was also a career-derailing directing job for Breck Eisner, son of Disney boss Michael Eisner, who did not do another cinematic film for 5 years and hasn't made an attempt to direct a big-budget tentpole movie of this magnitude since; his next tentpole would be The Last Witch Hunter 10 years later. Some of the producers and writers also saw their careers pushed to the caboose until The New 10's started rolling around.
  • Saint John Of Las Vegas (2010) — Budget, $3.8 million. Box office, $111,731. The first film by IndieVest Pictures was given a limited release and a very tepid reception from critics.
  • Salinger (2013) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $650,675. This documentary about J. D. Salinger had a very limited release, though it did get the highest per-screen-average at the box office on its opening weekend.
  • The Salton Sea (2002) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $764,554. D.J. Caruso's directorial debut topped out at 30 theaters and closed after seven weeks.
  • Salvador (1986) — Budget, $4.5 million. Box office, $1.5 million. This biopic of journalist Richard Boyle, who co-wrote the screenplay with director Oliver Stone, was a highly Acclaimed Flop, with particular praise going to James Woods' performance as Boyle. Stone rebounded that year with his Oscar-winning smash hit, Platoon.
  • Santa Claus: The Movie (1985) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $23,717,291. This movie was a setback to all the top players who were involved with it, with one, Leslie Newman, not writing another film until 2000. This movie did become a Cult Classic to some.
  • The Sasquatch Gang (2007) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,458. The film was only released in nine theaters and was pulled from all of them within a week.
  • Saturn 3 (1980) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9 million. This movie was released in the ultimate bad year for ITC Entertainment (it had a lot of underperforming films, of which Raise The Titanic was the biggest loss and killed the company). ITC boss Lew Grade presold TV rights to NBC for $4 million, which offset some of the film's losses.
  • Saving Silverman (2001) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $19,402,030 (domestic), $26,086,706 (worldwide). This was Jason Biggs's Star-Derailing Role and his only leading roles since this romantic comedy failed were in the American Pie sequels and Anything Else. He bounced back with Orange Is the New Black, though.
  • Say It Isn't So (2001) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $12,320,393. It was panned by critics and audiences so badly that it got booted out after five weeks. This was Fox's second consecutive flop after Monkeybone and it led to them taking a write-off for their losses.
  • The Scarlet Letter (1995) — Budget, $46 million. Box office, $10,382,407. The film was derided for adding sex and action scenes and changing the ending. Demi Moore didn't help by claiming "In truth, not very many people have read the book." This movie, along with Super Mario Bros, would begin producer Roland Joffe's drop into the B and then C-lists of producers/directors.
  • School For Scoundrels (2006) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $23,947,685. This remake of the 1960 British movie spent its first two weeks in over 3,000 theaters before most of them dropped it.
  • School Ties (1992) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $14,715,067.
  • Scorched (2002) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $8,000. It's an understandable gross considering the film played in 12 theaters and was booted out of theaters after its opening weekend. It didn't help that it sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years.
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. The World (2010) — Budget, $85–90 million ($60 million after tax rebates). Box office, $47,664,559. This box office bob-omb was mainly due to its targeted demographic of only teenagers and gamers who would get most of the jokes. Poor marketingnote , some Michael Cera fatigue, and coming in at the tail end of summer in 2010 didn't help it either.
  • Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse (2015) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $14.9 million. A victim of Paramount's choice to release the film near-simultaneously to VOD, resulting in major cinema chains like Regal and Cinemark to boycott the film. Director Christopher Landon later rebounded with Happy Death Day.
  • The Sea Of Trees (2016) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $20,444 (domestic), $825,577 (worldwide). This was booed out of the Cannes Film Festival the previous year and spent a while looking for a distributor. It was finally released in late August where audiences greeted it just the same.
  • Search And Destroy (1995) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $389,503. The first and only feature film directed by artist David Salle was given a paltry release of 22 theaters.
  • Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $7,266,383. Steven Zaillian's directorial debut was this biopic of chess prodigy Josh Waitzkin. It was an Acclaimed Flop that never left limited release. Zaillian had better luck that year with Schindler's List, though it took him five years to direct another feature, A Civil Action.
  • Second Hand Hearts (1981) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $19,450. Filmed in 1978 as a way for director Hal Ashby to keep busy in the period between making Coming Home and Being There, this quirky Romantic Comedy/Road Movie had a Troubled Production, then sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for three years before it got a limited release in very few theatres for the sole purpose of selling the TV rights. The film's critical and commercial failure marked the beginning of the end for Ashby after his remarkable run during The '70s.
  • The Second Jungle Book: Mowgli & Baloo (1997) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, $346,056. Its release topped out at 101 theaters and it didn't last long in them.
  • The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $58,236,838 (domestic), $188,133,322 (worldwide). This second film version of the James Thurber short story got mixed reviews from critics and suffered from a crowded holiday season. It still got by on its worldwide gross, though.
  • Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (2012) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $9,636,289. This comedy revolved around two people who meet Just Before the End and it does end. Critics and audiences consequently gave it mixed reviews for its Mood Whiplash and Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy.
  • Seeking Justice (2011, 2012) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $411,746 (domestic), $12,355,798 (worldwide). Lasted three weeks in theaters, with an 87% average drop between weeks and losing all but 8 theaters, before it was thrown out of those theaters. One of a handful of bombs in The New '10s for Nicolas Cage.
  • The Seeker: The Dark Is Rising (2007) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $31,400,740. This In Name Only adaptation of The Dark Is Rising had the second worst debut for a wide release movie and lost nearly all of its theaters by its third weekend. The director and screenwriter, both of whom freely admitted they did not care for the book, saw their careers cast off the big screen after this fiasco. Naturally, this was despised by both the books' fans and Susan Cooper, the author of the book series.
  • Self/Less (2015) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $12,279,691 (domestic), $30,523,226 (worldwide). This was the second release by the newly-resurrected Gramercy Pictures, which became a specialty label for Focus Features. Its financial and critical takedown guaranteed it a run of seven weeks.
  • Semi-Pro (2008) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $43,884,904. This is the last movie from standalone New Line Cinema, who were absorbed into Warner after The Golden Compass. This is also the last movie involving producer and director Kent Alterman.
  • Senseless (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $12.8 million. It would be seven years before Penelope Spheeris directed another narrative film, The Kid and I. She directed two music documentaries between the two, but they were never released on home video due to rights issues.
  • The Sentinel (2006) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $36,280,697 (domestic), $78,084,827 (worldwide). This political thriller's failure sent director Clark Johnson to exclusively TV work until he started production on Juanita.
  • September (1987) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $486,434. Woody Allen's lowest grossing film.
  • September Dawn (2007) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $1 million. The controversial film lasted in theaters for two weeks before being pulled. It's the last theatrical release that Christopher Cain has directed so far.
  • Serena (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $5 million. Despite two major stars, this sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years despite there being no hiccups during post-production, apart from director Susanne Bier taking time off to promote Love Is All You Need and spending eighteen months editing this movie. The end result was eviscerated by critics and limped at every market it opened.
  • Serenity (2005) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $38,869,464. Killed Hollywood interest in the Firefly franchise once and for all, but the franchise continued in comic book form and with an in-progress MMORPG. This film is noteworthy of being the only theatrical spinoff of a series that did not even finish its first season.
  • Serenity (2019) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $8,357,614 (domestic so far). Despite the presence of Anne Hathaway and Matthew McConaughey, the film was dumped into the market with nearly no advertising by distributor Aviron Pictures after poor test screenings. The film's negative reviews likely hasn't helped. It is yet another series of commercial bombs for the troubled Aviron (formerly Clarius Entertainment).
  • Serial Mom (1994) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $7,820,688. This John Waters film topped out at 560 theaters. Critics generally praised the satire and Kathleen Turner's performance while others found the film too dark to be funny, and was also overshadowed that year by Natural Born Killers, which dealt with similar themes. This was one of a series of busts that eventually doomed Savoy Pictures the following year. It eventually became a Cult Classic like many of Waters's films.
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) — Budget, $140 million. Box office, $118,634,549 (domestic), $209,073,645 (worldwide). It got good reviews from critics, but it still ended the career of screenwriter Robert Gordon, who does not have a single credit after this film except for an interview about Galaxy Quest. A stop-motion sequel was canceled, and the book series was later adapted into a far more faithful and better reviewed TV series.
  • Serving Sara (2002) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $20,146,150. Reginald Hudlin didn't direct another movie in 15 years, but he's still visible as a producer. This was also a blow to Matthew Perry and Elizabeth Hurley's theatrical film careers, only doing a couple films since.
  • Sesame Street Presents: Follow That Bird (1985) — Budget, unknown, but probably close to $10 million. Box office, $13.9 million. The first feature film spin-off of Sesame Street opened to glowing reviews from critics but was buried by a mountain of competitors that summer.
  • Seven Days in Utopia (2011) — Budget, $7.5 million. Box office, $4,373,074. This Christian golf drama topped out at 561 theaters and lasted for nine weeks.
  • Seven Years in Tibet (1997) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $37,957,682 (domestic), $131,457,682 (worldwide). This movie's production and release earned its stars and makers a ban from setting foot in China since it portrays the Dalai Lama, who has become a bitter Arch-Enemy Berserk Button to the Chinese government, and criticizes the government, which is also a Berserk Button; the list of people involved who are forbidden from traveling back to China includes stars Brad Pitt and David Thewlis and director Jean-Jacques Annaud. Annaud, however, was allowed to return 15 years later for the Shanghai Film Festival, and Pitt "got back in" for wife Angelina Jolie and Disney's Maleficent.note  It's unknown whether or not co-producer John H. Williams earned a ban himself, but Seven Years in Tibet was still his semi-final major live-action film (and the last non-comedy film) before it was derailed with DreamWorks/Jackie Chan's The Tuxedo 5 years later, causing him to stay strictly in animation including with DreamWorks Animation. Finally, screenwriter Becky Johnson did not write another cinematic film until 2012, the year the Chinese ban on Annaud was lifted.
  • Seventh Son (2015) — Budget, $95 million. Box office, $17,223,265 (domestic), $110,623,265 (worldwide). This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years due to the bankruptcy of its visual effects company, Rhythm and Hues, and Production Company Legendary Pictures signing a distribution deal with Universal. Its resulting failure gave Universal an $85 million loss.
  • Sex and the City 2 (2010) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $95,347,692 (domestic), $288,347,692 (worldwide). The film getting run down by critics and winning three Razzies halted any ideas of a third Sex and the City movie along with the theatrical career of director/producer/writer Michael Patrick King, who returned to his work in television. Sex and the City alum Sarah Jessica Parker also never produced another theatrical film herself. This film's chances also were not helped by the cast & crew doing an expensive overseas trip during the economic recession in the New 10's.
  • Sex Drive (2008) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $18,755,936. This was one of a string of flops for Summit Entertainment's first year as an independent distributor. They rebounded the next month when they began The Twilight Saga.
  • Sextette (1978) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $51,000. One of two films Mae West made after coming out of retirement, with Myra Breckinridge being the other, this adaptation of her play was also her final film. Part of the film's lack of appeal was presenting the far past her prime West as a memetic sex goddess surrounded by much younger men (including Timothy Dalton, her on-screen husband, who regards this as an Old Shame).
  • S.F.W. (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $63,513. Part of a year's slate that earned Gramercy Pictures the threat of a shutdown from Universal and PolyGram. Almost all of director Jefery Levy's films past this one are T.V. movies, and it snuffed out the American cinematic career of writer Danny Rubin.
  • Sgt. Bilko (1996) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $37,956,793. This film version of the classic TV series was one of several busts in the mid-90s for director Jonathan Lynn.
  • Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978) — Budget, $13 million. $20 million. The film version of the Beatles' album was ripped to shreds for its thin and incomprehensible story. This was a Star-Derailing Role for almost everyone in the cast with the notable exceptions of Steve Martin, George Burns, Donald Pleasence and Earth, Wind & Fire. It was overshadowed that summer by the far more successful musical Grease.
  • Sgt Stubby An American Hero (2018) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $2,831,366 (domestic). This animated film about the World War One hero dog was the first feature for Labyrinth Media & Publishing's American subsidiary Fun Academy. The critics liked it but it suffered from Invisible Advertising and died against Rampage on its opening weekend.
  • The Shadow (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $32,063,435 (domestic), $48,063,435 (worldwide). The film version of the old radio show and pulp hero started out strong but it faded out in a crowded summer. This was also among several bombs that ended Alec Baldwin's leading-man reputation, though he's had great success since as a character actor.
  • Shadows and Fog (1992) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $2,735,731. One of Woody Allen's least well-received films. This was also his last film with Orion Pictures, which declared bankruptcy that year.
  • Shadow Conspiracy (1997) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $2,312,463. This was the final directing job from George P. Cosmatos, and its embarrassing failure assassinated his career, which he was not able to revive before his death 8 years later. This movie also helped derail Charlie Sheen's main cinematic career, with the man moving to television, and co-writer Adi Hasak did not write in Hollywood again at all until 2010, and did not get another producer credit until 2014. This film also convinced distributor Disney to end their relationship with Cinergi Pictures, which led to that label plunging into darkness the next year once it released Burn Hollywood Burn.
  • Shag (1989) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $6.9 million. Director Zelda Barron wouldn’t direct another theatrical film again, mostly doing TV work afterwards.
  • Shakes the Clown (1991) — Budget, $1.4 million. Box office, $115,103. Bobcat Goldthwait had to wait 15 years before he could be able to write and direct another feature film.
  • Shanghai (2010) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $9,245,667. This was filmed in 2008 but it was placed on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for a while. It debuted in China in 2010 and waited five years before its US release where it died a quiet death in limited release with Invisible Advertising. Its US total amounted to 0.5% of its total box office.
  • Shanghai Surprise (1986) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $2,315,683. Derailed Madonna's film career, but Sean Penn's mainstream career managed to recover (though their relationship did not). Director Jim Goddard, however, was much less fortunate.
  • Shark Night (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $18,877,153 (domestic), $40,136,479 (worldwide).
  • Shattered (1991) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $11,511,031. Critics gave it mixed reviews and were particularly divided over the film's Twist Ending.
  • Shattered Glass (2003) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $2.9 million. Despite very strong reviews from critics, this film's financial failure ensured that star Hayden Christensen would only be remembered for playing Anakin Skywalker/a suitless Darth Vader in the second and third Star Wars Prequel Trilogy films, which turned both him and George Lucas into Snark Bait for the Broken Base they caused regarding Lucas's directing.
  • The Shawshank Redemption (1994) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16 million (original 1994 theatrical tally), $28.3 million (domestic tally after a February 1995 run during the Oscar season), $58 million (worldwide). This is one of the most critically acclaimed films of all time and is considered a classic, but it disappointed at the box office due to opening against another classic, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. The movie was Vindicated by Cable and video, making an additional $80 million in VHS sales, and is one of the films on Roger Ebert's Great Movies List (as is Pulp Fiction). This didn't prevent Shawshank from becoming the final film produced by Niki Marvin, who barely worked in Hollywood after this, plus director Frank Darabont didn't get another directing credit for 5 years until The Green Mile.
  • She's Having a Baby (1988) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $16,031,707.
  • Shes So Lovely (1997) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $7,281,450. John Cassavettes developed this romantic drama in the 1980's but it was put on the back-burner when he died in 1989. His son, Nick, finished the film. The end result was released on Labor Day weekend where it was greeted with mixed-to-positive reviews and topped out at 844 theaters.
  • Sheena (1984) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $5,778,353. Writer Lorenzo Semple Jr.'s career began to wind down after this movie, as did director John Guillermin (they only worked on one more movie).
  • Shelter (2008) — Budget, $500,000. Box office, $142,666. Its limited release topped out at 10 theaters. But critics gave it generally favorable reviews and it won numerous awards at various film festivals.
  • The Sheltering Sky (1990) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $2,075,084. The film version of the Paul Bowles novel topped out at 95 theaters during its theatrical release. The critics were mixed about it while Bowles, who also narrated the film, despised it.
