Follow TV Tropes

Following

Box Office Bomb / G-H

Go To

Main: Box Office Bomb

Navigation: #-B | C | D | E-F | G-H | I-J | K-M | N-R | S-T | U-Z


    open/close all folders 

    G 
  • Gaily, Gaily (1969) - Budget, $9 million. Box office, $1 million. The film version of Ben Hecht's novel A Child of the Century was the only film written by Abram S. Ginnes. It also marked Margot Kidder's film debut.
  • Gamer (2009) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $40,828,540. This Neveldine/Taylor thriller got generally poor reviews, many of which derided the film for its bleakness, glorification of the violence it tried to satirize, and excessive criticisms against its prospective audience.
  • Gangster Squad (2013) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $46,000,903 (domestic), $105,200,903 (worldwide). This movie was meant to be released in 2012, but the Aurora, Colorado shootings at the Cinemark Century theater during The Dark Knight Rises led to it being pushed back. The movie also played the Hollywood History card with crime boss Mickey Cohen's life (including him being arrested for murder; he was only arrested on felony tax evasion a la Al Capone). This version of the man was also a You Have Failed Me Sadist along Ernst Stavro Blofeld lines who commits some gruesome executions that were hard to deal with after Aurora, which even reshoots did not deal with. Producer Dan Lin's future theatrical films, with one exception, deal exclusively with the Lego franchise, writer Will Beall would not get another screen credit until the future Aquaman movie in the DC Extended Universe, and Ruben Fleischer wouldn't direct another film for five years until Venom.
  • The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (1987) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $1,576,615. It grossed a paltry $661,512 dollars for its opening weekend, and parental protests over the film's Refuge in Vulgarity after it received a PG rating led to it being pulled from theaters within weeks of its release. The notorious film became an instant Old Shame for both the creator of the source material, Mark Newgarden, and prolific voice actor Jim Cummings, who voiced several of the titular kids, and trashed the careers of songwriter/actor Anthony Newley and director Rod Amateau, as Newley never appeared in another theatrically released film, and Amateau only worked on one more film, 1988's Sunset, before disappearing from the entertainment industry completely. The movie also killed mainstream interest in the trading card game that the film was based on, and Topps would only really invest in them again in 2003. (Michael Eisner tried to make a new GPK movie in 2012, but it didn't take off) This was one of several bombs that helped dismantle its distributor, Atlantic Releasing Corporation.
  • Gardens Of Stone (1987) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5,262,047. Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam drama had its widest release at only 612 theatres. This was also the last film Coppola's son Gian-Carlo was working on before he was killed in a motorboat accident.
  • Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties (2006) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $28,426,747 (domestic), $141,702,264 (worldwide). Sent the live-action movies based off of the iconic comic strip to the vet to be euthanized after two films, with a third movie that does not have continuity with the first two being a CGI cartoon and one-sixth of the budget being released the next year. After that, all future Garfield movies went Direct to Video. Both films became an Old Shame to the actor who voiced the feline, Bill Murray note , and it was a theatrical Star-Derailing Role for Breckin Meyer, who played Garfield's owner, as his future movies are not high-profile (Meyer is not any fonder of the movies than Murray is, making fun of himself for it on Robot Chicken).
  • A Gathering of Eagles (1963) — Budget $3,346,500. Box office, $2,500,000. Not even Rock Hudson could save this film about a bomber wing of the Strategic Air Command (responsible for nuclear bomb armed B-52 bombers at the time). The makers misjudged the changing perception of the US military and the potential use of nuclear weapons in the early 1960s - later '60s anti-war and anti-nuclear weapon films such as Dr. Strangelove and Fail Safe would get a far better response critically and commercially.
  • Gattaca (1997) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $16,132,777. Despite great reviews, this sci-fi drama failed to find an audience upon release. This was Andrew Niccol's first film, and he'd find better success with the screenplay for The Truman Show the following year.
  • Gemini Man (2019) — Budget, $138 million (production costs), $261 million (total costs including marketing). Box office, $48,546,770 (domestic), $173,469,516 (worldwide). This sci-fi thriller spent 20 years in Development Hell before David Ellison's Skydance Media saved it and took the project to Paramount. The end result was eviscerated by critics as a Cliché Storm and unable to compete with the likes of Joker and The Addams Family. It didn't help that another sci-fi tentpole from Paramount/Skydance, Terminator: Dark Fate, bombed only a few weeks afterwards.
  • Gentlemen Broncos (2009) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $118,192. It was mauled so badly by critics that Fox Searchlight only gave it a limited release topping 18 theaters. Jared Hess didn't direct another film until 2015's Don Verdean.
  • George And The Dragon (2004) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $557,910. This adaptation of the St. George legend was dumped onto the Sci-Fi Channel in America and had a fleeting theatrical release overseas.
  • Georgia Rule (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $19,103,072 (domestic), $24,991,167 (worldwide). This film and I Know Who Killed Me later that year marked the downfall of Lindsay Lohan's acting career, and her prima donna behavior (which led to the producer writing an open letter criticizing her work performance), did her no favors, either.
  • Geostorm (2017) — Budget, $120 million. Box office, $33,700,160 (domestic), $212,900,160 (worldwide). Dean Devlin's directorial debut began filming on October 20th, 2014, but disastrous test results led to extensive re-shoots and rewrites which pushed the film's release date to exactly three years later. The end result was widely mocked by critics as a Disaster Movie Cliché Storm and it crashed and burned once its first box office results came in.
  • Geronimo: An American Legend (1993) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $18,635,620. Director Walter Hill had some misgivings about how this movie turned out, and it dented his career along with Neil Canton and writer John Milius. Hill blamed the film's failure on a rival made-for-TV Geronimo biopic that aired on TNT around the same time.
  • Gerry (2002) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, head's up, $254,683. This movie was a failed attempt at making a movie solely by Writing by the Seat of Your Pants, with Wikipedia noting it had a slow pace and unvarying set pieces. This helped derail Casey Affleck's career for several years.
  • Getaway (2013) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $10,501,938. This is the third and most recent film on director Courtney Solomon's resume, and he has no directing credits past this point. Production company Dark Castle's business ended up in the dark; they didn't have any credits for four years until Suburbicon... which also bombed.
  • The Getaway (1994) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $16,096,974 (domestic), $30,057,974 (worldwide). A remake of the 1972 crime drama from director Sam Peckinpah and starring Steve McQueen (Actor) and Ali MacGraw, the 1994 version starred then real-life married couple Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger. While the remake did get some buzz if not out and out controversy over some steamy sex scenes between Baldwin and Basinger (which film critic Leonard Maltin called uncomfortably "voyeuristic"), it failed to connect with both critics and audiences, like their previous collaboration together, 1991's The Marrying Man. It currently has only a 33% score on Rotten Tomatoes. In an April 1997 interview with Movieline magazine, Basinger blamed the movie's box office failure on the fact that it opened around the same time as Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and a snow storm on much of the east coast. This and a string of other post-Batman (1989) duds as well as the stressful toll of her legal and financial problems and the subsequent birth of her and Baldwin's daughter caused Basinger (after appearing later that year in Robert Altman's Ready to Wear, which also failed to recoup its budget) to go on a three year sabbatical from Hollywood.
  • Get Carter (2000) — Budget, $63.6 million. Box office, $19,412,993. A botched remake of the 1971 film. Director Stephen Kay didn't direct again for five years, and it was a critical setback to the careers of the producer brothers Canton.
  • Get Crazy (1983) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $1,645,711.
  • Get On Up (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $30,703,100 (domestic), $33,470,997 (worldwide). This James Brown biopic was an Acclaimed Flop, and critics particularly acclaimed Chadwick Boseman's performance as Brown, but was overshadowed by Guardians of the Galaxy on its opening weekend. Ironically, Boseman would later find greater success as Black Panther in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Get Rich Or Die Tryin (2005) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $30,985,352 (domestic), $46,442,528 (worldwide). 50 Cent's film debut was a semi-autobiographical film similar to 8 Mile. This was universally panned by critics for being a formulaic biopic and audiences generally ignored it. This was the screenwriting debut of Terence Winter, who hated the film for rewriting his script beyond recognition, and he stayed away from the big screen until The Wolf of Wall Street.
  • Getting Even with Dad (1994) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $18,869,594. Coming out the same weekend as The Lion King didn't help either. Along with Richie Rich and The Pagemaster, one of three Macaulay Culkin films that performed poorly at the box office that year. He did not appear in another feature film until 2003. This and the very negative critical reception to two other 1994 films from co-writer Jim Jennewein, The Flintstones (which was a financial success) and Major League II, led to Jennewein never writing another film, and this movie led producer Katie Jacobs to focus on television instead.
  • Gettysburg (1993) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,769,960. Ted Turner financed this Civil War biopic, which was originally intended as a television miniseries. The film played in only 248 theaters and was successful in the theaters that did play it despite its massive length (four hours and 14 minutes, plus intermission), but never exited limited release. It recouped its budget from video and television sales.
  • G-Force (2009) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $119,436,770 (domestic), $292,817,841 (worldwide). The first and only film by visual effects artist Hoyt Yeatman was deemed by critics as a So Okay, It's Average Cliché Storm.
  • The Ghastly Love of Johnny X (2012) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $2,436. This sci-fi/musical/comedy Retraux of 1950's B-movies played in a grand total of two theaters, and failed to find much of a following on video.
  • Ghost Dad (1990) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $25,421,633. Fresh off Leonard Part 6, apparently Bill Cosby decided to give the big screen one more try... in a movie where he plays a widower who apparently dies, realizes he hadn't arranged for life insurance for his kids and tries to close a deal to secure money to provide for them. The movie would get disastrous reviews, end any hope of Cosby having a film career and marked the final directing job for Sidney Poitier.
