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  • 2 Bits (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $26,282. This was a personal project for screenwriter Joseph Stefano and its pathetic limited releasenote  made him retire from the film industry.
  • 3 Generations (2017) — Budget, Unknown, but The Weinstein Company paid $6 million for distribution rights. Box office, $68,852 (domestic), $443,962 (worldwide). This was intended to be released in September 2015 as About Ray but it got put in The Shelf of Movie Languishment with a week to go before its release after a lukewarm screening at the Toronto International Film Festival. It didn't help that the film already faced controversy for casting Elle Fanning as its trans male main character. The filmmakers used the delay to re-edit the film which was greeted with scorn upon release. It had a limited release of three weeks and went to DVD a few weeks after that.
  • 3 Ninjas Kick Back (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11,798,854. This sequel to 3 Ninjas fell short of its budget and got a worse critical reception than its predecessor. However, it sold well on home video.
  • 3:10 to Yuma (2007) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $53,606,916 (domestic), $70,016,220 (worldwide).
  • The 6th Day (2000) — Budget, $82 million. Box office, $34,604,280 (domestic), $96,085,477 (worldwide). Part of a series of busts that derailed Arnold Schwarzenegger's career.
  • 8 Million Ways to Die (1986) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,305,114. This was the final film that Hal Ashby directed, and he died two years after its release.
  • 9/11 (2017) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $120,500. The movie was roasted on the stake by critics, with Charlie Sheen's truther antics only adding fuel to the fire.
  • 9½ Weeks (1986) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $6,735,922 (original theatrical release tally only). The film's initial failure in cinemas got offset by several critics championing the film and it being vindicated by video. It also managed to play at a Paris cinema for 5 years straight.
  • 10 Years (2011, 2012) — Budget, Unknown, however; Box Office, $203,373. This debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2011 and had its general release the following year. Its theatrical release lasted for four weeks and topped out at 63 theaters.
  • 12 Angry Men (1957) — Budget, $340,000. Box office, $1 million (rentals). This film was dwarfed by color films released then, but was acclaimed by critics and is one of the most important films ever made.
  • 12 Rounds (2009) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $18,184,083. The sequels to this movie went Direct-to-Video when the original failed to perform.
  • 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) — Budget, $50 million (production only). Box office, $52,853,219 (domestic), $68,489,240 (worldwide). Given the topic this film deals with (the 2012 terrorist attack on an American diplomatic compound in Benghazi that killed the country's ambassador, Christopher Stevens, along with several service members), politics unsurprisingly played a part in some part of how it got received, despite the film never physically naming President Barack Obama OR then-Secretary of State and later presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at all during its runtime (the film didn't have much of an impact on Clinton's campaign, but she got upset by insurgent Donald Trump at the finish line anyway). Critics and audiences were much more forgiving, at least by Michael Bay standards; it still has a rotten score on Rotten Tomatoes from critics. This is the first of two box office underperformers for director/producer Bay in 2016; it was followed by Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows about six months later, which also came during a corporate feud at the maker of both movies, Paramount, that derailed boss Philippe Dauman's career with the firm. The failure of the films brought Bay back to the Transformers Film Series, directing Transformers: The Last Knight.
  • The 13th Warrior (1999) — Budget, $85 million (not counting marketing costs), $160 million (counting them). Box office, $61,698,899. When adjusted for inflation, this is possibly the biggest flop of all time depending on how the numbers are calculated with an upper figure of $183 million lost. It was also critically panned and had to deal with the undertow of another film Disney/Buena Vista released a few weeks earlier, The Sixth Sense. This is the last time Michael Crichton took a producer job on a theatrical film in his life, it impaled the careers of screenwriters William Wisher and Warren Lewis. Despite the success of his remake of The Thomas Crown Affair director John McTiernan suffered a career setback that became fatal with a three-strike combo of Rollerball and Basic, and being in prison and declaring bankruptcy a few years later. The film also led to Omar Sharif briefly retiring from acting. Disney ironically also jettisoned studio chief Joe Roth (who replaced Jeffrey Katzenberg) at the end of the year this film was released on the back of this, several other critical busts, and Roth allegedly not getting along with CEO Michael Eisner.
  • 15 Minutes (2001) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $24,403,552 (domestic), $56,359,980 (worldwide). John Herzfield didn't direct another feature film for six years, and it took 13 years for him to write another screenplay for a theatrical film.
  • 16 Blocks (2006) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $36,895,141 (domestic), $65,664,721 (worldwide). This is the last film Richard Donner has directed to date.
  • 20th Century Women (2016) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $5,553,068 (domestic), $5,716,856 (worldwide). Definitely an Acclaimed Flop that didn't get the buzz it needed, and struggled its way out of limited release. It still received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay, and two Golden Globe nominations (Best Picture and Best Actress for Annette Bening, Musical or Comedy).
  • 28 Days (2000) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $37,170,488 (domestic), $62,198,945 (worldwide). It opened at number two behind Rules of Engagement and dropped down soon after, likely due to its generally negative reviews. Screenwriter Susannah Grant, whose other, more successful film that year, Erin Brockovich, opened around the same time, didn't write again until 2005's In Her Shoes.
  • 30 Minutes or Less (2011) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $40,547,440.
  • The 33 (2015) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $24.9 million. This dramatization of the 2010 Copiapo mining accident and the subsequent rescue of the thirty-three trapped miners received a lukewarm response from critics but an A- on Cinemascore. This was one of two busts, the other being Point Break, that crippled Alcon Entertainment. It was also the last film released scored by James Horner, who died in a plane crash five months earlier (his work on The Magnificent Seven was completed by Simon Franglen).
  • 47 Ronin (2013) — Budget, $175 million (not counting marketing and editing costs), $225 million (counting them). Box office, $38,362,475 (domestic), $150,962,475 (worldwide). As a result of rising costs during filming and editing, Universal pulled the director Carl Rinsch from the film and had their executives complete the movie. Adding insult to injury, the studio then wrote down the initial budget's costs... before the film got released in the U.S. Rinsch hasn't directed another full-length film since.
  • 50 to 1 (2014) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,064,454. It only topped out at 133 theaters but its theatrical release was an impressively long 29 weeks.
  • The 51st State (2001) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $14.4 million. This is the one film written by Stel Pavlov.
  • 54 (1998) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $16.8 million. Mark Christopher wouldn't direct again for 7 years, and it's the only serious role that Mike Myers took. All this, ironically, after extensive reshoots imposed by Miramax to make the film more "commercial" (including the jettisoning of a love affair between the two male leads, played by Ryan Phillipe and Breckin Meyer); a Director's Cut released in 2015 made up for it.
  • 88 Minutes (2008) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,213,467 (domestic), $32,593,385 (worldwide). This was filmed in 2005 but it was shelved until its international release in 2007 and a US release in 2008. The end result was universally reviled by critics and faded away after five weeks. Between this and that year's Righteous Kill, director Jon Avnet wouldn't direct another film until 2017.
  • Ninety Minutes In Heaven (2015) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $4.8 million. This was the first (and only) film by Giving Films, a sister company of Family Christian Stores and was marketed to Christian moviegoers. This was overshadowed by the runaway success of War Room, which targeted the same demographic, and left the mortal plane of theaters after its seventh weekend. As for Giving Films, this was the company's only film released prior to its parent company collapsing in early 2017.
  • 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $11,089,907. Was nearly a Creator Killer for director Ridley Scott, who didn't direct another movie for four years.
  • 1776 (1972) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $2.8 million (rentals). This adaptation of the hit Broadway musical about America's independence was only a success at New York's Radio City Music Hall and flopped everywhere else as movie musicals were no longer in vogue. This was legendary movie mogul Jack Warner's last film; he notoriously cut out the number "Cool Considerate Men" under pressure from Richard Nixon. Said number was later reinstated for a LaserDisc release in 1992 and was fully restored for the DVD and Blu-Ray releases.
  • 1941 (1979) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $31,755,742 (domestic), $92 million (worldwide). Steven Spielberg's Epic World War II comedy was panned by critics for its excessive slapstick note  and its failure was one of several flops that helped bring about the end of New Hollywood. Fortunately, Spielberg bounced back with Raiders of the Lost Ark.
  • 3000 Miles to Graceland (2001) — Budget, $62 million. Box office, $18,720,175. Stars Kurt Russell and Kevin Costner squabbled over the film's tone and were allowed to edit their own cuts to show to audiences (Costner's version mostly won out). Its failure was a factor in Franchise Pictures dying out by the end of the decade (along with the company's Hollywood Accounting).
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  • The A-Team (2010) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $77,222,099 (domestic), $177,238,796 (worldwide). Sadly the final film released during producer Stephen J. Cannell's life (he received posthumous credits on 21 and 22 Jump Street). Another one of the producers, Iain Smith, didn't have a major film billing until Mad Max: Fury Road, writer/actor Brian Bloom didn't deal with major league cinema again, and The A-Team series has yet to return to action outside of the video game LEGO Dimensions (a game driven in part by nostalgia franchises of The '80s, which may be a damning compliment for the A-Team).
  • Abandon (2002) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $12,302,319. Screenwriter Stephen Gaghan's directorial debut was derided by critics for its messy plot. His next directorial film, Syriana, fared much better with critics.
  • Abduction (2011) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $28,087,155 (domestic), $82,087,155 (worldwide). Killed Taylor Lautner's leading man career before it even started, relegating him to Adam Sandler movies, the role of Jacob in the Twilight film series, and loads of Direct-to-Video movies. This was also a bad stain on director John Singleton's career, as he has never directed another film since.
  • Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (2012) — Budget, $69 million. Box office, $37,519,139 (domestic), $116,471,580 (worldwide). Released the same year as Steven Spielberg's Lincoln film. One of several 2012 busts to have Tim Burton credited, and director Timur Bekmanbetov didn't direct again for another 4 years.
  • Absolute Beginners (1986) — Budget, £8.4 million. Box office, £1.8 million. Along with Revolution and The Mission, this put a huge dent into Goldcrest Films' prospects. While the film derailed the leading man career of Eddie O'Connell, female lead Patsy Kensit came out unscathed. The title track by David Bowie became a Breakaway Pop Hit, however.
  • The Abyss (1989) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $54,461,047 (domestic), $90 million plus 98 dollars (worldwide). This is the one film directed by James Cameron to bomb in the domestic box office. The film's production and Cameron's severe Enforced Method Acting with Ed Harris, which led to a near-drowning experience for Harris, prompted the actor to punch Cameron in the face after that shot was completed. Both Harris and co-lead Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio (who appeared in other films and was a recurring actress on Grimm) had breakdowns during production and serious Creator Backlash towards the film; both have vehemently refused to work with Cameron again, along with them refusing to talk about The Abyss in any way, which wasn't helped by Executive Meddling in editing. Cameron himself regretted how it turned out and declared it the worst production he's been involved with (in spite of all of this, The Abyss IS an Acclaimed Flop). Cameron would rebound with Terminator 2: Judgement Day two years later.
  • Accidental Love (2015) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $4,500. This film's director, David O. Russell, asked to be credited as "Stephen Greene", an alternative to the retired Alan Smithee alias. The film's production difficulties and critical panning killed it in the limited run arena.
  • Across the Universe (2007) — Budget, $70.8 million. Box office, $29.4 million. Got mixed reviews for being a Jukebox Musical based on The Beatles. Broadway director Julie Taymor's only film credits past this movie are based off of Shakespeare plays, and she does not have a writing credit after this except for something Shakespeare had already written centuries ago. It and DreamWorks Animation/Aardman's Flushed Away also dealt serious damage to the careers of writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais.
  • Action Point (2018) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $5,059,608 (domestic). This was the lowest-grossing opening weekend of Johnny Knoxville's film career. Paramount quickly pulled the plug on this film after less than two weeks.
  • Adrift (2018) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $31,445,012 (domestic), $52,045,012 (worldwide).
  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) — Budget, $46.63 million. Box office, $8,083,123. This film's implosion, along with the severe financial failure of Ishtar and to a lesser extent other movies such as Leonard Part 6, led to Columbia merging with Tristar and Coca-Cola selling their whole film business to Sony. It didn't help that the film was released that only 117 prints were made for the American market, which is unusual for a film of this budget. The film also did not get production company Allied Filmmakers off to the start they would have hoped for, with most of the label's films being a critical flop, a commercial flop, or a flop of both kinds. That said, this is one of the films that is an Acclaimed Flop, having a 92% on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984) — Budget $17 million. Box office, $6.3 million. Despite a stellar cast, this oddball film failed in theaters. It would later become a Cult Classic on home video however.