  • Sherlock Gnomes (2018) — Budget, $59 million. Box office, $43,242,871 (domestic), $90,345,871 (worldwide). The first fully-animated film produced by Paramount Animation, this hold-over from the late Brad Grey's regime was released over seven years after its predecessor. Critics weren't allowed to see it until opening day, and were unsurprisingly hostile when they did get to see it, and many of them questioned its very existence, especially considering Gnomeo & Juliet wasn't especially well received itself. It was also part of a very nasty string of bombs for Paramount and star Johnny Depp (although the former saved face with the micro-budgeted Sleeper Hit A Quiet Place just two weeks later).
  • Shining Through (1992) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $21,633,781 (domestic), $43,838,238 (worldwide). This World War II spy melodrama got negative reviews and was a career setback for Melanie Griffith and director David Seltzer.
  • The Shipping News (2001) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $24,405,825. The film version of E. Annie Proulx's novel received mixed reviews and a limited release which topped out at 434 theaters. It still received various nominations and awards from various organizations, including a National Board of Review award for Cate Blanchett.
  • Shock Treatment (1981) — Budget, $3.5 million (estimated). Box office, less than $100,000. This sort-of sequel to The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released as a midnight movie due to the ongoing success of its predecessor as one. Instead, it got an even worse critical and audience reception than its predecessor and flopped worse than the original's run as a general release movie. It never had a general release due to its resounding failure. It still became a minor Cult Classic in later years, though.
  • Shoot 'em Up (2007) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $26,820,641. Critics liked this action comedy for its awesome demeanor but it got shot down after six weeks in theaters. Director Michael Davis hasn't made another movie since.
  • Shooter (2007) — Budget, $61 million. Box office, $47,003,582 (domestic), $95,696,996 (worldwide). This film version of Stephen Hunter's first Bobby Lee Swagger novel, Point of Impact, fell short of its budget, but it did inspire a TV series nine years later.
  • Shoot The Moon (1982) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $9.2 million. This was an Acclaimed Flop released in late January/early February to avoid competition with star Diane Keaton's more-high profile release Reds. Keaton and co-star Albert Finney both got Golden Globe nominations out of it.
  • Short Cuts (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $6,110,979. This ensemble film adapted from several Raymond Carver short stories received rave reviews but it never left limited release.
  • Shorts (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $20,919,166 (domestic), $28,972,508 (worldwide). This was part of a string of flops for Robert Rodriguez which he broke the next year with Machete. Critics gave it generally mixed reviews.
  • Shout (1991) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $3,547,684. This film did not open in many markets, and was criticized by Roger Ebert for being historically and geographically inaccurate in its setting. Shout served as choreographer Jeffrey Hornaday's only theatrical direction job, and he wouldn't try directing anything again for 20 years.
  • Showdown in Little Tokyo (1991) — Budget, about $8,000,000. Box office, $2,275,557. Brandon Lee's American film debut suffered from Executive Meddling from Warner Bros. which cut the film down from 90 to 79 minutes and gave it a limited theatrical release in the United States, Mexico, Italy, Israel and Hungary. It became Vindicated by Video following Lee's death on the set of The Crow.
  • Showgirls (1995) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $20,350,754. Derailed the Hollywood career of star Elizabeth Berkley, and the viability of NC-17 rated films in general. Also put a heavy dent in director Paul Verhoeven's career as well as writer Joe Eszterhas who had a double-whammy with this and Jade, which earned him a tongue-lashing from Gene Siskel at the end of 1995. Another Worst Picture Golden Raspberry Award winner, Burn Hollywood Burn, would finally fell him 3 years later. This film became an immediate Old Shame to almost everyone on the crew (co-star Kyle MacLachlan was rumored to have almost stormed out on the film, while composer Toni Halliday actually did); Verhoeven even became the first person to accept a Razzie in person at the awards show. Showgirls was partially salvaged by home video sales, however, becoming one of MGM's highest home entertainment sellers. note 
  • Showtime (2002) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $77,741,732. One of three flops in 2002 that severely impacted Eddie Murphy's career.
  • Shut In (2016) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $8.4 million (worldwide). This is the second film distributed by EuropaCorp in 2016, and like the film before it, it was panned by critics and faced competition from major blockbusters by other studios, such as Doctor Strange (2016).
  • The Sicilian (1987) — Budget, $16.5 million. Box office, $5,406,879 (domestic). This film continued the descent of Michael Cimino's career. Cimino and the film were also hurt by a post-production editing incident with Cimino being Cimino, which landed him in court.
  • Sid And Nancy (1986) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $2,826,523. After this and a pair of critical flops the next year (Straight to Hell and Walker), director Alex Cox's cinematic career was sent straight to Hell; he's only done TV movies since.
  • Side Out (1990) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $450,000.
  • The Siege (1998) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $40,981,289 (domestic), $116,672,912 (worldwide). This thriller about terrorist attacks in New York City was controversial upon its release, with Arab and Muslim groups protesting the film for reinforcing them being associated with terrorism. The film gained new life after 9/11.
  • Siesta (1987) — Budget, $5,000,000. Box office, $604,491. Mary Lambert's directorial debut had a very limited release and was scarcely reviewed. It still got nominated for an Independent Spirit Award, though.
  • Silence (2016) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $16,106,536. This second adaptation of the Shusaku Endo novel was Martin Scorsese's long time passion project. Unfortunately, its late release date prevented it from qualifying for many pre-Oscar awards, thus preventing the awards buzz needed to expand from a very limited release. Its minimal advertising, dark subject matter, immense length and the fact it opened on a crowded holiday season, meant that the film itself was greeted with Silence. Not helping matters was the release of another historical religious epic that also starred Andrew Garfield, which overshadowed Silence come awards season. Part of a bad string for Scorsese.
  • Silent Fall (1994) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $3,180,674. This mystery thriller was Liv Tyler's film debut. Critics ripped it apart for its ineptly constructed plot, which ran on contrivances and solved by an untwist.
  • Silent Hill (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $46,982,632 (domestic), $97,607,453 (worldwide). Despite it not doing well (both critically and financially), the film managed to get a sequel 6 years later.
    • Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (2012) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17,529,157 (domestic), $52,302,796 (worldwide). While the movie recuperated its budget thanks to foreign gross, it barely made half of what the first film grossed worldwide. Combined with an even worse critical reception than the previous film, the Silent Hill movie franchise seems to have come to an end.
  • Silk Stockings (1957) — Budget, $2,581,000. Box office, $2,800,000. Recorded loss, $1,399,000. This musical remake of Ninotchka was the final film for veteran director Rouben Mamoulian, who retired after getting replaced on both Porgy and Bess and Cleopatra. Fred Astaire wanted this to be his last movie musical but he was brought back for Finian's Rainbow.
  • The Silver Chalice (1954) — Budget, $4.5 million. Box office, $3.2 million. This was Paul Newman's film debut, and when the movie aired on TV in 1966, Newman put out a newspaper advertisement warning people not to watch the film. This backfired, as ''The Silver Chalice'' pulled in surprisingly high ratings.
  • Simon Birch (1998) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18.3 million. This extremely loose adaptation of John Irving's novel A Prayer for Owen Meany received mixed reviews for its excessive Glurge, though Siskel & Ebert both liked it, with Siskel naming it one of the best films of the year.
  • Simon Sez (1999) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $292,152. Ringo Lam did not produce another film until 2007.
  • A Simple Plan (1998) – Budget, $17 million. Box office, $16 million. This was the last film greenlit by Savoy Pictures before it shuttered in 1995. It ended up being an Acclaimed Flop which topped out at 660 theaters.
  • A Simple Wish (1997) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $8.3 million. This was the final film from director Michael Ritchie before his death in 2001, and child actress Mara Wilson's penultimate live-action film.
  • Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas (2003) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $26,483,452 (domestic), $80,767,884 (worldwide). This was DreamWorks Animation's final 2D animated film. Co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg announced that they were abandoning traditional animation after Sinbad sunk at the box office, and the film itself, along with Disney's Treasure Planet and Home on the Range, effectively put an end to theatrical 2D animation until 2009. Sinbad's also one of three films in that time period that dealt a setback to screenwriter John Logan's career (The Time Machine and Star Trek: Nemesis are the other two). This film, along with several other bombs in 2003, lost DreamWorks over $166 million, beating out Cutthroat Island for biggest confirmed loss in a bomb adjusted for inflation; the company nearly went bankrupt, and might have played a part in DreamWorks Animation splitting off from its namesake parent company.
  • Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (2014) — Budget, estimated between $60 million to $70 million. Box office, $35,093,856. Compare its opening weekend (number 8 at $6,317,683) to its predecessor movie, which debuted number 1 at the box office with $29,120,273 against a budget of $40 million. The nine-year-long gap between both films resulting in diminished interest and controversy over its teaser poster featuring a semi-nude Ava Lord didn't help matters. The failure of this and Machete Kills kept Robert Rodriguez out of the director's chair for five years until Alita: Battle Angel.
  • Sing (1989) — Budget, $11.5 million. Box office, $2.2 million. The second and last feature film directed by Richard J. Blaskin.
  • The Singing Detective (2003) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $337,173. This film version of the British miniseries suffered from brutal critical reviews and an extremely limited release of 46 theaters. Director Keith Gordon retreated to television after this fiasco while star Robert Downey Jr.'s career stayed afloat until Iron Man saved it.
  • The Sisters Brothers (2018) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $10,328,777. One of many bombs for Megan Ellison's Annapurna distribution unit.
  • Six Degrees of Separation (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $6,410,676. An Acclaimed Flop, however.
  • Six Weeks (1982) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $6.7 million. It lasted five weeks in theaters.
  • Skin Trade (2014) — Budget: $9,000,000. Gross USA: $1,242.
  • Sky Bandits (1986) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $2,295,500. This was visual effects artist Zoran Perisic's directorial debut and it set the record for the largest crew on a feature film (532). Perisic directed one more film, 1995's The Phoenix and the Carpet, before he left the film industry for good.
  • Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $57,958,696. The film destroyed brothers Kerry (director and writer) and Kevin (production designer) Conran's careers — neither have done anything of note since.
  • Skyscraper (2018) — Budget, $125 million. Box office, $67,796,355 (domestic), $304,103,613 (worldwide). After the movie flopped, Legendary Pictures opted not to renew their financing deal with Universal, whose relations with Legendary were already strained by then due to a string of other box office stinkers, and opted to return to Warner Bros. after a five-year hiatus. It was also a big miss for star Dwayne Johnson, who before then was a consistent box office draw with the exceptions of Baywatch and Rampage.
  • Slackers (2002) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $6,413,915. This was expelled from theaters after two weeks. This is photographer Dewey Nicks' first and only directorial effort.
  • Slaves Of New York (1989) — Budget, Unknown, but the ugly part is... Box office, $463,972. This movie, along with Pink Cadillac, ran Bernadette Peters's cinematic career back off the road after she took a seven year hiatus from the big screen for her role in several bombs at the beginning of the 80's. The stage actress and singer has never been the leading lady in any movie since.
  • Sleeping Beauty (1959) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5.3 million (original release), $51.6 million (after worldwide re-releases!). While it WAS the second highest box office success that year and introduced Maleficent into the world, who became one of the definitive Disney villains of all time, its high production costs due to it going through Development Hell, being filmed in 70mm, and comments about the film's art direction mixed with several other factors in Walt's studio that year and resulted in the company winding up over $1 million in the red, which lead to layoffs. This ended the usage of said art for decades, as Disney had to reluctantly adopt the Xerox process for the next animated film from the studio, 101 Dalmatians, and it remained in use until at least 1977, with Disney not returning to more sophisticated art direction until the 80's and not doing another animated film based off a fairy tale or featuring a Disney Princess until The Little Mermaid started the Disney Renaissance on this film's 30th anniversary. Sleeping Beauty would find its legs in theatrical reissues in later years, with the artwork from Disney Legend Eyvind Earle becoming acclaimed, and it broke records when it hit home video under the Walt Disney Classics label in 1986, allowing it to fully go mainstream; this is the only single-story bomb past Bambi to be a part of the Disney Animated Canon's home media "Untouchables" roster note  as of 2016 (Fantasia 2000 also bombed, but it's a package film and is also in the "Untouchables" portfolio). This is the movie where Don Bluth started his professional career.
  • Sleeping Beauty (2011) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $36,578 (domestic), $A300,888 (Australia). This only had a limited release in the States.
  • Sleepless (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $28,928,766. This remake of the French film Sleepless Night was intended to be released on February 24th but was moved to Martin Luther King Day weekend. Its heavy competition and tepid reviews buried it at the box office.
  • Sleepover (2004) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10,148,953. Joe Nussbaum's directorial debut was heavily panned by critcs and evicted from theaters after five weeks.
  • Slither (2006) — Budget, $15 million (not counting marketing costs), $29.5 million (counting them). Box office, $12,834,936. James Gunn's directorial debut received great reviews and has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Slow Burn (2007) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1.7 million. This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for four years, during which it played at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival. The end result set the record at the time for the biggest second weekend drop at the box office (84.7%) and was snuffed out of theaters after two weeks. Director/Writer Wayne Beach has yet to work on another film.
  • The Slugger's Wife (1985) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $1,878,561. Hal Ashby had this movie taken away from him; he had one more movie after this one before he died, and producer Ray Stark had to wait four years for his next film.
  • Small Time Crooks (2000) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,266,359 (domestic), $29,934,477 (worldwide). Another Woody Allen Acclaimed Flop; this was his highest grossing film in the North American box office before Match Point broke his unlucky streak.
  • A Smile Like Yours (1997) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $3,330,352. The critics and box office frowning on this film made it the last writing job for Kevin Meyer, and the only theatrical directing job for Kevin Samples. Samples' production company, Rysher Entertainment, also never returned to the cinemas, and two years later it shut down with its library going to a variety of owners (first Viacom, then 2929 Entertainment, and now CBS/Qualia).
  • Smillas Sense Of Snow (1997) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $2,372,903. This film version of the novel Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow got a mixed reception by critics, with most reviews taking issue with the Halfway Plot Switch ending.
  • The Smurfs 2 (2013) — Budget, $105 million. Box office, $71,017,784 (domestic), $347,545,360 (worldwide). The poor reception of this film's predecessor likely contributed to this film's poor box office. This was Jonathan Winters' last role before his death the same year. The low domestic gross led to a third entry in the live-action Smurf movie series getting canceled. The Smurfs themselves wouldn't star in another theatrical movie until…
    • Smurfs: The Lost Village (2017) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $45,020,282 (domestic), $197,183,546 (worldwide). This Continuity Reboot, an attempt to Win Back the Crowd, earned tepid reviews from critics, and although it has done quite well overseas, it has failed to make any traction in America.
  • Snake Eyes (1998) — Budget, $73 million. Box office, $55,591,409 (domestic), $103,891,409 (worldwide). The film's marketing campaign was derided for revealing the identity of the Big Bad. Director Brian De Palma defended the marketing in an interview by saying the film "isn't about who did it. It's a mystery about a relationship." It started a series of career-demoting busts for De Palma.
  • Snatched (2017) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $45,852,178 (domestic), $60,845,711 (worldwide). Goldie Hawn's first film role in 15 years was overshadowed on opening weekend by Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, which was in its second week.
  • Snoopy, Come Home (1972) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, $245,073. It ended up being the final film released by Cinema Center Films (which was owned by CBS). The film itself ended up Vindicated by Cable and home video, and the film's commercial performance didn't prevent a couple more Peanuts movies from being made.
  • Snow Falling on Cedars (1999) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $23,049,593. The film version of David Gutterson's novel was praised for its Oscar-nominated cinematography but derided for its slow pacing.
  • Snow White and the Huntsman (2012) — Budget, $170 million. Box office, $155,332,381 (domestic), $396,592,829 (worldwide). Though it was saved by the foreign take, its overall disappointing performance led to Universal deciding against a direct sequel involving Kristen Stewart (her scandalous love affair with this film's director, Rupert Sanders, may have also played a part in that decision); instead, they pursued a spinoff focused on Chris Hemsworth's titular Huntsman and with a markedly lower budget, which was released four years later as...