  • Ghost in the Shell (2017) (2017) — Budget, $110 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $40,563,557 (domestic), $169,801,921 (worldwide). This adaptation of both Masamune Shirow's manga and Mamoru Oshii's film based on the manga got average reviews that praised its visuals, but noted its lack of substance and philosophical technobabble from the original film. The movie faced controversy in Western countries for its Race Lift casting choices note  while moviegoers didn't have issues with this in Asia. Fans of the original anime series/movie were even more ticked off when the ending became well known for revealing that Major was actually an Asian woman in a Caucasian body, which didn't help the film's case of whitewashing. To add insult to injury, it didn't even reach first, being beat out by DreamWorks Animation's The Boss Baby, which ended up dethroning the live-action adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, and only outdoing Power Rangers and Kong: Skull Island. Even the international box office was not able to save this film, particularly in China due to the film being released a week before The Fate of the Furious, which overran it upon its release and became the fifth biggest grossing film in the country.
  • Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (2012) — Budget, $57 million. Box office, $51,774,002 (domestic), $132,563,930 (worldwide). While it was able to somewhat recuperate its budget, its worldwide gross is less than half of what the first Ghost Rider movie made worldwide. Because of the movie's failure, the film rights for Ghost Rider were regained by Marvel, who rebooted the character for the Marvel Cinematic Universe in Season 4 of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.; this sent the Marvel Knights label to Hades after only two releases, the other being Punisher: War Zone, whose title character's film rights too reverted to Marvel.
  • Ghost Town (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,252,641 (domestic), $29,843,245 (worldwide). The critics liked it quite a bit in spite of the lackluster reception.
  • Ghost World (2001) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $6,217,849 (domestic), $8,764,007 (worldwide). This movie became an Acclaimed Flop, but it also became the sole writing credit for director Terry Zwigoff.
  • Ghostbusters (2016) — Budget, $144 million (production only). Box office, $128,350,574 (domestic), $229,147,509 (worldwide). Despite a rather vocal part of movie fandom who detested the Gender Flip premise and a passionate Ghostbusters fanbase who objected to a reboot of a beloved property, the film seemed to have a solid domestic run, much better than a lot of property revivals at the time. However, that money only looks good in a vacuum; between an exorbitant budget and a weak worldwide take, the movie fell far short of breaking even, putting plans of a Ghostbusters universe — including spin-offs, TV, and animated features — seemingly on hold. A second sequel to the original movie was later announced three years later, with the movie taking place after Ghostbusters II. Part of a string of failures for Melissa McCarthy. Director Paul Feig rebounded with his next film, A Simple Favor.
  • Ghosts of Mars (2001) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $14,010,832. The film was sent to Mars by critics, and it knifed the career of John Carpenter after a decade-long string of flops; he did not direct another movie until 2010.
  • Ghosts of Mississippi (1996) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $13,323,411. Rob Reiner took a 3-year hiatus before his next film premiered, the longest time between releases of his movies up to that point. As far as producers go, Nicholas Paleologos and Frederick Zollo didn't produce another film for a full decade, while Andrew Scheinman's producing career was sent up the river and did not come back until 2014. Also one of the movies that year, along with the infamous Theodore Rex, the highest budget film to be sent Direct to Video, that derailed Whoopi Goldberg's cinematic career, but she has moved on to other avenues such as The View.
  • G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $150,201,498 (domestic), $302,469,017 (worldwide). Became an Old Shame to Channing Tatum, who had to take part in this film as the character of Duke due to a picture deal he had with Paramount. His hatred for this film's script didn't prevent him from reprising the role in the sequel, G.I. Joe: Retaliation, but his character gets killed off for real early in that film.
  • Gigli (2003) — Budget, $54–74 million. Box office, $7,266,209. Suffered from Executive Meddling that shifted the focus from the crime-comedy elements to the "Bennifer" romance; it also derailed their movie careers for a while along with derailing their relationship AND director Martin Brest's career. The film's theatrical run saw two major drops in gross and screens (81% and 97%, respectively) before the plug was pulled on the cinematic run at the end of the third week, and Sony Pictures would subsequently pull advertising for this film in favor of Bad Boys IInote  and S.W.A.T., which were in their fifth and second weeks at the box office respectively.
  • The Gingerbread Man (1998) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,677,131. This legal thriller based on a discarded John Grisham novel tested poorly in an initial screening. So Polygram took it out of Robert Altman's hands and re-edited; their version tested even worse. Altman's version was given pretty decent reviews.
  • Giorgino (1994) — Budget, €12 million (and that's just an estimate in euros; the film apparently cost 80 million francs!). Box office: the exact intake is unknown, but only 60,000 people saw the film during its release, and it only made back 1% of its budget. This was famed singer Mylene Farmer's first and only attempt at branching out into film; she would only do voice work for Arthur and the Invisibles and its sequels ever since, and after the failure of this film she left France to take a break in the United States. Director Laurent Boutonnat, the songwriting partner of Farmer who also directed many of her music videos, wouldn't direct another full-length film until 2007.
  • Girl 6 (1996) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4,939,939. This was the first film by Spike Lee that he did not write the script for (which was done by Suzan-Lori Parks). Critics didn't think highly of it back then but it's now got a bit of a cult following. Its soundtrack of exclusively Prince tracks helped make it memorable.
  • The Girl in the Spider's Web (2018) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $35,127,108. This sequel to David Fincher's The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo was a failed attempt to reboot Steig Larsson's novel series. The critics didn't care for it, though they liked Claire Foy as Lisbeth Salander.
  • Girl, Interrupted (1999) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $28,912,646 (domestic), $48,350,205 (worldwide). Though Angelina Jolie won an Oscar for this movie, the writers weren't nearly as lucky. One of them, James Mangold (who is also the director and one of the producers), only wrote two more movies before sticking with the director and producer job, another, Anna Hamilton Phelan, didn't have another screen credit for ten years, and the third, playwright Lisa Loomer, withdrew from Hollywood altogether and stuck with plays.
  • The Girl Next Door (2004) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $14,589,444 (domestic), $30,411,183 (worldwide). This Sex Comedy received mixed reviews from critics, many of whom derided Fox for marketing it to teens. Lackluster advertising that made it look more appealing to younger teenage girls rather than the older teen/young adult males the film was aimed at also didn't help. It did find an audience via DVD and cable airings, though.
  • Gladiator (1992) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9,223,441.
  • Gladiators of Rome (2012) — Budget, $45-55 million (almost $80 million including marketing costs). Box office, $10,079,201 (worldwide). The loss was so significant for the film's animation studio, Rainbow SpA, that all of its other productions were affected. Rainbow had to cut costs on its TV shows for years afterward, most notably the 7th season of Winx Club.
  • The Glass House (2001) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $18,150,259 (domestic), $23,619,609 (worldwide). Opening it three days after the September 11th attacks certainly didn't help its prospects, plus September was already one of the Dump Months. It did sell well enough on home video to spawn a direct-to-video sequel.
  • Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $10.7 million (domestic). The film version of David Mamet's play was a critical smash which only topped out at 418 theaters.
  • The Glimmer Man (1996) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $20,351,264. This debuted at number two behind three-week champ The First Wives Club but quickly lost its luster.
  • Glitter (2001) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $5,271,666. This film's failure, along with that of the accompanying soundtrack album, sent Mariah Carey's career into recession for several years. Being released the weekend after 9/11 (in what was already a traditionally poor month) couldn't have helped either.
  • Gloria (1999) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $4,197,729. Sidney Lumet wouldn't direct another theatrical film until Find Me Guilty in 2006. This was also George C. Scott's final theatrical film.
  • Go Now (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $25,695. Did not get out of a limited release in the States and Britain, and ultimately became a TV movie.
  • Goal (2005) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $27.6 million. Got mixed reviews and earned director Danny Cannon a red card for theatrical releases; he's stayed in a successful television career since. It's also one of the last flops from Disney, who distributed this thru Touchstone, that led to CEO Michael Eisner getting ejected from the company by the fall. This film's financial failure didn't stop a trilogy from being made, but the third installment in this trilogy went Direct to Video.
  • GoBots: Battle of the Rock Lords (1986) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,338,264. Along with an animated series, GoBots attempted to cash in on the success of the Transformers toy line and adaptations. It didn't go over so well as Battle of the Rock Lords led to the end of GoBots.
  • Gods and Generals (2003) — Budget, $56 million. Box office, $12,923,936. This prequel to Gettysburg was labeled a terminally ill case of "prequelitis" from critics, and it dealt a great deal of damage to Maxwell and the producers. Maxwell would not direct another movie for ten years, and Ted Turner Pictures went out of business after just one film.
  • Gods and Monsters (1998) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,451,628 (domestic). It destroyed the cinematic careers of co-producers Gregg Fienberg and Paul Colichman despite being an Acclaimed Flop and getting several Academy Award nominations. Fienberg stayed in TV and Colichman did not work another movie for nine years.
  • God's Not Dead: A Light in Darkness (2018) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5.7 million (domestic to date). The 2018 film, the third in Pure Flix's God's Not Dead franchise, found itself announcing a release date of March 30, 2018 (Good Friday) but was in large part dismissed as a "a cash grab and not a movie promoting a Christian message anymore" on Pure Flix's part while competing for the Evangelical Christian film-goer market with two other films appealing to Pure Flix's base that had been released over the previous two weeks: the Erwin Brothers directed/Lionsgate Biopic I Can Only Imaginenote ; which proved a Sleeper Hit with over $80 million at the box office on a $7 million budget and the Affirm Films/Sony Pictures release Paul, Apostle of Christ (which proved a modest hit, making over $18 million on a $5 million budget). By contrast, the third film in the God's Not Dead series has so far made a grand total of just over $5 millionnote , worse than the opening weekend box office totals of its two predecessors while continuing a string of diminishing returns for films in the seriesnote .