  • The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland (1999) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $11,683,047. Both this and Muppets from Space caused The Jim Henson Company and Sony Pictures to dissolve their "Jim Henson Pictures" joint venture. A third Sesame Street film is currently in development though.
  • The Adventures of Ford Fairlane (1990) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21.4 million. Star Andrew "Dice" Clay claimed it was pulled from theaters early due to pressures from the "politically correct". The triple-Razzie winning and critically panned film became popular in Hungary, Spain, and Norway, however.
  • The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985) — Budget, $1.5 million. Box office, $849,915. It got glowing reviews from critics but a very limited release in only seven cities. It only got its widest release early the next year to coincide with the arrival of Halley's Comet (the real Mark Twain died the last time the comet reached perihelion). This was the first release by Atlantic Releasing's Clubhouse Pictures label which sputtered in 1989.
  • The Adventures of Pinocchio (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $15,094,530. A Truer to the Text version of the original novel than Disney's version, though critics didn't think highly of it. It managed to get a Direct-to-Video sequel, The New Adventures of Pinocchio, three years later.
  • The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002) — Budget, $100–120 million. Box office, $7,103,973. Yeah, you read that right. It sat on the shelf for ages because everyone knew it was a catastrophe. The eventual atomic implosion of the film ensnared the careers of director Ron Underwood and co-producer Martin Bregman; Bregman produced one more lower profile movie and Underwood directed two more, with the latter moving to TV. Eddie Murphy himself disowned it, as did co-star Alec Baldwin, and it was one of three flops in 2002 that severely impacted Murphy's career.
  • The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle (2000) — Budget, $76 million (not counting marketing costs), $98.6 million (counting them). Box office, $35,134,820. This take on the Jay Ward cartoon series has the dishonor of being the biggest animation/live-action hybrid bomb in history. Its failure along with that of Dudley Do-Right killed off plans for a Mr. Peabody & Sherman Live-Action Adaptation; that project was later rebooted instead as a CGI adaptation at DreamWorks Animation, and that ended up underperforming as well (although unlike Rocky and Bullwinkle and Dudley Do-Right, it at least made back its budget). This movie also flattened the cinematic careers of director Des McAnuff and Boris and Natasha players Jason Alexander and Rene Russo (the former of whom had a lot of trouble trying to get on the big screen and regards Rocky and Bullwinkle as an Old Shame); Russo appeared in several more failures before retiring from acting in 2005, and it would take the first Thor movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to get her back into movie-making. The Rocky and Bullwinkle duo's helper in the film, Piper Perabo, also got a B-list demotion, but she has continued acting.
  • The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl (2005) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $39,177,541 (domestic), $69,425,966 (worldwide). Its 3D gimmick was the biggest sore spot for critics. That it came out during a packed part of the summer did it no favors.
  • The Adventures of the American Rabbit (1986) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,268,443. Based on an idea by pop artist Stewart Moscowitz, the only time he ever got involved in a movie. Critics took the film to task for its sloppy script. This was one of several busts for Atlantic Releasing's Clubhouse Pictures label, which sputtered three years later.
  • Æon Flux (2005) — Budget, $62 million. Box office, $52,304,001. The film version of the MTV cartoon series suffered from Executive Meddling in Post-Production. It became an Old Shame for series creator Peter Chung and director Karyn Kusama.
  • The Affair of the Necklace (2001) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $471,210. It topped out at 40 theaters. The critics lambasted the film for Hilary Swank's miscasting but praised the elaborate sets and costumes.
  • The Affairs of Dobie Gillis (1953) — Budget, $470,000. Box office, $423,000 (domestic), $577,000 (worldwide). According to MGM records, the film resulted in a $131,000 write-down. The franchise would later see much more success with the television series The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis.
  • After Dark, My Sweet (1990) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $2,678,414. An Acclaimed Flop.
  • After Earth (2013) — Budget, $130 million. Box office, $60,522,097 (domestic), $243,843,127 (worldwide). Another nail in M. Night Shyamalan's coffin, a nasty setback to the careers of Will and Jaden Smith, and a decent-sized blow to the theatrical career of screenwriter Gary Whitta, whose next job was early story for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and otherwise has yet to get his next own screenplay into theaters. Shyamalan broke out of that coffin with his next two films, but both have only 7 figure budgets.
  • After the Sunset (2004) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $28,331,233 (domestic), $61,347,797 (worldwide). It opened at number three against The Polar Express and The Incredibles and faded out pretty quickly.
  • Against The Ropes (2004) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $6,614,280. Charles S. Dutton's directorial debut was ko'd after seven weeks. It also served no favors to revive Meg Ryan's career.
  • Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London (2004) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $23,630,159 (domestic), $28,818,995 (worldwide). Killed off the Agent Cody Banks movies with Malcolm in the Middle star Frankie Muniz after just two assignments, and Muniz didn't have an A-grade cinematic career afterwards, especially when Malcolm in the Middle ended in 2006. After this and Seed of Chucky, the Love Interest in the movie, Hannah Spearritt, did not appear on the silver screen again until 2012, and Cody Banks discharged director Kevin Allen from the cinemas until 2013; co-writer Harald Zwart didn't have an English film credit again until 2009.
  • Agora (2009) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $39,041,505. This epic about Hypatia, a philosopher in the Roman Empire who was murdered by Christian fanatics after standing up to them, was a huge hit in its native Spain but lack of interest overseas led to it losing money. Its U.S. distributor buried the film in 17 theaters, perceived to be out of fear of offending the self-proclaimed "anti-PC" Christian Right, though the Vatican did approve of it. Spanish-Chilean director/writer Alejandro Amenabar didn't make another film for 6 years.
  • Aint Them Bodies Saints (2013) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $1,031,243. Still is an Acclaimed Flop and put director David Lowery on the map, getting him hired by Disney for their Petes Dragon reimagining (which also underperformed, but not as badly).
  • The Alamo (1960) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $20 million. This was one of the top grossing films of 1960 but it didn't make back its then record budget. It was even worse for star John Wayne, who made his directorial debut here note , who put up quite a bit of the budget and was forced to sell his investment to United Artists. Wayne would not direct again until the more financially successful The Green Berets (which he actually co-directed).
  • The Alamo (2004) — Budget, $145 million. Box office, $25,819,961. One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company. While liked by several Texas critics and Ebert & Roeper, this movie also derailed director/writer John Lee Hancock's career; he wasn't credited on anything again until the end of the decade with 2009's The Blind Side, and didn't direct another Disney movie until Saving Mr. Banks in 2013. This was the first writing/story job for Leslie Bohem in 7 years after 1997's Dante's Peak, and he would have to wait another 7 for his next story job.
  • An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn (1998) — Budget, $10 million. Box office (get ready to faint), $52,850. The winner of six Golden Raspberry Awards, one of which was for Worst Picture of 1998. It also killed Arthur Hiller's direction career (he knew the movie was so bad, he asked the crew to be credited as Smithee. It didn't help, and he got the alias retired as well; he did one movie with Jon Bon Jovi after that, and that's it). This film was also the third and last blow to Joe Eszterhas, following Showgirls and Jade (the former of which also has a Worst Picture Razzie, and both films were ripped by Gene Siskel), and it's also part of a series of busts that convinced maker Disney to discontinue Hollywood Pictures, which was the brand they released this film under, as well as being the final nail in Cinergi Pictures' coffin after they started on the wrong foot with Medicine Man and Super Mario Bros.. in the early 90's. Finally, it and Dudley Do-Right derailed the cinematic career of Alan Smithee actor Eric Idle, who has not appeared in a live-action film in the 21st century apart from cameos.
  • Albino Alligator (1997) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $339,379. Kevin Spacey's directorial debut; he wouldn't occupy the director's chair again until 2004's Beyond the Sea.
  • Alex & Emma (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $15,368,897. Part of a string of busts for Rob Reiner. It was heavily-panned by critics and played itself out after eight weeks.
  • Alex Cross (2012) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $34,588,412. A failed attempt to reboot the James Patterson character with Tyler Perry in the title role. Its financial takedown shot down a planned sequel.
  • Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker (2006) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $23,937,870. This intended first film of the Alex Rider novels was its only cinematic outing.
  • Alex L'Ariete (2000) — Budget, €3 million. Box office, €1,900. Champion skier Alberto Tomba's only acting role (aside from cameos as himself in other works).
  • Alexander (2004) — Budget, $155 million (not counting marketing costs), $201.2 million (counting them). Box office, $167,298,192. The film was not well-received in the U.S. and put a bit of a dent in Oliver Stone's career; he re-edited the movie for DVD three times.
  • Alfie (2004) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $35,150,546. A remake of the Michael Caine movie that critics felt didn't live up to the original. Director Charles Shyer wouldn't make another film for eight years.
  • Ali (2001) — Budget, $107 million. Box office, $87,713,825. It was an Acclaimed Flop, especially for Will Smith's performance as Muhammad Ali, but it was TKOd by the eight week mark.
  • Alice (1990) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $7,331,647. Yet another Acclaimed Flop from Woody Allen.
  • Alice in Wonderland (1951) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $2.4 million (domestic). This ultimately didn't even dent Disney's emerging animation empire, but convinced Walt to never reissue the film, instead airing it on TV (this also allowed it to come to home video a few years before Disney, on Michael Eisner's orders, began releasing their animated library through the Walt Disney Classics line). Alice In Wonderland came into vogue after Walt's death, and is now one of the mainstream Disney films.
  • Alice Through the Looking Glass (2016) — Budget, $170 million (not counting marketing costs), $320 million (counting them). Box office, $77,041,381 (domestic), $299,457,024 (worldwide). Compared with the previous Tim Burton Alice in Wonderland film ($116,101,023 opening weekend for the former, compared to this film's $26,997,000 opening weekend) and the other live-action adaptation of a Disney Animated Classic released two months prior, this movie received toxic reviews from critics and opened second at the box office behind X-Men: Apocalypse (which got better reviews, but not by much), pulling in far less in opening weekend (Burton returned for this, but he didn't direct it; The Muppets director James Bobin did). One of the early Summer Bomb Busters of 2016. Part of a string of flops for star Johnny Depp, and this one came up in the wake of his divorce from Amber Heard, who got a restraining order against him after she accused him of being an alcoholic and abusive, with bruised images of her showing up on the internet to back it up. This is the second of two fairy tale Sequelitis implosions for producer Joe Roth within months, with The Huntsman: Winter's War also sinking (ironically against Disney). This is also sadly the final film role for Alan Rickman, who had died earlier in the year.
  • Alien: Resurrection (1997) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $47,795,658 (domestic), $161,376,068 (worldwide). This Alien film got some Executive Meddling that earned disapproval from writer Joss Whedon, and the mixed reception resulted in there being no new standalone films in the series until 2012's Prometheus; Alien vs. Predator was released during the hiatus. Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet did not do another film on American soil until 2013, and it did critical damage to the career of producer Gordon Carroll, who only did AVP before he died.
  • Aliens in the Attic (2009) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $25,200,412 (domestic), $57,881,056 (worldwide). This was supposed to be released in January but was shelved until July for reasons unknown. This is director John Schultz's penultimate film to get a theatrical release.
  • Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold (1986) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $3,751,699. Cannon Films shot this back-to-back with its prequel, 1985's King Solomon's Mines.
  • All Eyez On Me (2017) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $44,922,302 (domestic), $54.9 million (worldwide). This biopic of Tupac Shakur had a very turbulent Development Hell before it finally began production in December 2015. The film opened on June 16th, Shakur's birthday, and performed far above expectations to place at number three behind Cars 3 and Wonder Woman. But it dropped a massive 78% on its next weekend and was gone soon after. Critics gave it scathing reviews but audiences loved it.
  • All Good Things (2010) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $873,617. Documentary filmmaker Andrew Jarecki's narrative film debut was loosely based on the life of accused murderer Robert Durst. It was shoved to a limited release after it spent over a year on The Shelf of Movie Languishment. Jarecki's documented the real Durst for his next film as director, The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst.
  • All I See is You (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $217,644 (domestic). Open Road Films buried this drama in a limited release with Invisible Advertising after delaying it for months. This was the company's last film before they were quietly rebranded as Global Road Entertainment, which occurred only three days after its release to boot. Part of a very gloomy year for the company as well.