  • Snowden (2016) — Budget, $40-50 million. Box office, $31,346,669. The film about the famed CIA whistle-blower had the lowest opening for an Oliver Stone-directed film to date and got mixed reviews in comparison to another "based on a real person" film released the week before, Sully, which was critically acclaimed.
  • The Snowman (2017) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $6,670,765 (domestic), $42,670,765 (worldwide). This film version of Jo Nesbø's novel saw numerous directors considered (one of whom, Martin Scorsese, executive produced it) before Tomas Alfredson signed on. The film was so rushed into production that up to 15% of the screenplay went unfilmed, creating Plot Holes and confusion for the editors. The end result was a critical fiasco, with numerous reviews mourning the wasted premise, and melted in theaters. Unsurprisingly, Alfredson isn't happy with the film. Also a part of a bad string of flops for executive producer Scorsese, along with the aforementioned Silence, his short-lived HBO series, Vinyl, and his other 2017 producing ventures, Free Fire and Good Time. Most certainly part of a very bad string of flops for star Michael Fassbender, quite possibly his worst flop so far.
  • So Fine (1981) — Budget, $11.5 million. Box office, $10 million (approximate). Contributed to the derailment of Ryan O'Neal's movie career.
  • So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11,585,483. This movie murdered the cinematic prospects of director Thomas Schlamme, who returned to television instead. After this movie and Wayne's World 2, Mike Myers would take a 4-year hiatus from acting before he returned with the Austin Powers movies.
  • Solar Crisis (1990) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, Unknown. This film is here because despite its tentpole budget, it never escaped a limited release and faded from theaters without a trace. This is the last time director Richard Sarafian ever directed a theatrical film, and he ordered himself credited as Alan Smithee in the end because he was ashamed of the final product. Co-producer James Nelson only produced one more movie, and it led to Charlton Heston taking supporting roles for the rest of his career.
  • Solarbabies (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,579,260. This film was personally financed by Mel Brooks, who nearly declared bankruptcy when the budget spiraled out of control. It was the second film from choreographer Alan Johnson, but also his last, since it blew any more directing jobs he could have had into a supernova.
  • Solaris (2002) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $30,002,758. This is one of two bombs for James Cameron's Lightstorm Entertainment, with Strange Days being the other (neither were directed by Cameron).
  • Soldier (1998) — Budget, $60-75 million. Box office, $15 million. After this and the previous year's Event Horizon, director Paul W.S. Anderson didn't direct another theatrical film until the first Resident Evil film in 2002. This film also derailed Blade Runner writer David Webb Peoples's career, as he has not written a new screenplay for decades.
  • Solitary Man (2010) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $5,178,582. This was an Acclaimed Flop, especially for Michael Douglas's performance, but it topped out at 177 theaters. This is the second and last theatrical film directed by Brian Koppelman and David Levien, who still work as screenwriters.
  • Solo (1996) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $5,107,669. Director Noberto Barba focused mainly on television, most notably Grimm, since this movie failed.
  • Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) — Budget, $275 million (production), the costly reshoots included. Box office, $213,767,512 (domestic), $392,924,807 (worldwide). The film grossed a disappointing $103 million in its opening weekend and a dramatically low $29.6 million for the following weekend. Despite generally good critical reception and even better fan reception, it ended up becoming the first Star Wars film to flop at the box office, with analysts projecting that Disney lost at minimum $50-80 million on the film.
  • The Soloist (2009) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $38,332,994. This was to be released the previous fall but it was delayed to April when DreamWorks and Paramount ended their partnership. The film got respectful reviews which praised the acting but felt it was one of director Joe Wright's weaker films and gradually tuned out in theaters.
  • Someone Like You (2001) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $27,343,067 (domestic), $38,689,940 (worldwide).
  • Someone To Watch Over Me (1987) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $10,278,549. This was an Acclaimed Flop for Ridley Scott that did better on home video.
  • Something Borrowed (2011) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $39,046,489 (domestic), $60,183,821 (worldwide).
  • Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983) — Budget, $19 million (estimated). Box office, $8.4 million. This movie, along with TRON, nearly bankrupted Walt Disney Productions. Not long after this, CEO Ron Miller started Touchstone to produce more adult fare from Disney, but although its first release Splash fared very well, it was too little, too late for Miller when the previous failures, Walt's nephew Roy E. Disney's resignation and Save Disney campaign, a shutdown attempt from businessman Saul Steinberg, the Disney stereotype, AND the delayed and eventual failure of Feature Animation's The Black Cauldron ultimately combined to allow Paramount president Michael Eisner to dethrone Miller the next year. When Miller was offered a demotion to animation, he resigned altogether instead, and was not heard from in Hollywood again until a special thanks credit in Pixar's Inside Out (the animation position was taken by Roy while Miller started up the Silverado vineyards, which do supply wines to the Disney Theme Parks). A remake by David Katzenberg, the son of Eisner's former protege turned DreamWorks founder Jeffrey Katzenberg, is said to be in the planning stages.
  • Song to Song (2017) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $857,666. Debuting at Austin, TX's SXSW, this film received mixed to negative reviews from not only critics and casual moviegoers, but also fans of Terrence Malick. Part of a bad string for both Natalie Portman and especially Michael Fassbender.
  • Songwriter (1984) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $865,000. This was the last theatrical film written by sportswriter and author Bud Shrake, whose only film credits since were two TV movies. His other careers survived.
  • Son of the Mask (2005) — Budget, $84 million. Box office, $57.5 million. The star of the original Mask, Jim Carrey, refused to be attached to this film due to his disdain for sequels, and the film, which was planned for a 90's release, found itself in Development Hell after Carrey bolted from production (the makers did an infamous contest in Nintendo Power that won one Nathan Ryan Runk a cameo in Mask 2; New Line and THQ later sent Runk a care package of video games, a Mask jacket and $5,000 once production grounded to a halt). The sequel finally got released in 2005 and became one of the biggest critical and commercial blunders of the 2000s, and nearly every major cast and crew member who did work on this movie never really recovered from it (including Scream vet Jamie Kennedy, who was incensed at the disdain the film got; co-star Traylor Howard was saved by her role on Monk). Copyright holder Dark Horse shut the franchise down for 9 years as a result and it became an Old Shame for another star, Kal Penn.
  • Son of the Pink Panther (1993) — Budget, $25 million (not counting marketing costs), $28 million (counting them). Box office, $2,438,031. This movie tried to reboot the troubled franchise, but ended up becoming stillborn instead, nearly killing Roberto Benigini's then-fledgling American reputation and forcing director Blake Edwards to retire from films. Famed Czech actor Herbert Lom, who reprised his long-running role as Inspector Dreyfus in the film, became blindsided by the film-making process after the film's failure that he retired from acting, though he would make two final appearances on the television series Agatha Christie's Marple, eleven years later.
  • Sons of Provo (2005) — Budget, $200,000. Box office, $120,488. Yet another dud for Halestorm Entertainment.
  • Sorcerer (1977) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $12 million. William Friedkin's remake of The Wages of Fear suffered from a heavily Troubled Production which ran overbudget and saw many of the cast and crew stricken with illnesses. The end result was given a mixed to negative reception by critics and was left stranded on Earth while everyone else was in line to watch Star Wars that year. It didn't help that the Non-Indicative Title caused some confusion for audiences. The film was eventually taken out of Friedkin's hands and extensively reedited for foreign release under the title Wages of Fear. Friedkin found his contract with Universal (which co-produced this film with Paramount) terminated after Sorcerer failed to live up to the expectations of the filmmaker's previous hits, The French Connection and The Exorcist. Over time, it became Vindicated by History thanks to TV and Video and is now a Cult Classic.
  • The Sorcerer's Apprentice (2010) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $63,150,991 (domestic), $215,283,742 (worldwide). A failed attempt by Disney and executive producer/star Nicolas Cage to adapt the signature number from Fantasia into a live-action film (Mickey Mouse and Yen Sid are replaced with actor Jay Baruchel as the Apprentice and Cage as the titular sorcerer, and it's in a decidedly modern setting). Disney would not try to adapt anything else from the Fantasia movies until announcing a movie based off of the original masterpiece's final number, Night on Bald Mountain, in 2016 (their live-action remake of Disney Animated Canon films was saved by the remake of Alice in Wonderland the same year). Baruchel is still visible as the voice of Hiccup in DreamWorks Animation's How to Train Your Dragon movies, but Cage has had problems with movies since. Screenwriter Doug Miro would not write another cinematic screenplay until The Great Wall in 2016/2017, and he wouldn't be credited on anything again at all until creating Narcos in 2015. It also resulted in director Jon Turteltaub not trying for another 9 figure tentpole until 2018 and putting a major hex on his career, and story writers and longtime Hollywood players Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal have not written another film at all, plus they would be barely on the radar until 2016.
  • Soul Men (2008) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $12,343,883. This was one of three posthumous releases for Bernie Mac and it was overshadowed by one of the others, Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa, which opened the same day. This was also the final film for Isaac Hayes, who died the day after Mac. Director Malcolm D. Lee didn't direct again until 2013's Scary Movie 5.
  • Soul Survivors (2001) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $4,299,141. After getting sucked up and spat out by critics, this movie became part of a year's slate that put production company Artisan Entertainment on life support; they would rebound the next year before being absorbed by Lionsgate.
  • A Sound of Thunder (2005) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $11,665,465. This adaptation of the classic Ray Bradbury short story sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for nearly two years due to its production company, Franchise Pictures, going bankrupt. This was the penultimate film they produced before they shuttered. Director Peter Hyams would wait four years rather than two for his next movie, and the writing team's careers were set back somewhat too.
  • Sour Grapes (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box Office: $123,104. This film, directed and written by Larry David (of Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm fame), was panned by critics (landing on the Roger Ebert Most Hated Film List) and scorned by audiences. The film barely lasted its opening weekend and was removed soon after. David himself sees this film as an Old Shame.
  • South of Heaven, West of Hell (2000) — Budget, $4,000,000. Box office, $28,149. This crucified Dwight Yoakam's directing and writing career after one picture.
  • Southland Tales (2007) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $374,743. A failed followup to Richard Kelly's previous film, Donnie Darko. The movie tanked thanks to bad reviews, claiming the movie to be a pretentious, incoherent mess, that tried to recapture the spirit of Darko but to no avail. This movie tanked Kelly's career, as he would make one more movie after this, The Box.
  • The Space Between Us (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $14,793,385. The negative critical reviews and STX practically playing Keep Away with its release date did not help this movie make any traction at the box office.
  • Space Camp (1986) — Budget, $18-25 million. Box office, $9,697,739. Being released mere months after the Challenger explosion is suggested to be one of the major reasons this movie flopped. It was also the last film released by ABC Motion Pictures.
  • Space Chimps (2008) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $30,105,968 (domestic), $64,834,964 (worldwide). This animated film got a lukewarm response from critics and audiences and it did itself no favors by opening against The Dark Knight. While this entry didn't soar through the box office, it still got a sequel...
    • Space Chimps 2: Zartog Strikes Back (2010) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,124,518. Failed to make a profit when it was denied entry in U.S. theaters, and subsequently struck down maker Vanguard Animation, leading to their bevy of other projects getting stuck in nowhere (as of this writing, only two of their undeveloped films have seen release dates after their folding). This is the only movie DreamWorks Animation alumnus John H. Williams has attempted to direct.
  • Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983) — Budget, $14.4 million. Box office, $16.5 million. Columbia Pictures did this 3D sci-fi movie no good by opening it five days before Return of the Jedi. This was the final theatrical film for director Lamont Johnson, whose final overall film was the TV movie Wallenberg: A Hero's Story.
  • Spanglish (2004) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $55,041,367. This was one of Adam Sandler's better received films, getting a 53% on Rotten Tomatoes, but the box-office performance of this movie, along with Punch-Drunk Love, Reign Over Me, and Funny People, confirmed his typecasting as a comedic actor. James L. Brooks waited six years to direct his next film, How Do You Know, which is currently his last.
  • The Spanish Prisoner (1997) – Budget, $10 million. Box office, $9.5 million. This David Mamet thriller received glowing reviews from critics but it never left a limited release.
  • Spark A Space Tail (2017) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $790,355. And that's not even the American box office, which was only $192,705. Although, certainly being hit with both Invisible Advertising and being Not Screened for Critics (and once they were able to get into the movie it got terrible reviews... but even then, it took more than a few days for a Tomatometer to even register, which sat at a 0% at one point), as well as being screened in only 365 theaters (even Delgo and The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure played in at least 2,000!) couldn't have helped its case. All in all, the film was pulled only 13 days after it debuted from the few theaters playing it, and its international release was heavily pushed back. While the film grossed slightly more with its international release, it was way far from enough to recoup its budget. Part of a very gloomy year for distributor Open Road Films.
  • Spartan (2004) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $8,112,772. One of several busts that took down Franchise Pictures. David Mamet waited four years to direct again.
  • The Specials (2000) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, $13,276. Writer James Gunn eventually broke out of the indie market with Guardians of the Galaxy, but producer Mark Altman (who wrote the House of the Dead movies that Uwe Boll disowned) wasn't so lucky.
  • Species II (1998) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $26,817,565. Co-producer Dennis Feldman only worked on one more movie the following year before sticking with comic books, director Peter Medak didn't work on any more movies period, as did writer Chris Brancato (the latter moved to TV), and the movie's sequels went straight to cable.
  • Speed 2: Cruise Control (1997) — Budget, $160 million. Box office, $48,608,066 (domestic), $164,508,066 (worldwide). The absence of Speed star Keanu Reeves plus the sequel getting the exact opposite critical reception of the original movie resulted in one of the classic examples of Sequelitis at its worst (it's ironically one of three 1997 films that became the poster child for the trope, with Mortal Kombat: Annihilation and Batman & Robin being two additional candidates). Any plans to turn Speed into a film series crashed and burned with this movie, while any attempt to turn Jason Patric into a movie star ended with this film. Sandra Bullock, who did return for this sequel, disowns this film, as does Patric.
  • Speed Racer (2008) — Budget, $120 million (not counting marketing costs), $200 million (counting them). Box office, $93,945,766. Began the career and reputation disintegration of the Wachowskis (though their fall was actually signaled much earlier, with The Matrix Revolutions). It also derailed the Speed Racer franchise in turn along with the careers of two of the leads, Emile Hirsch and Christina Ricci.
  • Sphere (1998) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $37,020,277. This film version of Michael Crichton's novel was lambasted by critics for its Cliché Storm plot that derived from numerous sci-fi works. Director Barry Levinson and star Dustin Hoffman stayed afloat with Wag the Dog, which was released a few months earlier, and the other stars survived too.
  • Sphinx (1981) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $2,022,771. This adventure film based on a Robin Cook novel was a major embarrassment for director Franklin J. Schaffner, who ended up doing three more films in his lifetime. Critics mocked the film for, among other reasons, its absurd and confusing plot. While its Adventurer Archaeologist protagonist may draw comparisons to Raiders of the Lost Ark, this was released four months before the blockbuster.
  • Spider (2003) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $5,808,941. This only topped out at 54 theaters despite glowing reviews from critics. It did get David Cronenberg a Genie Award.
  • The Spirit (2008) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $39,031,337. This is Frank Miller's second-worst box office bomb, surpassed in 2014 by Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.
  • Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $73,280,117 (domestic), $122,563,539 (worldwide). This DreamWorks 2D animated film was the semi-final 2D film from the studio, and opened in the wake of the first Tobey Maguire Spider-Man movie and Attack of the Clones, the second Star Wars prequel (it also opened against The Powerpuff Girls Movie). The film also was criticized by conservatives/Republicans for how it portrayed Caucasians in regards to their behavior towards Native Americans and horses (the film's story was written by liberal superdonor Jeffrey Katzenberg, who ironically worked with Roy E. Disney for 10 years prior to 1994; Roy and his uncle Walt Disney were Christian conservatives of a high order). The film is also rather quiet and introspective in nature for an animated film about an animal (we only ever hear the titular character's thoughts), which might have turned off children looking for a zanier and more upbeat film. This is the last time DWA founder Katzenberg wrote a story for a theatrical film; and he only wrote and created Father of the Pride before that series' failure led to it being stuffed in a vault and Katzenberg remaining a businessman for the rest of his DreamWorks career. However, Spirit did get glowing reviews from Roger Ebert and Leonard Maltin among other critics, and a Netflix series, Spirit: Riding Free, premiered in 2017.