  • Gods of Egypt (2016) — Budget, $140 million (not counting marketing costs), approx. $170 million (counting them). Box office, $31,153,464 (domestic), $150,680,864 (worldwide). The film received damning reviews on release (the Rotten Tomatoes critic consensus reads, "Look on Gods of Egypt, ye filmgoers, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay of this colossal wreck, boundless and bare. The lone and level sands stretch far away. (Apologies to Shelley.)" It currently has a 16% with critics on the site. This prompted a backlash from the director of the film, Alex Proyas. It had a poor first week against Deadpool, and the next week saw the release of a second Gerard Butler film, London Has Fallen (which also didn't fare very well with critics), and Disney's Zootopia, the latter of which mauled both movies at the box office. It remains to be seen if the failure of both Gods of Egypt and London Has Fallen will send Butler's career to the Underworld (the movie's already become an Old Shame to cast member Chadwick Boseman).
  • Godsend (2004) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,379,751 (domestic), $30,114,487 (worldwide). Director Nick Hamm's theatrical career was cast off the silver screen until 2011's Killing Bono after this sci-fi thriller was mauled by critics and audiences.
  • Godzilla 2000 (2000) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $12,924,063. While it didn't make back a lot of money, it still succeeded in bringing back American interest in Godzilla once again.
  • Godzilla 1985 (1985) — Budget, $2 million (not counting marketing costs), $3.2 million (counting them). Box office, $4,116,395. With the exception of the disowned 1998 American film, Godzilla wouldn't return to American theaters until Godzilla 2000 in 2000.
  • Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) — Budget, $19.5 mllion. Box office, $12 million. This intended Grand Finale of the Millennium series and temporary retirement picture for Godzilla fell significantly short of expectations. The Big G's next two cinematic outings would come a decade later and did far better at the box office.
  • Going All The Way (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $113,069. This is the last time novelist Dan Wakefield attempted to write a screenplay.
  • Going the Distance (2010) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $17,804,299 (domestic), $42,052,757 (worldwide). Director Nanette Burstein and writer Geoff LaTulippe have not tried another theatrical film after this movie. It seems to have killed Justin Long's career as he hasn't been seen in a mainstream movie since except for some voice acting gigs, the projects of his friend Kevin Smith and a supporting role in Movie 43. Drew Barrymore's career also seemed to take a bit of a hit, as she's only appeared in a few movies in the years since. She nabbed a starring role alongside Timothy Olyphant in the Netflix series Santa Clarita Diet, which was met with an enthusiastic critical reception but was unexpectedly and prematurely cancelled after its third season. Following the show's end, she's managed to pick up another fairly high-profile gig, in the form of a talk show on CBS.
  • Gold (2016) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11.5 million. The Weinstein Company shifted this from a wide Christmas day release to a limited day before New Year's release to position it for awards consideration. Its mixed reviews dulled its awards luster pretty quickly.
  • The Golden Bowl (2001) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $5,753,678. This Merchant-Ivory adaptation of the Henry James novel debuted at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival, where it was poorly received. When the original distributor, Miramax, asked the filmmakers to recut the film, Merchant-Ivory took the film to Lionsgate, who gave it a limited US release of 117 theaters. Critics also gave it a mixed reception.
  • The Golden Child (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $79,817,937. Yes, distributor Paramount DID consider this a box office disappointment for the same reasons as Harlem Nights (see below): it made nowhere near as much money as the previous film to star Eddie Murphy, Beverly Hills Cop. Paramount was also having trouble with losing studio bosses Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg to Walt Disney Productions, and The Golden Child, in contrast to this movie's original director John Carpenter's eventual take on Fantasy China, Big Trouble in Little China (which has three major actors from this film), was badly panned by critics. Murphy has also more or less disowned this film.
  • The Golden Compass (2007) — Budget, $180 million. Box office, $70 million (domestic), $372,234,864 (internationally). Unfortunately, New Line Cinema had sold off the international distribution rights in order to raise enough money for the film's production, meaning that they only got the domestic gross, and never saw a penny of the international box office. As a result, New Line was absorbed into Warner Bros. soon after. Plans for the remainder of the book series eventually disappeared, leaving this film's ending to become an unintentional perpetual Cliffhanger and turning the whole experience into an Old Shame for director Chris Weitz thanks to Executive Meddling.
  • The Goldfinch (2019) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $4,977,125 (domestic), $6,777,125 (worldwide). The film version of Donna Tartt's acclaimed novel opened to critical and audience apathy. The film opened at eighth place against Hustlers and It: Chapter Two, the latter of which was in its second weekend. It is, by far, one of the worst opening weekends for a wide release ever. Its theatrical run was so bad that it lost all but 442 theaters in its third weekend.
  • Gone Fishin' (1997) — Budget, $53 million. Box office, $19,736,932. A tremendously Troubled Production, the movie suffered various delays, confused marketing (Disney couldn't entirely figure out whether to market it to older kids or adults), and a stuntwoman's death during filming. Disney sent it out to die against The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and director Christopher Cain didn't work on another theatrical film until September Dawn, ten years later.
  • Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) — Budget, $103.3 million (not counting marketing costs), $170.7 million (counting them). Box office, $101,648,571 (domestic), $237,202,299 (worldwide). Critics slashed the tires on this remake of the 1974 cult film, deriding the plot as nonsensical and car chases as boring, but audiences were more forgiving. An Old Shame for Christopher Eccleston. Disney took a roughly $90 million loss on the film, but it did better on home video.
  • The Good Dinosaur (2015) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $123,087,120 (domestic), $332,207,671 (worldwide). This Pixar film suffered from rampant micromanagement at Disney. The story went through dozens of rewrites, film staff departures, and eventually the entire voice cast got replaced after all of their parts had been recorded. The film was dumped for the Thanksgiving weekend, opening at a weak $39 million and behind The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2, then any chance of the film making a profit domestically was dashed with the release of The Force Awakens just a month later, making it Pixar's first-ever box office bomb in its history (Cars 2 also failed to make back its budget domestically but was saved by the international box office; the basic concept of this film had also been done twice before, with Steven Spielberg/Don Bluth's The Land Before Time in 1988 and Disney's own Dinosaur film in 2000).
  • The Good German (2006) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $5,914,908. Steven Soderbergh's film version of Joseph Kanon's novel was deliberately produced in the style of a 1940's film. Critics called out the film for its style-over-substance approach and it became a casualty of the crowded holiday season.
  • A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) - Budget, $92 million. Box office, $67,349,198 (domestic), $304,654,182 (worldwide). The fifth film in the Die Hard series, critics were lukewarm to negative toward its clichéd The New Russia technothriller plot and choppy action scenes. Fox seemed to sense a turkey on its hands, as the film was dumped into theaters on Valentine's Day. The first in the series to fail to recoup its budget domestically, though (outside of Russia for obvious reasons) the film did considerably better business overseas. It appears to have been a Franchise Killer, as all attempts to make another Die Hard film have stalled out, and it was first of a series of bombs that sent Bruce Willis into a steep career decline. The next film from director John Moore, I.T., would skip theaters in the USA for streaming services.
  • A Good Man In Africa (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2,308,390. Writer William Boyd didn't write another screenplay for five years, and the film's production turned it into an Old Shame for director Bruce Beresford, who had a considerable amount of disdain for it and considers it the worst project he's been involved with.
  • The Good Mother (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $4,764,606. The first of a series of bombs note  that zapped Leonard Nimoy's directorial career.
  • The Good Shepherd (2006) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $59,952,835 (domestic), $99,480,480 (worldwide). The second and final film directed by Robert De Niro.
  • The Good Thief (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $6,460,758. A well-regarded film that never made it past 222 theaters.
  • Good Times (1967) — Budget, $1,115,000. Box office, $600,000 (rentals, domestic), $800,000 (worldwide). This was sold to distributor Columbia prior to showtime, which earned producer Steve Broidy a profit despite being a failure. ABC wasn't so lucky to the tune of $1,050,000.
  • A Good Year (2006) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $7,459,300 (domestic), $42,064,105 (worldwide). Ridley Scott reteamed with his Gladiator star Russell Crowe for this romantic comedy based on a Peter Mayle novel. It was generally panned by critics, who didn't think Scott nor Crowe were well-suited for the material. Scott and Crowe had better luck the next year with American Gangster.
  • Goodbye Charlie (1964) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $3.7 million (domestic rentals). The film version of George Axelrod's play (also filmed as Switch in 1991) marked Pat Boone's final film under his seven-year contract with Fox.
  • Goodbye Lover (1999) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1,940,299. Roland Joffe's first film since the fiasco of The Scarlet Letter was mostly shot in 1996 and had reshoots done two years later after a poorly-received screening at Cannes. The modified film still got poor reviews and saw release in 865 theaters. All but 165 of them dropped it by its third week and it was in 216 theaters for its fourth and final week. This was the only film to be produced by New Regency subsidiary Regency Vision.
  • Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween (2018) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $46,700,633 (domestic), $93,320,380 (worldwide). The sequel to 2015's Goosebumps (based on the series of books of the same name) failed to make the big numbers of its predecessor, and averaged a 47% rating on Rotten Tomatoes compared to 76% of the first. It seems unlikely that another sequel is being planned.
  • Gossip (2000) - Budget, $24 million. Box office, $5,108,820 (domestic), $12,591,270 (worldwide) This critically dismissed thriller was quickly silenced in a market dominated by the likes of U-571 and Gladiator in its brief run. First-time feature director Davis Guggenheim would find much more success in the field of documentaries starting with the Oscar-winning An Inconvenient Truth, though he would attempt one more scripted film seven years later with Gracie (listed below).
  • Gotti (2018) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2.4 million. This is the second biopic of mobster John Gotti, and it was critically mauled for its stereotypical script, messy editing, and tenuous connection to the real story, not the least being a big case of Historical Hero Upgrade to Gotti himself. It is one of the few films with a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and this sparked backlash from the film's marketing, which accused critics of conspiring against the film. The box office losses were exacerbated by 40% of the ticket sales coming from MoviePass, which was the parent production studio. It was one of several blunders that whacked MoviePass Ventures and eventually MoviePass itself, and did little to help John Travolta's acting career (though his performance was cited by critics as one of the few positives). This also sadly turned out to be Kelly Preston's final film appearance before her death in 2020.