  • All Is Lost (2013) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $6 million (domestic), $13 million (worldwide). Lionsgate sent it adrift in limited release with Invisible Advertising despite glowing reviews, in particular for Robert Redford's performance, likely to focus their resources on The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.
  • All Night Long (1981) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $4,454,295 (domestic), $10 million (worldwide). This was the third and final theatrical movie made by Jean-Claude Tramont, and according to several biographies, his wife Sue Mengers lost her job as Barbra Streisand's agent when she had suggested her for the movie.
  • All the King's Men (2006) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $9,450,897. This adaptation of the novel was heavily panned by critics and imprisoned the directing career of Steven Zaillian in Hollywood Jail for 10 years; the next time he would try to direct, it would be a TV mini-series (he is still a force in Hollywood as a writer and producer, though).
  • All the Money in the World (2017) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,113,707 (domestic), $53,913,707 (worldwide). Early controversy emerged when Kevin Spacey found himself embroiled in a sex abuse scandal. With only a month to go before its theatrical release, director Ridley Scott reshot all of Spacey's scenes with Christopher Plummer. Though it didn't save the film at the box office, Plummer was nominated for a Golden Globe and an Oscar.
  • All the Pretty Horses (2000) — Budget, $57 million. Box office, $18,133,495. Billy Bob Thornton's directorial followup to Sling Blade was this adaptation of a Cormac McCarthy novel. Thornton got into conflicts with Miramax over the length of the movie and the musical score. The end result was generally panned by critics and faded from view pretty quickly even after getting a few awards nominations.
  • All The Queens Men (2001) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $23,662. One of the biggest bombs in history percentage-wise, earning a -99.92% return on the budget. This movie confirmed the derailing of Friends star Matt LeBlanc's cinematic prospects; after Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle in 2003, the conclusion of Friends in 2004, and the weak performance of Friends spinoff Joey in the mid 2000's, LeBlanc took a 4-year leave from acting (he would eventually move on to Top Gear). The film's failure also beheaded the producing career of Phil Alden Robinson and several other factors in the early 2000's led to him not getting any credits for the rest of the decade. Writer David Schneider also would not write another film until 2017.
  • Allied (2016) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $40,098,064 (domestic), $119,520,023 (worldwide). This World War II drama suffered from mixed reviews, a brutal holiday season and the alleged affair between stars Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard that led to his separation from Angelina Jolie right around its release note .
  • Almost An Angel (1990) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $6,939,946. John Cornell wouldn't direct another film again after this movie flopped.
  • Almost Famous (2000) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $47,383,689. A highly Acclaimed Flop that got Cameron Crowe an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay.
  • Almost Heroes (1998) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $6,136,856. Chris Farley's last starring role was delayed from release for a year and finally opened five months after Farley's passing. Director Christopher Guest rebounded two years later with Best in Show.
  • Aloha (2015) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $26,250,020. An ugly blot on director/writer/producer Cameron Crowe's career, and part of an unsatisfactory year for distributor Sony. Accusations of whitewashing really didn't help matters, with Emma Stone being cast as the one-quarter Chinese and one-quarter Hawaiian Allison Ng; she views this role as an Old Shame because of those reasons.
  • Alone in the Dark (2005) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $10,442,808. Credited with destroying the reputation of video game movies beyond their already bad reputation and turning director Uwe Boll into the signature punchline for bad movies in general (he would make a sequel to this, but he only produced that one and it was released Direct-to-Video by Universal). Alone in the Dark is also the film that slapped Christian Slater and Tara Reid into the B-list of celebrities, especially after Reid's botched plastic surgery/liposuction (though she was fortunate enough to get the Sharknado TV movie series in due time). The Alone in the Dark video game franchise also never saw the heights it was at before this film was made.
  • Alone Yet Not Alone (2013) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $887,851. It received a very limited release that September, which led to an Oscar nomination for its title song, only for it to be revoked a few weeks later when it was revealed co-composer Bruce Broughton violated campaign protocols to get it nominated. It received a wide release in June 2014, where it was promptly buried in theaters.
  • Alpha (2018) — Budget, $51 million. Box office, $35,829,745 (domestic), $98,217,052 (worldwide). It was enjoyed by critics, but was mis-marketed as a family film and was released on the same day as Crazy Rich Asians.
  • Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip (2015) — Budget, $90 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $85,643,880 (domestic), $232,287,225 (worldwide). While the previous three Chipmunks films did well at the box office (although they all had a poor critical reception), 20th Century Fox, originally planning a December 23rd release for the fourth installment of the series, decided to cash in on counter-programming by bumping it up to a downright suicidal Dec. 18th date, putting it in direct competition with the highly anticipated Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens from former longtime partner Lucasfilm, who disassociated themselves from Fox after being bought by Disney. The Road Chip didn't stand a chance — The Force Awakens proceeded to utterly demolish it at the box office, raking in a record-breaking $100 million on opening day alone and over $1 billion worldwide just barely after its first week, making it the highest-grossing film of the 2010s. The Road Chip crashed and burned at a meager $14,287,159 on the same weekend, limping to $47,539,910 the same week, then $64,050,442 worldwide. On top of that, The Force Awakens was universally lauded by critics as a true-to-form comeback for the Star Wars franchise, while The Road Chip was utterly eviscerated by critics. In all likelihood, the film's resounding failure will bring the Chipmunks film series to an end, being the second negative business-changing bust of the year for Fox after the attempted Fantastic Four reboot.
  • The Alphabet Killer (2008) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $106,596. Was released in only two theaters worldwide and due to poor reviews, proved to be a Star-Derailing Role for star Eliza Dushku's film career.
  • The Amateur (1981) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6.8 million. Director Charles Jarrott wouldn't direct another theatrical movie for five years.
  • The Amazing Spider Man 2 (2014) — Budget, $255-$293 million (not counting a marketing budget of $180-$190 million). Box office, $202,853,933 (domestic), $708,982,323 (worldwide). While the international grosses probably kept it from being a full bomb, the movie's mixed-to-negative reception (the reviews cited too much franchise-building and extremely poor villain portrayals as the biggest reasons for its failure), Andrew Garfield being later fired due to friction with the Sony bosses and missing an important meeting, and the infamous Sony hack toward the end of the year all contributed to the rebooted series being canceled in favor of an unprecedented deal with Marvel Studios to bring Spidey into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, starting with an extended cameo appearance in Captain America: Civil War, which won the crowd back in spades.
  • Amazon Women on the Moon (1987) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $500,000. A Spiritual Successor to co-director John Landis's The Kentucky Fried Movie, this time teaming him with four other directors. Critics felt the Mood Whiplash between the sketches was its biggest weakness, but it's since become a Cult Classic.
  • Amelia (2009) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $19,642,013. Hilary Swank's first film from her production company, 2S Films, was this biopic of Amelia Earhart. Its general panning by critics did neither her career or said company any favors.
  • American Anthem (1986) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $4,845,724. An attempt to make a star out of Olympic athlete Mitch Gaylord did no favors for him. It also derailed director Albert Magnoli's career, who waited seven years before his next film, Street Knight, and received a universal panning from critics such as Siskel & Ebert.
  • An American Carol (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7,013,191. The bust of a movie that parodied the American Left in general, and Michael Moore in particular, was released during America's Election Year to ensure that Barack Obama wouldn't become President. (We all know how that turned out.) The film received unanimously negative reviews, and some critics had to go out of their way to clarify that they were panning the film's quality after being accused by the producers of having a liberal bias. It also put David Zucker's career in Hell; he wasn't credited on another film until the fifth Scary Movie, and has yet to return to the director's booth. It's also the final live-action role for Dennis Hopper; he died in 2010.
  • American Dreamz (2006) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $16,458,459. Paul Weitz's “cultural satire” of the Second Bush Administration years received mixed reviews which felt its satirical points weren't effective.
  • American Flyers (1985) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,420,355. This bicycling drama never went past a limited release. Screenwriter Steve Tesich only wrote one more theatrical film, the same year's Eleni, before he stuck to playwriting for the rest of his life.
  • American Outlaws (2001) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $13,342,790. Les Mayfield didn't direct again for another 4 years, and co-writer Roderick Taylor didn't write another screenplay for 6.
  • American Ultra (2015) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $15,470,118. The first of two flops for writer Max Landis, the other being Victor Frankenstein.
  • Amityville 3-D (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,333,135. This installment in the Amityville movies was burned down by critics and crushed the cinematic 3D movie until the end of the 2000's, as well as being part of a chain of busts that ended the long main career of director Richard Fleischer. Future Amityville movies were sent Direct To Cable until the 2005 remake.
    • Amityville: The Awakening (2017) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $742 (domestic), $7.7 million (worldwide). This Amityville Horror sequel was buried in a limited release with Invisible Advertising after The Weinstein Company's Dimension Films put it on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for nearly three years. It was released a few months earlier internationally and on Google Play beginning a few weeks before its US theatrical release. Its scathing critical reception and audience apathy, not to mention it being released not long after the Harvey Weinstein scandal, insured its paltry intake on opening weekend.
  • Analyze That (2002) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $55,003,135. This sequel to Analyze This fell short of the critical and financial success of the original. Any ideas of a third film were gunned down after this installment fell short.
  • And God Created Woman (1988) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1,717,376. It sent director Roger Vadim's theatrical career into "the fiery pit" (he's only done TV movies since) and got him chastised by Roger Ebert for remaking his original 50's classic and having little in common with it.
  • And So It Goes (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $25,312,387. The second of three busts for distributor Clarius Entertainment.
  • Angel Eyes (2001) — Budget, $53 million. Box office, $29,715,606. One of several films produced by Franchise Pictures and its finances were investigated in the lawsuit that brought down the company. Its weak reviews and opening against Shrek did it no good.
  • Angela's Ashes (1999) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,042,112.
  • Angels & Demons (2009) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $133,375,846 (domestic), $485,930,816 (worldwide). The critics liked it better than The Da Vinci Code even if the final gross fell short of the previous film. It took seven years before a sequel emerged with Inferno.
  • Animal Factory (2000) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $43,805. Despite strong reviews, this movie failed to even make it to $50,000 gross.
  • Anna and the King (1999) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $39,263,420 (domestic), $113,996,937 (worldwide). This historical drama based on Anna Leonowens and her time in the Siamese court was intended to be more historically respectful than The King and I, though it still got banned in Thailand. The critics were mixed, though they liked it far better than the animated film of The King and I released earlier that year.
  • Annie (1982) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $57 million. This film was one of three theatrical victims of ET The Extraterrestrial (Blade Runner and The Thing were the others) despite being the 10th highest grossing film of the year, and it, along with the financial failure of Pennies from Heaven and the general failure of Heartbeeps, forced noted diva Bernadette Peters off the silver screen until 1989. Annie was successfully Vindicated by Video, however, and still was able to revive interest in the classic show, later resulting in a made-for-TV sequel in 1995 and a remake in 2014.
  • Annihilation (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $28,386,743 (domestic so far). The film was only released in North American theaters, being released direct-to-Netflix everywhere else. What really didn't help was Paramount releasing this a week after the mega-hit that was Black Panther.
  • Anomalisa (2015) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $5,531,455. It received glowing reviews and became the first R-rated film to be nominated for the Best Animated Film Oscar, but it was only in 573 theaters.
  • Anonymous (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $15,395,087. This movie is the first in a line of box office disappointments for director Roland Emmerich. It didn't help that its wide release was abruptly cancelled and it topped out at 513 theaters.
  • Another Stakeout (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $20,208,496.
  • Another You (1991) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $2,865,916. It ranks among the top ten widely released films for having the biggest second weekend drop at the box office, dropping 78.1% from $1,537,965 to $334,836. This was the final Star-Derailing Role for star Gene Wilder. He did not appear in another theatrically-released film. This was also Richard Pryor's final film in a leading role (Pryor however, would appear one last time in a movie in 1997's Lost Highway). The film was released four years after Pryor revealed that he had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and his physical deterioration is evident in this film.
  • Another Woman (1988) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,562,749. Didn't stop Woody Allen a bit.
  • The Ant Bully (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $28,142,535 (domestic), $55,181,129 (worldwide). Got decent reviews, but was also panned by The Arizona Republic for trying the "animated insect movie" after Pixar and DreamWorks had taken their own dips in the pool eight years earlier. Director John A. Davis's directing career was stomped flat by this film's failure.