  • Splice (2010) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $26,857,459. This was supposed to have been released the previous September but it languished in The Shelf of Movie Languishment when its production company went under. A successful screening at Sundance got it saved by Warner Bros, who released it in a tough summer. Critics generally liked it but viewers were less receptive.
  • Splitting Heirs (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3,246,063. Eric Idle hasn't written a feature film screenplay since.
  • Spy Game (2001) — Budget, $92 million. Box office, $62,362,560 (domestic), $143,049,560 (worldwide). This spy thriller which involved a terrorist plot opened two months after 9/11. Universal pressed on with the release date when they found that test audience scores improved after the attacks. It got generally good reviews upon release and held the number three spot at the box office for two weeks. It fell flat afterwards.
  • The Spy Next Door (2010) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $24,307,086 (domestic) $45.2 million (worldwide). This WAS considered a disappointment, and several critics accused the film of ripping off True Lies. This is the only Jackie Chan movie aimed directly at kids rather than families, fading in the wake of his Karate Kid reboot, and it sent director Brian Levant's career to the Direct-to-Video floor; writer Gregory Poirier also got a demotion to a lower level of writers.
  • The Spy Who Dumped Me (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $33,562,069 (domestic), $75,320,680 (worldwide). The release was overshadowed by the huge success of another spy movie, Mission: Impossible – Fallout, which was in its second weekend when this movie opened.
  • The Squeeze (1987) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $2,228,951.
  • Standing Ovation (2010) — Budget, $5.6 million. Box office, $531,806. This received a scathing reception from critics and was booed out of theaters after two weeks. Director Stewart Raffill hasn't made another film since, though he has two films in development.
  • Stanley And Iris (1990) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $5,820,015. This was the last film Martin Ritt ever directed, and he later died months after its release. It also prompted Jane Fonda to stop acting for 15 years.
  • Star! (1968) — Budget, $14,320,000. Box office, $4 million (domestic), $10 million (worldwide box office), $4.2 million (rentals). This was part of a string of musical bombs for 20th Century Fox that killed the live-action musical, the Fox careers of Darryl Zanuck and his son Richard (Richard bounced back as a producer; his father didn't), and put the studio in a financial black hole until Star Wars in 1977 and the move to embrace V/H/S as an alternate viewing method. In a desperate move, Fox took the film out of director Robert Wise's hands, edited the three hour film to two hours, retitled it Those Were the Happy Times, and re-released the film a year later under this new cut and title, but it was too little too late. The film put Julie Andrews' career in jeopardy for a while, and blacked out the theatrical career of writer William Fairchild and put a hit in the careers of Wise and producer Saul Chaplin.
  • Star 80 (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,472,990. This would be the last film Bob Fosse ever directed before his death in 1987.
  • Star Trek Beyond (2016) — Budget, $185 million. Box office, $158,848,340 (domestic), $343,322,891 (worldwide). Despite receiving fairly strong reviews (if not quite as impressive as previous installments), it's another victim of 2016's expanse of wrecked tentpole films. It was released weeks after TMNT: Out of the Shadows also faltered amongst those tentpoles. Both films were released during the nuclear breakdown of the relationship between Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman and Viacom's primary shareholders at the National Amusements cinema chain company, which has Sumner and Shari Redstone; their stance and a slump in Viacom under Dauman sunk a deal to sell almost half of Paramount to Dalian Wanda along with Dauman's career with the firm. Despite this, a fourth film is still in the works, probably helped by Beyond grossing within its break even point of between $340-350 million; however, judging by the inspired decision to have none other than Quentin Tarantino direct it, it appears that the franchise is destined to go towards a different direction.
  • Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $43,254,409 (domestic), $67,312,826 (worldwide). Though it opened against stiff competition, its poor performance halted the Star Trek movie franchise until the reboot seven years later (it also halted director Stuart Baird and writer John Logan's careers as well, though Logan would return to screenwriting five years later, and more or less concluded the mission of both Star Trek: The Next Generation and the post-Star Trek: Voyager time period in the franchise's "prime universe" that the movie is set in, the furthest time period explored in the canon as of 2017; the next TV series set in the prime universe to be produced after Nemesis, 2017's Star Trek: Discovery, was a prequel set long before TNG.). TNG cast member Brent Spiner's writing job on this film and his appearance in The Master of Disguise, which was devoured and spat out by critics, wound up sending his career into a bad spot, though he is still visible. Worst of all, it derailed Tom Hardy's career for a while (he played Shinzon, the film's Big Bad), and he hates this movie with a passion and blames it for his drinking problems and near-suicide in the years that followed (both of which also led directly to his divorce from producer Sarah Ward); unsurprisingly, he refuses to discuss it (three other TNG crew members, LeVar Burton, Marina Sirtis, and Gates McFadden, also despise the film).
  • Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $3,360,800. The New York Times accused this film of being a Star Wars ripoff, and coming out only months after another film it was similar to, The Black Cauldron, didn't help either. It also failed to kick-start interest in 3D movies back then. Only one member of the crew that wasn't part of the cast or music department, Donald W. Ernst, remained visible after this film; he joined Disney and worked on Aladdin and Fantasia 2000. The movie also faded into virtual obscurity until it got a review in 2012 from The Nostalgia Critic.
  • Stardust (2007) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $38,634,938 (domestic), $135,560,026 (worldwide). The film version of Neil Gaiman's novel was an Acclaimed Flop best known for, among other things, starting Mark Strong's prolific run of Evil Brit roles.
  • Stardust Memories (1980) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10,389,003. This was not one of Woody Allen's most critically renowned works, though it did get a Writer's Guild Nomination and was later somewhat Vindicated by History. This was his last film with United Artists, which was suffering from the Troubled Production of Heaven's Gate, and his following films were made with Orion Pictures until its own bankruptcy. Allen still considers this his favorite of his films.
  • Stars and Bars (1988) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $100,000. This was one of a slate of films by Columbia Pictures greenlit by outgoing president David Puttnam that the studio left out to dry. Daniel Day-Lewis would rebound the next year with his first Oscar-winning role in My Left Foot.
  • Starship Troopers (1997) — Budget, $105 million. Box office, $54,814,377 (domestic), $121,214,377 (worldwide). This attempt to satirize political and military endeavors AND spit in the face of the original novel was simply viewed as mindless (but still fun) sci-fi bug action by most critics. This didn't prevent a small franchise based on the movie from taking root, and it was later regarded as one of the most entertaining movies of the 90s by Slant Magazine. While Paul Verhoeven managed to recover from Showgirls somewhat with this movie, its domestic bombing ensured it would be his penultimate American movie until Hollow Man; he returned to Europe after this.
  • The Starving Games (2013) — Budget, $8.5 million. Box office, $3,889,688. Although most of Aaron Seltzer and Jason Friedberg's movies up to this point have all been unanimously reviled by critics, this is the first of their spoofs to clearly flop at the box office.
  • State of Grace (1990) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,911,542. This gangster film had the misfortune of being released five days before Goodfellas, which eclipsed it at the box office. Critical reception for this film was still pretty good and it became a Cult Classic years later.
  • States of Grace (2005) — Budget, $800,000. Box office, $203,144.
  • State of Play (2009) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $37,017,955 (domestic), $87,812,371 (worldwide). This was part of a string of flops and overbudget films in production that cost Universal chairman Marc Smuger his job.
  • The Statement (2003) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $1.5 million. Norman Jewison never directed another film again after this movie flopped in its limited release.
  • State Fair (1962) — Budget, $4.4 million. Box office, $3.5 million. This remake of the 1945 movie musical by Rodgers and Hammerstein and the third film version of Phillip Strong's novel was greeted with critical and financial apathy. This is unambigously agreed to be Rodgers and Hammerstein's biggest film failure note  and Fox itself considers it an Old Shame. This was the final film directed by Jose Ferrer.
  • Stateside (2004) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $174,318. This shipped out of theaters after its third weekend.
  • Stay (2005) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $8,342,132. This was mauled by critics and audiences so badly that it lost all but 63 theaters by its third week and was in only one theater on its sixth and final week.
  • Stay Tuned (1992) — Budget, $25 million. Box Office, $10,736,401. This was Not Screened for Critics, who gave it mixed reviews once they saw it. It was later saved by showings on HBO.
  • Steal Big Steal Little (1995) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $3,150,170. This was one of a series of busts that did in Savoy Pictures a few months later.
  • Stealing Harvard (2002) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,277,032. The film ensured Tom Green could only get cast in B to C-level cinematic films. It also ensured director and actor Bruce McCulloch would not direct another major film and damaged the careers of the writers.
  • Stealing Home (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $7,467,504. Struck out the career of producer Hank Moonjean, who retired after this and a few 1988 successes, and put a serious dent in the career of director Steven Kampmann.
  • Stealth (2005) — Budget, $135 million. Box office, $76,932,872. Was also slaughtered by critics, with Roger Ebert calling it a "dumbed down Top Gun crossed with the HAL-9000 pilot from 2001". The film slaughtered the career of writer W.D. Richter, who never received another credit in Hollywood until getting attached to a remake of Big Trouble in Little China.
  • Steel (1997) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $1,710,972. The movie only confirmed that basketball legend Shaquille O'Neal should "stick to hoops." He would not be in a movie where he played a fictional character rather than himself again until Smurfs 2. Steel, along with Batman & Robin and an assist in the infamous Superman 64 1999 video game, quashed DC Comics' dominance in the industry, and Marvel would fully take over as the alpha comic book company from that point to now starting with the first Blade movie the next year, 1998, before picking up steam with the original X-Men in 2000. DC wouldn't recover until Batman Begins in 2005. Steel also slam-dunked the directing/writing career of Kenneth Johnson; after this bomb, he did two Disney Channel TV movies in 1999, and then he didn't write or create another show or script until 2007, just directing TV episodes in the meantime; he's also never returned to the Cineplex or taken another producer credit on anything.
  • Steel Dawn (1987) - Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $562,000. Ended up being Doug Lefler's only screenwriting credit, and Lance Hool wouldn't direct another movie for twelve years.
  • Step Up: All In (2014) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $14,904,384 (domestic), $86,165,646 (worldwide). This seems to have finished off the Step Up franchise after five films.
  • The Stepfather (1987) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $2.4 million. Earned a lot of good reviews and became a Cult Classic, though. It still managed to spawn a few sequels (in 1989 and 1992) and a remake in 2009.
  • The Stepford Wives (2004) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $59,484,742 (domestic), $102,001,626 (worldwide). This case of "remakitis" was heavily criticized for swapping the thriller/horror elements of the base novel and 1975 film in favor of being a comedy. It derailed Paul Rudnick's cinematic career, as he's never written another screenplay and, apart from script revisions in 2006, did not get another writing credit until a TV movie in 2016. It's also the second-to-last film Frank Oz has directed. The movie's matters weren't helped when reports of a Troubled Production and tension between Oz and the film's cast surfaced.
  • Steve Jobs (2015) — Budget, $30 million (not counting marketing costs), $60 million (counting them). Box office, $17,766,658 (domestic), $34,441,873 (worldwide). Despite highly positive reception and breaking numerous records on its initial limited run, the biopic of the namesake legendary tech icon opened at just $7.2 million on its opening weekend when it was widely released. It had a notorious Troubled Production (Sony ended up dropping the film for Universal to pick up thanks to disputes over creative direction) and was disowned by the estate of Jobs as well as Apple CEO Tim Cook over its presumed negative portrayal of the Apple founder, despite having never saw the film themselves by the time they made their complaints (one of Jobs's colleagues from Disney/Pixar, Ed Catmull, also criticized the film). Universal ultimately pulled it from all but a handful of theaters about a month after its release due to continuous poor performance — they'd end up doing the same with another disaster not one week later. The start of a very bad string for Michael Fassbender.
  • Stick (1985) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $8,489,518. It opened at number one on its first weekend but it crashed and burned immediately after. Star/Director Burt Reynolds would wait eight years before he occupied the director's chair again with the TV film, The Man from Left Field.
  • Still of the Night (1982) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $5,979,947. This Hitchcockian thriller is an Old Shame for Meryl Streep, whose Oscar-winning role in Sophie's Choice followed a few weeks later. Director/co-writer Robert Benton rebounded with his next Oscar-winner, Places in the Heart.
  • The Sting II (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,347,042. This In Name Only sequel to the 1973 Best Picture Oscar winner achieved neither the critical or financial success of its predecessor.
  • Stoker (2013) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,714,221 (domestic), $12,077,441 (worldwide). The first English-language film by Park Chan-wook got generally good reviews but never got out of a limited release. This was also the first of three films produced by Tony Scott released after his death.
  • Stolen (2012) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $2,106,558. This got kicked out of theaters after two weeks.
  • Stone (2010) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $9,479,718. The last film released by Starz's ill-fated film division, Overture Films.
  • Stonewall (2015) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $186,354. This film, based on the riot at New York City's Stonewall Inn that started the gay rights movement, was doomed to failure once director Roland Emmerich cast a heterosexual white male in the lead, then played extremely fast and extremely loose with the facts surrounding the event. The entire LGBT community was quick to condemn the film once the first trailer came out, and some comments from Emmerich defending his decisions didn't help matters. Then the first weekend's box office came in, and everyone rushed to declare Stonewall a bigger disaster film than Emmerich's actual disaster films like 2012 or The Day After Tomorrow.
  • Stone Cold (1991) — Budget, $17-25 million. Box office, $9,151,887. Froze director Craig R. Baxley's cinematic career solid; apart from one 1997 film and the third Kirk Cameron Left Behind movie (which premiered in churches), Baxley's future movies are made for TV. Star Brian Bosworth, who made his cinematic debut with this film, didn't appear in another movie until 1995.
  • Stop Loss (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11 million. Got decent reviews, but it still stopped director/writer Kimberly Peirce's and co-writer Mark Richard's cinematic careers dead in their tracks. Richard never worked on another movie, while Peirce didn't write at all ever again and didn't direct another film until 2013.
  • Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot (1992) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $28.4 million (domestic), $70,611,210 (worldwide). Sylvester Stallone absolutely despises having been in this movie, calling it the worst movie he did and joking it was "one of the worst films in the entire solar system, including alien productions we've never seen" and "a flatworm could write a better script". He also claims he punishes his children by forcing them to watch it. He and director Roger Spottiswoode recovered with other movies, but the "mom", Estelle Getty, took critical damage to her career, since she did not appear in another theatrical film until Stuart Little at the end of the 90's and only appeared in that plus one more movie before she was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia (the disease that led to Robin Williams committing suicide), which eventually claimed her life. One of the writers of the film's "flatworm could write better" script, Blake Snyder, only did one more movie, Disney's Blank Check, before he vanished from Hollywood, and co-producer Michael C. Gross retired from filmmaking shortly afterwards.
  • The Story of Us (1999) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $27,100,031 (domestic), $58,900,031 (worldwide). This romantic dramedy starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Bruce Willis was roundly criticized for its writing and lack of chemistry between the two leads. Another box-office bust for Rob Reiner, and writer Alan Zweibel (who co-wrote Reiner's infamous North) hasn't written another feature film screenplay since.
  • Straight to Hell (1987) — Budget, $1,000,000. Box office, $210,200. This film and Walker's very poor performances immediately sentenced Repo Men director Alex Cox to the C-list of Hollywood moviemakers; he has only been able to scrape enough money to make Direct-to-Video films since. This one, however, became a Cult Classic.
  • The Straight Story (1999) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,197,866 (domestic). This true-life story was David Lynch's first and only film that did not deal with Mind Screw, as well as his only Disney film. It was a highly Acclaimed Flop that earned an Oscar nomination for Richard Farnsworth in his last film.
  • Strange Days (1995) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $7,959,291. This is one of two bombs for James Cameron's Lightstorm Entertainment, with Solaris being the other (neither were directed by Cameron). Co-writer Jay Cooks went 7 years without another screenwriting credit (he did some rewriting to Titanic, but he was not credited for that).