  • Goyas Ghosts (2006) — Budget, $51 million. Box office, $9,448,082. This is the final film that Milos Forman directed or wrote before his death in 2018.
  • Grabbers (2012) - Budget: $5,207,020, Box office: $427,335
  • Grace Of Monaco (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $26 million. Its US theatrical release was scrapped due to disputes with director Olivier Dahan and the Weinstein Company and it premiered straight-to-cable there. It also didn't help that the critics and Princess Grace's family overwhelmingly disliked the film in any form. The tepid reception has likely stalled Dahan's career.
  • Grace of My Heart (1996) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $660,313. This had to confront Tom Hanks' directoral debut, That Thing You Do!, which, like Grace Of My Heart, focused on the early to mid 60's pop music scene. Director Allison Anders took a three-year hiatus from writing and directing.
  • Gracie (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,826,568. Davis Guggenheim's last scripted film as of 2020.
  • Graffiti Bridge (1990) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $4.2 million. This attempt at a pseudo-sequel to Purple Rain killed off any hope of Prince appearing on the big screen ever again. Also probably one of the turning points which became the foundation for Prince's feud with Warner Bros. in the mid-90s.
  • Grandma's Boy (2006) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $6.6 million. Immediately sentenced director Nicholaus Goossen to the C-list. He only directed another Happy Madison film in 2009, didn't work for another five years, and has stuck to television and shorts since.
  • Grandview USA (1984) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $4,743,119. This went straight out of theaters after two weeks and it wouldn't see a DVD release until 2011.
  • Grease 2 (1982) — Budget, $11.3 million. Box office, $15.1 million. The film's failure killed off plans for a third movie, and it became a major Old Shame for lead actress Michelle Pfeiffer, who claims she "hates it with a vengeance". It was also a major blow to Maxwell Caulfield's movie career.
  • Great Balls of Fire! (1989) — Budget, $16-18 million. Box office, $13,741,060.
  • The Great Raid (2005) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $10,769,311. This led to the writer duo of Carlo Bernard and Doug Miro not writing another film for four years.
  • The Great Wall (2017) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $45,157,105 (domestic), $331,957,105 (worldwide). This historical fantasy film set in Ancient China is the first major movie produced by the US and China. It was Overshadowed by Controversy over the casting of Matt Damon as the lead, even though his character was specifically written as a foreigner and the alleged Mighty Whitey aspects weren't as severe as feared. It did great business in China (even if film-goers there regarded it as So Okay, It's Average), who didn't object to the casting, but it wasn't enough to save it in the US. In the end, this film torpedoed Legendary's 2014 distribution deal with Universal, resulting in Legendary returning to Warner Bros. for most films from 2019 onward.
  • The Great White Hope (1970) - Budget, $9.87 million. Box office, $9.325 million (domestic rentals). The film version of Howard Sackler's lauded play, loosely based on boxer Jack Johnson, featured James Earl Jones and Jane Alexander (in her film debut) recreating their stage roles. It was a critical darling back in the day, though time hasn't been kind to it.
  • The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, less than $8 million by 1983, $15,473,333 (current total). This film's flopping, due in no small part to a long length and criticism over its distracting celebrity cameos (including a legendary example of miscasting with John Wayne as the Centurion), discouraged any more biblical epics for a while, and it sadly sent the careers of producer/director George Stevens and actress Dorothy McGuire to Hell. McGurie's career took a hiatus for six years, and Stevens only made one more film in 1970.
  • Greed (1924) — Budget, $665,603. Box office, $274,827. Erich von Stroheim's adaptation of the novel McTeague was shot as an eight-hour movie but MGM cut it down against his will to two-and-a-half hours. This initially released version was panned by critics and audiences and was disowned by Stroheim. The original cut and the edited footage is now lost and its four-hour restoration was made with still photos to fill the gaps. This has been Vindicated by History as Stroheim's all-time masterpiece.
  • Greedy (1994) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $13,137,484. This was the last film Kirk Douglas made before his stroke in 1996 which impaired his ability to speak.
  • Green Lantern (2011) (2011) — Budget, $225 million (plus another $100 million for marketing). Box office, $219,851,172. Warner Bros. wanted this to be their big new superhero trilogy, but combined with generally negative reviews and poor box office numbers, this appears to be a Stillborn Franchise (though there are still plans to have Green Lantern in the DC Extended Universe franchise). It also hasn't discouraged star Ryan Reynolds from taking the role of another comic book character, Deadpool, five years later, which was a project he had personally been involved with for years and included him making a Take That! to Green Lantern). It also sent director Martin Campbell's career into a pit for years; he has mostly focused on TV, and it would be four years before he got attached to another cinematic project, when he was tapped for the Jackie Chan/Pierce Brosnan project The Foreigner. (Campbell's the man responsible for Brosnan's Grand Premiere James Bond film, GoldenEye, along with Daniel Craig's Grand Premiere Bond film, Casino Royale (2006).)
  • Green Room (2016) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $3,769,214. This Punks vs neo-Nazis horror-thriller received rave reviews from critics, but Invisible Advertising due to troubles with production company Broad Green Pictures doomed its box office chances. Thankfully, it did better on home video and is now considered a Cult Classic.
  • Green Zone (2010) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $94,882,549. One of several films centered on The War on Terror to flop at the box office. It opened at number two behind Alice in Wonderland (2010) and quickly fell through. Its spiraling budget played a role in getting Universal chairman Marc Smuger and a few other executives fired.
  • Grey Owl (1999) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $632,617. (Wow.) This biopic about the titular environmental activist was never released theatrically in the U.S. and its reception in the UK was bad enough to set Richard Attenborough's directing career back eight years. The semi-final film to date to involve Allied Filmmakers.
  • Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $45.9 million. It received mixed-to-positive reviews for its Truer to the Text take on Tarzan, but its underperformance led to a sequel getting scrapped. It already faced Creator Backlash from screenwriter Robert Towne, who was so dissatisfied with the changes made to his script that he substituted his name with that of his late dog, P.H. Vazak, who ended up getting nominated for an Oscar. The movie is also notorious for having Glenn Close redub all of leading lady Andie MacDowell's dialogue. It was also the last film for Sir Ralph Richardson, who also died before the film was released, and who also got an Oscar nomination for his performance.
  • Gridiron Gang (2006) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $38,432,823 (domestic), $41,480,851 (worldwide). Sony dumped the film overseas after it disappointed in the US (the films' international-unfriendly subject matter didn't help).
  • Gridlockd (1997) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $5,571,205. One of the last two films Tupac Shakur starred in, being released after he was murdered in Las Vegas the year before. Director Vondie Curtis-Hall did not direct another major film for four years, and co-producer Paul Webster didn't take a non-executive producer role on a movie for three years.
  • Grind (2003) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,141,166. This skateboarding comedy was panned by critics for its one-note characters and low-brow humor (though audience reception was much better) and skated away from theaters after five weeks.
  • Grindhouse (2007) — Budget, $67 million. Box office, $25,422,088. A love letter to the Exploitation Film craze of the 1970's from Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. Audience confusion over its Double Feature nature and likely sabotage from notorious film executive Harvey Weinstein over the casting of Rose McGowan contributed to its poor box office, though good critical reception and strong home video sales propelled it to Cult Classic status. A rare film in that it was outperformed by its spinoffs.
  • Grudge Match (2013) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $29,807,260 (domestic), $44,907,260 (worldwide). This was part of a brutal year for Sylvester Stallone and the worst received of his output by critics. It also didn't fare well in a particularly crowded holiday season. In 2018, Kim Basinger sat down with Interview to look back on the in-depth chat she'd had with the magazine almost two and half decades earlier, and she was asked to review the answers she'd given in 1994 to see if she still felt the same way. For the most part, her opinions hadn't changed. There was one question that she gave a starkly different answer to, however: She claimed that she'd never had a bad experience making a movie during her initial interview, but Basinger revealed that this was no longer the case — she admitted that she had a terrible time making Grudge Match.
  • The Guardian (1990) — Budget, $10-20 million estimated. Box office, $17 million. Critics generally felt this horror film was too absurd to be scary. Director William Friedkin disowned this movie. It also killed Jenny Seagrove's career as a lead in American films, as everything she's done since has been British films.
  • The Guilt Trip (2012) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $37,134,215 (domestic), $41,863,726 (worldwide). Critics felt that the talents of Seth Rogen and Barbra Streisand were wasted; the latter had the "honor" of a Razzie nomination for Worst Actress.
  • Guilty by Suspicion (1991) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $9,480,198. This film about the Hollywood blacklist got some negative publicity once screenwriter Abraham Polonsky (himself a blacklist victim) disowned the film in the press due to Executive Meddling. (The lead character, played by Robert De Niro, was written as a Communist in the script and was rewritten to be a moderate liberal in the finished product.)
  • Gulliver's Travels (2010) — Budget, $112 million. Box office, $42,779,261 (domestic), $237,382,724 (worldwide). This flop really put a dent in Jack Black's mainstream career. Director Rob Letterman fell off the radar until 2015, when he and Black reunited with the more successful Goosebumps.
  • Gumby: The Movie (1995) — Budget, $2.8 million. Box office, $57,100. The cinematic adaptation of The Gumby Show never escaped a limited release when it was squashed by critics, and it subsequently squashed helmer Art Clokey's career and future new Gumby material as well; the series has remained visible due to reruns, but attempts to revive the franchise with new shows fell victim to Development Hell.
  • The Gun In Betty Lous Handbag (1992) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,721,911. This satire about a bored housewife who lets herself take the rap for a murder was despised by critics and ignored by audiences. Allan Moyle waited three years to direct his next film, Empire Records, which also floundered at the box office.
  • The Gunman (2015) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $10,664,749. This was universally panned by critics and was shot down after six weeks in theaters.