  • Anthropoid (2016) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $5 million. It only saw release in 452 theaters and it kept losing theaters until its sixth and final week.
  • Anything Else (2003) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $13,585,075. There was no Hollywood ending for Woody Allen when this bomb rolled into theaters; after it and Hollywood Ending the year prior, he would not do a movie where he took acting, producing AND directing credits again until 2012, though he remained in business during this time.
  • Anywhere But Here (1999) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $18,670,401 (domestic), $23,631,929 (worldwide).
  • The Apparition (2012) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $9,627,492. The last horror film Warner Bros. released by itself before it started using New Line Cinema for that purpose. The film was panned by critics and audiences alike and faced competition from the better-received The Possession by Lionsgate.
  • Approaching the Unknown (2016) — Budget, $1.3 million. Box office, $10,232. It only ran in 11 theaters for one week.
  • Apt Pupil (1998) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $8,863,193. This adaptation of the Stephen King story received mixed reviews for its murky presentation of its disturbing content.
  • Arctic Tale (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,858,064. Its widest release was in 227 theaters. The critics generally liked it but they didn't care for the cutesy narration.
  • Arlington Road (1999) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $24,756,177 (domestic), $41,067,311 (worldwide).
  • Army of Darkness (1992) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $11,502,976 (domestic), $21,502,976 (worldwide). The third film in the Evil Dead series debuted in Asia in October of 1992 and in the US in February of 1993. Before that, it was caught in the crossfire over producer Dino de Laurentiis's lawsuit with Universal over the rights to the character of Hannibal Lecter and had to sit on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for a while. Even after that lawsuit, the film still faced Executive Meddling over its Downer Ending, which was reshot for the US release. The end result was still liked by critics, though not to the same extent as its predecessors, with its most common criticism being its embrace of slapstick humor. Overtime, it became a certified Cult Classic.
  • Around the World in 80 Days (2004) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $72,178,895. One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, but it didn't slow down star Jackie Chan's career much. This movie ended the cinematic career of David Titcher and is the last non-Happy Madison/Adam Sandler production in the cinemas to involve Frank Coraci. This was also the last appearance by Arnold Schwarzenegger in a movie prior to him taking office as Governor of California.
  • The Arrival (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14 million. This Alien Invasion thriller was crushed by the anticipation for Independence Day, which opened a little over a month after it did. The critics liked this film slightly more than its bigger, louder rival, though, and it performed much better overseas and on video.
  • The Art of War (2000) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $40,400,425. This film's failure didn't stop two sequels from being made, but it did send them Direct To DVD.
  • Arthur (2011) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $33,035,397 (domestic), $45,735,397 (worldwide). This remake of the Dudley Moore film was seen as an unneeded remake by critics and bottomed out after four weeks. This is the first feature film by director Jason Winer, who's stuck to TV ever since.
  • Arthur Christmas (2011) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $46,462,469 (domestic), $147,419,472 (worldwide). This was released amidst a mass of family films during a busy holiday season and it barely made an impression at the box office. It became Vindicated by Cable in later years.
  • Arthur and the Invisibles (2006) — Budget, $86 million. Box office, $15,132,763 (domestic), $107,944,236 (worldwide). It was a success in its native country, France, but its American underperformance exiled its sequels straight-to-DVD in the States.
  • Aspen Extreme (1993) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $8,041,048. The first and only feature film directed by Patrick Harsburgh.
  • The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $15,001,776. Director Andrew Dominik's cinematic career was chased off the big screen for 5 years.
  • Assassins (1995) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $30,303,072 (domestic), $83,303,072 (worldwide). The first script sold by The Wachowskis, who unsuccessfully tried to get their names off the film once they saw the direction it was being taken.
  • Astro Boy (2009) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $39,886,986. The losses of the film sucked producer Imagi Studios into a black hole of debt.
  • Assassin's Creed (2016) — Budget, $125 million. Box office, $54,647,948 (domestic), $241,362,598 (worldwide). The film faced very heavy competition with Rogue One, which came out a week before, and grossed a mere $10 million on its opening week. It continued the perception that Video-Game Movies Suck, and is a part of a very bad string for Michael Fassbender.
  • Assault on Precinct 13 (2005) (2005) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $20,040,895 (domestic), $35,294,470 (worldwide).
  • The Associate (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $12,844,057. Helped take Whoopi Goldberg off the A-List.
  • The Astronaut's Wife (1999) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $10,672,566 (domestic), $19,598,588 (worldwide). This movie becoming one of the biggest critical and commercial bombs of 1999 resulted in the career of Rand Ravich burning on reentry; he only had one more film after this, and then he plummeted to the C-list of Hollywood producers.
  • Asura (2018) — Budget, $113.5 million. Box office, $7.1 million. The directorial debut of stunt coordinator Peng Zhang was China's most expensive film. It was meant to start a trilogy, but it bombed so disastrously that it was pulled from theaters after a single weekend.
  • At Close Range (1986) — Budget, $6.5 million (estimated). Box office, $2,347,000. In spite of being an Acclaimed Flop.
  • At First Sight (1999) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $22,365,133. This was the one and only screenplay by Steve Levitt.
  • At Long Last Love (1975) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $1.5 million. The film received such bad reviews director Peter Bogdanovich published a full page apology letter in several newspapers. The film tarnished leading lady Cybill Shepherd's movie career and made her a laughingstock in Hollywood until Moonlighting a decade later. A studio editor recut the film on his own time in 1979. 32 years after that, Bogdanovich saw this cut and liked it so much he finally allowed it to be released on DVD to better reviews in 2013, 38 years after premiering in theaters.
  • At Play in the Fields of the Lord (1991) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $1,345,903. Director Hector Babenco's last English-language film; his subsequent films were produced in Brazil, the first of which came eight years after this one.
  • Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001) — Budget, $120 million. Box office, $84,056,472 (domestic), $186,053,725 (worldwide). This Disney film was released in the wake of the premiere Shrek movie, which took aim at Disney after they jettisoned DreamWorks co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg and then fell into acrimony and Snark Bait seas regarding Katzenberg's boss Michael Eisner's handling of the studio (which turned Eisner into an enemy for Katzenberg, Roy E. Disney and Pixar, and claimed his Disney career in the end). It also earned the worst reviews from audiences for any film in the Disney Animated Canon since The Black Cauldron (at least up to that point). Atlantis along with the poor reception of Pearl Harbor led to Disney Studios chairman and Disney Animation alumni Peter Schneider to step down as chairman of Walt Disney Studios to form his own theatre production company, and it also sunk the mainstream careers of Beauty and the Beast and The Hunchback of Notre Dame directors Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise, and broke up the power duo when Trousdale jumped to Shrek producer DWA in two years. There would be a brief reprise for theatrical 2D animation with Lilo & Stitch the next year, but after that, theatrical 2D animation would begin fading out at both Disney and DreamWorks.
  • Atlas Shrugged Parts I, II, and III (2011/2012/2014) — Budget, roughly $10 million/$10 million/$5 million. Box Office, roughly $4 million/$3 million/$800,000. Commentators found it impossible not to comment on the irony of the adaptation of a famous libertarian/"Objectivist" work being rejected by the movie free-market, and then its producers plowing forward with both a sequel and Part III — using Kickstarter, of all things, which just adds to the irony.
  • Attack the Block (2011) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,024,175 (US box office), $5,824,175 (worldwide). Its US release was hit with Invisible Advertising and an extremely limited release despite testing positively there. It has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Australia (2008) — Budget, $130 million. Box office, $49,554,002 (domestic), $211,342,221 (worldwide). This held the number one spot in Australia for two weeks but it only got as far as number four on its second week in the U.S. Baz Luhrmann wouldn't direct another film until The Great Gatsby.
  • The Avengers (1998) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $23,384,939. The last of three career-zapping bombs for director Jeremiah Chechik, and one of two Star-Derailing Roles for star Uma Thurman, with her role as Poison Ivy in Batman & Robin being the other. Chechik didn't direct another film until 2013, and Thurman fell into limbo before clawing her way back up with the Kill Bill films in 2003. Both this and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen 5 years later also convinced ex-James Bond Sean Connery (who played the Big Bad in this film) to retire from acting. The British Avengers television franchise (which has nothing to do with Marvel) has since been banished to audio plays by Big Finish in the 2010's.
  • Avenging Angelo (2002) — Budget, $17 million (allegedly).note  Box office, sadly, $824,597. This was the first film starring Sylvester Stallone to go Direct-to-Video in most countries, including North America. This was Anthony Quinn's final film role, released a year after his death. It also served Madeleine Stowe's film career no favors either.
  • The Aviator (2004) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $102,610,330 (domestic), $213,741,459 (worldwide). While this is regarded as one of the greatest films of 2004, controversy arose over producer Charles Evans Jr's involvement, which wasn't helped by him forcing himself into a producers' photo at the Producers Guild of America Awards. Evans hasn't really been involved with Hollywood since. This helped John Logan's career out somewhat after he "helped" crash Star Trek: Nemesis along with two other movies, but it would still be a few years before he got back in the Hollywood swing of things.
  • An Awfully Big Adventure (1995) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $259,724. It was only in 12 theaters in the US. Alan Rickman blamed its underperformance on it being considered a Tough Act to Follow for director Mike Newell and star Hugh Grant's last film.

    B 
  • The Baader Meinhof Complex (Der Baader Meinhof Komplex) (2008) — Budget, 13.5 million euros/$19.7 million. Box office, $16,498,827. Still was critically acclaimed and earned a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar nomination, but Uli Edel would wait a while to make another theatrical film.
  • Babar: The Movie (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,305,187. Nelvana had to rely on home video sales to recoup the loss.
  • Babe: Pig in the City (1998) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $69,131,860. Director George Miller wouldn't return to live-action films of any sort until 2015. Its own box office failure would end the Babe franchise after two films.
  • Babylon A.D. (2008) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $22,532,572 (domestic), $72,108,608 (worldwide). This put a very severe restraint on the career of director Mathieu Kassovitz, who has not had a major presence in Hollywood cinema since and is not fond of the final version of this film.
  • Baby's Day Out (1994) — Budget, $48 million. Box office, $16,827,402. After this film's implosion and the mixed reception to director Patrick Read Johnson's next movie, Angus, Johnson would not direct another cinematic movie until 2007. He did executive produce Dragonheart in 1996, though. It still managed to break box-office records in India, and led to a Bollywood remake, Sisindri, released a year later.
  • The Bachelor (1999) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $21,760,240 (domestic), $36,911,617 (worldwide). This remake of Seven Chances was universally panned by critics and fell flat at the box office after debuting at number three. Chris O'Donnell made one more film, Vertical Limit, before his temporary hiatus from the big screen (which had more to do with his family than anything).
  • Bad Company (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3,674,841. This thriller debuted to an apathetic critical reception and a limited release topping out at 302 theaters. Damian Harris didn't direct another film until 2000's Mercy.
  • Bad Company (2002) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $65,977,295. This was pushed back from December of 2001 as its plot, which involved terrorists plotting to blow up New York's Grand Central Station, was Too Soon to 9/11. Even eerier, this was the last major movie to film in the former World Trade Center. Its new release date didn't help.
  • Bad Girls (1994) — Budget, $25-35 million. Box office, $15,240,435. Originally directed by Tamra Davis, this was penned as a much more serious action movie; After studios were disappointed with the original shoots, they replaced her with Jonathan Kaplan, who rewrote the script and turned it into more of a romantic satire yarn. This angered several of the actresses on set, specifically Drew Barrymore, who threatened to quit during it and refused to promote the film upon release. While the movie had a great opening weekend it dropped hard the following week, and was eventually out of theaters in less than a month.
  • The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,589,102. Its widest release was only 96 theaters. It was well received critically though.
  • Bad Moon (1996) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $1,060,024. Part of a string of box office underperformers for director Eric Red, and this one caused his cinematic career to black out until 2008. This also ended Michael Pare's career as a theatrical lead, mostly doing small roles or starring in direct-to-video films.
  • The Bad News Bears (2005) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $34,252,847. This failed remake of the 1976 sports comedy followed two other kid sports comedy duds that summer, Kicking and Screaming and Rebound.
  • Bad Santa 2 (2016) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $23,229,371. This film got hit hard by Sequelitis and was buried under higher-profile films such as Moana and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them during the busy Thanksgiving weekend. The film's failure could be the ultimate lump of coal in director Mark Waters and co-producer Andrew Gunn's Christmas stockings as far as their Hollywood careers are concerned.