  • Strange Invaders (1983) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $1,362,303. This was meant to be the second part of a trilogy, but the weak returns got the third part sent into orbit. Director Michael Laughlin did not hang around Hollywood for much longer.
  • Strange Magic (2015) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $12,429,583 (domestic), $13,603,453 (worldwide). Its opening weekend was only $5.5 million, making it the all-time worst-opening ever for an animated film in 3000+ theaters. This can be mostly blamed on Disney releasing it in January with minimal advertising under the dying Touchstone Pictures brand, which at this point was only being used for live-action DreamWorks films and as their sort of equivalent to Alan Smithee, and it being a Juke Box Musical that critics despised. This film's failure could be the final bust to convince George Lucas to not try any more daring endeavors after his name became Snark Bait starting in the late 90s, and it would ultimately become the only Lucasfilm Animation production not tied to the Star Wars franchise.
  • Strange Wilderness (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6,964,734. Worth noting for the fact that its distributor, Creator/Paramount, removed its logo from the beginning, perhaps out of shame; much like DreamWorks Animation's 2006-2012 filmography, it only appears at the very end of the movie with a "Distributed by" tag on it.
  • A Stranger Among Us (1992) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $12,282,994.
  • Straw Dogs (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,324,441. This remake of the 1971 film sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years. It got generally mixed reviews from critics who derided the film for glorifying violence and was forced out of theaters after four weeks. Rod Lurie didn't direct again until the TV movie Killing Reagan.
  • The Stray (2017) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $1,579,440 (domestic). This movie was dumped with very little fanfare the same weekend as Blade Runner 2049, The Mountain Between Us, and My Little Pony: The Movie, and while all three of those films underperformed, they still made more money in their opening weekends than The Stray did in its entire lifetime.
  • Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li (2009) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $12,764,201. A video game movie based solely on a popular character, it sunk most of its inbuilt fanbase's interest when they cast Kristin Kreuk as the Chinese character of Chun Li. Any accusations of whitewashing aside, this was an indication that the makers of the movie were discarding whatever (admittedly flimsy) canon information there was to be had about the character and her world to make an "In Name Only" film. The film became the second Stillborn Franchise for Street Fighter movies after Jean-Claude Van Damme's version 15 years prior also got derided by critics, and this one hammered the cinematic careers of most of the crew; Kreuk moved to a steady job on the Beauty and the Beast TV show reboot in 2012, but director Andrzej Bartkowiak didn't direct again until 2017 and screenwriter Justin Marks didn't write again until Jon Favreau's take on Walt Disney's The Jungle Book in 2016.
  • Streets of Fire (1984) — Budget, $14.5 million. Box Office, $8,089,290. This movie was originally pitched to Paramount, but wound up being distributed by MCA/Universal instead. Paramount executive Jeffrey Katzenberg's confrontation with producer Larry Gordon over it and Gordon's next film Brewster's Millions torched Gordon's friendship with Paramount/Disney boss Michael Eisner for 2 years. The film getting only OK reviews from critics (it still got a fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes) and opening against Paramount's Star Trek III: The Search for Spock led to plans for a trilogy with the lead character of this film crashing and burning (an unofficial "sequel" was made in 2008). Co-writer Larry Gross was dismayed by the film's reception, and the project led to his cinematic career grinding to a halt for the rest of the 1980's. However, despite the film's failure in its country of origin, it found success in Japan, which lead to the creation of Bubblegum Crisis and Capcom's Street Fighter.
  • Street Smart (1987) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $1,119,112. This is one of the movies that eventually did in The Cannon Group, and is the second bust for them and Christopher Reeve after Superman IV in 1987 (alongside Masters of the Universe the same year for The Cannon Group alone); Reeve had agreed to do the Superman movie to fund this one. This gave Morgan Freeman a major career boost and his first Oscar nomination, so all was not lost.
  • Striking Distance (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $24,107,867. This faced a massively Troubled Production which dealt with extensive re-shoots and problematic behavior by star Bruce Willis among other issues. Willis did apologize for the film later on, though.
  • Striptease (1996) — Budget, $40-50 million. Box office, $33,109,743 (domestic), $113,309,743 (worldwide). Came out one year after another Razzie-winning Hot and Sexy film, Showgirls, and it derailed the career of director Andrew Bergman, who only made one more movie 4 years later. It was also a factor in derailing Demi Moore's top A-list status.
  • Stroker Ace (1983) — Budget, $16.5 million. Box office, $13 million. Burt Reynolds later said doing this NASCAR comedy instead of Terms of Endearment was his biggest mistake. Critics were more than happy to agree with him.
  • Stronger (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $5.5 million. This biopic of Boston Marathon Survivor Jeff Bauman received glowing reviews, especially for Jake Gyllenhaal's performance as Bauman, but its limited release hasn't done it any favors. As with Patriots Day, which was released about a year earlier, its Too Soon topic may have been its detriment.
  • Stuart Little 2 (2002) — Budget, $120 million. Box office, $65 million (domestic), $170 million (worldwide). Despite being considered a Surprisingly Improved Sequel by critics, it seriously damaged the viability of Stuart Little; a third film went Direct-to-Video, and an animated spinoff only lasted 13 episodes, with not much being done with the book afterwards. Writer Bruce Joel Rubin had to take a 5-year hiatus from writing screenplays.
  • Stuart Saves His Family (1995) — Budget, $6.3 million. Box office, $912,082. This movie's failure put a temporary halt on the previously successful Saturday Night Live films until A Night at the Roxbury three years later.
  • Stuck on You (2003) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $33,832,741 (domestic), $65,784,503 (worldwide). This got lost in a crowded holiday season, but it was one of the Farrelly Brothers' best reviewed movies.
  • The Stupids (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $2,491,989. Was critically blasted as well. One of the 3 career-halting films with Tom Arnold released that year and part of a string of busts for director John Landis.
  • Suburban Commando (1991) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $7 million. This sci-fi comedy starring Hulk Hogan and Christopher Lloyd was universally panned by critics and it was the final film for veteran Western director Burt Kennedy. It subsequently became a Cult Classic, particularly for Lloyd's character's exasperated declaration of "I WAS FROZEN TODAY!"
  • Suburbicon (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,048,590. This George Clooney dark comedy based off a script by The Coen Brothers crashed and burned with critics and audiences, mainly due to its Mood Whiplash and its failure to balance its two storylines. Its opening weekend was Paramount's worst wide release opening ever, and it left theaters after only three weeks.
  • Sucker Punch (2011) — Budget, $82 million. Box office, $36,392,502 (domestic), $89,792,502 (worldwide). This Zack Snyder film's marketing campaign couldn't clarify if this was an Animesque action movie with Fanservice or a Deconstruction of such. Audiences of both spectrums were turned off and those who saw it were left confounded. It promptly fell flat in the box office. It's starting to become a Cult Classic.
  • Sudden Death (1995) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $20,350,171 (domestic), $64,350,171 (worldwide). Killed writer Gene Quintano's cinematic career for 6 years.
  • Summer Catch (2001) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $19,772,447. This film took Freddie Prinze Jr. off the A-List.
  • Summer Lovers (1982) — Budget, $5,000,000. Box office, $4,968,000. Like many films that summer, it was buried by the success of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. It inspired a real-life gift shop of the same name in Greece. It's also remembered for its soundtrack, which included Hard To Say I'm Sorry and So Excited
  • Summer of Sam (1999) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $19,288,130. This Spike Lee film about the Son of Sam serial killings got mixed reviews from critics and fell flat during the Fourth of July weekend led by Wild Wild West.
  • Sugar & Spice (2001) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $16.9 million. Was director Francine McDougall's theatrical debut; since its failure she has yet to do another one, mainly sticking to television features now.
  • The Sunchaser (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $21,508. Michael Cimino's first film since Desperate Hours, his behavior with this film and its failure in its limited test run, which sent it Direct-to-Video, killed off what was left of his career and reputation. Cimino was never heard from in Hollywood again after 1996, but he did write a few books in the early 2000s and directed the No Translation Needed segment of the French anthology film To Each His Own Cinema.
  • Sunset (1988) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $4,594,452. Sunset was writer Rod Amateau's final film credit, and its failure along with the creation of The Garbage Pail Kids Movie completely shredded his career.
  • Sunshine (2007) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $32.1 million. It fell victim to a botched advertising campaign which misrepresented its final-act twist as the main plot. Its limited release didn't help either. Danny Boyle bounced back with Slumdog Millionaire the very next year, and the other major players saw their careers survive.
  • Super (2011) — Budget, $2.5 million. Box office, $327,716. This is director James Gunn's lowest-grossing movie, though its limited release played a major role in that outcome. It did better with its simultaneous VOD (where it did make back its money and then some), which allowed Gunn to rebound with Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • The Super (1991) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $11 million. This was Vincent Gardenia's final film.
  • Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 (2004) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9.4 million. This was the last movie that Bob Clark directed before he died. It was reviewed even worse than the original, having a 0% on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • Super Capers (2009) — Budget, $2,000,000. Box office, $30,955. Yes, that's around 1.5% of its budget made up. The only other movie director Ray Griggs did was a documentary on the fiscal crisis, I Want Your Money.
  • Super Mario Bros. (1993) — Budget, $42 million (not counting marketing costs), $48 million (counting them). Box office, $20,915,465. Squashed an attempt by Disney, who distributed the film through Hollywood Pictures, to integrate Nintendo into their business note (Comcast/Universal would get the chance to integrate Nintendo into their business in 2015). Sadly started the Video-Game Movies Suck trend, which continues to this day. The drastically different take on Mario and the Development Hell it went through also led to Nintendo mandating that, besides the one-off case of the Japan-only Animal Crossing anime film, none of their franchises outside Pokémon be adapted into movies, and when Nintendo decided to change their minds in 2016, they decided to go their own way (à la Marvel Studios) rather than license the characters to film studios, and make them animated films rather than live-action ones. This is the film Bob Hoskins, who played Mario, considered to be his biggest Old Shame, and co-stars John Leguizamo, who played Luigi, and Dennis Hopper, who played Koopa/Bowser, also did not have anything nice to say about it (series creator Shigeru Miyamoto was much more forgiving than they were). This movie and Medicine Man were very poor starts to co-production company Cinergi Pictures' business (it was somewhat offset by Tombstone the same year), and another production company, Allied Filmmakers, never had another successful film after this; both closed by 2000 (Cinergi was finished off by another Disney-distributed film, Burn Hollywood Burn). The husband-and-wife directing team of Annabel Jankel and Rocky Morton, who Hoskins, Leguizamo and Hopper all disdained, never worked on another theatrical film, and the movie, along with The Scarlet Letter, would begin producer Roland Joffe's drop into the B and then C lists of producers/directors.
  • Supercross (2005) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $3 million (domestic). Apparently fared a little better outside America.
  • Superfast (2015) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1.8 million. The second bomb in a row for the duo of Seltzer and Friedberg.
  • Supergirl (1984) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $14.2 million. The film's failure was possibly a reason why superheroine movies were a wasteland for decades. It also lead to the Salkinds selling the Superman film rights to the Cannon Group. It would also be a factor in the pre-Crisis Supergirl's death during Crisis on Infinite Earths
  • Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $15,681,080. This ultimately did in The Cannon Group, nuked the career of Mark Pillow, who played a villain, and put the Superman film franchise in hibernation until...
    • Superman Returns (2006) — Budget, $270 million. Box office, $200,081,192 (domestic), $391,081,192 (worldwide). This became a stillborn attempt to revive the original Superman film series continuity, which resulted in a planned sequel getting canceled and another hiatus for films about the character until DC/Warner rebooted the series altogether in 2013 with Man of Steel to start the DC Extended Universe (that film would also be the next theatrical producing job for Jon Peters, who has no cinematic credits between the two films). The failure to spawn a new series based on it also led to director Bryan Singer following in Halle Berry's footsteps and returning to Fox's X-Men film franchise, and it killed the theatrical career of screenwriter Dan Harris until X-Men: Apocalypse a decade later.
  • Supernova (2000) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $14,828,081. Became an Old Shame to director Walter Hill (he even [[Alan Smithee took his name off the film) in addition to being one of the biggest bombs of the 2000's. This is the second film and bomb for David C. Wilson's career after 1991's The Perfect Weapon, and his career was sent back into deep space until The Man From U.N.C.L.E in 2015.
  • Surf's Up (2007) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $58,867,694 (domestic), $149,044,513 (worldwide). Although reviewed well by critics particularly for its water effects and mockumentary style, a lot of people avoided this movie like the plague for its "surfing penguins" premise alone, due to it coming out after both March of the Penguins and Happy Feet caused a considerable Hype Backlash against penguin movies. Co-director Chris Buck didn't direct for 6 years (he rebounded with Frozen), and the other director, Ash Brannon, wouldn't direct again until 2016. A sequel to this would show up, but it would be 10 years later and on direct-to-VOD.
  • Surrogates (2009) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $38,577,772 (domestic), $122,444,772 (worldwide). This sci-fi thriller was released the week after Disney chairman Dick Cook was fired and replaced by Rich Ross. It subsequently got mixed reviews from critics and it dropped down after opening at a weak number two. Its failure also derailed the career of director Jonathan Mostow, who later re-emerged to do The Last Ship.
  • Surviving Christmas (2004) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $15,120,800. One of the reasons this film did not survive the box office was being released right before Halloween rather than during Christmas. After this film and Disney's Sky High, director Mike Mitchell has stayed virtually in animation, with almost all of his project as animator from 2007 on being DreamWorks Animation films (he did direct one more live-action Alvin and the Chipmunks movie along with the second SpongeBob SquarePants movie and The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part). It's also the last film Betty Thomas had a producer's credit on, did damage to the careers of the 4 writers on it, was one of several films in that period that dented Ben Affleck's career, and was one of the last straws that led to Steven Spielberg selling DreamWorks Pictures to Paramount for a brief time.
  • Surviving Picasso (1996) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $2,021,348. Its widest release was 49 theaters.
  • Suspect Zero (2004) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $11,416,075. One of several busts that year for Intermedia Films, which ultimately doomed the company a few years later.
  • Suspiria (2018) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2,483,472 (domestic). This remake of Dario Argento's horror film polarized critics with its Surreal Horror and it never expanded beyond a limited release.
  • The Swan Princess (1994) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $9,771,658. This was the first film from former Disney animator Richard Rich's animation company, Rich Animation Studios, and it wasn't a good start for them; it already had a Troubled Production due to being animated by hand-painting cels, a process that led to the film taking four years to complete. It didn't survive a packed holiday season, primarily the re-release of that year's juggernaut The Lion King. However, it did very well when it was released on video (selling over 2.5 million units when it was in print on VHS), leading to a direct-to-video series materializing.
    • The Swan Princess II: Escape from Castle Mountain (1997) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $273,644. This film was released direct-to-video in most countries, and given a very limited one in the United States.
  • The Swarm (1978) — Budget, $11.5 million to $21 million. Box office, $7.6 million. This didn't last more than two weeks in theaters, and was the first of three disaster disasters that blew apart the career of Irwin Allen.
  • Sweet and Lowdown (1999) — Budget, $29,750,000. Box office, $4,197,015 (domestic). Still another Acclaimed Flop from Woody Allen.
  • Sweet Charity (1969) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $8 million. This movie musical was Bob Fosse's directorial debut and Ben Vereen's film debut as well. Its disastrous reception dealt a huge blow to Universal Pictures. Fosse rebounded with his next film, Cabaret.
  • Sweet Dreams (1985) — Budget, $13.5 million. Box office, $9 million. Director Karel Reisz would only direct one more film after this before retiring from the industry and passing away in 2002. It also put a slight dent into actor Ed Harris' leading career, though he did rebound a bit in the following decade. Despite its poor commercial performance it did very well in reviews and Jessica Lange garnered another Oscar nomination for her performance as Patsy Cline.
  • Sweet Hearts Dance (1988) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $3,790,493.
  • Sweet November (2001) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $25,288,103 (domestic), $65,754,228 (worldwide). This movie crippled the careers of the producers and director; said director, Pat O'Connor, didn't direct his next film until 2012.
