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  • The Eagle (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,490,041 (domestic), $37,983,590 (worldwide). The film adaptation of Rosemary Sutcliff's The Eagle of the Ninth drew a mixed critical reception, with its detractors citing it for the emotionless direction and Channing Tatum's performance.
  • Early Man (2018) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $8,267,544 (domestic), $54,622,814 (worldwide). Despite good reviews, Aardman's stop-motion caveman comedy was utterly demolished by the same-weekend juggernaut that was Black Panther. It doesn't help either that the film suffered from Invisible Advertising after its release. As a result of its failure, Lionsgate ended their partnership with Aardman, with all future films from Aardman being released on Netflix in America as a consequence.
  • Earth Girls Are Easy (1989) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,916,303. This sci-fi musical had a hard time finding an interested studio and it faced financial difficulties during production. It died in a limited release, but it would later become a Cult Classic, largely due to the presence of various cult actors, including Jim Carrey, Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis and Damon Wayans.
  • Eastern Promises (2007) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $17,266,000 (domestic), $56,106,607 (worldwide). An Acclaimed Flop that netted Viggo Mortensen his first Oscar nomination.
  • Ed (1996) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $4,422,380. This and Dunston Checks In dealt damage to the idea of having monkeys in starring roles. It also dealt strikeouts of several sorts to the top players in the film's production; producer Bill Finnegan never produced another original theatrical film, screenwriter David Mickey Evans did not get another credit for the rest of the 90's and his future writing jobs are on Direct to Video films, and director Bill Couturie did not work another film for five years and has only directed documentaries since.
  • Ed TV (1999) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $35,319,689. This was compared unfavorably to the previous year's The Truman Show despite it actually being a remake of the 1994 Canadian film Louis 19, King of the Airwaves. It's now regarded more favorably once Reality TV became prevalent.
  • Ed Wood (1994) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $5,887,457. This was the first film directed by acclaimed director Tim Burton to not do well at the box office. It's also the very last film released while Jeffrey Katzenberg was still on distributor Disney's lot; he left the lot and ended his involvement with the studio the next day. The film did get great reviews and Oscar wins (Best Supporting Actor for Martin Landau's performance as Bela Lugosi, plus Best Make-Up).
  • Eddie (1996) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $31,387,164. One of the films that year, along with the infamous Theodore Rex, that derailed Whoopi Goldberg's cinematic career, but she has moved on to other avenues such as The View.
  • Eddie the Eagle (2016) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $15,789,389 (domestic), $46,152,800 (worldwide). The critics liked this sports dramedy but that wasn't enough to keep it from placing 6th on opening weekend. It did much better in its native U.K.
  • The Edge (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $27,873,386 (domestic), $43,312,294 (worldwide). Was the last leading-man role for Alec Baldwin in a major Hollywood film; he has since gravitated towards supporting roles.
  • Edge of Darkness (2010) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $43,313,890 (domestic), $81,124,129 (worldwide). Mel Gibson attempted a comeback after his infamous DUI years prior, but it opened to mixed reviews. Gibson would have to wait until 2016 before he could try to get back into the top of the Hollywood pantheon with Hacksaw Ridge, but he did play a Big Bad in The Expendables 3 in the meantime.
  • The Edge of Seventeen (2016) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $14,431,633 (domestic), $19,370,020 (worldwide). It opened against Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and later Moana, but it did get positive reviews, and earned lead star Hailee Steinfeld a Golden Globe nomination.
  • Edge of Tomorrow (2014) — Budget, $178 million. Box office, $100,206,256 (domestic), $369,206,256 (worldwide). Despite great reviews, it couldn't withstand competition from The Fault in Our Stars, which won the weekend. The poor marketing and unappealing title also played a role in it flopping stateside; the latter problem may have played a part in the film being remarketed as Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow once it reached video. Still, the international take was enough to get a sequel, Live Die Repeat and Repeat, greenlit.
  • Edison (2006) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $4,143,414. It tested poorly and subsequently went straight to DVD in a number of territories despite its A-List cast (Morgan Freeman, LL Cool J, Justin Timberlake and Kevin Spacey).
  • The Education Of Charlie Banks (2007-2009) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $15,078. This movie from Fred Durst only got a limited release two years after it premiered at Tribeca, and then was expelled from the theater circuit to the DVD market.
  • Eight Crazy Nights (2002) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $23,833,131. This is the only animated film that Adam Sandler and his production company Happy Madison have made, and its terrible reception due to excessive Toilet Humor was one of the multiple blows to theatrical 2D animation that killed the tradition until The Princess and the Frog in 2009. Sandler would not get involved with another animated project until the Hotel Transylvania films in the New 10's, which were also distributed by Sony/Columbia. He would eventually dip back into the animation pool when he announced a new project in 2016.
  • Eight Legged Freaks (2002) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,322,606 (domestic), $45,867,333 (worldwide). This B-movie homage poisoned director Ellory Elkayem's and writer Jesse Alexander's careers, as it's the only cinematic job they've had. Elkayem and Alexander never wrote another screenplay, and Elkayem has only done TV movies and a Direct to Video film since and Alexander has focused on a prolific television career since. It would later find an audience on home video.
  • Electric Dreams (1984) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $2,193,612. The film debut of music video director Steve Barron (of "Take on Me", "Money for Nothing", and "Billie Jean" fame). It opened at number 14 despite opening at 920 locations,note  and barely lasted to the next week. It also received a mixed critical reception, but later became something of a Cult Classic, thanks in part to its soundtrack, which proved much more popular than the actual movie, especially Phil Oakey's "Together in Electric Dreams". While Barron would go on to find more success with the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie, the most notable thing on writer Rusty Lemorande's resume since was a screenplay credit for Disney and Michael Jackson's 3-D short film Captain EO.
  • Elektra (2005) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $24,409,722 (domestic), $56,681,556 (worldwide). The only Marvel films that grossed lower than this film are Man-Thing, Punisher: War Zone, Howard the Duck and The New Mutants. This, along with Catwoman, kept the superheroine genre barren for over a decade, and ended the Daredevil Marvel movie series after just two films, becoming an Old Shame for Jennifer Garner in the process and impaling director Rob Bowman's cinematic career as well. Film copyright holders Fox subsequently found themselves unable to reboot the series before the rights reverted to Disney/Marvel, who rebooted it themselves as a Netflix show.
  • Eleni (1985) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $305,000. This hurt star Kate Nelligan's American film career a bit, as her next high-billing role was Fatal Instinct eight years later.
  • Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $16,383,509 (domestic), $74,237,563 (worldwide). This sequel to 1998's Elizabeth fell short of its predecessor's critical and financial acclaim, though Cate Blanchett earned an Oscar nomination.
  • Elizabethtown (2005) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $26,850,426 (domestic), $52,034,889 (worldwide). This fiasco set back Cameron Crowe's career by six years, though time has been kinder to it. It's probably most infamous now for helping spawn the term "Manic Pixie Dream Girl" in relation to Kirsten Dunst's character.
  • Ella Enchanted (2004) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $22,918,387 (domestic), $27,388,767 (worldwide). Director Tommy O'Haver hasn't been able to get another one of his films theatrically released after this. However, it would later become Vindicated by Cable due to endless repeats on Disney Channel (it's telling how out of all the Miramax Films titles they sold to Filmyard Holdings, Disney still holds the television rights to this particular film).
  • Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (1988) — Budget, $7.5 million. Box office, $5,596,267. There wouldn't be another Elvira film until 2001, and it blacked out director and Saturday Night Live producer James Signorelli's film career as well.
  • Elysium (2013) — Budget, $115 million. Box office, $93,050,117 (domestic), $286,140,700 (worldwide). This was seen as a Tough Act to Follow for Neill Blomkamp's directorial debut, District 9, and even he felt it could've been better.