  • Bad Times at the El Royale (2018) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $14 million (domestic so far).
  • Bailey's Billion$ (2005) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $45,000. This was kicked out of 37 theaters after its opening weekend. Director/Producer David Devine's career stalled after its burial; his only credits since are on the TV shows Across the River to Motor City and The Madcap Learning Adventure.
  • Bait (2000) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $15.4 million. It nearly ended Jamie Foxx's leading career, as he wouldn't lead again in a theatrical film for four years, but winning an Oscar for portraying Ray Charles in Ray revived his career. Director Antoine Fuqua saw better success the following year with Training Day.
  • Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever (2002) — Budget, $70–90 million. Box office, $19,924,033. This was the only major attempt by Thai filmmaker Wych Kaosayananda, who credited himself as "Kaos", to break into the American cinema market. He returned to Thailand when the movie imploded, and wasn't heard from again for another 10 years. TV showrunner Peter Lenkov also never tried to write another cinematic film (his writings for this film are uncredited).
  • Balto (1995) — Budget, 31 million. Box office, 11.3 million. It notably killed off Amblimation, prompting the chain of events that would form DreamWorks. Home video releases were supposedly profitable enough to produce two sequels, however.
  • Bambi (1942) — Budget, $858,000 (not counting marketing costs), $1.7 million (counting them). Box office, $1.64 million (original theatrical release tally only). The outbreak of World War II hurt this film badly, and, along with Pinocchio and Fantasia's initial disappointing releases, and a bitter strike from Disney's animators resulted in Walt Disney having to make package films for the remainder of the 40s until Cinderella brought full-length animation back to mainstream. It's also one of a handful of RKO Pictures-distributed flops in the early 40's that dealt damage to the studio. Bambi has since been considered one of Walt's best, along with Pinocchio and Fantasia.
  • Bamboozled (2000) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2,463,650. This Spike Lee film was given a limited release due to its controversial subject matter. This was given a mixed reception from critics, many of whom felt Lee's satire was too heavy-handed to be effective.
  • Bandits (2001) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $67,631,903. It was an Acclaimed Flop that earned its stars several awards nominations, including a Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild nomination for Cate Blanchett.
  • Bandslam (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,225,023. A definite case of Misaimed Marketing.
  • Bangkok Dangerous (2008) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $42,487,390. An English remake of the Pang Brothers' own Thai film; it was also their last film in English. It debuted at number one with $7 million in September, making it the lowest number one debut since Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star.
  • Baptists at Our Barbecue (2004) — Budget, $500,000. Box office, $173,306. Another dud for Halestorm Entertainment.
  • The Barbarians (1987) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $800,000. Influential director Ruggero Deodato didn't last long in Hollywood after this.
  • Barbarosa (1982) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $1,736,123. Audiences ignored it even though the critics adored it (it currently has a 100% Adoration Rating on Rottentomatoes).
  • Barb Wire (1996) — Budget, $9 million. Box Office, $3,793,614. This film suffered from being labeled a Hotter and Sexier clone of Casablanca. Pamela Anderson would not have a starring role in a motion picture again for many years, and copyright holder Dark Horse Comics has refused any more adaptations of the Barb Wire series. It also had the misfortune of taking Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie with it due to the fact that the producers threw the marketing towards Barb Wire.
  • Barney's Great Adventure (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $12 million. This film, along with an earlier string of box office failures, led PolyGram to sell out their film division, and eventually themselves, to Seagram, who placed the PolyGram name under Universal a year later. The movie also ended the idea of any more Barney and Friends movies (by that point the show was already a Snark Bait target from shows such as Animaniacs), and stomped the cinematic career of director Steve Gomer into a pancake; he never dealt with Barney again and has only directed episodes for TV network dramas and comedies since.
  • Barney's Version (2010) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $8,455,457. This only played in 281 theaters despite great reviews and a Golden Globe for Paul Giamatti.
  • Baseketball (1998) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $7,027,290. Began the slow but steady decline of director David Zucker, and Trey Parker and Matt Stone wouldn't star in anything they didn't write/direct themselves after this, at least until Trey was cast as the villain in 2017's Despicable Me 3 (Parker and Stone rebounded in the 21st century; Zucker has yet to).
  • Basic (2003) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $42,792,561. John McTiernan has directed no films since this feature, especially since he went to prison later.
  • Basic Instinct 2 (2006) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $38,629,478. It and Catwoman began the derailment of star Sharon Stone's career, ended Michael Caton-Jones' directing career, signaled the end of Mario Kassar and Andrew Vajna's C2 Pictures label, with Kassar not getting another producer credit for 3 years, and concluded ideas of a Basic Instinct film series, with a third film getting canned note . It was even dubbed by the Razzies in the 2007 Razzie Awards ceremony as "Basically, It Stinks, Too".
  • Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,617,391. This feature was originally supposed to go Direct-to-Video, but Warner Bros. ordered it made for the theaters. This decision was a double-edged sword; it was critically loved, but didn't make back its budget, which the filmmakers blamed on Warner. It turned a profit when it did make it to video later, and became a major Cult Classic. This is one of only two theatrically released movies Warner/DC vet Alan Burnett worked on (the other being Disney's Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp).
  • Battle of the Sexes (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,837,161. Based on the eponymous 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobbie Riggs, this found itself struggling upon expanding to wide release even with glowing reviews.
  • Battle of the Year (2013) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $16,549,477.
  • Battlefield Earth (2000) — Budget, $75 million (declared), $44 million (actual). Box office, $29,725,663. The egregious case of Hollywood Accounting involved in the production led to Franchise Pictures being sued into bankruptcy. The infamous film's creation also crippled plans for a sequel about the second half of the book and put John Travolta's career back in jeopardy after his Career Resurrection with Pulp Fiction. Co-stars Barry Pepper and Forest Whitaker and director Roger Christian, who hate this film, also fell off the map (Whitaker would come back with The Last King of Scotland), one of the writers, J.D. Shapiro, criticized Travolta's creative "input" and personally accepted the most recent Golden Raspberry Award this movie got, and Battlefield Earth is also guilty of ruining the chances of any further adaptations of L. Ron Hubbard's work or anything connected to Scientology being taken seriously.
  • Battleship (2012) — Budget, $209 million. Box office, $65 million (domestic), $302.8 million (worldwide). While it was a hit globally, that didn't prevent the U.S. media from pairing up this film with John Carter as one of the big bombs of summer 2012 after it grossed a weak $25.5 million on its opening weekend.
  • Baywatch (2017) — Budget, $69 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $58,060,186 (domestic), $177,856,751 (worldwide so far). An attempt at an Affectionate Parody that pushed the comedic and fanservice elements of its parent series Up to Eleven (a la the far better-reviewed 21 Jump Street), it was panned by critics for lacking the show's camp factor. Coming out the same weekend as Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales didn't help, being beaten by both that film, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (the latter in its fourth week). What also didn't help was star Dwayne Johnson mocking the film's negative reviews, which didn't do wonders for the film's PR, though he would bounce back a few months later with Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.
  • The Beans of Egypt, Maine (1994) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $73,956. Jennifer Warren's directorial debut. She only directed one more film in 2000 and stuck mainly to acting. Part of a series of bombs that derailed I.R.S. Records' ill-fated film division.
  • The Beast (1988) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $161,004.
  • Beastmaster 2: Through the Portal of Time (1991) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $869,325. The remaining Beastmaster sequels went Direct-to-Video.
  • The Beautician and the Beast (1997) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $11.4 million. Fran Drescher's first and only theatrical lead role, and her last live-action theatrical appearance overall. This and Dunston Checks In also sent helmer Ken Kwapis's career into the river until the middle of the 2000's.
  • Beautiful Creatures (2013) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $19,452,138 (domestic), $60,052,138 (worldwide). This intended first film of The Caster Chronicles vanquished plans for its sequels with its underperformance. It was also the first of three films that killed interest for Paranormal YA adaptations.
  • The Beaver (2011) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $970,816 (domestic, no typos there), $6,370,816 (worldwide). Directed by Jodie Foster, this turned out to be a botched comeback attempt for Mel Gibson as his personal troubles continued to overshadow his career (Hacksaw Ridge managed to restore his reputation instead). Foster would not direct another movie until 2016's Money Monster, 5 years later.
  • Bébé's Kids (1992) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $8,442,162. This Animated Adaptation of Robin Harris's stand-up act was the first animated film aimed mainly at African-American audiences. Its Saturday Morning Cartoon art style and risque humor led to an Uncertain Audience. It later became a Cult Classic and director Bruce W. Smith rebounded with The Proud Family.
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17.9 million. This film was intended as a Spiritual Successor to Mary Poppins when the author of that book, Pamela Travers, denied Disney the ability to make sequels to Mary Poppins. This got good reviews, but didn't fare well at the box office; it subsequently was the beginning of the end for director and longtime Disney collaborator Robert Stevenson.
  • Bee Season (2005) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $6,856,989. The film version of Myla Goldberg's novel was the last collaboration between Naomi Foner and Scott McGehee before their divorce in 2009. They had a few more credits individually since then.
  • Bee Movie (2007) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $126,631,277 (domestic), $287,594,577 (worldwide). After this film, DreamWorks Animation altered their M.O. with Kung Fu Panda.
  • Before And After (1996) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $8,797,839. This film was part of a string of flops for Barbet Schroeder and it sent screenwriter Ted Tally off-screen until All the Pretty Horses.
  • Before I Go To Sleep (2014) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $15,447,154. The last of three busts for distributor Clarius Entertainment. The company was forced to give up the rest of its slate and cease operations the following year.
  • Before I Fall (2017) — Budget, $5 million (not counting marketing costs), $25 million (counting them). Box office, $12,241,072 (domestic), $14,065,693 (worldwide). This was one of the highest grossing independent films of the year but its huge marketing costs killed its chances for success.
  • Being Human (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $1,519,366. The victim of Executive Meddling which resulted in director Bill Forsyth disowning the film.
  • Being Julia (2004) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $14,339,171. This is the last American film director Istvan Szabo has been involved with.
  • Beloved (1998) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $22,852,487. Disney forced the Oprah Winfrey film, an Acclaimed Flop, out of theaters to make way for Adam Sandler's The Waterboy, which despite good success was hated by critics.
  • Below (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $605,562. This World War II horror film topped out at 353 theaters and sunk after three weeks.
  • Ben-Hur (2016) — Budget, $100 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $94,061,311. Originally meant to open in February before being moved against the 2016 Rio Olympics, the remake of the 1959 cinematic classic got clubbed by critics and finished nowhere close to even a bronze showing at the cinema circuit (much less gold or silver), partially due to those bad reviews, partially due to the idea of remaking Ben-Hur and its iconic chariot race Signature Scene at all (and this is after the other two adaptations from 1907 and 1925), and partially due to opening behind Suicide Squad and the last few stragglers in the 2016 Summer Bomb Buster and against the closing ceremonies of the Olympics (which included Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe playing Mario in the hand-off ceremony, which alone got way more attention than Ben-Hur). This unfortunately is the biggest bomb in the Summer Bomb Buster, and is expected to be at least a $100 million defeat for MGM/Paramount (Rolling Stone called the experience "A Remake Disaster of Biblical Proportions"). This film is the very last straw for Viacom/Paramount boss Philippe Dauman, who resigned under bad circumstances the day this film opened (Paramount invested in this bomb alongside MGM, which is the studio that owns the other three Ben-Hur films). It and director Timur Bekmambetov's previous film, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, could potentially cause his directing career to crash into the wall, and the line of Paramount flops in 2016 plus Monster Trucks ultimately sent the label's president, Brad Grey, out the door after Dauman (Grey would die of cancer a few months later).
  • Benji The Hunted (1987) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $22,257,624. This movie and Full Metal Jacket several weeks later found themselves front-and-center on Siskel & Ebert when Ebert praised this movie and panned the latter, the inverse of Siskel's ratings, which was something that angered Siskel (said moment was referenced on The Critic). The Benji film series and director Joe Camp took a 17-year retirement after this movie (Camp moved into horse training).
  • Beowulf (2007) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $82,280,579 (domestic), $196,393,745 (worldwide). This is the final film for co-writer Roger Avary, who was arrested on manslaughter and a DUI two months after the film hit theaters, which landed him in jail for several months.