  • Sweet Smell of Success (1957) – Budget, $3.4 million. Box office, $2.25 million. This film version of Ernest Lehman's novelette debuted to a disastrous test screening but was received warmly by critics. Lehman, who also co-wrote the screenplay, bounced back with North by Northwest, while his co-writer Cliford Odetts had a few more credits before he died in 1963. Director Alexander Mackendrick wouldn't make another film until 1963.
  • The Sweetest Thing (2002) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $24,718,164 (domestic), $68,696,770 (worldwide).This is the one and only screenplay written by Nancy Pimental. It was heavily panned by critics and was gone by its sixth weekend.
  • Swept Away (2002) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $598,645. This adaptation of the 1974 film got labeled a terminal case of "remakitis" by critics and later the Razzies, and only played on 196 screens in the States, going down to 59 for the last week before Sony pulled the film; it also went Direct-to-Video in the United Kingdom. Madonna was so dismayed by the reception that she hasn't appeared in a starring live-action role since. Director Guy Ritchie and writer Matthew Vaughn, on the other hand, bounced back after a couple of years.
  • Swing Kids (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $5,632,086. Thomas Carter's directorial debut received mixed reviews, including a spot on Roger Ebert's Most Hated Film List. Its limited release of 544 theaters didn't help either.
  • Swing Shift (1984) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6,650,206. This suffered from difficulties between director Jonathan Demme and star Goldie Hawn over the tone of the film. It did receive good reviews, but writer Nancy Dowd did not share the sentiment due to the numerous rewrites and is credited as “Rob Morton.” It was also the only credit to Jerry Bick Productions. It is perhaps best known nowadays as the film where Hawn and Kurt Russell met and fell in love during the making of the production.
  • Swing Vote (2008) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $17,634,313.
  • Switchback (1997) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $6,492,660. Writer Jeb Stuart's directorial debut and his last film credit of any kind until 2010's Blood Done Sign My Name.
  • Switching Channels (1988) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $9,129,999. This remake of The Front Page was an Old Shame for Christopher Reeve, who took on the project to help deal with his divorce when Michael Caine was originally attached. Reeve instead had to deal with the Hostility on the Set between Burt Reynolds (who replaced Caine) and Kathleen Turner. He cited this as a Star-Derailing Role for him along with The Aviator, Superman IV: The Quest for Peace and Street Smart.
  • Swordfish (2001) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $69,772,969 (domestic), $147,080,413 (worldwide). This high-tech heist thriller, helmed by Dominic Sena and produced by Joel Silver, was critically pulverized for its far-fetched plot, excessive flashiness, and its dearth of sympathetic characters.
  • Sydney White (2007) — Budget, $16.5 million. Box office, $13,620,075. This was the final theatrical film produced by Morgan Creek Productions until 2011; they produced Ace Ventura Jr: Pet Detective in the interim.
  • Sylvia Scarlett (1935) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, Unknown, but by 1984, the film was still in the red. This film was one of the biggest critical and commercial failures of its time and contributed to Katharine Hepburn being considered "box office poison" for a few years, but time has been kinder to it.
  • Synecdoche, New York (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $4,393,681. This was writer Charlie Kaufmann's directorial debut and it would be seven years before he was involved with another theatrical film, Anomalisa.
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  • Tai Pan (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $4,007,250. MGM sought to make a film version of James Clavell's novel as early as 1966, but the studio's financial troubles cast it into Development Hell until Dino De Laurentiis saved it in the 80's. It was filmed in China under extensive Executive Meddling from the government, and De Laurentiis later came to regret filming the movie there. The end result was one of several busts that ultimately piled up and broke De Laurentiis's company, DEG. It also ended director Daryl Duke's film career and he spent the next six years in television before retiring.
  • Take Me Home Tonight (2011) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $6.9 million. This retro 80's teen comedy sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for four years due to Universal getting cold feet from the film's cocaine use. Rogue Pictures bought the distribution rights and while it died a quiet death at the box office, it has since become a Cult Classic.
  • The Taking of Beverly Hills (1991) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $939,277. Columbia Pictures took the film off its Spring 1991 slate and released it that Fall with Invisible Advertising and a limited release. This film and The Favor were the last two feature films Ken Wahl starred in before permanently breaking his back in a 1992 accident, which forced him to retire from acting.
  • The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (2009) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $65,452,312 (domestic), $150,166,126 (worldwide). This remake of the 1974 film was the penultimate film directed by Tony Scott. Its mixed reviews and tough competition that summer derailed its chances for success.
  • Taking Lives (2004) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $32,682,342 (domestic), $65,470,529 (worldwide). This was part of a bad year for Village Roadshow Pictures, with Torque and Catwoman coming later to bomb. Ethan Hawke didn't like his time on the movie but he did like working with Angelina Jolie.
  • Taking Woodstock (2009) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $9,975,737. Ang Lee's film about the Woodstock Music Festival, released on the 40th anniversary of the event, was released to mixed reviews and a wide release topping out at 1,395 theaters. It was subsequently pulled after five weeks. The screenplay was written by James Schamus, the head of distributor Focus Features, who was consequently forced out of the company after this bombed. It would be five years before his next credit, the short film That Film about Money. Lee's next film did far better with critics and audiences.
  • The Tale of Despereaux (2008) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $50,877,145 (domestic), $86,947,965 (worldwide). The first and only film by Framestore Feature Animation, the film division of visual effects house Framestore.
  • The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (2013, 2014) — Budget, 5 billion yen/$49.3 million. Box office, 2.313,602,733 yen/$22,613,153 (Japanese box office), 2.5 billion yen/$24,186,232 (worldwide). Still one of the most critically acclaimed films that year; this was the first anime not done by Hayao Miyazaki to be an Oscar nominee. It's also the final film for director Isao Takahata, as he retired in 2014 and died of lung cancer four years later.
  • Tall Tale (1995) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $11,047,627. The first of three career-zapping bombs for Jeremiah Chechik.
  • Tank Girl (1995) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $4,064,495. In addition to being a Star-Derailing Role for Lori Petty, who played the titular character, this movie immediately became an Old Shame for co-star Naomi Watts and the creators of the Tank Girl comic, Alan Martin and Jamie Hewlett, who were brought in to animate a handful of scenes when incompetent producers and Executive Meddling left those scenes unfilmed, an experience they despised. When the movie tanked, Martin & Hewlett responded by discontinuing the main comic for 10 years, and said incompetent producers saw their careers get shelled, plus Rachel Talalay never directed another movie again, and only did one more cinematic release.
  • Teacher's Pet (2004) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,491,969. Although it was well-received by critics, this film's underperformance seems to have euthanized any plans for future theatrical films based on a Disney animated series, as not a single one has been released since; any films based off Disney animated series since then have been either direct-to-video or straight-to-television. Alongside Disney continually screwing over its parent series, the underperformance of this film is also a likely reason why it, outside of the movie, has never seen a full DVD or digital release.
  • Teaching Mrs. Tingle (1999) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $8,951,935. This is the only film directed by Scream vet Kevin Williamson. The fact that the movie was released shortly after the Columbine High School massacre and had to change its title (from Killing Mrs. Tingle) did not help it at all.
  • Team America: World Police (2004) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $32,786,074 (domestic), $50,907,422 (worldwide). The film's Troubled Production turned Trey Parker and Matt Stone off from making further feature films forevermore; they stuck exclusively to their signature series South Park on television after this, only (successfully) branching off into theater with The Book Of Mormon several years later.
  • Tears of the Sun (2003) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $43,734,876 (domestic), $86,468,162 (worldwide). The start of a lousy year for Revolution Studios, with Hollywood Homicide and Gigli following.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows (2016) — Budget, $135 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $82,051,601 (domestic), $245,623,848 (worldwide). While the movie did get slightly better reviews than the first one from 2014 and a bit warmer reception from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fans for introducing Casey Jones, Bebop and Rocksteady to these movies, it was released during one of the most brutal summer seasons Hollywood has ever had in recent years, having to go up against Universal/Legendary's Warcraft (which involved TMNT co-investor Dalian Wanda), Fox/Marvel's X-Men: Apocalypse, original TMNT film trilogy helmer New Line's The Conjuring 2, and Disney/Pixar's Finding Dory, among others. As a result, it could not share the box office with them the way the original did with Disney/Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy. TMNT: Out of the Shadows was also released in the midst of an equally brutal management feud at copyright holder Viacom between CEO Philippe Dauman and founder and former friend Sumner Redstone when Viacom's financial problems led to estranged daughter Shari Redstone entering the picture and being part of the group that got Dauman and four other Viacom board members thrown off the board, with Dauman losing his spot in Sumner's trust and subsequently having to leave Viacom/Paramount on very acrimonious terms (Dauman was responsible in part for losing both sides of Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg's DreamWorks SKG, which eventually ended up at Comcast/Universal after stints at Disney and Fox). While the plan on Paramount/Nickelodeon is for a series of TMNT films, the underperformance of this second installment, according to interviews, deshelled the movie series after only two outings. This is also the second bust in a row for producer Michael Bay, coming months after 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.
  • Tekken (2010) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $1,696,665. One of the examples of Video-Game Movies Suck; this one was disemboweled by the creator of the Tekken franchise, Katsuhiro Harada (the film plays up a bit of honor in the Mishima fighting family, which does not exist in the games; the games make them one of the all-time classic examples of Big, Screwed-Up Family). It got mediocre reviews from other gaming factions and only ran in theaters in Japan and the Philippines, coming Direct-to-Video in the States when the bad reception got it kicked out of American theaters before it could run. Tekken K.Oed the career of director Dwight Little, who stuck to television for years, and the career of screenwriter Alan McElroy, who does not have a screenwriting credit after this, moving on to smaller stuff. The film had a prequel concerning Kazuya Mishima that also went Direct To DVD 5 years later (Kazuya's actor Ian Anthony Dale did not reprise the role), and there are plans to reboot the film franchise.
  • The Telephone (1988) — Budget, $2.2 million. Box office, $99,978. Whoopi Goldberg sued Rip Torn, who directed the film, in a failed attempt to stop its release, and it was greeted at its New York screening by cries of "I want my money back!" and "I hope the film breaks!" from the audience. Torn never directed another movie, and the film's producers saw their careers derailed, plus Harry Nilsson and Terry Southern never wrote another screenplay.
  • The Temp (1993) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6.4 million. This was hit by Executive Meddling over the tone of the movie. It was consequently panned by critics and it didn't have a good stay in theaters.
  • Tempest (1982) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5 million. This Setting Update of The Tempest was one of several flops for Paul Mazursky in the early 80's, who officially recovered with Down and Out in Beverly Hills. It's best remembered for being Molly Ringwald's film debut.
  • The Tempest (2010) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $346,594. This movie and the highly-publicized Troubled Production of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark and eventual 8-figure loss on the Broadway play threw Julie Taymor, who directed both productions (and was forced to quit/was fired from Spider-Man), into the C-list of Broadway/Hollywood directors. It was also one of the last, if not the last, Miramax films released by Disney as they sold the division to Filmyard Holdings around the same time, though this film was released through the Touchstone Pictures label so Disney could retain the rights.
  • The Ten Commandments (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,051,907. Despite having big names such as Christian Slater and Ben Kingsley attached, this animated adaptation of the classic movie and bible story performed horribly at the box office, with 90% of its gross coming from domestic theaters. The film also got terrible reviews, scoring a 14% on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (2006) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,908,762. While it didn't do so well, it still remains a Cult Classic to Tenacious D fans everywhere.
  • Tender Mercies (1983) — Budget, $4.5 million. Box office, $8.44 million. Although this country music drama was a critical smash, ultimately getting Oscars for star Robert Duvall and screenwriter Horton Foote, Universal gave it a limited release with Invisible Advertising after poor test screenings.
  • Texas Rangers (2001) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $763,740. Sat on a shelf for two years before being shoved out to theaters. Director Steve Miner wouldn't direct another theatrical film for nine years.
  • Texasville (1990) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $2,268,181. The sequel to The Last Picture Show brought back most of the cast and director Peter Bogdanovich, but the first film wasn't as familiar to filmgoers 19 years later, and Columbia Pictures didn't really put in an effort to try to attract an audience and ultimately gave it a small release.
  • Terminal Velocity (1994) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $16,487,349. Director Dean Sarafian went straight to TV work after this skydiving thriller crashed to Earth.
  • Terminator Genisys (2015) — Budget, $155 million. Box office, $90 million (domestic), $441 million (worldwide). The director of the original two classics, James Cameron, praised the film, but that love was not shared by critics or American audiences. Its poor domestic performance and tepid reception among critics, fans, and audiences caused Paramount to shelve the sequels to this iteration of the series. It harmed director Alan Taylor's career (he was also extremely displeased with the big Plot Twist of the film getting leaked in the marketing campaign); he's had career issues since but is still around. This film also more or less proved that Arnold Schwarzenegger, who reprised the Terminator role, is not a leading man anymore, ensured Emilia Clarke, who played this film's version of Sarah Connor, will still be remembered for her role in Game of Thrones for a bit (she's also refused to be associated with the character after this), put a crutch on the career of Jason Clarke, is part of a bad string for Jai Courtney, would have put a dent in Matt Smith's career were it not for his involvement in The Crown the following year, and helped get Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman terminated the next year. Cameron was contracted by current copyright holder Skydance for another Terminator film that will disregard Genisys, with Deadpool's Tim Miller directing.
  • Thank You For Your Service (2017) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9,479,390 (domestic). One of two consecutive flops for Miles Teller, released the week after his other one, Only the Brave, this adaptation of the non-fiction book continued the long streak of films centered on The War On Terror floundering at the box office.
  • That Lady in Ermine (1948) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $1.5 million (rentals). This was the final film for director Ernst Lubistch, who died only eight days into production. Replacement director Otto Preminger declined credit out of respect for Lubistch. This floundered at the box-office and stars Betty Grable and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. deemed it an Old Shame.
  • That Old Feeling (1997) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $16,574,176. This is the final film Carl Reiner has directed before he retired.
  • Thats Life (1986) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $4,079,895. Blake Edwards shot this independently and he dealt with Union Protests which forced the original Cinematographer to resign.
  • That's My Boy (2012) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $57,719,093. Part of a string of box office busts for Adam Sandler, and screenwriter David Caspe has barely been on the radar since. It also didn't do co-star Andy Samberg a whole lot of good, either.
  • That's What I Am (2011) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,400. It only played in ten theaters and closed after three days, but in comparison to other WWE films, got decent reviews.
  • There Be Dragons (2011) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $4,372,642. This movie confirmed the utter incineration of Roland Joffe's career. His next film, The Lovers/Time Traveler, spent years struggling to be properly released.
  • They (2002) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $16,130,385. Despite the ads prominently featuring his name, the only thing Wes Craven had to do with this horror film was being a "presenter"—so basically, nothing at all. Critics didn't find it scary enough and it promptly faded away at the box office.
  • They All Laughed (1981) — Budget, $8.6 million. Box office, Unknown, but it didn't crack the $1 million mark. The murder of one of the film's stars, Dorothy Stratten, and the controversy surrounding it, caused 20th Century Fox to drop the film, leading to director (and Stratten's lover) Peter Bogdanovich to buy the film and distribute it himself, which ultimately forced him into bankruptcy. Although an Acclaimed Flop, it is one of the films that ended the New Hollywood era and Bogdanovich was relegated to being a director-for-hire for the next two decades.
  • The Thief and the Cobbler (1993) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $669,276 (no, we didn't mistype it). What Could Have Been perhaps a milestone in animation turned into one of the biggest flops of all time. The film started production in 1964, and was in production for nearly three decades because Richard Williams tried to completely finance it independently (a technique he was noted for in many of his projects) and failed to complete it on the deadline the studio set for him. It was then taken from him and then turned into a saccharine musical that borrowed elements from Aladdinnote  after it had borrowed elements from The Thief And The Cobbler, a move The Nostalgia Critic called "animated inbreeding." The film managed to secure distribution in South Africa and Australia in 1993 and bombed in both countries, and was released in the United States by Miramax in 1995 with even more modifications. Richard Williams refuses to acknowledge any part of the film for nearly 20 years and regrets having completion insurance for it, and his filmography would be nonexistent until 2010, and low-key after.