  • The Emperor's New Groove (2000) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $89,302,687 (domestic), $169,327,687 (worldwide). This Disney Animated Classic had one of the most infamous production histories in the history of the studio; it was meant to be another musical like in the Disney Renaissance, but Disney executives ordered it turned into a buddy comedy. The film met Development Hell and prompted CEO Michael Eisner to confront the filmmakers and say, "You are this close to being cancelled!" Said Development Hell jettisoned all of Sting's involvement apart from two songs, which Sting and the animators were dismayed at, and the whole thing got a documentary on the film's production titled The Sweatbox. In the end, the final version underperformed a bit at the box office, but got great reviews and was quickly vindicated by video/DVD sales, leading to a small franchise. This is unfortunately the last time director Mark Dindal, who was still reeling from Cats Don't Dance, could enjoy the spotlight; his next Disney film, Chicken Little, was widely panned despite doing well at the box office, and was the finishing blow to Dindal's career.
  • Empire of the Sun (1987) - Budget, $25 million. Box office, $22.24 million (domestic), $66.7 million (worldwide). Steven Spielberg's adaptation of JG Ballard's novel was a critical darling but it fell flat in its US release.
  • Empire Records (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $303,841. After forcing director Alan Moyle to cut out over 40 minutes and several characters, Warner Bros. severely slashed the amount of theaters and gave it no ads after a poor test screening with a Latino audience (maybe because all the characters were white, as was the music they listened to?). It was despised by critics, but audiences loved it and it became a Cult Classic thanks to cable airings.
  • The End of the Affair (1999) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $10,827,816. Neil Jordan's version of the Graham Greene novel, and the second film version overall, was an Acclaimed Flop that never left a limited release.
  • The End Of Violence (1997) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $386,673. It was derided by critics as an incoherent, dreary mess, but its cinematography was praised. Director Wim Wenders bounced back with Buena Vista Social Club.
  • Ender's Game (2013) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $61,737,191 (domestic), $125,537,191 (worldwide). It suffered from poor marketing that couldn't really make clear if the film was targeted to kids or adults. It also had the misfortune of being the adaptation of a novel by noted Heteronormative Crusader Orson Scott Card, during a time when gay rights were a hot issue; some civil rights groups urged a boycott of the film solely on these grounds.
  • Endless Love (2014) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $23,438,250 (domestic), $34,718,173 (worldwide). This very loose adaptation of Scott Spencer's novel, previously adapted in 1981, was panned by critics (though they preferred this film to the original), while Spencer hated the film even more for being less faithful to his book than the earlier film.
  • Enemy at the Gates (2001) — Budget, $68-85 million. Box office, $51,401,758 (domestic), $96,976,270 (worldwide). The one film writer Alain Godard attempted to executive produce. It was also heavily criticized in countries making up the former Soviet Union and Germany for how their portrayal in this WWII pic was, which led to director Jean-Jacques Annaud stating he would not present another film at Berlinale after it was booed there.
  • Enemy Mine (1985) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $12,303,411. Executive Meddling over the film's title (which mandated that a slave mine subplot be added) and a Troubled Production doubled the film's budget, making this a worse loss for Fox than it should have been. Wolfgang Petersen (who stepped in after the first director Richard Loncraine was fired) did not direct another film for the rest of the 80's, and writer Ed Khmara didn't write another screenplay until 1993. On the positive side, critics praised the performances of Dennis Quaid and especially Louis Gossett Jr, and it was Vindicated by Cable thanks to HBO reruns.
  • Enough (2002) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $40,007,242 (domestic), $51,801,187 (worldwide). The film version of Anna Quindlen's novel was shredded by critics for its messy script, but praised for Jennifer Lopez's performance. It didn't help that it was released during the runs of Spider-Man and Attack of the Clones.
  • Envy (2004) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $13,562,325 (domestic), $14,581,765 (worldwide). This was shoved into The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years due to lousy test screenings and it would have gone Direct to Video in the US if not for Jack Black's success in School of Rock. Part of a rotten streak for director Barry Levinson, and neither Black, Ben Stiller or DreamWorks are proud of the film. It went straight to DVD in Europe.
  • Equilibrium (2002) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1,203,794 (domestic), $5,359,645 (worldwide). Its limited release and mixed to negative reviews didn't do it any favors. While it would be Vindicated by History and turn a profit through video sales, writer/director Kurt Wimmer would do only one more film, Ultraviolet, before he abandoned the director's chair.
  • Ernest Rides Again (1993) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $1,450,029. Was the last Ernest film released theatrically.
  • Escape from L.A. (1996) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,477,365. Part of a string of directing career-ending bombs for John Carpenter, and it's the only film Kurt Russell, who worked with Carpenter on Big Trouble in Little China, has attempted to produce or write. The film also received a semi-Shout-Out/Take That! from Duke Nukem 3D.
  • Escape from Tomorrow (2013) — Budget, $650,000. Box office, $171,962. An attempt at free publicity and recognition by secretly shooting in Disney's American theme parks fell apart when the Mouse House wised on to the attempt to invoke the Streisand Effect and ignored the film outright; as a result, it fell out of the limelight instead.
  • Escape Plan (2013) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,132,228 (domestic), $137,324,564 (worldwide). Part of a bad year for Sylvester Stallone, though it did get the best reviews of his output (beating the Rottentomatoes score for Bullet to the Head by 2%).
  • Eskimo (1934) — Budget, $935,000. Box office, $1,312,000. Recorded loss, $236,000. This docudrama about an Alaskan whale hunter was the first film shot in a Native American language, Inupiat, though not the first film shot in Alaska. While it was an Acclaimed Flop, as well as the inaugural winner of the Best Film Editing Oscar, critics felt it was too similar to other films about the Inupiat.
  • Eulogy (2004) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $75,076 (domestic), $89,781 (worldwide). It was only out in 22 theaters and was laid to rest two weeks later.
  • EuroTrip (2004) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $20,796,847. This teen comedy got sent back from theaters after six weeks. Director Jeff Schaffer stuck to TV for five years after this, barring a co-writing credit on Shark Tale, until Brüno (2009).
  • Evan Almighty (2007) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $100,462,298 (domestic), $173,418,781 (worldwide). Torpedoed the careers of director Tom Shadyac and writer Steve Oedekerk (Shadyac backed out of Hollywood, only sticking to writing documentaries, while Oedekerk moved to children's programming), and crushed any ideas of continuing the "Almighty" film series after two movies.
  • Eve of Destruction (1991) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5,451,119. This Terminator/Frankenstein clone was the final theatrical film for director Duncan Gibbins before his death two years later. The film didn't do Gregory Hines' career any favors, and Dutch actress Renee Soutendijk, who played the titular Eve and her creator, never made another Hollywood film.
  • Even Cowgirls Get The Blues (1994) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $1,708,873. This was delayed out of 1993 thanks to a bad reception at the Toronto Film Festival, and could have derailed Uma Thurman's career completely had it not been for Pulp Fiction months later. Director/writer/producer Gus Van Sant would not write another screenplay for nine years.
  • The Evening Star (1996) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,767,815. An attempt at a sequel to Terms of Endearment, which instead contracted a bad case of Sequelitis. This sickness stricken the careers of director/writer Robert Harling, producer Polly Platt, and co-writer Larry McMurtry; the latter would somewhat recover with Brokeback Mountain in 2005, but the others did not, as Harling only wrote one more critically panned film before effectively disappearing from Hollywood, and Platt never took another non-executive producer role for another film in her life. This was also one of the last times co-producer and Paramount/Disney vet and former co-worker to Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, David Kirkpatrick, dealt with Paramount; a fight he had with one of their executives ultimately derailed his mainstream career.
  • Event Horizon (1997) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $26,673,242. Director Paul W.S. Anderson withdrew from Mortal Kombat: Annihilation to do this movie (although both MKA and Event Horizon were critically panned anyway). Both Event Horizon and Soldier led to Anderson entering a hiatus in cinematic directing until the first Resident Evil movie in 2002. This movie also sucked co-writer Philip Eisner's cinematic career into a black hole right as it started. He didn't write another movie for five years and didn't write another theatrical movie for 11 (said theatrical film is his only other full-length film credit). On the other hand, the film was Vindicated by Cable and earned a cult following.