  • Bert Rigby, You're A Fool (1989) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $75,868. In case you're wondering, that's just over one percent of its budget. That's an understandable gross considering it topped out in 23 theaters and was gone after three weeks.
  • Best Defense (1984) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $19,265,302. This critically savaged comedy opened at number 2 behind Ghostbusters, but fell flat immediately. Dudley Moore had better luck that year with Micki + Maude, as did Eddie Murphy with Beverly Hills Cop, but director Willard Huyck would only direct one more film, Howard the Duck.
  • Best Laid Plans (1999) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $27,816. Its widest release was in 5 theaters.
  • The Best of Times (1986) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $7,790,931. This sports comedy proved a minor speed bump for all the major players involved.
  • Betsy's Wedding (1990) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $19.7 million. Arguably the end of Molly Ringwald's stardom, as afterwards she wouldn't do another theatrical film role for six years.
  • Bewitched (2005) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $63,313,159 (domestic), $131,426,169 (worldwide). Made ideas of more adaptations of the classic television show go "poof". Writer Delia Ephron's career also vanished, and her sister Nora's directing career would disappear for another four years before she directed what became her final film, Julie & Julia.
  • Beyond Borders (2003) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $11,705,002. After this film, production company Mandalay Pictures slowed down their output heavily.
  • Beyond Skyline (2017) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $992,181 (worldwide). This sequel to Skyline was seen as vast improvement over the critically mauled original, but it was only released in a handful of international markets. The US got it Direct-to-Video.
  • The BFG (2016) — Budget, $140 million. Box office, $55,483,770 (domestic), $182,968,754 (worldwide). This adaptation of the Roald Dahl book got positive reviews, but due to Disney focusing all of their advertising on Finding Dory, and a falling out between studio DreamWorks/Amblin Entertainment and Disney that led to the former studios jumping ship to Universal, the film barely got much attention. It didn't help that it was released during a very busy summer. This is also one of the lowest-grossing movies in Steven Spielberg's career, and this is the final movie Melissa Mathison wrote before her death the year prior. It stands as the latest Acclaimed Flop to be based off of Dahl's work.
  • Bicentennial Man (1999) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $87,423,861. A hard hit to Robin Williams's career, and the film that led to his second feud with The Walt Disney Company, who produced this film alongside Columbia.
  • The Big Blue (1988) — Budget, 80 million French Francs (roughly $14 million or €11.5 million). Box office, $3,580,882. One of a handful of 1988/1989 films that caused the Weintraub Entertainment Group to implode right out of the gates, and one of the movies that ended Coca-Cola's control over Columbia and caused their merger with Tristar and Sony, and this one was heavily edited and received a different ending for the U.S. release, which was panned by critics.
  • The Big Bounce (2004) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $6,807,176. This had a troubled post-production when producer Steve Bing suddenly demanded director George Armitage edit the movie to a PG-13. He reluctantly complied, quit the film and the end result was lambasted by critics. Armitage has yet to make another film.
  • Big Bully (1996) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $2,042,350. One of the 3 career-halting films with Tom Arnold released that year and was also the last theatrical live-action movie that Rick Moranis would star in (though it was less to do with this movie and more to do with his wife's passing).
  • Big Fish (2003) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $66,809,693 (domestic), $122,919,055 (worldwide). Tim Burton's film version of the John August novel got plenty of glowing reviews and awards nominations, but fell short of its budget likely due to its competition that season. This was infamously the inspiration for Spalding Gray to commit suicide.
  • The Big Kahuna (2000) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $3,728,888. John Swanbeck's directorial debut and his only film until The Blue Diamond, which is scheduled for next year. Screenwriter Roger Rueff, who adapted his own play Hospitality Suite into this film, didn't have another film credit until he remade his play into a 2016 short.
  • Big Miracle (2012) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $24.7 million. It got pretty good reviews, but director Ken Kwapis wouldn't return to the director's chair until 2015's A Walk in the Woods. This was also arguably, a star derailing role for Drew Barrymore. She has only done two movies since (Blended with Adam Sandler, which wasn't as widely accepted by audiences as their previous two pairings, The Wedding Singer and 50 First Dates, and a low budget, British film called Miss You Already) and has more recently, transitioned into television.
  • The Big Picture (1989) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $117,463. After this film, Richard Gilbert Abramson never produced another theatrically-released film (his next project was Theodore Rex, which was denied a cinema run).
  • Big Top Pee-wee (1988) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $15,122,324. The director of the original Pee-wee Herman film, Tim Burton, did not return for this sequel due to commitments on Batman. It was also poorly received by critics and was dumped into theaters amongst a Bambi reissue, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, A Fish Called Wanda, and other movies. This and the aforementioned Big Picture popped the career balloon of producer Richard Gilbert Abramson. It not only ended the Pee-Wee movie series after two features, it was also the beginning of the end for Pee-wee's Playhouse as well; it ended its run two years later, and not helping matters was Paul Reubens' infamous nudie theater incident the year after. It would be a quarter-century before Netflix revived Pee-wee Herman on a visible basis.
  • The Big Town (1987) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $1,733,000. This was released a week after the abrupt resignation of Columbia Pictures president David Puttnam. This was the only feature film directed by Ben Bolt, a replacement for Harold Becker, and he went back to TV ever since.
  • The Big Trail (1930) — Budget, $1.76 million. Box Office, $945,000 (rentals). Recorded Loss, over $1 million. John Wayne's debut as a leading man was one of the first films shot in 70mm. Barely any theaters were equipped to show the film and it quickly rode off into the sunset. Wayne would wait nine years for his actual Star-Making Role in Stagecoach.
  • Big Trouble (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $8,493,890. As noted above, the film was all set to be released, but after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, it was pushed back to avoid implications of being Too Soon, since the movie's climax involves hijacking an airplane. It didn't help.
  • Big Trouble in Little China (1986) — Budget, $20 million (not counting marketing costs), $25 million (counting them). Box office, $11.1 million. This movie's original failure in theaters thanks to distributor 20th Century Fox also releasing Aliens the next week led to director John Carpenter to return to lower budget features and got a planned sequel cast into limbo until BOOM! comics continued it in 2014. Carpenter would not return to directing big budget features until the 90's, by which point he got ensnared in a line of bombs that blacked out his A-list directing career. This movie quickly became a Cult Classic on home video and with critics, with one of the major Big Bads in the Mortal Kombat franchise note  and a recurring enemy in a few other series being based off this film's villain (Jackie Chan's cartoon had two villains that took elements from this movie's villain note , and the second to appear was voiced by James Hong, who played BTILC's Big Bad). A remake is being made with Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson.
  • The Big Wedding (2013) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $21,819,348 (domestic), $48,425,971 (worldwide). This was universally panned by critics despite its All-Star Cast and is one of many flops for Katherine Heigl.
  • The Big Year (2011) — Budget, $41 million. Box office, $7.4 million. Despite three bankable names in the lead roles, an established supporting cast, and a director whose two previous films grossed well over $100 million, Fox dumped this film in theaters with a misleading trailer and no promotion. Its failure might partly explain why Steve Martin isn't currently planned for any theatrical projects in the near future (outside of Dreamworks Animation's Home).
  • Big Wednesday (1978) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $4.5 million. Though it had a good reception in Japan note .
  • Bigger Than the Sky (2005) — Budget, $750,000. Box office, $21,398. This film was dumped into limited release to fulfill a contractual obligation with MGM and the film’s producers that the studio inherited from Orion Pictures.
  • Biker Boyz (2003) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $23,510,601. The second and last theatrical movie directed by Reggie Rock Blythewood, who went to TV work after this. It opened at number three and quickly crashed and burned afterwards.
  • Billionaire Boys Club (2018) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $770,212 (worldwide so far). Two words: Kevin Spacey. No wonder it earned back only $126 dollars in 10 theatres on opening day.
  • Billy Bathgate (1991) — Budget, $48 million. Box office, $15,565,363. The film version of E.L. Doctorow's novel had a very Troubled Production largely due to the Hostility on the Set between Dustin Hoffman and director Robert Benton. The end result received lukewarm reviews and was shot down after four weeks. Writer Tom Stoppard wouldn't write another theatrical film until his Oscar-winner, Shakespeare in Love.
  • Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (2016) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $30,930,984. It earned weaker reviews than most of the other films directed by Ang Lee, which hindered the opening to where it did not even make a million dollars in opening weekend in the United States. The technology required to show this film the way Lee made it also was only available in two theaters in America, period. This continues a trend of films that have basis on the Iraq War not doing well in the U.S., except for American Sniper.
  • Bio-Dome (1996) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $13,427,615. This derailed Pauly Shore and Stephen Baldwin's careers after Shore had several critical flops.
  • Bird (1988) — Budget, $9-$14.4 million. Box office, $2.2 million. Clint Eastwood's biopic of jazz saxophonist Charlie "Bird" Parker was liked by critics and awards groups, but it never expanded beyond 93 theaters.
  • Birdy (1984) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,455,045. This was screwed by Tri-Star, who cancelled its wide release after it got ignored by various award groups note . Its widest release was at 18 theaters.
  • Birth (2004) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $23,925,492. This killed Jonathon Glazer's cinematic directing career for 9 years.
  • The Birth of a Nation (2016) — Budget, $8.5 million plus the additional $17.5 million that Fox Searchlight paid to distribute the film. Box office, $15,858,754. Not helping this film's chances at all was a years-old rape case that was attributed to director/writer/star Nate Parker and co-writer Jean McGianni Celestin resurfacing prior to opening. Neither that nor the film putting out a mediocre performance in the box office will help their careers any.
  • Birth of the Dragon (2017) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $6,967,631. This dramatization of Bruce Lee's 1965 bout with Wong Jack Man had a scathing reception from critics and audiences, mainly due to relegating Lee to a Supporting Protagonist for a fictional white protagonist. It was overshadowed that weekend by Hurricane Harvey's landfall and the McGregor vs. Mayweather boxing match and it died a quick death at the end of an apathetic summer.
  • Black Book (2006) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $26.7 million. While this film was critically well received, won a good deal of awards, and was successful in the Netherlands, it didn't prevent the careers of Paul Verhoeven, producer Jeroen Beker, and writer Gerard Soeteman from taking serious damage. Verhoeven didn't get another film credit for six years, and Beker and Soeteman don't have any credits at all after this film. Lead actress Carice Van Houten received international attention due to this film, and several years later would take on the role of a certain red priestess that would propel her career across the globe.
  • The Black Cauldron (1985) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $21,288,692. The film's Development Hell/Troubled Production (it was delayed out of 1984 when new boss Jeffrey Katzenberg got the film previewed and subsequently and infamously edited it) and eventual failure almost took Disney Animation down with it, but the modest success of their next animated feature, The Great Mouse Detective, kept that from happening (the success of rivals Don Bluth and Steven Spielberg with An American Tail and then The Land Before Time also motivated Disney to keep their animation department open). The Great Mouse Detective along with the impressive runs of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Oliver & Company, and a reissue of 101 Dalmatians, plus revenue from the Walt Disney Classics and Walt Disney Cartoon Classics lines of videos, ultimately gave Disney enough energy to make The Little Mermaid four years later, which started the Disney Renaissance (plus there are allegations that the two leads from the film inspired Link and Princess Zelda in The Legend of Zelda franchise, which started the next year). The Black Cauldron still ended the Disney careers of CEO Ron Miller and the film's producers and directors, one of whom was Richard Rich, who went on to make The Swan Princess and The King and I (Miller became a successful winemaker). It also ended any more ideas of adapting the Prydain book series that inspired the film until Disney began work on a reboot in 2016. Finally, it and the management shift that resulted in Katzenberg coming to Disney led to Disney Animation being moved out of their historic building on the main Disney lot and into Glendale warehouses for Katzenberg's entire decade with the firm; The Black Cauldron is the final film made in the classic animation building. As for the movie itself, it was sealed in the deepest corner of the Disney Vault after exiting theaters until fan pressures got it released under the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection brand in 1998, 13 years after premiering in theaters.
  • The Black Dahlia (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $49.3 million. Director Brian De Palma took a years-long sabbatical from Hollywood-level filmmaking.
  • Black Dog (1998) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $12,951,088. Black Dog opened with a terrible $4,809,375 — placing #5 for the slow weekend led by He Got Game. It sank 52.5% to $2,285,705 the following frame. Also, Universal didn't screen the film for critics. Patrick Swayze would never have another major studio vehicle built around him after Black Dog bombed.