  • Guy (1997) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, just $4,134. This was in one theater and was gone after nine days. It did no favors for Gramercy Pictures.
  • A Guy Thing (2003) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17,432,163. The second and last feature film directed by Chris Koch, who's stuck to TV work ever since.
Advertisement:

    H 
  • Hackers (1995) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7,563,728. It was panned by critics at the time for its dumb plot and its unconvincing portrayal of hackers. It still became a Cult Classic.
  • Hair (1979) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $15,284,643. The film version of the counterculture rock musical received glowing reviews but not from the original creators, who felt the filmmakers missed the point of their work. While audiences ignored it back then, it's Vindicated by History now.
  • Half Past Dead (2002) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,233,280. Yet another deadly whack to Steven Seagal's fading career (which had gotten a slight comeback the year before with Exit Wounds), and the most severe one yet. Seagal would not star in another major movie until 2010's Machete, and Half Past Dead's failure sentenced the sequel, which did not feature Steven Seagal, to Direct-to-DVD. Director Don Michael Paul's next movie came in 2006, and he's been stuck with sequels and TV movies after that film.
  • Hamlet (1996) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $4,739,189. Kenneth Branagh's four-hour, unabridged adaptation of the Shakespeare play only had a limited release, though a shorter cut was also given a wider release. It was still an Acclaimed Flop.
  • The Hand (1981) -— Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $2,447,576. This was Oliver Stone's first major studio film as director; he wouldn't direct again until 1986's Salvador.
  • The Handmaid's Tale (1990) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $4,960,385. The film version of Margaret Atwood's novel fell flat due to a limited release and unenthusiastic reviews. It fell further into obscurity after the highly-successful Hulu series debuted.
  • Hands of Stone (2016) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $5 million. This biopic of boxer Roberto Duran got a fifteen-minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival, but it opened to mixed reviews and poor results when it opened in August at the end of the big summer bomb-buster of '16.
  • Hanging Up (2000) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $51,880,044. The film served as Walter Matthau's last feature, as he died a few months after its release, and director Nora Ephron didn't work another film for five years.
  • Hannibal Rising (2007) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $27,670,986 (domestic), $82.2 million (worldwide). This prequel for Hannibal Lecter axed the franchise after its rancid critical and financial reception. The franchise was revived by an NBC series in 2013.
  • The Happiest Millionaire (1967) — Budget and Box office, $5 million. Would have lost money for marketing expenses. This is the final movie Walt Disney was personally involved in.
  • Happily Ever After (1990, 1993) — Budget, Unknown, but there was a $10 million marketing campaign included from distributor 1st National Film Corp. Box office, $3,229,382. This project was created to try to keep Filmation afloat (they went out of business shortly before its release), and when they attempted to create a direct sequel to Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs along with Pinocchio without Disney's approval, the Mouse House immediately descended on them with a lawsuit, forcing them to change things to put distance between it and Disney. The film opened in France in 1990, but the legal hotfoot kept it out of American cinemas until 1993, when 1st National released it around the same time as the last theatrical Snow White reissue before that film's VHS premiere. Happily Ever After was blasted by critics and bombed, becoming the last straw that bankrupted 1st National; this movie was dropped from the radar right afterwards.
  • Happily N'Ever After (2007) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $38,085,778. Coming off the heels of other "Fractured Fairy Tale" movies such as the Shrek franchise, this film was dumped on by critics (it has one of THE lowest Rotten Tomatoes scores for any animated film), who accused it of being a ripoff. This film's failure put an animation curse on production company Vanguard Animation and Lionsgate that really hasn't gone away, with Norm of the North being Lionsgate's latest animated implosion, and sent a sequel to this specific movie Direct to Video (producer John H. Williams, who is part of both this and the Shrek series, has still fared well).
  • Happiness (1998) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $2,807,390. This film never escaped a limited release, although it probably wouldn't have done better in a wider release either given its difficult subject matter. This hasn't dented the independent filmmaker Todd Solondz much.
  • Happy Feet Two (2011) — Budget, $135 million. Box office, $64,006,466 (domestic), $150,406,466 (worldwide). This lost Warner Bros. $40 million, and director George Miller closed down his Dr. D studio two years after this film's failure. The movie's failure also convinced Miller to refocus on his bigger Mad Max project and stop with family movies. Happy Feet 2's box office failure would put the franchise on ice.
  • The Happytime Murders (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,506,452. The Jim Henson Company's first major venture into R-rated material was critically trashed for being a one-note "Dirty Muppets" joke and died against Crazy Rich Asians, which was in its second weekend. Part of a string of commercial failures for Melissa McCarthy.
  • Hard Eight (1997) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $222,559. Paul Thomas Anderson's directorial debut and his first of many films to underperform despite high marks from critics. Its limited release and Executive Meddling did it no favors.
  • Hard Rain (1998) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $19,870,567. Director Mikael Solomon's last film to get a theatrical release.
  • Harlem Nights (1989) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $60,864,870 (domestic), $95,900,000 (worldwide). The one film Eddie Murphy directed was technically profitable despite negative reviews, but Paramount still considered it a box office disappointment due to the movie only grossing half the money Murphy's previous films made, though it opened at #1 at the box office against Disney's The Little Mermaid, which ultimately outgrossed Harlem Nights. In a grim addition, several theaters in Detroit and California became settings for a few shootings note  that resulted in the AMC theater chain banning any further Harlem Nights showings and a riot to erupt in Richmond following the shooting death of Marcel Thompson, 17, when that showing was canned. This whole mess kept Eddie Murphy from directing another movie again, and knocked him into the B list of stars until The Nutty Professor in 1996.
  • Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man (1991) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $7,018,525. This became a Cult Classic later on. Mickey Rourke however treats the film as Old Shame, admitting that he only did the movie for the money.
  • Harry Brown (2010) — Budget, $7.3 million. Box office, $1,818,681 (domestic), $10,329,747 (worldwide). Its widest release in the US was in 67 theaters. The critics generally liked it but director Daniel Barber waited five years before his next film.
  • Harry And Son (1984) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $4,864,980. Paul Newman didn't assume a producer's role for another 20 years. The film's commercial failure, plus some medical issues, did no favors to the career of Robby Benson; instead he became known for being the voice of the Beast in Disney's Beauty and the Beast seven years later.
  • Hart's War (2002) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $33,076,815. This was part of a bad year for MGM, being released the week after the remake of ''Rollerball'. The producers blamed the failure on MGM advertising it as an action film instead of the courtroom drama that it was. Director Gregory Hoblit wouldn't make another film for five years. Jonathan Brandis hoped to save his career with this film but his part was mostly shipped off to the cutting room floor. It's likely his frustration over this contributed to his suicide the next year.
  • Hatchet series:
    • Hatchet (2006) - Budget: $1,500,000, Box office: $208,550. The first in the horror series had a very limited release.
    • Hatchet II (2010) - Budget: $800,000, Box office: $156,190. It had a very limited release like its predecessor and it didn't even last a week in theaters.
  • The Hate U Give (2018) — Budget, $23 million (plus a marketing budget of around $30 million). Box office, $34.9 million. This adaptation of Angie Thomas' YA novel received near-universal acclaim from critics, but was ignored by most audiences (though it did get an "A+" rating on CinemaScore), likely because of competition from more higher-profile October releases, like Venom, A Star is Born, and Halloween, and 20th Century Fox not knowing how to properly market the film with its heavy racial subject matter. This was one of the last films produced by the studio's Fox 2000 division before their new owner shut down the label, and its follow-up, On the Come Up, moved development to Paramount as a result. This was the final film for screenwriter Audrey Wells, who died the day before its release.
  • The Hateful Eight (2015) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $54,117,416 (domestic), $155,760,117 (worldwide). The film was already doomed, being released in the same overcrowded holiday season as The Force Awakens and The Revenant (the latter of which both took the top spot of its opening weekend in wide release at the box office and dethroned the former in said weekend at the box office), even leading Tarantino accusing Disney of "forcing the film out of the opening spot" but that was the least of the film's worries. The film opened in limited release on the same weekend as The Force Awakens and in 70mm film to boot, until then said to be a dead format (the next big 70mm release, Dunkirk, handled its release more tactfully). The 70mm cut was longer, which meant that those unable to see it in that format felt like they were missing out. What din't help either was that its screener copy leaked to the internet on the same weekend. The film itself was generally well received by critics but proved to be divisive, due to pacing that was slow even by Tarantino standards (3 hours long and largely takes place in a single log cabin) and a grim tone that verged on apathy.
  • Haunted Honeymoon (1986) — Budget, $13 million, Box office, $8,033,397. This was Gilda Radner's final film role before her death in 1989, and it started the short string of movies that led to the complete crash of her husband Gene Wilder's film career (it's also the last time he took the director's megaphone).
  • The Haunted Mansion (2003) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $75,847,266 (domestic), $182,290,266 (worldwide). One of a handful of failed theme park attractions-to-movie adaptations from The Walt Disney Company, and part of a bad streak for star Eddie Murphy. This was offset by Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl earlier that year, but it's still the prelude to a brutal series of bombs for Disney in 2004 that, along with revolts from shareholders and Pixar, ultimately derailed boss Michael Eisner's career with the firm. A remake is supposedly being worked on. Director Rob Minkoff, one of the co-directors of The Lion King, didn't direct again until Jackie Chan's The Forbidden Kingdom five years later, and co-producer Don Hahn, who also produced The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast, stuck to shorts and documentaries for Disney until Frankenweenie in 2012.
  • Havana (1990) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $9,243,140. This film's failure served as the final collaboration between star Robert Redford and director Sydney Pollack.
  • Haywire (2012) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $18,942,396 (domestic), $33,372,606 (worldwide). In spite of good reviews, the studio sold the film wrong and dropped it on the dump month of January, leading to the financial failure. Apart from The Company You Keep, this film shorted out the cinematic career of writer Lem Dobbs for five years.