  • An Everlasting Piece (2000) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $75,228. It's an understandable gross considering the film topped out at eight theaters. Producer Jerome O'Connor filed a lawsuit against Dreamworks for its poor distribution, which was dropped a decade later.
  • Everybody Wants Some!! (2016) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,400,278. Despite near-universal acclaim and a big name director, the film failed to expand outside limited release due to poor performance. It also kicked off a Trauma Conga Line for Paramount that year, culminating in Viacom president Philippe Dauman getting the boot after a decade with the company.
  • Everybody Wins (1990) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $1,372,350. It would turn out to be the final film Karel Reisz ever directed.
  • Everybodys All American (1988) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $12,638,294. Taylor Hackford didn't direct another film until 1993's Blood In Blood Out. This is also Tom Rickman's penultimate feature film screenplay to date, the last being 2000's Bless the Child.
  • Everybody's Fine (2009) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $16,443,609. It wasn't fine for this remake of the 1990 Italian film: it closed after three weeks and went straight-to-DVD in Brazil, Russia and Japan. Director Kirk Jones waited three years to make his next film.
  • Everyone Says I Love You (1996) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9,759,200. One of Woody Allen's more successful flops, with Roger Ebert considering it one of his best.
  • Everyone's Hero (2006) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $16,627,188. The one theatrical film that visual effects artist Colin Brady and Superman actor Christopher Reeve attempted to direct together (it's also the last film from Reeve and wife Dana, who died during production), with the other director, Dan St. Pierre, managing to stay alive, but barely (his next major directing job for a movie that was a wide-release was Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return in 2014). Everyone's Hero also struck out the cinematic writing careers of writers Robert Kurtz, Jeff Hand, and Howard Jonas.
  • Evil Angelsnote  (1988) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6.9 million. This was a critical smash which added to Meryl Streep's tally of Oscar nominations. It never expanded beyond 334 theaters.
  • Evolution (2001) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $38,345,494 (domestic), $98,376,292 (worldwide). The Rotten Tomatoes consensus accused director Ivan Reitman of attempting to remake Ghostbusters, and several critics panned it for its liberal usage of Toilet Humour and Squick regarding the enemy aliens. It got an animated continuation that same year, but said show ran for only one season. Reitman would not direct his next cinematic movie for five years.
  • Excess Baggage (1997) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14.5 million. Was supposed to be the first in a line of movies produced by Alicia Silverstone, but the movie's poor box office made it her only production credit. Both this film and the infamous Batman & Robin led to a quick end to Silverstone's stardom. This also grounded the career of Demolition Man director Marco Brambilla, as the only movie he's worked on since was a segment in the 2006 pornographic anthology film Destricted.
  • Excessive Force (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,152,117. This got a Direct to Video sequel despite its financial and critical takedown.
  • Existenz (1999) — Budget, $31 million Canadian Dollars/$15 million U.S. Dollars. Box office, $2,856,712. This had the unfortunate timing to come out after the similarly themed The Matrix. Its limited release of only 256 theaters didn't help but it got generally good reviews.
  • Exit to Eden (1994) — Budget, $25-30 million. Box office, $6,841,570. This film version of Anne Rice's novel was lambasted by critics for its clumsily inserted subplot with a pair of Canon Foreigner cops played by Dan Aykroyd and Rosie O'Donnell (who both regretted making it) and for being an unfunny, unsexy sex comedy.
  • Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014) — Budget, $140 million. Box office, $65,014,513 (domestic), $267,281,036 (worldwide). It drew controversy for its action-oriented take on the Biblical story of Moses and for its whitewashed cast of Egyptian characters. This was another critical and financial dud for Ridley Scott, but he immediately bounced back with The Martian.
  • Exorcist: The Beginning (2004) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $41 million (domestic), $78 million (worldwide). This prequel to The Exorcist was born out of Executive Meddling after an unsatisfactory response to Paul Schrader's relatively bloodless Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist. The end result was eviscerated by critics and series creator William Peter Blatty for its overemphasis on gore and its prequelitis. Schrader's version was released the following year.
  • Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $30.7 million. Although this sequel to The Exorcist technically made a profit, even becoming Warner Bros' highest opening weekend at the time, it was still deemed a failure as it grossed nowhere near the amount its predecessor did. Nowadays it’s well known as one of the most infamous cases of Sequelitis in movie history, with critics and audiences generally agreeing that it was a laughably bad sequel.
  • The Expendables 3 (2014) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $39,322,544 (domestic), $206,172,544 (worldwide). Unfortunately, the film got leaked online several weeks before release, which prompted a lawsuit against several piracy websites from Lionsgate. In addition to that and bad reviews, everyone in the U.S. was waiting in line for Guardians of the Galaxy and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014). Despite all this, and thanks to its foreign gross, a fourth installment in the Sylvester Stallone series is said to be in the works.
  • The Experts (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $169,203. Paramount dumped this in 100 theaters after putting it on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years. The film led to John Travolta and Kelly Preston's Romance on the Set and eventual marriage.
  • Explorers (1985) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,873,044. It was originally scheduled for late-August but Paramount rushed it to early July when it wasn't even finished. Its new release date buried it under the box-office smash Back to the Future and the popular Live Aid concert happening around the same time sealed its fate. It was properly edited for its home video release and it has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Exposed (1983) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,352,083. This romantic thriller set back director James Toback's career by four years.
  • The Express (2008) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $9,808,124. This sports biopic fumbled in theaters after four weeks despite pretty good reviews from critics. Director Gary Fleder's film career was benched for five years until Homefront and screenwriter Charles Leavitt wouldn't write another film until Seventh Son. It also marked Chadwick Boseman's film debut.
  • Extraordinary Measures (2010) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $15,134,293. This is the first film produced by CBS Films, which still exists, though in a somewhat reduced operation. One of two 2010 bombs that caused Brendan Fraser's career to outright flatline after Looney Tunes: Back in Action put it in the hospital for the decade prior to it. Director Tom Vaughan's career found itself plummeting to Development Hell after this movie, writer Robert Nelson Jacobs has not created another screenplay, and this, along with Cowboys & Aliens, was a major blow to Harrison Ford's career, though he eventually bounced back when he returned to Star Wars for The Force Awakens.
  • Extreme Measures (1996) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $17,380,126. It debuted in second place behind second-week champ The First Wives Club but flat-lined soon after.
  • Extreme Ops (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $10,959,475. This sent director Christian Duguay to TV work for five years.
  • Extreme Prejudice (1987) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $11,307,844. John Milius conceived this western drama in 1976 but it wasn't until the mid-80s that production began with Walter Hill directing. Tri-Star tried to rush the film to a Christmas 1986 release, but the filmmakers resisted. The end result was liked a lot by critics, but it fell flat after opening at number two behind The Secret of My Success.
  • Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $31,847,881 (domestic), $55,247,881 (worldwide). Its story of an autistic boy dealing with his father's death in 9/11 was derided by critics as heavy-handed Oscar Bait and a major case of being too insenitive because of the topic it covered. That didn't stop it from getting an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.note 
  • Eye Of The Beholder (1999) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $17,589,705. It was the first film to ever receive an "F" on Cinemascore. Director Stephan Elliot wouldn't direct again for eight years.
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    F 
  • Factory Girl (2006) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $3,572,632. This film put a major dent in director George Hickenlooper's career and was the beginning of Hayden Christensen's drought in roles since the George Lucas-produced Star Wars movies had come to an end, and he had earned Razzies and snark for his portrayal of Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader for the last two movies before Disney seized control (Christensen was also intentionally minimizing his career after making a few investments.)