  • Black Knight (2001) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $39,976,235. Director Gil Junger's cinematic career was blacked out by this film's failure; the next film he made ended up going Direct-to-Video and he's stayed on television since.
  • Blackhat (2015) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $17,491,707. This was Michael Mann's first film in 6 years, but despite the poor reception and the film's premature exit from theaters after 3 weeks when it got dumped into January against American Sniper, Mann has financing and distribution set up for an Enzo Ferrari biopic.
  • Blackwood (2001, 2002) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $1,500 (US only). This was an early Uwe Boll project before he started making video game movies, and a poor reception at a film festival sent it Direct-to-Video and into obscurity.
  • Blade Runner (1982) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $33.8 million. Like with Annie and The Thing, the film opened at about the same time as E.T., which took its audience. Not helping matters were the negative reviews the film got at the time, though the film's visuals were praised and influenced the look of many science fiction films for years to come. This became Vindicated by History once it hit home video which saw multiple re-edits released (which helped save the film's critical reputation) and a theatrical sequel was released 35 years later.
    • Blade Runner 2049 (2017) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $92,054,159 (domestic), $259,239,658 (worldwide). This long anticipated sequel to Blade Runner was released to glowing reviews, even if not to the extent of the original. Its massive length and challenging plot were cited as factors that worked against its theatrical success.
  • Blair Witch (2016) — Budget, $5 million (not counting marketing costs), $25 million (counting them). Box office, $20.7 million (domestic), $45.1 million (worldwide). Much like Ben-Hur, this sequel to the horror classic got nailed by most critics and managed to secure the lowest opening for any film with the words "Blair Witch" in them. The low take makes it unlikely it will earn enough money to recoup the marketing budget, which quintupled the final price tag.
  • Blast from the Past (1999) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $26,511,114 (domestic), $40,263,020 (worldwide). This movie and Dudley Do-Right blasted director Hugh Wilson's career into the wall for 5 years. It also halted writer Bill Kelly's career until Disney's Enchanted 8 years later. It also once and for all, signified the end of the road for Alicia Silverstone (whose career on the A-list was already the ropes thanks to the failures of Batman & Robin and Excess Baggage two years prior) as a leading lady in major studio productions.
  • Blaze (1989) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $19,131,246. This biopic of stripper Blaze Starr, focusing on her affair with Louisiana Governor Earl Long, received mixed reviews from critics and never expanded beyond 970 theaters.
  • Bleed for This (2016) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,083,906 (domestic), $6,245,378 (worldwide). Much like The Edge of Seventeen, it opened against the box office monster Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, but got good reviews.
  • Bless the Child (2000) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $40,443,010. Paramount seemed to know that they had a turkey on their hands as they screened the movie at the 11th hour for critics, so most of the reviews would not post by Friday. Bless the Child placed #7 for its opening weekend. For the following frame, it declined 48.6% to $4,837,688 and dipped 43.9% to $2,712,898 in its third session. Writer Tom Rickman was cursed with only writing TV movies after this (one of which was The Reagans, which was released months before Ronald Reagan's passing). It also didn't help director Chuck Russell's career as he has only directed two films since Bless the Child, and the most recent one a good 14 years after 2002's The Scorpion King. Finally, this along with the similar failure of that year's I Dreamed Of Africa were arguably the final nails in the coffin for Kim Basinger (who was making her first set of movies since her Oscar winning performance for L.A. Confidential three years prior) as an A-list level headlining star. Many of her films since then have either been in small, supporting roles or low budgeted independent films.
  • Blind Fury (1990) - Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2.6 million (domestic). While the movie was a financial failure, putting plans for a sequel on the backburner, it received much critical praise and did very well once it hit video.
  • Blindness (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,844,979. This film version of Don Mc Kellar's sci-fi novel centered on a sudden epidemic of blindness. It dealt with protests from blindness advocates over the film's portrayal of blind people. It appeared on some critics top 10 lists, but its reception was mixed overall.
  • The Blob (1988) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $8,247,943. This Bloodier and Gorier remake of the 1958 movie received mixed reviews but later became a Cult Classic. Director Chuck Russell would return six years later with The Mask.
  • Blood and Chocolate (2007) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6,311,117. This In Name Only film version of Annette Curtis Klause's novel was heavily panned by critics and was cast out of theaters after nine weeks.
  • Blood and Wine (1996) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $1,094,668. This is the only cinematic screenplay from co-writer Alison Cross, and co-writer Nick Villiers didn't writer again for 4 years. It also ensured director Bob Rafelson wouldn't direct for 6 years.
  • Blood Diamond (2006) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $57,377,916 (domestic), $171,407,179 (worldwide). While the movie received some critical praise, it ended up opening the same weekend as Apocalypto, which destroyed it and every other film at that period. It ended up having excellent home video sales however, enough to cover most of the losses.
  • Bloodhounds of Broadway (1989) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, here it comes, $43,671. In addition, film helmer Howard Brookner passed away from AIDS months before this movie's release.
  • The Blood of Heroes (1990) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $882,290. A Cult Classic notable for the sport Jugger which was defictionalized in 2007. Director/Writer David Peoples found better luck in 1992 with his script for Unforgiven.
  • Blood In Blood Out (1993) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $4,496,583. This drama centered on members of a Los Angeles street gang was retitled Bound by Honor due to its original title being the slogan of an actual gang and the LA riots were fresh on everyone's minds. It was still given a mixed reception by critics.
  • BloodRayne (2006) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $3,650,275. This Video-Game Movies Suck example was accused by Gametrailers of "wasting Ben Kingsley's talent", and it put a bit of a dent in Kingsley's career in addition to becoming an Old Shame for frequent Uwe Boll/Quentin Tarantino collaborator Michael Madsen and writer Guinevere Turner, the latter of whom refused to work with director Boll afterwards. It also prompted Boll to sue co-star Billy Zane (who played Cal Hockley in Titanic) for lost revenue. This did not stop Uwe Boll from starting a series of films when the film sold well on DVD...
    • Blood Rayne II Deliverance (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $167,445. After the first film fulfilled the expectations for all Uwe Boll/Video-Game Movies Suck projects, this one had a limited run and was otherwise released Direct-to-Video. A third installment was created three years later, and it was just as badly received as these two movies.
  • Blood Red (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $15,510. Despite having well-known actors such as Eric Roberts and Dennis Hopper in the cast, this film was dumped into theaters after being on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for three years. Is a footnote in history for being Julia Roberts' film debut and the only film she and brother Eric acted in together.
  • Blood Ties (2013) — Budget, $24.7 million. Box office, $2,415,472. This was buried in a limited release in North America, with a mere 28 theaters screening the film.
  • Blood Work (2002) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $31,794,718. Its reviews were mixed and it didn't survive its opening weekend against Film/XXX. Fortunately, director Clint Eastwood and writer Brian Helgeland bounced back the next year with Mystic River.
  • Blown Away (1994) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $30,156,002. It's the last time Jay Roach helped write a screenplay for a film, but he recovered in 1997 by directing the Austin Powers trilogy.
  • The Blue Bird (1940) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, unknown. This attempt by Fox to Follow The Wizard of Oz with Shirley Temple was her penultimate film with the studio. The fact that she played a bratty girl who needed to learn a lesson may have been a key factor in its disappointment.
  • The Blue Bird (1976) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $887,000. Fox's second attempt at filming the classic play was hyped as the first cinematic collaboration between the USA and the USSR. Unfortunately, this was a severely Troubled Production which dealt with outdated equipment, actor illnesses, misbehaving actors, a problematic director in George Cukor and weather. The end result was eviscerated by critics and has never had an official video release.
  • Blues Brothers 2000 (1998) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $14 million. This film, along with the Direct-to-Video film Susan's Plan, dropped the curtain on director John Landis's career outside of documentaries until Burke and Hare in 2010, which killed his career a second time.
  • Blue Chips (1994) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $23 million. Along with I Love Trouble and I'll Do Anything, this was part of a bad year for Nick Nolte.
  • Blue City (1986) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,947,787. Blue City is the only movie film producer and Paramount executive Michelle Manning attempted to direct.
  • The Blue Iguana (1988) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $161,398. This was John Lafia's directorial debut. His screenplay for Child's Play would save him from this fiasco and he would later direct that film's sequel.
  • Blue In The Face (1995) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $1,268,636. Directors Wayne Wang and Paul Auster shot this comedy as a followup to Smoke. This was notable for being filmed in five days and for being completely adlibbed by the cast. It received mixed reviews from critics, who felt the film was disjointed, but audiences were more forgiving.
  • Blue Sky (1994) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $3,359,465. This was filmed in 1990 but it was placed on The Shelf of Movie Languishment due to Orion Pictures' bankruptcy. This ended up being the final film of director Tony Richardson, who died in 1991. It was an Acclaimed Flop that garnered Jessica Lange an Oscar for Best Actress.
  • Boat Trip (2002) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $15 million. This was a Star-Derailing Role for Cuba Gooding Jr..
  • Bobby (2006) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $11,242,801 (domestic), $20,704,591 (worldwide). An ensemble drama centered around the moments leading up to Robert F. Kennedy's assassination. It received mixed reviews which called out its melodrama and crowded narrative but it received award nominations for its Ensemble Cast.
  • Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius (2004) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2,707,913. This movie halted the career of director/writer Rowdy Herrington, as he's never directed or written again. Bobby Jones is also the sole writing job for Kim Dawson, Bill Pryor, and Tony De Paul.
  • The Body (2001) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $36,849 (domestic); $3,739,400 (worldwide). This religious thriller about a conspiracy concerning a corpse alleged to be Jesus was considered too daring and controversial for mainstream audiences and was buried in a limited release (11 theatres) in the U.S. Most of the film's box office totals came from Spain (not surprising, since it stars Antonio Banderas).
  • Body of Evidence (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $13.2 million. Director Uli Edel only did TV work for the rest of the decade.
  • Body of Lies (2008) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $39,394,666 (domestic), $115,097,286 (worldwide). One of many movies focused on The War On Terror to sink at the box office. It's also one of several consecutive busts for Ridley Scott.
  • Body Parts (1991) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $9,188,150. Paramount was forced to pull many ads for this film the week before release when news of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer broke loose. Part of a string of box office underperformers for director Eric Red, and writer Norman Snider didn't write another film for 19 years.
  • Body Snatchers (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $428,868. This movie did earn a lot of good reviews, and only proved to be a minor setback for the careers of its director and most of the writers. Screen story writer Raymond Cistheri, however, never worked another movie.
  • Bogus (1996) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $4.3 million. One of the movies that year, along with the infamous Theodore Rex, the highest budget film to be sent Direct-to-Video, that derailed Whoopi Goldberg's cinematic career, but she has moved on to other avenues such as The View.
  • Bolero (1984) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $8,914,881. This is the movie that burned up the partnership between MGM/UA and Cannon Films (MGM had a policy against releasing X-Rated films in theaters, which became Hilarious in Hindsight when they released the NC-17 rated Showgirls a decade later). Star Bo Derek claimed that producer Menahem Golan wanted more sex in the film, then blamed her and her husband, director John Derek, for the erotic content when Moral Guardians complained. John saw a fatal blowback to his career; he directed just one more movie before his death, and Bo saw a demotion to the B list of actresses with her performance and multi-Razzie wins.
  • The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $15,691,192. This notorious adaptation of the Tom Wolfe novel was lambasted for, among other things, its immensely miscast stars and mishandling of the source's satire. Director Brian De Palma's career never fully recovered from the mess, but most of its stars bounced back.
  • The Book of Henry (2017) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $4,288,104. This drama film became Snark Bait once its unintentionally funny, contrived plot was revealed. This didn't dent Colin Trevorrow's plans to direct Star Wars 9 at first, but he stepped down a few months later.
  • The Book of Mormon Movie, Volume 1: The Journey (2003) — Budget $2,000,000. Box office, $1,680,020. Panned by both Mormon and non-Mormon critics alike, plans for a volume two never materialized and director Gary Rogers never made another film.
  • The Boondock Saints (2000) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $20,471. Fortunately, it made $50 million through video rentals as it became a Cult Classic.
  • The Boost (1988) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $784,990. Based on Ben Stein's novel The Ludes, this drama about cocaine addiction got a mixed reception from critics and died a quiet death in a limited release.