  • He Got Game (1998) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $21,567,853. Disney sold off the foreign rights to the film prior to its release in an effort to recoup some of its budget.
  • He Said, She Said (1991) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $9,804,775. Director Ken Kwapis waited five years before his next film, Dunston Checks In, after this romantic comedy was ripped by critics and shunned by audiences. His wife and co-director, Marisa Silver, only had a few TV credits after this.
  • Head (1968) — Budget, $750,000. Box office, unknown but almost certainly under $100,000 note . The Monkees try their hand at the big screen. The combination of the band being considered past their prime after their TV series was canceled, plus the bizarre Mind Screw of a film that director Bob Rafelson and co-writer Jack Nicholson put together led to Columbia Pictures burying the movie. It played in a handful of big city theaters at the end of 1968, went on the drive-in circuit after that, and was forgotten afterwards, but became a Cult Classic in The '80s when The Monkees experienced a resurgence in popularity.
  • Head in the Clouds (2004) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $3,510,605. This film sent John Duigan's directing career to Heaven; save for directing the Australian film Careless Love in 2012, he hasn't directed anything since.
  • Head of State (2003) — Budget, $35.2 million. Box office, $38,620,484. This Chris Rock vehicle came out shortly after the Iraq War began and people ended up staying home to watch the news than go to the movies. Ali LeRoi hasn't produced a film since.
  • Head Office (1985) — Budget, $9-12 million. Box office, $3,393,807.
  • Heart and Souls (1993) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,581,714.
  • Heart Like a Wheel (1983) — Budget, $7.5 million. Box office, $272,273.
  • Heartbeeps (1981) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2.1 million. The film's failure killed any chances of Andy Kaufman doing a Tony Clifton movie. Heartbeeps, along with the financial underscores of Pennies from Heaven and Annie, junked Bernadette Peters' movie career as well. She wouldn't be in another movie until 1989.
  • Heartbreak Hotel (1988) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5.5 million. Even with 18 Again! released the same year, this movie about a teenager kidnapping Elvis Presley was a Star-Derailing Role for Charlie Schlatter, who mostly became a voice actor within ten years. It also arguably ended Tuesday Weld's career as a leading actress, as almost all her roles since have been smaller or at least secondary.
  • The Heartbreak Kid (2007) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $36,787,257 (domestic), $127,766,650 (worldwide). It would be four years before the brothers Farrelly, who directed the movie, and Leslie Dixon, one of the writers, would have another screen credit.
  • Heartbreakers (2001) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $57,756,408. Despite this, the TV rights ended up being sold for $10 million.
  • Hearts in Atlantis (2001) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $30,919,415. This film falling just over $80,000 short of its original budget and getting exactly 50/50 reviews from critics sunk director Scott Hicks' career for six years, and is the second-to-last film written by William Goldman until the 2010's.
  • Heat (1986) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $2,793,214. The first film version of William Goldman's novel of the same name. The film went through five directors, star Burt Reynolds feuded with one of them, Dick Richards, who was later injured after falling from a crane. Richards and Jerry Jameson were the two credited directors on the film; Richards never worked in Hollywood again but Jameson found steady work on TV. Goldman, who also wrote the screenplay, was displeased with the results.
  • Heathers (1989) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $1,108,462. This was expelled from theaters after five weeks, but it was acclaimed by critics and became a Cult Classic once it hit home video.
  • Heaven & Earth (1993) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $5,864,949. Oliver Stone's final film in his Vietnam trilogy was the least liked by critics. Its limited release of 781 theaters didn't help its box office, and its failure effectively signaled the end of the Vietnam War film boom from the decade prior.
  • Heaven's Gate (1980) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $3,484,331. This film's failure led to the bankruptcy of United Artists, the ruination of director Michael Cimino's career, the derailment of Kris Kristofferson as a leading man, and (along with other flops) the end of the auteur period in Hollywood, and became a byword for box office disasters. The film's Troubled Production was heavily publicized, but the critical thrashing in its New York premiere, and finally, United Artists pulling the film at Cimino's request to re-edit it was largely considered the catalyst that kept audiences away.
  • Heavens Prisoners (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $5,009,305. This sent screenwriter Harley Fenton's career to Heaven for a few years.
  • The Hebrew Hammer (2003) — Budget: $1,000,000, Gross USA: $19,539. This superhero parody only had a limited release, mainly due to Comedy Central airing the film nearly two weeks earlier. It also drew controversy for its use of Jewish and Christian stereotypes. Further airings by Comedy Central cemented it as a Cult Classic.
  • Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $3.6 million. The film version of the off-Broadway musical, with co-creator John Cameron Mitchell writing, directing and starring in the title role, was released in only a handful of theaters, but it was an Acclaimed Flop then and a Cult Classic now.
  • Heist (2001) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $28,510,652. While it didn't set the box office on fire, it generated a whopping $72 million in rentals on home video.
  • Heist (2015) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $50,136. Got a handful of poisonous reviews and only got a limited release in theaters, otherwise coming directly to video-on-demand.
  • Held Up (1999) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $4,705,631. Apart from a movie called Good Advice, director Steve Rash's cinematic career was held up in Hollywood Hell until 2012.
  • Hellboy (2019) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $19.7 million (domestic), $30 million (worldwide). This reboot of Hellboy was eviscerated by critics for its messy script, Mood Whiplash, and overreliance on gore. It dropped between 68% and 73% in its second weekend, then 91% in its third, which happened to be the same weekend Avengers: Endgame came out.
  • Hell in the Pacific (1968) - Budget, $4,150,000. Box office, $3,230,000. The movie had one of the more expensive productions at the time. This, combined with the movie's unusual concept, lack of subtitles and unpopular ending, caused the movie to become one of the biggest box office bombs of its time. It was one of the factors that caused its production company, ABC Films (subsidiary of the ABC company), to eventually go bankrupt. However, the critics did praise many aspects of the film, especially Toshiro Mifune's performance as one of the best in his career.
  • Hello, Dolly! (1969) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $26 million (rentals), $33.2 million (box office total). The adaptation of the play cost the film's backers $10 million and, despite faring well at the Academy Awards, signaled the beginning of the end for the live-action musical. Critics felt the film was an overproduced mess with Barbra Streisand immensely miscast in the title role. The film's financial failure and the critical panning of Gene Kelly's next film The Cheyenne Social Club were crippling blows to Kelly, who never directed another theatrical film after 1970, and it was part of a string of bombs that crushed the relationship and Fox careers of Darryl Zanuck and son Richard, though Richard became a producer, and led to Fox entering troubled waters until the premiere Star Wars film. Hello Dolly's reputation was eventually revived when two major songs from it and a few clips were used as key set pieces in Pixar's masterpiece WALL•E 40 years later (both of the songs used are also used in the Disney Theme Parks).
  • Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (1987) — Budget, $2 million (estimated). Box office, $2,683,519. Was more of a hit on home video, where it actually turned a profit. Resulted in the next two entries in the Prom Night franchise going Direct to Video. Producer Peter Simpson blames this film's failure on the last-minute decision to make it an In Name Only sequel to Prom Night (1980).
  • Hells Kitchen (1999) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $11,710. This only played in two theaters. Angelina Jolie fared much better that year with Girl, Interrupted.
  • Her Cardboard Lover (1942) — Budget, $979,000. Box office, $973,000. Recorded loss, $348,000. The third film version of Jacques Deval's play (after The Cardboard Lover and The Passionate Plumber) was Norma Shearer's final film.
  • Here on Earth (2000) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,873,148. Screenwriter Michael Seitzman didn't write another film until North Country, while director Mark Piznarki mainly stuck to TV since this film.
  • Hero (1992) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $19,507,345 (domestic), $66,507,345 (worldwide). This lost Columbia Pictures $25.6 million.
  • Hesher (2010) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $382,946. The first and only feature film by short film director Spencer Susser played at 42 theaters.
  • Hey Arnold! The Movie (2002) — Budget, $3 million (not counting marketing costs), $16 million (counting them). Box office, $13,728,902 (domestic), $15,249,308 (worldwide). The film's poor performance led to Paramount cancelling a sequel that would have served as the Grand Finale for the Hey Arnold! series, leaving the show to end on a cliffhanger that wouldn't be resolved until a one-off special 13 years after the show ended.
  • Hidalgo (2004) — Budget, $40 million (not counting marketing costs), $100 million (counting them). Box office, $67,303,450 (domestic), $108,103,450 (worldwide). One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, and a rather bad setback to the career of director Joe Johnston. It would be six years before Johnston's next film, The Wolfman, which would also bomb, but he would fully bounce back in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, a Spiritual Successor to his earlier film The Rocketeer.
  • A Hidden Life (2019) - Budget, $7-9 million. Box office, $1,730,597 (domestic), $4,612,788 (worldwide). An Acclaimed Flop from Terrence Malick that was buried in a limited release that never expanded beyond 43 theaters. In addition to being the final roles for Michael Nyqvist (the movie finished filming in 2016, a year before Nyqvist's death, but was in post-production for three years) and Bruno Ganz (who died ten months before the release), it was also the final film from Fox Searchlight Pictures before their new parent company Disney, like their more mainstream counterpart, renamed them to just Searchlight Pictures to distance them from Rupert Murdoch‘s Fox Corp (and Fox News).
  • High Crimes (2002) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $41,543,917 (domestic), $63,781,810 (worldwide). This second pairing of Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd failed to duplicate the success of their previous outing, Kiss the Girls.
  • High Lifes and Low Lifes (2001) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $228,194. This was booted out of US theaters after three weeks. Director Mel Smith made his final film two years later.
  • High Spirits (1988) — Budget, $15.5 million. Box office, $8,578,231. Hit co-star Peter O’Toole hard, as afterwards he rarely appeared in anymore American-produced theatrical films.
  • Highlander (1986) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $12.9 million. This movie became a Cult Classic in Europe, which led to...