  • Fair Game (1995) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $11,534,477. This loose adaptation of the Paula Gosling novel was shot to pieces by critics for its cliché script, ineffective humor, and the lack of chemistry between stars William Baldwin and Cindy Crawford, the latter of whom was singled out for a generally weak performance. Any hopes that Crawford would leap from a modeling career to an acting career went up in flames, and it put a sizable dent in Baldwin's own acting career. The box office woes were not helped by late reshoots due to poor test screenings, inflating the budget. The film would be nominated for three Razzies, and director Andrew Sipes never worked on another film.
  • Fair Game (2010) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $9,540,691 (domestic), $24,188,922 (worldwide). This drama based on the Plame Affair was rated favorably by critics but its widest release was in 436 theaters.
  • Faithful (1996) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $2,101,580. Ended up being director Paul Mazursky's final theatrical film, as he continued on to do TV movies and documentaries until his passing in 2014. Was one of several films in that period that put a dent into co-star Chazz Palminteri's career as well, as he mostly did independent movies and small roles afterwards, rarely appearing in the top billing of theatrical releases again.
  • The Falcon and the Snowman (1985) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $17 million. The film version of the Robert Lindsey novel was the first film written by Steven Zaillian. Its January release likely killed its theatrical prospects despite glowing reviews. Zaillian's next film screenplay came five years later with Awakenings.
  • The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $4.75 million. Comparisons with contemporary Roman epic Cleopatra are inevitable, although Fall had a substantially less Troubled Production and was much more well-received by critics. Audiences, however, had lost interest in sword and sandal epics following Cleopatra (and, unlike Cleopatra, Fall has largely faded into obscurity since its initial release in 1964). Producer Samuel Bronston and his studio went broke when this film failed. It was also among a series of flops for Paramount Pictures that ended Barney Balaban's 28-year run as studio president.
  • Fallen (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $25,232,289. Fortunately for director Gregory Hoblit, his next film was Frequency.
  • The Fan (1981) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $3,082,096. Director Ed Bianchi didn't direct another theatrical film for another decade.
  • The Fan (1996) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $18,626,419. The first film produced by Mandalay Entertainment was the second and final film written by Robert "Phoef" Sutton, who works in TV now.
  • The Fanatic (2019) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $3,153. Opening in only 58 theaters, this film drew mockery for its unintentional humor and John Travolta's hammy performance as an autistic stalker, which did little to help resuscitate his career after critically drubbed performances in American Crime Story and Gotti. The third feature film directed by Fred Durst, and also his worst received to date in terms of critical reception and box office.
  • Fanboys (2009) — Budget, $3.9 million. Box office, $960,828. This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for nearly three years as The Weinstein Company grew cold feet over the cancer subplot. Despite the best efforts by the filmmakers to promote it (up to and including showing a rough cut to George Lucas, who gave Approval of God) and positive reception within the Star Wars fandom, it was ultimately given a very limited release where it died a quiet death, and it faded into bargain bins across the nation.
  • Fandango (1985) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $91,666. This was Kevin Reynolds's directorial debut, the film debut of Suzy Amis and Kevin Costner's lead acting debut. It was also the first film by Amblin Entertainment to not credit Steven Spielberg. It died in a limited release but was Vindicated by History.
  • Fantasia (1940) — Budget, $2,280,000. Box office, $361,800 (original theatrical release tally only). The outbreak of World War II plus the cost of movie theaters having to install Disney's new "Fantasound" technology to properly show Fantasia hurt this film badly, and, along with Pinocchio and Bambi's initial disappointing releases and a bitter strike from animators, defeated the dream of turning Fantasia into a concert/animation film series for decades and resulted in Walt Disney having to make package films for the remainder of the 40s until Cinderella brought animation back to mainstream. It's also one of a handful of RKO Pictures-distributed flops in the early 40's that dealt damage to the studio. Fantasia has since been considered one of Walt's best, along with Pinocchio and Bambi.
  • Fantasia 2000 (2000) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $60,655,420 (domestic), $90,874,570 (worldwide). It was announced around the same time as the Walt Disney Classics VHS release of Fantasia and the premiere of Beauty and the Beast, and was a massive production that took nine years to finish. Disney released the movie to celebrate the new millennium. The reasons for the low gross was Executive Producer Roy Disney's decision to release the film only in IMAX format, amongst other marketing moves such as building a temporary IMAX theater that cost $4,000,000 and having the show's orchestra tour the country. The IMAX-only showings severely reduced the potential box office gross due to the format still being in relative infancy, having less than 100 theaters in North America at the time. It became the highest grossing IMAX feature up to that point and helped further development of the format, plus it was received well from critics, but it still lost money due to this decision, even after it was released in regular theaters in the summer. The overall box office underperformance ended the dream of Fantasia becoming a concert film series a second time, with a planned third film canceled and several shorts meant for it instead being released on the Platinum Edition DVDs of The Lion King and The Little Mermaid. All major features released in IMAX by Hollywood now have regular theater showings released simultaneously with the IMAX release.
  • Fant4stic (2015) — Budget, $155 million (not counting marketing costs), $200 million (counting them). Box office, $56,117,548 (domestic), $167,397,693 (worldwide). Fans and copyright holder Disney/Marvel were already annoyed at Fox's ill-fated attempt to hold on to the Fantastic Four franchise despite the middling performances of the 2005 film and its sequel. The movie's Troubled Production that saw director Josh Trank exhibit bad behavior that cost him a Star Wars directing job, Marvel Comics seemingly doing everything in their power not to promote it (this is a company that put Howard the Duck on their website and not this), and the evisceration by the critics, fans, and general audience led this to be the worst-performing superhero-based movie since The Green Hornet. It didn't even win on its opening weekend, losing to Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, which premiered a week prior. Its nuclear failure morphed Fox's entire fiscal year into a severe financial loss, crushed their plans for a sequel, and played a very significant part in Fox's acquisition by Disney. It also derailed Trank's career, turning his name into instant sarcasm-bait as a latter-day Michael Cimino. As if adding insult to injury, Fox's next Marvel movie, Deadpool, utterly demolished expectations, earning back its ~$60 million budget thirteen times over, making this movie's entire lifetime's gross earnings in its opening weekend (that film was rated R and therefore somewhat out of Disney's comfort zone, but in contrast to Fant4stic, they did not have a problem with creating merchandise for that film or allowing Marvel executives to praise it). As for other members of the crew, all four "Fantastics" in the movie regard this as an Old Shame, with at least Miles Teller and Toby Kebbell seeing career difficulties. The creation of the movie and its bombing led Marvel to deep freeze the Fantastic Four franchise until 2018, with the re-release of their comic and placing them back in video games months later, before another, much-anticipated reboot in the Marvel Cinematic Universe was announced.
  • Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21,002,919 (domestic), $46,471,023 (worldwide). Part of a string of box office flops based off of the library of Roald Dahl (all of these movies are acclaimed flops). This was Wes Anderson's animated debut, and he waited nine years for his next one, Isle of Dogs.
  • The Fantasticks (2000) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $49,666. This film adaptation of the classic musical was completed in 1995, but withheld until 2000, when it became a critical and commercial bomb. This is the last theatrical movie with Michael Ritchie's name on it to be released before his death in 2001.
  • Far Cry (2008) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $700,000. This Uwe Boll film was actually distributed by two major Hollywood studios instead of being a small project (Touchstone Pictures distributed it in North America while Fox distributed it in Boll's home country of Germany, where it was heavily edited). This case of Video Game Movies Suck is one of the last truly mature projects Disney agreed to distribute before studio chief Dick Cook was asked to leave by CEO Bob Iger when they bought Marvel the next year and changed their film strategy. All of Uwe Boll's films past this point were small-scale productions, and gaming companies—for good reason—didn't want to let Boll anywhere near their properties; all the video game movies he did inflicted heavy damage on the franchises they came from (Boll attempted to land a role as director for Warcraft, but Blizzard, expecting an Uwe Boll-helmed Warcraft movie to be a Franchise Killer for Warcraft itself, laid into him for applying. Boll also wanted to do a Metal Gear Solid film, which got an equally negative reception from creator Hideo Kojima).