  • The Thing (1982) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $19 million. It received mixed to negative reviews for its graphic effects and bleak tone and it didn't stand a chance in the summer of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. It also didn't help that Blade Runner, another dark sci-fi film, was released the same day and ultimately eclipsed it. The film found an audience on home video and has since been Vindicated by History.
  • The Thing (2011) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $27,428,670. One of numerous bombs produced by co-distributor Morgan Creek Productions, the failure of this film led to the company going on hiatus. Their next film, All Eyez on Me, wouldn't be released until six years later.
  • The Thin Red Line (1998) — Budget, $52 million. Box office, $36,400,491 (domestic), $98,126,565 (worldwide). Terrence Malick's first film in 20 years was this adaptation of James Jones's novel. Critics liked it quite a bit, though not as much as the year's other World War II film, Saving Private Ryan. The reclusive Malick waited seven years to direct again.
  • The Thing Called Love (1993) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $1,029,721. The last feature film by Peter Bogdanovich before he took the rest of the 20th century off. It was also River Phoenix's last completed film before his death later that year.
  • Things We Lost In The Fire (2007) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $8,547,733. This got generally good reviews but its box-office fire burned out after three weeks.
  • The Third Miracle (2000) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, $591,142. It's an understandable gross considering its release topped out at 30 theaters and it left after 73 days.
  • Third Person (2014) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $2,619,194. Its US release topped out at 227 theaters, which it slowly expanded to over four weeks, and it bottomed out soon after. It lasted in theaters for a total of 14 weeks but director Paul Haggis has yet to take on another project after this failure.
  • Thirteen Days (2000) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $66,579,890. This was a highly Acclaimed Flop that opened in limited release late in the year and expanded a few weeks later to wide-release.
  • The Thirteenth Floor (1999) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $11,916,661 (domestic), $18,564,088 (worldwide). Director Josef Rusnak's next two films went Direct-to-Video, then returned to the big screen in 2008 with his It's Alive remake.
  • This Boy's Life (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,104,962. While well-reviewed by critics, this movie never escaped a limited release.
  • This is My Life (1992) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $2,922,024. Julie Kavner has not had a leading role in a film since, outside of her playing Marge Simpson in The Simpsons Movie.
  • This Means War! (2012) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $54,760,791 (domestic), $156.4 million (worldwide). This movie, along with her previous flops, completely destroyed Reese Witherspoon's career as a leading lady, as ever since, outside of leading films she produced herself, she's been in supporting roles and cameos. Though she would later make a comeback with Wild.
  • Thomas And The Magic Railroad (2000) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $15,933,506 (domestic), $19.7 million (worldwide). This was the last time child actress Mara Wilson would step in front of a movie camera (she retired in order to focus on school), and the only major theatrical adaptation of the Thomas the Tank Engine children's series thus far. Its own box office failure may have caused the demise of Gullane Entertainment and its takeover by Hit Entertainment in 2002 and also may have played a part behind Alec Baldwin leaving the USA narrations of Thomas & Friends after Series 6.
  • Thoroughbreds (2018) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $2,830,775. An Acclaimed Flop that failed to expand even out of limited release. Some fans harbor hope that it will find a cult following through TV and video, much like Heathers.
  • A Thousand Acres (1997) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $7,936,780. This movie version of the Jane Smiley novel (in turn inspired by Shakespeare's King Lear) was heavily panned by critics, though Jessica Lange got a Golden Globe nomination out of it. Director Jocelyn Moorhouse wouldn't helm another feature until 2015's The Dressmaker.
  • A Thousand Words (2012) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $22,044,277. Filmed in 2008, but was shelved for four years due to Dreamworks breaking away from Paramount. This notably got a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and may very well be the ultimate Career Killer for Eddie Murphy; he didn't appear in another film until 2016's Mr. Church.
  • Three For The Road (1987) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,539,000. Three careers saw a severe downgrade to B-level Hollywood as a result of this movie: Stars Alan Ruck and Kerri Green, whose teenage idol days were cut short prematurely, and director Bill Norton, who was barely heard from until 1994, and hasn't attempted to direct another theatrical film since.
  • The Three Musketeers (2011) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $20,374,484 (domestic), $132,274,484 (worldwide). Milla Jovovich ripped into Summit Entertainment on Twitter over their marketing of the film after its lackluster opening weekend. Audiences and critics found the film So Okay, It's Average, but it did its best business in Japan and Germany.
  • Three of Hearts (1993) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $5,495,507.
  • Three to Tango (1999) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $10,570,375. This romantic comedy helped wreck Matthew Perry's film career, which was decimated period three years later after Serving Sara.
  • Thumbelina (1994) — Budget, $28,000,000. Box office, $11,373,501. A doomed attempt to rescue Don Bluth's studio and take some of Disney's musical share (including casting The Little Mermaid herself, Jodi Benson, as the title character). This didn't help music composer Barry Manilow's career in cinema out much; one of the songs he wrote for the movie, "Marry the Mole", made Thumbelina the only animated film to win a Razzie until the middle of The New 10s.
  • Thunderbirds (2004) — Budget, $57 million. Box office, $28,283,637. This movie's failure resulted in director and Star Trek: The Next Generation cast member Jonathan Frakes being relegated to TV directing jobs only. That is still better than what writer William Osborne got (he also wrote Fat Slags the same year).
  • Thunderpants (2002) — Budget, 3,500,000 British Pounds Sterling. Box office, 1,860,002 British Pounds Sterling. Despite the film's very off-kilter premise, about a boy whose problem with flatulence helps him become an astronaut, critics generally loved it and it became a Cult Classic down the line. Director Peter Hewitt's career was kept alive by Garfield The Movie (but not for long).
  • Tideland (2006) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $566,611. This Terry Gilliam movie was filmed when production stalled on The Brothers Grimm and was picked up by Think Film after a disastrous reception at the Toronto International Film Festival. The end result was given a mixed reception from critics, a release topping out at nine theaters and was forced out after four weeks.
  • Tigerland (2000) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $139,692. An Acclaimed Flop that never got out of a limited release.
  • Til There Was You (1997) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,525,125. The first and only theatrical film directed by Scott Winant, who went back to TV ever since. It was also the final film scored by Miles Goodman, who died a year before its release.
  • Tim & Eric's Billion Dollar Movie (2012) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $223,580. This movie received a scathing review from Roger Ebert and Funny or Die never made another movie for theaters.
  • A Time of Destiny (1988) — Budget, $9.5 million. Box office, $1.2 million. One of several Columbia Pictures films greenlit by outgoing president David Puttnam that the studio left out to dry. Filmmakers Gregory Nava and Anna Thomas waited seven years before their next feature film, My Family.
  • The Time Machine (2002) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $56,832,494 (domestic), $123,729,176 (worldwide). This is the sole live-action film DreamWorks Animation vet Simon Wellsnote  directed and one of two films with extended live-action to involve him (the other is Who Framed Roger Rabbit). The Time Machine warped Wells' directing career into limbo until Disney/ImageMovers's Mars Needs Moms in 2011, which set his directing career back a second time, and the exhausting production of The Time Machine, which led to Wells bowing out and Gore Verbinski doing uncredited directing, led to Wells never dealing with live-action again. The Time Machine, Star Trek: Nemesis, and Sinbad were also blows to writer John Logan's career. This version of H.G. Wells' novel is the last time the novel has been adapted for the big screen.
  • Timeline (2003) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $43,935,763. This was the final blow to the career of executive producer Michael Ovitz. The author of the book this film was based on, Michael Crichton, was so enraged by the film's negative reception and failure that he barred Hollywood from doing any cinematic adaptations of works of his that had not yet been adapted such as Jurassic Park until his death in 2008, and it put a crippling dent in the careers of director Richard Donner and co-writer Jeff Maguire; the other writer, George Nolfi, and Richard's wife, producer Lauren Shuler Donner, were able to escape this film's black hole. This would have been the final film score from Jerry Goldsmith before his death, but it was replaced when he couldn't continue.
  • Times Square (1980) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1.4 million. The movie was chopped to pieces by the studios during production, including reducing the major lesbian themes between two characters, as well as forcing disco songs and themes onto the movie without the directors consent, all of which the crew claims killed the message of the movie. It also killed the career of actress Robin Johnson, who was so upset at how she and the movie were mistreated that she spent the rest of her studio contract working as a bank teller in spite. Director Allan Moyle would temporarily quit directing for the decade, though he did return in the Nineties and rebound his career a bit.
  • Titan A.E. (2000) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $36,754,634. The film's failure, caused by lack of promotion due to 20th Century Fox's lack of confidence, led to both the closure of Fox Animation Studios (the company Fox formed with the film's directors Don Bluth and Gary Goldman) and Fox chairman Bill Mechanic resigning from his position. Fox later returned to the animation industry by appointing Blue Sky Studios as their animation division beginning with Ice Age (which was initially going to be a 2D animated feature, until Titan A.E. bombed). It is both Bluth and Goldman's last major film project to date. Adjusted for inflation, this is one of two finalists for the biggest animated box office bomb of all time (the other finalist is Mars Needs Moms a decade later), and it's the biggest 2D animated bomb period in term of cash lost. This all led to Titan A.E. being a major factor to ending The Renaissance Age of Animation (with the failures of the aforementioned Treasure Planet and Home on the Range serving as the final blows), as the film's failure convinced the major animation studios (Disney and DreamWorks to be more specific) that the traditional animation industry was no longer being classified as relevant thanks to the ever-growing popularity of computer animation (though there still are hopes for yet another renaissance).
  • Titus (2000) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $2,259,680. This is the last major film that was non-political or a large project to involve former Breitbart News empresario and future Donald Trump Cabinet member Steve Bannon, who was a co-executive producer on this film. Director and writer Julie Taymor did not take another writing credit until 2007.
  • To Be or Not to Be (1942) — Budget, $1.2 million, Box office, $1.5 million (domestic rentals). Critics and Audiences generally found this Nazi satire Too Soon in the face of World War II. It was also Carole Lombard's final film, released a month after her death in a plane crash. It was soon Vindicated by History as a comedy classic.
  • To Die For (1995) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $21,284,514. One of the final movies from the Rank Organisation, who died off and were absorbed by The Rank Group, who took what's left of the production house out of media. Buck Henry's writing career was also put in a coma for 6 years, and the next film to be written by him would turn that career's lifeline off.
  • To Gillian On Her37th Birthday (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,137,645. Despite having Claire Danes and Michelle Pfeiffer on board, this attempt to cash in on the success of Ghost by Michael Pressman, after thirteen years in the television directing wilderness following the failure of Doctor Detroit, also tanked with both the box office and critics. Pressman would have to wait another nine years for another chance in theatres.
  • Tom and Jerry: The Movie (1992) — Budget, $3.5 million (Not counting marketing costs). Box office, $3,560,469 (domestic). The film's North American release was delayed to the summer of 1993 when the film's original intended distributor, Seven Arts, collapsed (it was subsequently purchased by Miramax). A lot of criticism towards the film was due to the eponymous world-famous duo being Suddenly Voiced, friends, AND singing, and the plot of the film going in a Disney-esque direction that reduced Tom & Jerry effectively to supporting characters. The movie's failure convinced Hanna-Barbera never to experiment with this type of film again, making all future Tom & Jerry films Direct-To-Video and with the duo silent once more. It was also the penultimate score by Henry Mancini (and the second of only two animated films he scored, with The Great Mouse Detective being the other), the last film Dana Hill was in, a Star-Derailing Role for both her and Richard Kind (they voiced the duo, though Kind's career survived thanks to Spin City), and prevented producer/director Phil Roman from working on another theatrically released movie until 2015 (he stuck with television, The Simpsons and Garfield material since).
  • Tomb Raider (2018) — Budget, $94 million. Box office, $52,150,027 (domestic), $254,150,027 (worldwide). This Darker and Edgier reboot of the video game franchise was the highest rated video game movie on Rotten Tomatoes until Rampage the following month, but was still considered So Okay, It's Average by critics. Great international numbers and home media sales were enough for Warner Bros./MGM to greenlight a sequel.
  • Tomorrowland (2015) — Budget, $190 million (not counting marketing costs), Approx. $250-$330 million (counting them). Box office, $92,842,526 (domestic), $204,742,526 (worldwide). One of a handful of failed theme-park attractions-to-movie adaptations from The Walt Disney Company, and this could very well be a Star-Derailing Role for George Clooney as well as major co-stars Britt Robertson and Raffey Cassidy (this film was intended as a Star-Making Role for them; that possibility is gone and replaced with potentially stalling their cinematic careers). This is also the first misstep (and a considerable one) for acclaimed director Brad Bird, who later rebounded with Incredibles 2 but has yet to have another live-action project greenlighted. Disney CFO Jay Rasulo ironically stepped down from the company around this time after being passed over for promotion in favor of Disney Parks boss Thomas Staggs (who resigned the next year instead). In addition, plans for a third TRON movie were "deleted" after this film's disappointing opening weekend along with any sci-fi material that is not Star Wars or Marvel Cinematic Universe related.
  • Top Dog (1995) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5 million. This was the last theatrical release to feature Chuck Norris until The Expendables 2 came out in 2012. It doesn't help that it was released shortly after the Oklahoma City Bombing, which is ironic because the trailer never showed the villains.
  • Topaz (1969) — Budget and Box office, $6 million. Alfred Hitchcock's version of the Leon Uris novel received mixed reviews from critics, who felt the film lacked tension. It also suffered from poor test screenings, which prompted Hitchcock to change the ending twice. Hitchcock himself viewed it as an Old Shame, and he bounced back with his next film, Frenzy.
  • Topsy-Turvy (1999) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6,208,548. Mike Leigh's biopic of Gilbert and Sullivan and their creation of The Mikado was an Acclaimed Flop which had a limited release.
  • Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) — Budget, $25.5 million. Box office, $29,548,291. This film began the disintegration in the relationship between Fox chairman Darryl F. Zanuck and his son Richard.note  Tora! Tora! Tora was also part of a series of Fox flops that put the studio in dire straits until Star Wars. As for the crew of the film, it's the final co-American film co-director Kinji Fukasaku ever took part in and put dents in the careers of the writers and co-director Richard Fleischer. All this said, it would eventually be Vindicated by Cable and gain notoriety for its groundbreaking visual effects.
  • Torque (2004) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21,215,059 (domestic), $46,546,197 (worldwide). Nearly everybody involved with this film saw their careers destroyed; the exception is Ice Cube.
  • Total Recall (2012) — Budget, $125 million. Box office, $58,877,969 (domestic), $198,467,168 (worldwide). Made about half of what the original made domestically... a quarter of what it made if adjusted for inflation.
  • Tough Guys Don't Dance (1987) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $858,250. This is one of the movies that eventually did in The Cannon Group. Ryan O'Neal's infamous acting in this film ("OH GOD, OH MAN!") ended up being the final nail in the coffin of his A-list movie career.
  • The Tourist (2010) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $67,631,157 (domestic), $278,346,189 (worldwide). It would be eight years before director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck took up another film. His co-writer, Julian Fellowes, had better luck that year when Downton Abbey debuted. Co-producer Jonathon Glickman saw his film career stall a few years later.
  • The Tournament (2009) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $490,000. A Troubled Production (the original budget was $4 million and ended up drying out the budget twice) and a release to theaters delayed by two years didn't do many favors.
  • Town & Country (2001) — Budget, $90 million (not counting marketing costs), $105-110 million (counting them). Box office, $10,372,291. Warren Beatty had no film credits until 2016's Rules Don't Apply, and it outright caused Buck Henry's writing career to die out after To Die For put it on a lifeline; Henry would not write another screenplay until 2014. Also halted the writing career of the other screenwriter, Michael Laughlin.
  • Toys (1992) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $23.3 million. The film's critical and commercial failure was a big blow for director Barry Levinson, who saw this as his passion project. Ironically, it was dwarfed by another Robin Williams film, Disney's Aladdin. Its writer, Valerie Curtin, never wrote another screenplay.