    • Highlander II: The Quickening (1991) — Budget, $30 million (not counting marketing costs), $34 million (counting them). Box office, $15,556,340. A notorious critical and commercial flop, noted especially for its Troubled Production and Executive Meddling (the film's director walked out of the premiere 15 minutes in, and one of the writers, Brian Clemens, didn't work on another cinematic movie). This didn't stop a third film from being made, which was...
    • Highlander III: The Sorcerer note  (1994) — Budget, $26,000,000. Box Office, $12,308,080. This installment DID get a better reception, but not by much (it also led to director Andy Morahan remaining with his career in music videos). The series continued six years later with...
    • Highlander: Endgame (2000) — Budget, $15-$25 million. Box office, $15,843,608. After this movie (which was Not Screened for Critics after the previous two became critical punching bags that had to be retconned), the fifth installment, Highlander: The Source, which came out in 2007, never saw the inside of a cinema, instead premiering on the Sci-Fi Channel. This is the one time director Doug Aarniokoski has attempted to direct a theatrical film with a considerable budget. He's stayed in television since apart from Nurse 3D.
  • The Hitcher (1986) — Budget: $6 million. Box office: $5,844,868. Most critics accused this thriller of being too sadistic and exploitational, but it eventually became a Cult Classic over time.
  • Hitman: Agent 47 (2015) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $22.5 million (domestic), $82.3 million (worldwide). A case of Video Game Movies Suck and "remakitis", and a failed attempt by Fox to try to offset any radiation from the nuclear fallout of Fant4stic's critical and financial implosion in the domestic market (Fox did not do themselves any favors by rehiring the writer of the other Hitman movie, Skip Woods, to write this one). It did fare better overseas, though. Skip Woods, meanwhile, has yet to make another film.
  • The Hoax (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11,772,461. This was an Acclaimed Flop but its release was rather limited, starting from 235 theaters and topping at 1,069. One person not pleased with the film was Clifford Irving, who wrote the book it was based on, which chronicled his infamous fake biography of Howard Hughes, who lambasted the film for its historical liberties.
  • Hobo with a Shotgun (2011) - Budget: $3 million. Box office: $834,953.
  • Hocus Pocus (1993) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $39.5 million. This Disney Halloween fantasy comedy was released in July (likely to avoid self-competition with Disney's other Halloween movie), where it was slammed by critics and unable to compete with the ongoing box-office juggernaut Jurassic Park and newcomer Free Willy. It was Vindicated by Cable and is now a Cult Classic.
  • Hoffa (1992) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $29,302,121. This Bio Pic of Teamster Boss Jimmy Hoffa divided critics, particularly over Jack Nicholson's performance in the title role (which got him nominated for a Golden Globe and a Razzie).
  • Holiday Affair (1949) — Budget and box office unknown. Projected loss, $300,000. Robert Mitchum was cast as the romantic lead in this failed attempt to change his image after being busted for marijuana possession, but the studio soon realized that the incident only solidified his bad-boy status to the public. Audiences stayed away at the time of its release but it has since become a minor Christmas classic thanks to Turner Classic Movies.
  • Hollywood Ending (2002) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $14,569,744. There was no Hollywood ending for Woody Allen when this bomb rolled into theaters; after it and Anything Else the next year, he would not do a movie where he took acting, producing AND directing credits again until 2012, though he remained in business during this time.
  • Hollywood Homicide (2003) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $51,142,659. This sent director Ron Shelton's career to the slammer for fourteen years until he returned to direct and produce Just Getting Started.
  • Hollywoodland (2006) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $16,803,753. This movie got good reviews, but director Allen Coulter didn't direct another theatrical film for four years and stuck to television.
  • Holmes & Watson (2018) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $30.3 million (domestic), $39 million (worldwide). This parody of Sherlock Holmes starring Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly was panned by critics once they were able to see it, and there were many reports of audiences walking out of screenings of the film before the 30-minute mark. The film's already-toxic reputation wasn't helped by allegations that Sony tried and failed to unload it onto Netflix when they realized it would bomb. Steve Coogan and Reilly have since rebounded (at least critically) with Stan & Ollie, a biopic about Laurel and Hardy that has received critical acclaim.
  • A Hologram For The King (2016) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $7,744,096. A limited release of 523 theaters made this Tom Hanks' lowest grossing film in 31 years.
  • Horus: Prince of the Sun (1968) — Budget, 140,000,000 million yen (around $1.4 million) Box office, unknown. The first collaboration between Studio Ghibli co-founders Isao Takahata (in his directorial debut) and Hayao Miyazaki (the scene designer and chief animator) suffered one of the worst Troubled Productions in anime history and was yanked from theaters after ten days. Toei Animation demoted everyone who worked on it and told Takahata he would never direct another film with them again. The film became a hit with students and artists and has since been Vindicated by History. Takahata, meanwhile, left Toei with Miyazaki in 1971, and the rest is history...
  • Holy Man (1998) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $12,069,719. The start of several career-zapping busts for director Stephen Herek. Eddie Murphy isn't proud of it either.
  • Holy Matrimony (1994) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $713,234. Joseph Gordon-Levitt's first starring role was also Leonard Nimoy's final film as director.
  • Home Alone 3 (1997) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $30,882,515 (domestic), $79,082,515 (worldwide). The third installment in the theatrical Home Alone trilogy had zero connection to the other two with Kevin McCallister and Harry and Marv, and did not feature Macaulay Culkin since he bolted from Hollywood. note  This third film, much like the also reviled Halloween III: Season of the Witch, uses a new plotline with a stolen computer chip and new characters. This unaffiliated take didn't fare any better with critics not named Roger Ebert than the other films and got a weaker reception from audiences, putting a serious dent in John Hughes's career; Hughes only executive produced two more movies before his death. Future Home Alone movies were either Made-for-TV or direct-to-streaming from this point onward.
  • Home For The Holidays (1995) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17,468,887 (domestic), $22,119,269 (worldwide).
  • Home Fries (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,513,979 (domestic). Director Dean Parisot did rebound with Galaxy Quest a year later though, which starred one of this film's stars, Daryl Mitchell.
  • Home Movies (1980) — Budget, $400,000. Box office, $89,134. Apparently, it only got a theatrical release in New York City and a few European countries like Italy. This was conceived by director Brian De Palma as a training exercise for students at his film course in Sarah Lawrence College.
  • A Home Of Our Own (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,677,807. Director Tony Bill would only do TV movies until 2006.
  • Home on the Range (2004) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $103,951,461. One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, and this one is considered by many to be the finishing blow for the post-Golden Age era called The Renaissance Age of Animation, as Disney abandoned its traditional animation department after the film failed, opening the floodgates to The Millennium Age of Animation where CGI animated media began taking over the mainstream. It also impounded the careers of director Will Finn and John Sanford; Finn mostly stuck to Direct to Video media and didn't direct again until 2013, and Sanford didn't appear again at all until DreamWorks' second Dragons cartoon in 2015.
  • The Home Teachers (2004) — Budget, $425,000. Box office, $203,917. The niche success Halestorm Entertainment had with their LDS comedies began to dwindle when this film flopped in theaters. While DVD sales pulled it out of the red, spectators began to grow weary of this type of self-referential and slap-sticky religious comedy.
  • Homefront (2013) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $20,158,898 (domestic), $43,058,898 (worldwide). Director Gary Fleder's first film in five years and currently his last. Part of a bad year for Sylvester Stallone, who wrote the screenplay. It didn't help that it came out the same day as Frozen (2013).
  • Homegrown (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $77,910. Stephen Gyllenhaal's directing career was put under house arrest for 14 years.
  • Honest (2000) — Budget, £3 million. Box office, £111,309. This crime film and thinly-veiled vehicle for the girl group All Saints never escaped a limited release, nor did it see wide distribution outside of the United Kingdom. It was widely panned by British film critics, who deemed it at release one of the worst films of all time, and its highly edgy and adult content meant younger fans of the group were pretty much off-limits.
  • The Honeymooners (2005) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,183,426. This was seen as a pointless remake of a classic series, though Roger Ebert was one of the few critics who liked it. In any case, it kept director John Schultz off the big screen for four years.
  • Honky Tonk Freeway (1981) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $2,004,742. This movie was ejected from theaters after only one week. Accusations of stereotyping of American culture and the revelation that the film was funded through a tax avoidance scheme, courtesy of the executive producer, didn't seem to help matters. Many also agree that the film began the erosion of music label EMI's film studio, though some argue that Can't Stop the Music played an earlier role as well.
  • Hoodlum (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $23,461,013. Director Bill Duke didn't do another theatrically released film for ten years.
  • Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $16,960,968. Essentially the last nail in the "Fractured Fairy Tale" trend's coffin; even DreamWorks Animation had toned it down for the fourth Shrek film that came out the year before, and its spinoff, Puss in Boots, which also saw its debut in 2011, took a more action-oriented angle. The "Fractured Fairy Tale" trend was replaced by a combination of 90s-esque Animated Musical films and more action-oriented animated movies. The film having gone through Development Hell (or rather, distribution hell) that saw it released six years after the original certainly didn't do it any favors, either.
  • Hoot (2006) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $8,224,998. This movie had the worst opening weekend for any film opening in over 3,000 theaters at the time, holding the record for nearly 14 years until it was dethroned by The Rhythm Section.
  • Hope and Glory (1987) — Budget, $9.3 million. Box office, $10 million. This was highly praised by critics and it earned five Oscar nominations. But this was one of several Columbia Pictures films acquired by outgoing president David Puttnam that the studio left in limited release. The studio took a $105 million write-off due to the failure of Puttnam's slate. This was also overshadowed by the release of Steven Spielberg's Empire of the Sun, based on a novel which, like Hope and Glory, is a semi-autobiographical account of a British boy's experiences during World War II.
  • The Horse In The Gray Flannel Suit (1968) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3.3 million. The final feature film for actor Fred Clark, who died a few months before it was released.
  • The Host (2013) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,627,201 (domestic), $63,327,201 (worldwide). The decline in popularity of the author's best known work, Twilight, likely contributed to this film adaptation's poor performance at the box office.