  • A Farewell to Arms (1957) — Budget, $4.1-4.3 million. Box office, $5 million (domestic rentals), $6.9 million (worldwide rentals), $20 million (worldwide gross). David O. Selznick produced this adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel as a vehicle for his wife, Jennifer Jones, who played the doomed heroine, Catherine Barkley. Critics took the film to task for, among other things, Jones's miscasting, her lack of chemistry with co-star Rock Hudson, and its overblown grandeur. While distributor Fox made its money back, Selznick did not, and this would be the last film he produced.
  • Farewell To The King (1989) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $2,420,917. One of two films during this time, the other being Flight of the Intruder, that grounded the directing career of John Milius, but he's still a major Hollywood player.
  • Fascination (2005) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $16,670. This film was dumped into limited release to fulfill a contractual obligation with MGM and the film’s producers that the studio inherited from Orion Pictures.
  • The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $62,514,415 (domestic), $158,468,292 (worldwide). While this installment in the franchise did need international gross to break even, it didn't slow the series down at all.
  • Faster (2010) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $23,240,020 (domestic), $35,626,958 (worldwide). This one caused co-producer Tony Gayton's cinematic career to skid right off the highway; he moved to television and created Hell on Wheels.
  • Fat Man and Little Boy (1989) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $3,563,162. This dramatization of the development of the atomic bomb got a mixed reception for its historical liberties and its casting of Paul Newman and Dwight Schultz. This started the gradual downfall of director Roland Joffe.
  • Fatal Instinct (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $7,839,327. This parody film was eviscerated by critics and faded out of theaters pretty quickly. It went Direct to Video in the UK after its disastrous run in North America. This was the penultimate film directed by Carl Reiner.
  • Father Figures (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,501,244 (domestic), $25,601,244 (worldwide). This critically reviled comedy was placed on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for over a year, retitled the film from the more provocative Bastards and was sent to die in a packed holiday season.
  • Fathers' Day (1997) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $35,681,080. This was one of three major flops (Batman & Robin and The Postman being the other two) in a disastrous year for Warner Bros., and Robin Williams later considered it an Old Shame. Outside of a voiceover role in Pixar's A Bug's Life, Seinfeld star Julia-Louis Dreyfus wouldn't return to the big screen until The New 10's.
  • The Favor (1994) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3 million. Originally set for a 1991 release by Orion, but after they went bankrupt that year it sat on a shelf before getting a sudden release in 1994. It had a decent opening week but fizzled out due to poor promotion, and dropped off the charts later that month.
  • Faust (1926) - Budget: 2,000,000 reichsmarks. Box office: 1 million reichsmarks.
  • Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) — Budget, $18.5 million. Box office, $10.6 million. This movie put Monty Python alumnus Terry Gilliam's cinematic career in the hole until 2005, and was one of two 1998 films that derailed co-writer Tod Davies's cinematic screenwriting career indefinitely. Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas, however, became a Cult Classic when it was released on DVD.
  • FeardotCom (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $18,902,905. Disconnected director William Malone's cinematic career until 2008, and after that movie, his Hollywood career remained offline.
  • Fearless (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,995,302. This only appeared in six theaters on its opening weekend and opened its widest at 749 theaters a few weeks later. Still, critics gave it glowing reviews and Rosie Perez got an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Director Peter Weir wouldn't make another film until The Truman Show five years later.
  • Felicias Journey (1999) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $824,295. Atom Egoyan's follow-up to The Sweet Hereafter was an Acclaimed Flop which won four Genie Awards.
  • Femme Fatale (2002) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $16.8 million. It had mixed reviews, though prominent critics like Roger Ebert praised it highly.
  • Ferdinand (2017) Budget, $111 million. Box office, $84,410,380 (domestic), $296,069,199 (worldwide). This film version of the classic Munro Leaf book was well-liked by critics, but for whatever reason Fox decided to release it on the same day as The Last Jedi, which proceeded to demolish Ferdinand at the box office domestically for the first weeks of its release. However, the film saw decent legs without major competition from other animated children's films throughout the rest of the holiday season, and it saw good business overseas.
  • Fever Pitch (1985) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $618,847. This was the last movie that Richard Brooks directed before he died in 1992.
  • The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu (1980) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $10,697,276. This comedic take on the infamous Sax Rohmer character was the final film for Peter Sellers, who played the title character, his nemesis Wayland Smith, and others, who died two weeks before it was released. Critics utterly despised it and it proved to be the last film revolving around the character. This was also the final film for David Tomlinson, John Le Mesurier, and Sellers' wife, executive producer Lynne Frederick.
  • Fierce Creatures (1997) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,381,260. This is the last story that Monty Python alumnus John Cleese would write until The Croods in 2013. Co-writer Iain Johnstone, on the other hand, didn't write another fictional movie at all.
  • The Fifth Estate (2013) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $8,555,008. This had the worst opening for a wide release that year. The critics cited the film for its slow script and direction, while the controversial nature of its subject (the founding of Wikileaks) drove quite a few moviegoers away. It was also the last R-rated film released through Disney until the acquired-from-Fox Stuber six years later.
  • The Fifth Wave (2016) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $34,294,936 (domestic), $106,484,451 (worldwide). The film version of the YA novel was ripped apart by critics for being a Cliché Storm no different than other sci-fi YA works but viewer response was much higher.
  • Fight Club (1999) — Budget, $63 million. Box office, $37,030,102 (domestic), $100,853,753 (worldwide). At the time of its release, the film was ravaged by critics for its messages, dark humor, and violence, and was K.O'ed at the box office. Fox owner Rupert Murdoch never forgave executive Bill Mechanic for greenlighting this film, and was rumored to be one of the reasons why Mechanic was fired from the studio. Thankfully, the film managed to become a huge Cult Classic, being voted as one of the greatest movies of all time in multiple magazine polls, and one of David Fincher's best films.
  • Fighting Back (1982) - Budget, $9 million. Box office, $6.4 million. This Death Wish clone executive produced by the first film's EP, Dino De Laurentiis, was eviscerated by critics and was overshadowed on opening weekend by Rocky III and Laurentiis's own Conan the Barbarian.
  • The Fighting Temptations (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $32,750,821. This eventually knocked out the career of director Jonathan Lynn along with the careers of the movie's producers, and was one of a handful of bad steps for Cuba Gooding Jr..
  • Filth And Wisdom (2008) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $354,628. Madonna's directorial debut and the first film of her production company, Semtex Films. It had a very limited release and a simultaneous release on VOD.
  • Final Analysis (1992) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $28,590,665. One of a few flops in the early 90's that melted the A-list career of Kim Basinger.
  • Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (2001) — Budget, $135-167 million. Box office, $85,131,830. This film's failure led to the collapse of Square Pictures after only one film and delayed the merger of Squaresoft with Enix; the latter company was hesitant at merging with a company that had just lost a large amount of money in a high-profile manner. As a result of the film's flopping, it halted the idea of Animated Actress character Aki Ross (who was voiced by Ming-Na Wen) appearing in other movies right out of the gates. This film is also cited as the reason why the movie's director and the creator of the Final Fantasy series, Hironobu Sakaguchi, resigned from the firm and ended his involvement with the franchise, moving to Hawaii and starting the development studio Mistwalker (this film also wounded the careers of its writers; this is also one of at least two instances on this list where the main brain behind the games was unable to direct a film based off the series and saw his career get impaled; the other is Origin Systems' Chris Roberts and the Wing Commander movie). Square has not enjoyed the level of dominance it once had prior to this film's release.