  • Bordello of Blood (1996) - Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5.5 million. The films failure ended up scrapping plans for a third Tales From the Crypt movie. It also ended up denting Dennis Miller's career as a lead theatrical actor, having left him with small roles and TV work since.
  • The Border (1982) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $6,118,683. This was the film Jack Nicholson made in-between his Oscar-nominated role in Reds and his Oscar-winning role in Terms of Endearment. This lacked the critical and financial support of either of those two films.
  • The Borrowers (1997) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $22,619,589. Producer Rachel Talalay, who was just coming off Tank Girl, which turned her and the other producers of that movie into enemies of the comic's creators, saw her cinematic career fully implode with this film. She has done a lot of TV work since then (including Supernatural and Doctor Who), but the only two movies she did past this were TV movies. The careers of the director, other producers, and writers also saw downgrades to B-level (two of them, Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, would get back into the A-level in the New 10s).
  • Bottle Rocket (1996) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $560,069. Despite the film's financial failure, its critical acclaim brought attention to director Wes Anderson.
  • Bounce (2000) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $36,805,288 (domestic), $53,425,292 (worldwide). This was the first film delivered to theaters (Time Square's AMC Empire) via satellite. It also briefly revived Ben Affleck and Gwyneth Paltrow's off-screen romance after they broke up previously. Its mixed reviews called out its Cliché Storm plot and its leads un-engaging on-screen romance.
  • Bound (1996) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $3,802,260. Though it won several festival awards and brought attention to the Wachowski siblings.
  • The Bounty (1984) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $8,613,462. One of several busts for producer Dino De Laurentiis, who saved the project from Development Hell after it started with David Lean. Its stars, including Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins, survived.
  • The Box (2009) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $15,051,977 (domestic), $33,333,531 (worldwide). While it got somewhat better reviews than his previous film, it was still the killing blow to director and writer Richard Kelly's career, as he hasn't made another movie since.
  • Boxing Helena (1993) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $1,796,389. This K.Oed Jennifer Lynch's attempt at a cinematic career immediately. She didn't make another movie for 15 years.
  • The Boy in Blue (1986) — Budget, $7.7 million Canadian dollars. Box office, $275,000 U.S. dollars. This film crushed director Charles Jarrott's cinematic career permanently, since every movie he made in his life after this were T.V. movies.
  • Boys and Girls (2000) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $25.8 million. After the huge success of She's All That, director Robert Iscove worked once again with Freddie Prinze Jr. on this movie. Iscove never really had a theatrical hit again, and Boys and Girls was part of a rut that Prinze was stuck in during the early '00s.
  • Brain Donors (1992) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $918,239. David and Jerry Zucker's remake/homage to A Night at the Opera was filmed as Lame Ducks, but after the Zuckers left Paramount, the studio scrapped the planned publicity campaign, changed the title, and withdrew the film after its initial screenings. It became a Cult Classic once it hit video.
  • Braindead note  (1992) — Budget, $3 million. Box office (here's a horror), $242,623! (domestic). Peter Jackson's third film, its blink-and-you-missed-it box office run sent the movie into obscurity until Jackson's success with The Lord of the Rings brought it back into the limelight a decade later. Now an Acclaimed Flop.
  • Brainstorm (1983) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $10.2 million. This sci-fi film was the final film for Natalie Wood, who died just after filming her scenes. MGM attempted to scrap the film after her death, but director Douglas Trumbull pushed back and got the film finished after making adjustments. It went onto The Shelf of Movie Languishment for over a year and was released in September with Invisible Advertising. Trumbull was so exhausted by the Executive Meddling that he retired from mainstream filmmaking until The Tree of Life.
  • The Brave One (2007) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $69.7 million. An Acclaimed Flop, it did at least manage to get Jodie Foster a Golden Globe nomination. Unfortunately, director Neil Jordan got hit with the blunt of the damage, as he hasn't directed an American-based feature film since.
  • Brazil (1985) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $9 million. Terry Gilliam's dystopian satire was released in Europe by Fox to healthy box office results. Its US release by Universal became a shining example of Executive Meddling as the studio attempted to Re-Cut the film into a more marketable movie with a happy ending. Gilliam gained enough critical support through covert screenings that the studio released his cut, which was slightly shorter than the original, but with the Downer Ending intact. It ended up an Acclaimed Flop upon release and later became a Cult Classic.
  • Breakfast Of Champions (1999) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $178,278. The film version of Kurt Vonnegut's satirical novel received scathing reviews from critics and topped out at 11 theaters. Vonnegut himself had nothing good to say about it.
  • Brenda Starr (1989) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $67,828. This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for three years due to legal issues before getting released in France. It waited another three years before it got a US release, where it didn't survive long in theaters.
  • Brick Mansions (2014) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $20,396,829 (domestic), $68,896,829 (worldwide). This was Paul Walker's second-to-last completed film before his unfortunate death the year before.
  • The Bride (1985) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,558,669.
  • Bridget Jones's Baby (2016) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $24.1 million (domestic), $207-$211 million (worldwide). The third film in the Bridget Jones series was a Surprisingly Improved Sequel to the previous film but it was greeted with audience apathy in the States. It did far better in its native UK, setting the record for the biggest opening day for a romantic comedy.
  • Bright Lights, Big City (1988) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,118,077. It would be the last film that James Bridges would direct before his death in 1993.
  • Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $11,957,943. The film version of Neil Simon's play, the first of his Eugene Trilogy, was the penultimate film directed by Gene Saks.
  • Brighton Rock (2011) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,829,020.
  • Bringing Up Baby (1938) — Budget, $1,073,000. Box office, $1,109,000. This slapstick comedy was considered too weird for audiences and critics in 1938. Its failure resulted in director Howard Hawks getting booted from Gunga Din in favor of George Stevens. This was also the film that cemented Katharine Hepburn's reputation as "Box-office Poison;" she bought her way out of her RKO contract then returned to glory when she starred in The Philadelphia Story. The film has since been Vindicated by History as one of the all-time great comedies.
  • Brigham City (2001) — Budget, $1,000,000. Box office, $852,206. Despite positive reviews, the film's murder mystery plotline and dark moments possibly drove some Mormon audiences away.
  • Bringing Out the Dead (1999) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $16,640,210.
  • Brokedown Palace (1999) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,115,013. This is the final film directed by Jonathan Kaplan before he focused his career on TV shows. This was banned in Thailand for its negative depiction of its legal system. Star Claire Danes was banned in the Philippines, where it was filmed, for making unflattering comments about the country in an interview. This and The Mod Squad derailed Danes' career for a good bit.
  • The Bronze (2016) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $615,816. This movie is one of the worst grossing movies released in 1,000+ theaters. It also had one of the lowest opening weekends of all time ($331).
  • Brother Bear (2003) — Budget, $128 million. Box office, $85,336,277 (domestic), $250,397,798 (worldwide). One of the last Disney films to be made in 2D animation before their switch to CGI, starting with Chicken Little. It is also the most recent Disney film to have a Direct-to-Video sequel.
  • The Brothers Bloom (2008, 2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $3,531,756 (domestic), $5,529,464 (worldwide). Its widest release was in 209 theaters but the critics generally liked it. Director Rian Johnson had better luck with his next film, Looper.
  • The Brothers Grimm (2005) — Budget, $88 million. Box office, $37,916,267 (domestic), $105,316,267 (worldwide). A Troubled Production like so many of Terry Gilliam's works. This one dealt with a change in production companies from MGM to the Weinstein Company due to the former's financial difficulties, Executive Meddling from the Weinsteins which included replacing the original cinematographer after six weeks, actors suddenly dropping out and the release date getting delayed nine months. The end result was given mixed reviews when it opened in August and was chased out of theaters after eight weeks.
  • The Brothers Grimsby (2016) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $25,182,929. The biggest bomb of Sacha Baron Cohen's career. It opened in America with $3.5 million, slightly more than its UK opening of $2.6 million.
  • The Brothers Solomon (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $900,926 (domestic), $1,035,056 (worldwide). Bob Odenkirk has yet to sit in the director's chair past this film's flopping; it's also infamous for being the first movie film critic Richard Roeper walked out on.
  • The Brown Bunny (2003) — Budget, $10 million. World-wide ticket and DVD sales: $374,000. Mostly famous now for the epic war of words between its producer/director/lead actor Vincent Gallo and critic Roger Ebert.
  • The Browning Version (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $487,391. Mike Figgis' adaptation of Terence Rattigan's play never exited limited release in North America
  • Bubble (2006) — Budget, $1.6 million. Box office, $261,966. This premiered in theaters and on HD Net on the same day and on DVD four days later; most theaters refused to show the film as a result.
  • Bubble Boy (2001) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5,007,898. Critics hated this comedy for its over-reliance on lowbrow humor and it bounced out of theaters after seven weeks.
  • Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star (2011) — Budget, just under $10 million. Box office, $2,529,395. It was taken out of theaters after only two weeks, and quickly derailed Nick Swardson's film career before it could even get started (the Misaimed Marketing didn't seem to help either).
  • Buddy (1997) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $10,113,400. This film's menagerie of animals included several chimpanzees, which got an outcry from animal activists over the movie's attempt to portray chimpanzees as suitable, docile house pets (chimpanzees can be pretty aggressive as well as intelligent). Director Caroline Thompson's feature film career was iced for 8 years. Co-writer William Joyce also did not have a theatrical credit for that time span apart from Pixar's A Bug's Life. This is also the only film in Rene Russo's career (before or since) where she was the first billed star.
  • Buddy Buddy (1981) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $7,259,000 (domestic). This critically-panned comedy was the last film directed by Billy Wilder.
  • Bullet to the Head (2013) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $13,561,515. The start of a bad year for Sylvester Stallone; this had his worst opening weekend in 32 years and his second lowest of all time.
  • Bulletproof (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $22,611,954. It opened in number one but was immediately shot down afterwards. Director Ernest R. Dickerson has nothing but bad memories about the film after the studio got ahold of it. It nearly killed Adam Sandler's career until he bounced back with The Wedding Singer.
  • Bulletproof Monk (2003) — Budget, $52 million. Box office, $37,713,879. The first and only feature film directed by Paul Hunter, who went back to music videos after its critical and financial beatdown.
  • Bullets Over Broadway (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,383,747. This was one of Woody Allen's most highly Acclaimed Flops.
  • Bulworth (1998) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $29.2 million. This was the last film directed by Warren Beatty until 2016's Rules Don't Apply.
  • Burke and Hare (2010) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $4.3 million. It is the last film that John Landis has directed so far.
  • Burlesque (2010) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $39,440,655 (domestic), $89,519,773 (worldwide). The first and only feature film directed by Steve Antin and he wouldn't do another film until a writer credit on Proud Mary, which is set to open in 2018.
  • The Burning (1981) — Budget, $1.5 million. Box office, $270,508 (domestic, original release), $707,770 (domestic, after reissue). This was the debut release of Miramax Films and the film debuts of Jason Alexander, Fisher Stevens and Holly Hunter. It initially failed to expand from its original limited release, due to the over-saturation of slasher films at the time. Orion Pictures gave the film a wide release the next year, but the film still came nowhere close to making back its small budget. Apparently, it did well internationally though, making over $1 million in Japan alone. It later became a cult hit in the US on video.
  • Burnt (2015) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,603,571 (domestic), $35,607,937 (worldwide). The second bust in a row for Bradley Cooper following Aloha. It was lambasted by critics for being a Cliché Storm with a Jerk Ass main character.
  • The Butcher's Wife (1991) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,689,816. This critically trashed fantasy comedy was the only feature film directed by Terry Hughes, whose TV career still survives. This was also the only film credit for screenwriters Ezra Litwak and Marjorie Schwartz.
  • By The Sea (2015) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $538,460 (domestic), $2,555,525 (worldwide). Even with the star power of Brangelina (who produced and directed this movie), it never escaped limited release when critics and audiences rained down on it.
  • By the Sword (1993) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $6,220. This fencing drama was released on only nine theaters and bowed out after its opening week. It has never been released on video since VHS.
  • Bye Bye Love (1995) — Budget, unknown but said to be $15-20 million. Box office, $12 million. Neither critics nor audiences were feeling this romcom. This, along with Fluke and especially Cutthroat Island bombing in the same year, put a dent into Matthew Modine's career as a leading mainstream actor, with his major theatrical roles since being reduced to lower on the billing.


Alternative Title(s): Numbers Through H, Numbers Through D

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