  • Toys in the Attic (1963) — Budget, $2.1 million. Box office is unknown, but United Artists recorded a loss of $1.2 million. This film adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play received mixed reviews, with many critics feeling that Dean Martin was miscast as its tormented protagonist. Martin never tried his hand at heavy drama again.
  • Track 29 (1988) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $429,028. It's an understandable gross considering the film only played at 13 theaters. It got a generally positive reception, though critics like Roger Ebert admitted it was a tough sit.
  • Trail of the Pink Panther (1982) — Budget, less than $15 million (actual budget unknown). Box office, $9,056,073. Its failure along with that of Curse of the Pink Panther killed the original series. Blake Edwards' reputation suffered due to his decision to cobble together outtakes of the late Peter Sellers from the earlier Panther films to create a brand-new plot, which was derided as being in poor taste. Edwards never had a box-office success again (with the exception of Micki + Maude) and would retire from directing films after 1993's Son of the Pink Panther.
  • Transcendence (2014) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $23,022,309 (domestic), $103,039,258 (worldwide). This is the first and only feature film directed by Wally Pfister, whose next directorial credits were episodes of Flaked and The Tick. It also furthered the decline of Johnny Depp's career and dealt a huge blow to production company Alcon Entertainment.
  • Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) — Budget, $217 million. Box office, $130,168,683 (domestic), $605,425,157 (worldwide). Poor performance in China (which had boosted the previous entries in the series), fatigue from domestic audiences, and overall backlash to Paramount and Michael Bay's evident inability to learn from their mistakes are all cited as factors in this film's underperformance. The planned sixth film in the main series was subsequently put on indefinite hold, with focus being placed on the Bumblebee prequel/spinoff, which Bay is only producing instead of directing.
  • The Transformers: The Movie (1986) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,849,647. This along with the failure of My Little Pony: The Movie (1986) cost Hasbro a combined $10 million. Both films also led to the cancellation of a movie based on Jem then in development. Come home video, the film is now considered a cornerstone of Transformers fiction across the franchise's myriad canons.
  • The Transporter Refueled (2015) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,029,670 (domestic), $72,629,670 (worldwide). A failed attempt to reboot the film series with Ed Skrein replacing Jason Statham.
  • Transylmania (2009) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $408,049. This horror spoof by the Hillenbrand Brothers was unanimously despised by critics and yanked from theaters after two weeks. The Hillenbrand Brothers were sued by their investors for fraud in 2012.
  • Trapped (2002) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $13,414,416. This was the final English-language film for director Luis Mandoki, who primarily works in his native Mexico now. It didn't help that its release date was shuffled a few times and it was Not Screened for Critics.
  • Trapped in Paradise (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,017,509. George Gallo didn't direct another movie for seven years. The box-office failure of this film, along with Wayne's World 2 and Clean Slate, drove Dana Carvey back to television until The Master of Disguise, which did in his movie career for good.
  • Treasure Planet (2002) — Budget, $140–180 million. Box office, $109,578,115. Has the dishonor of being the biggest money loser in the Disney Animated Canon thus far, and one of the biggest animated bombs in history as far as net loss is concerned. This and the failure of Home on the Range led Disney to abandon the traditional animation format until 2009. It was also a bit of a setback to the careers of The Little Mermaid/Aladdin/The Great Mouse Detective/Hercules directors John Musker and Ron Clements, who directed this film as well, since they actually left Disney sometime afterwards and nearly defected to former boss Jeffrey Katzenberg's DreamWorks Animation before being brought back after Treasure Planet became part of a string that ended the Disney career of Katzenberg's own former boss Michael Eisner. Musker and Clements didn't direct another film until the end of the decade with The Princess and the Frog (said 2009 film) and would not direct another full-fledged adventure film until Moana (both Moana and The Princess and the Frog also double as musicals; they have not directed another non-musical after Treasure Planet).
  • The Tree of Life (2011) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $13,303,319 (domestic), $54,303,319 (worldwide). Critics praised this Terrence Malick film for its stunning imagery and existential themes, while audiences were left baffled by what they saw. There were reports of walk-outs and refunds at a few movie theaters over this movie.
  • Trenchcoat (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,304,286. Walt Disney Productions hid their involvement with this film due to its more mature themes and the kiddie stereotype that was applied to Disney at the time.note  Disney launched Touchstone Pictures the next year, but that would ultimately come too late to save CEO Ron Miller and studio chairman Tom Wilhite's jobs, and they would be replaced by Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, respectively, by the time of The Black Cauldron. This movie is a big Old Shame for Disney; the film's followup release on VHS the same year was the last time Disney let it see the light of day until The New 10's, well after Eisner and Katzenberg left Disney themselves.
  • Trespass (2011) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $24,094 (domestic), $9,612,469 (worldwide). This is Joel Schumacher's last film to date. It played in 10 theaters for one week before it got taken out.
  • Trespass Against Us (2017) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $174,238. A very low take, even for a limited release, and part of a bad string for Michael Fassbender.
  • Trial and Error (1997) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,598,571. This was a Star-Derailing Role for Michael Richards' film career as his only film credits since are a voiceover in Bee Movie and a role in the short, Walk the Light. It was also compared unfavorably to director Jonathan Lynn's earlier courtroom comedy, My Cousin Vinny.
  • Trial by Jury (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,971,777. Writer/director Heywood Gould had to wait seven years to do another feature.
  • The Trigger Effect (1996) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $3,622,979. David Koepp's directorial debut was inspired by an episode of Connections. It was an Acclaimed Flop that never left a limited release.
  • Triple 9 (2016) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,639,297 (domestic), $23,119,442 (worldwide). This got pushed back from September 2015 to February 2016 where it dealt with runaway smash Deadpool and eventual busts Gods of Egypt and Eddie the Eagle. Invisible Advertising and mixed reviews ensured this crime thriller was lost in the shuffle as well.
  • A Troll in Central Park (1994) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $71,368. You read that right, the film grossed less than one third of 1% of its budget, making it, percentage-wise, one of the biggest (maybe the biggest) box office flops in the history of animated films. Warner Bros. deliberately gave the film no promotion because they expected it to fail (this came after the movie was labeled a severe case of Tastes Like Diabetes). This was the second-to-last film from Don Bluth's homegrown animation studio, and the last from said studio to credit him (he likened the film to a child born prematurely), and any ideas of the studio recovering died a quiet death after this film.
  • TRON (1982) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $33 million. Despite decent reviews, the cost of the new computer technology that was used to create TRON along with a dire lack of marketing due to Disney executive Card Walker not believing in such a thing led to Disney writing off most of the $17 million budget. This film's darker tone, along with other films such as Dragonslayer, led to Disney CEO Ron Miller creating Touchstone to distribute Splash, but Disney's financial problems, its stereotyping as a kiddie company, a takeover and breakup attempt, and the protracted development of The Black Cauldron got him "derezzed" and replaced by Michael Eisner. After becoming Vindicated by Video, a sequel, TRON: Legacy, was released in 2010, and a reboot is currently in the works.
  • Troop Beverly Hills (1989) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $8.5 million. One of a handful of 1988/1989 films that caused the Weintraub Entertainment Group to implode right out of the gates, and one of the movies that ended Coca-Cola's control over Columbia and caused their merger with Tristar and Sony. It was also one of the many box-office bombs that drove star Shelley Long back to television after leaving Cheers. It did become a bit of a Cult Classic thanks to cable reruns.
  • Troy (2004) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $133,378,256 (domestic), $497,409,852 (worldwide). This rendition of The Trojan War fell short of its budget domestically but it stormed through the international box-office. Its mythological liberties played a role in its mixed reception with critics and audiences.
  • True Colors (1991) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $418,807.
  • True Crime (1999) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $16,649,768. This crime thriller received mixed reviews and dropped sharply at the box office after opening at number three. Clint Eastwood recovered the next year with Space Cowboys but co-writer Paul Brickman saw his career stall with his only credits since being a TV miniseries and short.
  • True Identity (1991) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $4.6 million. British comedian Lenny Henry's foray into the American public, the film's bombing put a halt to his plans, and since then his only movie roles have been voiceovers.
  • True Romance (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $12,309,980. It was an Acclaimed Flop however, and its writer Quentin Tarantino would move onto bigger and better things.
  • The Trumpet of the Swan (2001) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $102,202. Not only did it get a limited release, it had the misfortune of being released a week before Shrek. Director Richard Rich only directed one movie the next year, and didn't direct again until 2012. It was TriStar Pictures's first animated film since the Pound Puppies film, and they didn't do another animated film until the end of the decade.
  • The Truth About Charlie (2002) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $7.1 million. This remake of Charade was greeted with critical and audience apathy and made its exit after five weeks. Its widest release was just 755 theaters.
  • Truth or Consequences, N.M. (1997) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $122,046. Had a very limited release, and received mixed reviews. This would be one of two films actor Kiefer Sutherland directed, the other one being Woman Wanted.
  • Trust (2010) — Budget, $9.5 million. Box office, $595,439(!). The second and final film (to date) directed by David Schwimmer.
  • Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $19 million. This biopic of automaker Preston Tucker was conceived by Francis Ford Coppola as an experimental musical in 1976 but it wasn't until 1986 that production finally began on a much more straightforward film. The end result was given glowing reviews by critics but fell by the wayside with audiences. Ironically, despite its financial failure, it did revive interest in Tucker's cars.
  • Tulip Fever (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $7,884,436. Part of an incredibly gloomy year for distributor The Weinstein Company, this novel adaptation earned a pathetic 10% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and had its release date punted all over the place.
  • Tunnel Rats (2008) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $35,402. The low gross is because it was only screened in Germany. Unlike other Uwe Boll projects, not only is this film not based on a video game, it was an Acclaimed Flop.
  • Turbo (2013) — Budget, $135 million. Box office, $83,028,128 (domestic), $282,570,682 (worldwide). Ended up losing DreamWorks $13.5 million after marketing costs were added plus an additional $2 million when follow-up Blu-ray sales of the film disappointed, and earned DWA boss Jeffrey Katzenberg a lawsuit from shareholders for possible Hollywood Accounting (the suit was dismissed in 2015), but this didn't stop DreamWorks from producing a Netflix original series based on the movie. Turbo was part of a handful of animated missteps from DWA that led to their acquisition by Comcast/Universal minus Katzenberg.
  • Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie (1997) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $9,615,840. Compared to Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: The Movie, which grossed over $60 million on a $15 million budget, its rather poor showing coupled with Power Rangers''s decline would lead this movie to be the last big-screen showing for the franchise and while the series is still healthy in its main medium of TV, a movie of any sort wouldn't happen until 2012's Direct-To-TV's "Clash of the Red Rangers". The reboot film ended up absolutely crushing this movie, making over 4-and-a-half times as much on its first weekend alone than this movie did its entire run.
  • Turbulence (1997) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $11,538,235. The film's failure didn't stop them from making two sequels, but it did sent them direct to video. Director Robert Butler hasn't made another major theatrically released movie after this one.
  • Turistas (2006) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $7 million (domestic), $14.7 million (worldwide). A call to boycott the film by Brazilian tourism officials gave the film a negative light at the start, and not helped by lead actor Josh Duhamel apologizing for the film in interviews. Director John Stockwell didn't do another American theatrical film until Cat Run five years later.
  • Turk 182 (1985) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $3.5 million. It brought Robert Urich's theatrical career to a screeching halt.
  • Turn It Up (2000) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,247,949. It didn't last long in theaters, and was the last film played at the Indian Hills Theater before the bankruptcy of Carmike Cinemas and the acquisition of the property by the Nebraska Methodist Hospital led to the building's demolition in spite of protests.
  • Tusk (2014) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $1,826,705. The low gross caused Kevin Smith's next movie to be released on Video-On-Demand, as well as a limited release.
  • The Tuxedo (2002) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $50,547,998 (domestic), $104,391,623 (worldwide). This is considered one of the dopiest films that Jackie Chan took part in, and he survived since Shanghai Knights came out a few months later, but other crew members were not so fortunate, and their careers were sent to the Netherworld for varying periods of time. For storymen Matt Manfredi and Phil Hey, they were there for 3 years before being released on a Charlize Theron project, for co-producer Adam Schroeder, his producing career was put in time out for 8 years, while his partner, John H. Williams, has only done animated material such as Shrek 2 since, and screenwriter Michael J. Leeson's cinematic career has yet to resurface (he's done two TV projects since). It also didn't help co-star Jennifer Love Hewitt's career out that much, and added on to financial difficulties that resulted in DreamWorks SKG breaking up, with David Geffen cashing out and Jeffrey Katzenberg spinning off the animation arm.
  • Twice Upon a Time (1983) — Budget, no more than $4 million. Box office, unknown. What is known is that this, The Right Stuff and Once Upon a Time in America were the flops that piled up and broke The Ladd Company. The company was already in financial trouble at the time and put it into limited release. It proved too mature for family audiences note  and too bizarre for general audiences and died a quick death. It aired on HBO a few times in 1984, and wasn't released on video until 1991, but only with the internet did it become a Cult Classic, finally getting a DVD release in 2015.
  • Twilight 1998 (1998) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $15,055,091. This was the first film written by novelist Richard Russo, who collaborated with the director, Robert Benton. It was also his only theatrical film until he collaborated with Benton again for The Ice Harvest. note Benton occupied the director's chair again for 2003's The Human Stain. This was given a mixed response from critics and left theaters after eight weeks.
  • Twin Dragons (1999) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $8,359,717. This Jackie Chan film was released in Hong Kong in 1992 where it ranked in the top-10 highest grossing films of the year. It promptly fell flat in the box office when it opened in the US. Fortunately, this didn't slow Chan's career down a bit.
  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $4.2 million. This movie completely finished off the original run of the Twin Peaks TV franchise after its television series got hit with problems that led to its first cancellation and an entry in David Hofstede's book What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events In Television History. The director of the film and one of the creators of the show, David Lynch, didn't direct another full-length feature film for 5 years, while the series would return for a third season only in 2017, two-and-a-half decades later.
  • Twin Town (1997) — Budget, 1.7 million British Pounds Sterling/$3.3 million. Box office, $127,923. Kevin Allen's directorial debut was also Rhys Ifans's film debut. It became a Cult Classic which inspired talk of a sequel around 2016.
  • Twisted 2004 (2004) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $40,954,603. This is the last film Philip Kaufman has directed to date and marked the beginning of the end of Ashley Judd's career as a leading lady.
  • Two Brothers (2004) — Budget, $72 million. Box office, $62,172,050. This family drama fared well in its native France, but was flattened in the States when it was released in a competitive summer.
  • Two-Faced Woman (1941) — Budget, $1,247,000. Box office, $875,000 (domestic), $1,800,000 (worldwide). Recorded loss, $62,000. Greta Garbo was cast in this Romantic Comedy after the smash success of Ninotchka. The film's plot, which had Garbo's character pose as her (fictitious) twin sister to win back her cheating husband, earned it the wrath of the Moral Guardians, which required it to be re-edited before it could be approved. The end result was utterly eviscerated by critics, who felt that Garbo was miscast, with Time Magazine infamously calling it "almost as shocking as seeing your mother drunk." Garbo ended her MGM contract, and her film career, with this film, and she generally faded from public view for the rest of her life.
  • Two For The Money (2005) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $30,526,509. This was Morgan Creek Productions's first film released by Universal after it broke from Warner Bros.. Its critical and financial takedown resulted in a theatrical run of six weeks.
  • Two If By Sea (1996) — Budget, Unknown, Box office, $10,658,278. Australian director Bill Bennett's first and (as of 2018) last Hollywood film.
  • The Two Jakes (1990) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $10,005,969. This sequel to Chinatown would be the last film directed by Jack Nicholson and its underperformance shot down plans for a third movie.
  • Two Much (1996) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $1,141,556. This adaptation of Donald Westlake's novel, which previously inspired the French film Le Jumeau, was heavily panned by critics and it didn't last long in theaters. It's best known for Antonio Banderas and Melanie Griffith's Romance on the Set and eventual marriage.

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