  • Find Me Guilty (2006) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $2,636,637. The penultimate film of Sidney Lumet's career was based on the story of mobster Jackie DiNorscio. It was an Acclaimed Flop, with much of the praise going to Vin Diesel's performance as DiNorscio.
  • A Fine Mess (1986) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6,029,826.
  • The Finest Hours (2016) — Budget, $70-80 million. Box office, $52,099,090. This was originally meant to open the previous October, but Disney ended up dumping the film on the same day as Kung Fu Panda 3, which got considerably better reviews overall to the mixed ones The Finest Hours got (this was also the day Fifty Shades of Black opened and The Force Awakens was still playing). It was subsequently scuttled at the box office and cost Disney $75 million for the error (though they would rebound with Zootopia in time).
  • Finian's Rainbow (1968) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $11.6 million. Domestic rentals, $5.1 million. Francis Ford Coppola's film version of the Harburg and Saidy musical was his first studio film. Unfortunately, it came out at a time when musicals declined in popularity, not helped by the roadshow release inadvertently matting out the dancers' feet when it converted it from 35mm to 70mm. This marked Fred Astaire's last musical. One positive was that Coppola met George Lucas when the latter worked as his production assistant.
  • Fire and Ice (1983) — Budget, $1.2 million. Box office, $760,883. This is a Ralph Bakshi film, so unsurprisingly, it became a Cult Classic.
  • Fire Birds (1990) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $14,760,451. This movie caused director David Green's directing career to go down in flames for ten years.
  • Fire Down Below (1997) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $16,228,448. Steven Seagal's contract with Warner Bros. went up in smoke when this movie did. Director Félix Enríquez Alcalá went back to television where he's had steady work since.
  • Fire with Fire (2012) — Budget: $10,400,000, Box office: $2.4 million. This action thriller starring 50 Cent was dumped Direct to Video in the States and was in only a handful of countries theatrically.
  • Fired Up (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18,599,102. The directorial debut of Will Gluck was kicked out of theaters after seven weeks. Gluck found better luck the next year with Easy A.
  • Firestorm (1998) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $8,165,212. This firefighting drama starring NFL star Howie Long was the only new release on opening week and it was curbstomped by a slew of longstanding holdovers. Between this and the same year's The Patriot, veteran cinematographer Dean Semler never got into the director's chair again.
  • Firewall (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $48,751,189 (domestic), $82,751,189 (worldwide). One of several consecutive busts that decade for Harrison Ford, though he broke his unlucky streak a few years later with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.
  • The First 20 Million Is Always The Hardest (2002) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $5,491. Confirmed Volcano's liquidation of Mick Jackson's cinematic career; he didn't take another directing job on a movie released in the cinema circuit for 14 years. This is one of the biggest bombs in history percentage-wise, alongside Don Bluth's A Troll in Central Park; it was only released in two theaters, and the writer of the book it's based on, Po Bronson, never dealt with Hollywood again, though he became a columnist for Time online. Thankfully for co-writer Jon Favreau, his career only went up from here.
  • First Daughter (2004) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $10,592,180. This was released the same year as Chasing Liberty, both romantic comedies about the rebellious daughter of the US President. It promptly flopped in theaters but did slightly better on home video.
  • First Knight (1995) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $37,600,435 (domestic), $127,600,435 (worldwide). This interpretation of King Arthur is the second film directed solo by Jerry Zucker. It received mixed reviews, with many critics citing the film for miscasting Richard Gere as Sir Lancelot. Zucker directed one more film, Rat Race, before he stuck to producing.
  • First Love Last Rites (1998) — Budget, $300,000. Box office, $42,953. This adaptation of Ian McEwan's short story had a limited release and a mixed critical reception. Its soundtrack was much better received.
  • First Man (2018) — Budget, $59 million. Box office, $44,936,545 (domestic), $100,546,153 (worldwide). Damien Chazelle's biopic of Neil Armstrong ran into controversy for not depicting Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin raise the flag on the Moon. While critics loved the film, it was stranded in space as audiences preferred holdovers Venom and A Star Is Born.
  • Five Corners (1987) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $969,205. This was John Patrick Shanley's first screenplay, but it was released after his Oscar-winning smash Moonstruck. Critics still liked it.
  • Five Days One Summer (1982) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $199,078. This was the last film Fred Zinnemann ever directed before his death in 1997. This was also the only theatrical film produced by Cable and Wireless Finance.
  • The Five-Year Engagement (2012) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $28,835,528 (domestic), $53,909,751 (worldwide). This Judd Apatow produced comedy debuted at number five and fell flat once TheAvengers opened the following weekend. This did no favors for Jason Segel's career, and aside from the critical reception to his performance in The End Of The Tour, he has wound up making little-seen independent films.
  • Flags of Our Fathers (2006) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $65,900,249. This was released a few months ahead of a companion film, Letters from Iwo Jima. While this film faltered at the box office, Iwo Jima did not. That wasn't enough to save co-writer William Broyles's career (he moved to New Mexico), but the other major players in both movies stayed alive.
  • Flakes (2007) — Box office, $778. No, that's not a typo. Flakes was only open in one theater, and closed after nine days. Unsurprisingly, this is director Michael Lehmann's final theatrical work.
  • Flash Gordon (1980) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $27,107,960 (domestic), at least $50 million (worldwide). It was a hit internationally and fared very well with critics, but plans for a film trilogy never went through after performing just OK in the United States box office. Became a Cult Classic and future film villains, including Aladdin's Jafar, were based off this movie's Big Bad. A remake is on the Hollywood docket.
  • Flash of Genius (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $4,802,953. This biopic of Robert Kearns, the inventor of the windshield wiper, was ran off the road after three weeks in theaters. Marc Abraham, who made his directorial debut here, stuck to producing until he returned to the director's chair for I Saw The Light.
  • Flatliners (2017) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $16,883,115 (domestic), $44,449,372 (worldwide). Universal panning from film critics has helped this movie remake live up to its title at the box office.
  • Flawless (1999) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $4,485,485. Critics gave this dramedy mixed reviews, though they singled out Philip Seymour Hoffman for praise.
  • Fled (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,193,231. Writer Preston A. Whitmore II didn't write for another film for four years. It didn't help that it was released during the smash success of Independence Day.
  • Flesh+Blood (1985) — Budget, $6.5 million. Box office, $100,000 (domestic). This was the last time screenwriter Gerard Soeteman worked with director Paul Verhoeven for 20 years; while Verhoeven moved on to Hollywood and did RoboCop (1987), Soeteman stayed low-key.
  • Flesh And Bone (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,709,451. The second and final film directed by Steve Kloves, who went back to screenwriting beginning with 2000's Wonder Boys.
  • Flight of the Intruder (1991) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $14,587,732. One of two films during this time, the other being Farewell to the King, that grounded the directing career of John Milius, but he's still a major Hollywood player.
  • The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) — Budget, $3.8-5.3 million. Box office, $3 million (rentals). This first adaptation of the Elleston Trevor novel flopped at the box office despite respectful reviews. It's since become a Cult Classic.
  • The Flight of the Phoenix (2004) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $34,586,264. Unlike the original, this was a financial and critical flop.
  • The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (2000) — Budget, $83 million. Box office, $59,468,275. Had the misfortune of going through Development Hell that resulted in the original film's cast leaving and the crew having to restart from scratch. Releasing it at a time when Hanna-Barbera cartoons had long lost the public's interest didn't help anything. The only theatrical film based on a Hanna-Barbera property released since then (excepting Scooby-Doo and its sequel, the franchise itself being perhaps the sole Hanna-Barbera franchise that hasn't gone out of mainstream vogue of 2010's) is the Live-Action Adaptation of Yogi Bear. As for the crew members of Viva Rock Vegas, the film bankrupted the cinematic careers of co-writers Jim Cash and Jack Epps. Jr (the last film to credit them had a screenplay from before 2000), and it and Josie and the Pussycats wounded the careers of the other two writers, Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont.
  • Flipped (2010) — Budget, $13.5 million. Box office, $1,755,212. Its poor showing in its limited release made Warner Bros. abruptly cancel plans to go wider. It only topped out at 442 theaters.
  • The Flock (2007) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $7,119,846. This film was sent straight to video in North America. Did some pretty severe damage to the careers of co-producer Elie Samaha and director Andrew Lau, the latter of whom has virtually stuck to Chinese movies since.
  • The Flowers Of War (2012) — Budget, $94 million. Box office, $311,434 (domestic), $97,311,434 (worldwide). This was given a limited release in the US so it could qualify for the Oscars (which left it with no nominations). It was far more successful in its native China, grossing $95 million there.
  • Flushed Away (2006) — Budget, $149 million. Box office, $64,488,856 (domestic), $176,319,242. This movie flushed $109 million of DreamWorks Animation's money down the toilet and permanently drowned their partnership with Aardman Animations, who were becoming displeased with DWA by this point.
  • Fly Me to the Moon (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,816,982 (domestic), $41,721,414 (worldwide). This debuted as a 4-D attraction in various theme parks the previous year. Critics and audiences found it So Okay, It's Average while its Uncanny Valley character designs may have turned off others.
  • Flyboys (2006) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $17,834,865. Director Tony Bill and co-screenwriter David S. Ward have not been involved with another theatrical film since. Producer Dean Devlin would also have no film credits until 2013.
  • Foodfight! (2012) — Budget, $45 million (others say $65 million). Box office, $73,706. Its decade-long Development Hell (which included someone stealing the discs with completed animation and footage), and controversies over its rampant product placements doomed the film from the beginning; it was mostly released Direct to Video, and one of the production companies behind it, Threshold Entertainment, who mostly does theme park attractions, has yet to announce another cinematic project (it also more or less spoiled the theatrical careers of producer/director Lawrence Kasanoff and writer Sean Catherine Derek, the former of whom hadn't really worked since producing Mortal Kombat: Annihilation).
  • Fool For Love (1985) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $900,000. Sam Shepard wrote and starred in this adaptation of his play, which was adored by critics, but was only released in 57 theaters.
  • For Keeps (1988) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $17,514,554. This Molly Ringwald film, directed by John G. Avildsen, experienced a very Troubled Production. It was one of four films released between 1987 and 1990 that utterly destroyed Ringwald's promising future as a leading lady, the other three being The Pick-up Artist, Fresh Horses, and Betsy's Wedding. Critics cried foul over its melodramatic handling of the issue of teen pregnancy and clichéd plot.
  • For Love Of The Game (1999) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $46.1 million. This film version of Michael Shaara's final novel was given a mixed reception from critics, many of whom accused the film of being more interested in baseball than telling a believable love story note . It opened at number two at the box office before it fell flat in later weeks. It also became notorious for Kevin Costner's public feud with Universal and director Sam Raimi over the final cut.
  • For Love or Money (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $11,146,270. This was evicted from theaters after four weeks. Director Barry Sonnenfeld rebounded a month later with Addams Family Values.
  • For Queen And Country (1988) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $191,051.
  • For Richer or Poorer (1997) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $32,748,995. One of two 1997 films that smashed the cinematic directing career of Bryan Spicer; McHale's Navy is the other.
  • For The Boys (1991) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $23,202,444. It didn't help that the whole world was waiting in line to see Beauty and the Beast that same day.
  • The Forbidden Dance (1990) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1.8 million. Came out on the same week as another dance film, Lambada, which completely took this one's attention. The failure killed off plans for a franchise based off this movie, and it ended up being the only theatrical film that Sawmill Productions worked on.
  • Forces of Nature (1999) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $52,888,180 (domestic), $93,888,180 (worldwide). This romantic comedy spent its first two weeks at number one before it was quickly swept away. It was released three days before the suicide of co-star David Strickland.
  • Forever Lulu (1987) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $36,786. This film is perhaps known nowadays for being Alec Baldwin's big-screen acting debut.
  • The Founder (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $24,036,928. This biopic of McDonald's founder Ray Kroc received great reviews from critics, especially for Michael Keaton's performance as Kroc, but suffered from a glut of competitors on its wide opening weekend.note 
  • The Fountain (2006) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $15,978,422. This surreal existential drama from Darren Aronofsky divided critics and audiences upon its release but it became a Cult Classic down the line.
  • The Four Feathers (2002) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $29,882,645. This adaptation of A.E.W. Mason's classic novel got a mixed reception from critics, many of whom called out the film for its lack of energy. Director Shekhar Kapur didn't direct again for five years.
  • Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse (1962) — Budget, $7.1 million. Box office, $4.1 million. By modern inflation rates, that's over $22 million in losses. This film's failure was part of what caused MGM's financial issues in the early sixties, and what eventually led to an overhaul in staff, including then-president Joseph Vogel getting replaced by Robert O'Brien.
  • Four Rooms (1995) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $4,257,354. An Anthology Film based on some of Roald Dahl's adult short stories. Unlike some other adaptations of Dahl's works, the critics weren't on its side.
  • The Fourth War (1990) — Budget, $14.5 million. Box office, $1,305,887. The last screenplay by Kenneth Ross and one of the last films by Cannon. This was shipped out of theaters after two weeks.
  • Foxfire (1996) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $269,300. Its widest release was in 218 theaters.
  • Francis Of Assisi (1961) - Budget, $2,015,000. Box office, $1.8 million. Michael Curtiz's biopic of the Patron Saint of Italy was the last film he completed; his next and final film, The Comancheros. was completed by John Wayne after he stepped down due to illness. Critics generally agreed that it lacked any dramatic tension.
  • Frankenhooker (1990) — Budget, $2.5 million. Box office, $205,000. The movie suffered due to not being able to secure an R rating in time, thus many theaters refusing to hold it. This is director Frank Henenlotter's last theatrical film to date, as well as the final theatrical release by Shapiro-Glickenhaus Entertainment.
  • Frankenstein Unbound (1990) — Budget, $11.5 million. Box office, $334,748. Roger Corman's final film as a director; he's had steady work as a producer since.
  • Frankenweenie (2012) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $35,291,068 (domestic), $81,491,068 (worldwide). This Tim Burton stop-motion remake of his 1984 short opened a week after the much family-friendlier Hotel Transylvania.
  • Frankie And Johnny Are Married (2003) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $22,900. No that's not a typo, the film played in only four theaters over five weekends. The third and final strike for Michael Pressman's film directing career, though he remains in demand for television work.
  • Freaked (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $29,296. Alex Winter and Tom Stern's directorial debuts was this absurdist sci-fi comedy. A regime change at Fox occurred during post-production and the new executives slashed the budget, then pulled the film from national release after poor test screenings and slashed the advertising budget. The end result debuted in two theaters and vanished pretty quickly.
  • Freaks (1932) — Budget, $316,000-$350,000. Box office, Unknown. This controversial pre-Hays Code horror film recorded a loss of $164,000, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. The film's plot and then-notorious characters, who were deformed and led by a character who intended on murder, caused audiences to storm out of screenings and got this film banned from theaters before it could complete its cinematic run; this is the only MGM film to be ripped out of theaters; the studio disowned the film shortly thereafter, selling the rights to exploitation producer Dwain Esper, though MGM bought back the film in the early 1960s. This mess disemboweled the career of director Tod Browning, turned the movie into an Old Shame for one of its actors, Angelo Rossitto, led to the original cut of the film being presumably missing, and got MGM sued by a woman who claimed the movie made her miscarry. Eventually became a Cult Classic and the current edited version now sports a 93 on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • Freaks of Nature (2015) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $70,958. This vampire/zombie/alien mashup horror comedy was originally supposed to come out in January 2015 under the Genius Bonus title of Kitchen Sink , but then was delayed to September... but it didn't get a trailer (under its current name) until October, and only two weeks before being dumped in a mere 107 theaters with Invisible Advertising and disappearing another two weeks later.
  • Fred Claus (2007) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $97,838,349. Co-writer Jessie Nelson had to wait ten years for another one of her scripts to be made into a film. Ironically, that script is the sequel to Enchanted, which came out during the same holiday season as Fred Claus and ultimately trounced the latter film at the box office.
  • Freddie as F.R.O.7 (1992) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $1,119,368. It had the worst per-theater average for an animated movie (only grossing $501,230 at 1,257 sites) until Delgo came out. A sequel was in pre-production but was immediately cancelled after the film bombed. The film was later reedited and retitled Freddie the Frog for its American VHS release in 1995, but did its reputation no favors. Director/writer/producer Jon Acevski has no other credits besides this movie.
  • Freddy Got Fingered (2001) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $14,254,993 (domestic), $14,333,252 (worldwide). This infamous film was ruthlessly panned by critics for its take on comedy scenes. The film itself was edited down to get an R rating, and Ebert & Roeper's comments basically said that it STILL should have received an NC-17 despite the edits (Ebert accused the MPAA of being "morally adrift" and later added the movie to his most hated film list). Freddy Got Fingered murdered Tom Green and Derek Harvie's theatrical careers before they could get started. The film DID sell well on DVD, however.
  • Free Birds (2013) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $55,750,480 (domestic), $110,150,480 (worldwide). While the first fully animated outing from Reel FX Creative Studios barely broke even domestically, basing a movie around a holiday most familiar to Americans (i.e. Thanksgiving) didn't translate into big profits in the more lucrative worldwide market, and didn't translate into big reviews either, with only a 19% score on Rotten Tomatoes. While producer/screenplay writer Scott Mosier continues to see major work, most recently the 2018 adaptation of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! simple titled The Grinch, Director/co-writer Jimmy Hayward (Horton Hears a Who!, Jonah Hex) hasn't been seen in the director's chair since. Reel FX would go on to animate the much better received The Book of Life one year later.
  • Free Fire (2017) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $3,793,754. This action comedy debuted far, far below expectations to finish at number 17 at the box office behind several new releases. Part of a bad year for executive producer Martin Scorsese, with Good Time and The Snowman coming later to flop.
  • Free State of Jones (2016) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,035,950. One of the victims of what Roger Friedman's Showbiz 411 website is calling the "Summer Bomb Buster", being released in the wake of a multitude of failed high-budget tentpoles; this one was overshadowed by Finding Dory, The Conjuring 2, Independence Day: Resurgence, The BFG, and The Legend of Tarzan (the latter three of which also underperformed).
  • Free Willy 3: The Rescue (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3.4 million. This film effectively put the Free Willy franchise on ice for 13 years; the next film, Escape from Pirate's Cove (2010) went Direct to Video before putting the franchise on hold again. It was also part of a rather disastrous summer slate for Warner Bros..
  • Freedomland (2006) — Budget, $37.7 million. Box office, $14,655,626. This movie's failure imprisoned mega-producer Joe Roth's directing career; he's stuck to being a producer since and has not directed another theatrical film.
  • Freeheld (2015) - Budget, $7 million. Box office, $1.7 million. Peter Sollett's narrative remake of Cynthia Wade's 2007 Oscar-winning documentary short got a mixed critical reception, which said its Cliché Storm characters and plot undermined its good intentions, and it was only released in 148 theaters.
  • Freejack (1992) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,129,026. This Cyberpunk thriller was hit with Executive Meddling and extensive reshoots which led to a product which was trashed by critics and ignored by audiences.
  • Freeway (1996) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $295,493. This dark comedy was adored by critics but it died with Invisible Advertising in a limited release spanning nine theaters. It's since become a Cult Classic which spawned a Direct to Video sequel.
  • Fresh Horses (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $6,640,346. One of a handful of 1988/1989 films that caused the Weintraub Entertainment Group to implode right out of the gates, and one of the movies that ended Coca-Cola's control over Columbia Pictures and caused their merger with Tristar and Sony. It was also part of a string of critical and commercial failures (Betsy's Wedding, For Keeps, and The Pick-Up Artist) that terminated Molly Ringwald's credibility as a leading lady.
  • Friend Request (2017) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,759,078 (domestic). This was released well over a year after it debuted in Germany. It was eviscerated by critics and it had the worst debut for a film playing at 2,500+ theaters.
  • Fright Night (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $18,302,607 (domestic), $41,002,607 (worldwide). The critics liked this remake of the 1985 horror film, even if not to the extent of the original. Its late-August release, Invisible Advertising, and being Not Screened for Critics screwed it over significantly.
  • The Frighteners (1996) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $16,759,216 (domestic), $29,359,216 (worldwide). Executive Meddling rushed this film to a July release date, which got it vaporized by Independence Day and the Summer Olympics. This was Michael J. Fox's last leading role in a live-action film before he semi-retired due to Parkinson's Disease. Peter Jackson rebounded with The Lord of the Rings beginning in 2001.
  • From Beyond (1986) - Budget: $4,500,000. Box Office: $1,261,000.
  • From Justin to Kelly (2003) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4.9 million. Aside from just about killing Justin Guarini's reputation, the film's failure ensured the impossibility of future American Idol movies.
  • From Paris with Love (2010) — Budget, $52 million. Box office, $24,077,427 (domestic), $52,826,594 (worldwide). Director Pierre Morrel waited five years before his next film, The Gunman.
  • From The Hip (1987) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $9,518,342. The first film written by David E. Kelley, who waited nine years to write another. Bob Clark waited another three years before his next film, the similarly ill-fated Loose Cannons. This was one of several busts that broke distributor DEG.
  • Frontier(s) (2007) — Budget, $3,000,000. Box office, $2,425,535. This NC-17 rated horror film was dumped in ten theaters for a single weekend in 2008, a year after its debut at the Agde Film Festival. Xavier Gens, who made his feature directorial debut here, had better luck with Hitman.
  • Frozen Assets (1992) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, $376,008 (domestic). This comedy about a man who gets tricked into running a sperm bank was universally despised by critics, including Siskel & Ebert, and it was a major embarrassment for distributor RKO Pictures. They stuck around as a production company and only tried distributing a film ten years later.
  • Full Of It (2007) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $486,722. It only got to 15 theaters and was expelled after one week. It was shown later that year on ABC Family as Big Liar on Campus.
  • Fun Size (2012) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $10.9 million. The lowest-grossing movie released by Nickelodeon so far.
  • The Funeral (1996) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $1,306,233. It never went past 70 theaters but the critics liked it quite a bit.
  • Funny About Love (1990) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $8,141,292. This was both the penultimate film directed by Leonard Nimoy and the penultimate film for Gene Wilder.
  • Funny Games (2008) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $7,938,872. An English Shot-for-Shot Remake of Michel Haneke's own Austrian thriller. The Rotten Tomatoes consensus summed up the film as "a sadistic exercise in chastising the audience" and it was viewed less favorably by critics than the first film.
  • Funny People (2009) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $71,585,235. Critics generally liked the film but they called it out for its excessive length. This cemented Adam Sandler's typecasting as a comedic actor and the only serious roles he would take after this were in independent films, and it would be a decade before he had a mainstream success as a dramatic actor with Uncut Gems. Universal chairman Marc Smuger would be out of a job a few months later due to this and other flops under his watch.
  • Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus (2006) — Budget, $16.8 million. Box office, $2,505,841. Director Steven Shainberg's career faded to black until 2016's Rupture. Its extremely limited release and its critical drubbing didn't help either.
  • Furry Vengeance (2010) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $17,630,465 (domestic), $36,236,710 (worldwide). This is one of two 2010 bombs that caused Brendan Fraser's career to outright flatline after Looney Tunes: Back in Action put it in the hospital for the decade prior to it. It also turned director Roger Kumble's career into roadkill and proved to be a major setback for producer Robert Simonds.

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