  • Hostage (2005) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $34,639,939 (domestic), $77,944,725 (worldwide). This Bruce Willis film was one of his worst openings for an action film since Last Man Standing.
  • Hostiles (2017) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $31.7 million. A relatively Acclaimed Flop which struggled in limited, and later, wide release, due to a very crowded market.
  • Hot Pursuit (2015) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $34,580,201 (domestic), $51,680,201 (worldwide). Lost more than $12,000,000. It opened far, far behind Avengers: Age of Ultron, which was on its second weekend, despite opening at number two ($13 million vs the latter's $77 million).
  • Hot Rod (2007) — Budget, $25.3 million. Box office, $14.3 million. The film debuts of Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and director Akiva Schaffer of the The Lonely Island. The film received mixed reviews for its script and humor, something the filmmakers predicted, and it fell by the wayside at the box office. It later became a Cult Classic.
  • The Hot Spot (1990) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,293,976. Charles Williams adapted his own novel Hell Hath No Fury into a screenplay in 1962, but it wasn't until years later that Dennis Hopper revived the project into this film. This ended up being the penultimate film of Hopper's directorial career. It died in a limited release topping 365 theaters even though critics liked it.
  • Hot to Trot (1988) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $6,436,211. Director Michael Dinner's first and final major movie (he's stuck to television since with one exception), a theatrical Star-Derailing Role for noted comedian Bobcat Goldthwait (it also became an Old Shame for him when he got a copy of the script in 2011), and a severe halter to entertainment featuring talking horses.
  • Hot Tub Time Machine 2 (2015) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $13,081,651. This case of Sequelitis has likely drained out the Hot Tub Time Machine movies after two pictures.
  • Hotel! (2001) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $29,813. In addition to mixed reviews, this film opened in theaters the day after the 9/11 attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and about 3,000 lives took place (one of the buildings destroyed at the Trade Center was ironically a Marriott hotel that was Tower #3, making the timing more uncomfortable). This all began the downward trend of Leaving Las Vegas director Mike Figgis's career.
  • Hotel Artemis (2018) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,969,598. Part of a string of flops for financially-troubled distributor Global Road.
  • The Hottie & the Nottie (2008) — Budget, $9,000,000. Box office, $27,696 (domestic), $1,596,232 (worldwide). A stillborn attempt to make Paris Hilton a movie star. It also derailed the careers of a lot of its staff, one of whom, Greg Wilson, got caught in a Serial Numbers Filed Off incident on America's Got Talent years later in a botched attempt to get back to the A list.
  • Hounddog (2006) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $131,961. The film was intended to be a break into more adult material for star Dakota Fanning; its failure delayed this by a couple of years. Most notable for the controversy over a rape scene involving Fanning's character, and the subsequent dismissal by critics of said scene as being pure Narm.
  • The House (2017) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $25,584,504 (domestic), $33,384,504 (worldwide). Its opening weekend was the worst debut for Will Ferrell's career as a lead actor.
  • House Arrest (1996) - Budget, $5 million. Box office, $7,032,782. Critics were highly unamused by this family comedy, while its mid-August release helped nail its chances of success shut.
  • House of Cards (1993) — Budget, $9.9 million. Box office, $322,871. This was filmed in 1991 but was shelved for two years after 20th Century Fox dropped the distribution rights, leading Miramax to pick it up. One of several career-derailing busts for Kathleen Turner and was also one of the films that prompted Italian film company Penta to get out of the Hollywood industry.
  • House Of D (2005) — Budget, $6,000,000. Box office, $388,532. This is the only time David Duchovny attempted to direct and write.
  • House of the Dead (2003) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $10,249,719 (domestic), $13,818,181 (worldwide). This was infamous director Uwe Boll's first major American video game film, and he, to the surprise of many a person, hates this movie and its screenplay, considering it to be the worst film he's done; the sequel, which went straight to cable, brought back the person who wrote that screenplay but Boll did not get involved at all with that film (said screenwriter, Mark Altman, never got involved with another film that wasn't low-budget or Direct to Video). It put a bit of a dent in Sega's endeavors outside the video game market (they wouldn't be serious about more movies based off one of their games until the the 2020 adaptation of their flagship franchise Sonic the Hedgehog, which was a solid success critically and financially and let to the greenlighting of a sequel) and it's also the third-to-last movie from producer/distributor Artisan Entertainment before they were swallowed by Lionsgate.
  • The House of the Devil (2009) — Budget, $900,000. Box office, $101,215. Despite acclaim from critics and horror fans.
  • The House Of The Spirits (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $6,265,311. The film version of Isabel Allende's novel was derided by critics for, among other reasons, casting mainly white actors as Latino characters and its episodic structure failing to translate on film.
  • House of Wax (2005) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $32,064,800 (domestic), $68,766,121 (worldwide). This extremely loose remake of the 1953 film earned notoriety as the film debut of Paris Hilton.
  • The House of Yes (1997) — Budget, $1,500,000. Box office, $626,057. Producer Robert Berger's cinematic career is virtually nonexistent past this film.
  • The House On Carroll Street (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $459,824. Ending up being the second worst box office results of a major film in 1988. The last theatrical film by screenwriter Walter Bernstein, who stuck to TV work, with his last credit being the creator of the 2011 British miniseries Hidden.
  • How Do You Know (2010) — Budget, $120 million ($100 million net after tax rebates). Box office, $48,668,907. The film served as a Star-Derailing Role for Jack Nicholson, as he never appeared in another film after 2010 and he would officially retire from acting in 2017, though he later signed on for an American remake of Toni Erdmann soon after. It also dealt serious damage to producer Paula Weinstein, who did not produce another film for four years, and James L. Brooks, while still being a producer, has not directed another movie after this one, plus production company Gracie Films (the company behind The Simpsons) did not put out another theatrical film for six years.
  • How I Got Into College (1989) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,642,239. This died a very quick death in limited release. It's now notable for being the acting debut of Tom Kenny.
  • How to Lose Friends & Alienate People (2008) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $19,151,797. This film version of Toby Young's memoir opened at number one in the UK but it fell apart soon after. Its US release saw it debut at number 19 and it went downhill from there. The critics gave it mixed to negative reviews.
  • Howard the Duck (1986) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $16,295,774 (domestic), $37,962,774 (worldwide). Allegedly, two Universal executives, Frank Price and Sidney Sheinberg, got into a fistfight while arguing over who was to blame for greenlighting the film; both of them deny this. Price's resignation, meanwhile, has been directly attributed to this same movie with the headline ""Duck" Cooks Price's Goose" (Price would resurface at his other major home, Columbia, a little while later). It is also a Career Killer for husband-and-wife team Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz (they bolted to Hawaii), a major setback to the careers of several of its stars (including Tim Robbins of The Shawshank Redemption & Mystic River fame, who got a Razzie nom, though he rebounded with Bull Durham), and is one of the few productions George Lucas has ever admitted regret over (this is one of two 1986 films that delivered a setback to his career, with Jim Henson's Labyrinth being the other). Also, a Squick scene with exposed duck breasts early in the movie (which was nicknamed "DuckTits" by The Nostalgia Critic) and a second with the titular character and a human woman almost having sex led to some backlash due to the film having a PG rating; both it and The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (a film NC actor Doug Walker also despised) led to further enforcement of the PG-13 rating. And to top it off, this notorious film, along with legal issues from Disney concerning Howard's physical resemblance to Donald Duck, kicked Howard into the bottom bracket of Marvel's comic book superstars for the next 30 years in addition to starting Marvel's movie business off on the wrong foot. Thankfully, a combination of a buyout by Disney after they traded dominant positions with DC in the 2000's (meaning no more legal snags between the two ducks), cameos in Guardians of the Galaxy and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, a new Howard comic series, and Fant4stic taking the "most infamous movie with Marvel's name on it" title away may mean a turnaround for the duck at last.
  • Hudson Hawk (1991) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $17,218,080. Numerous reports on the film's Troubled Production place the blame on Bruce Willis letting his ego run rampant, causing multiple re-shoots and editing wars. This was the final standalone Tristar Pictures film before they were merged with Columbia.
  • The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $2,816,518. The lowest grossing film of The Coen Brothers. It received mixed reviews and a very limited release but it's now a Cult Classic.
  • Hugo (2011) — Budget, $156 million (not counting marketing costs), $190 million (counting them). Box office, $73,864,507 (domestic), $185,770,160 (worldwide). This was adored by critics, was nominated for 11 Oscars and won five, but suffered from a poor marketing campaign, an unusually limited release and major competition during the Thanksgiving holidays. It didn't help that the film's budget ballooned due to it being shot entirely in 3D causing costs to spiral out of control.
  • Hulk (2003) — Budget, $137 million. Box office, $132,177,234 (domestic), $245,360,480 (worldwide). While it debuted to a massive $62 million on its opening weekend domestically, it dropped a legendary 70% on its second weekend due to very poor word-of-mouth, ultimately falling short of its production budget domestically.
  • The Human Centipede 3 (Final Sequence) (2015) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $14,562. Any ideas of more sequences in the Human Centipede movie series are unlikely after this attempt.
  • The Human Factor (1979) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $376,050. The film version of the Graham Greene novel was the final film for director Otto Preminger. Star Richard Attenborough turned his focus to directing after this film, beginning with his Oscar-winning smash Gandhi, and his next starring role was in Jurassic Park.
  • Human Nature (2002) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $705,308. Michel Gondry's directorial debut and his first collaboration with writer Charlie Kaufman. Critics compared it unfavorably to Kaufman's Being John Malkovich and it ended its limited release of 224 theaters after four weeks. Gondry's next film would fare much better with critics.
  • The Human Stain (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $24,863,804. Robert Benton directed only one other film after this adaptation of a Philip Roth novel was greeted with a lukewarm response by critics and audiences. Critics, in particular, lambasted the casting of Anthony Hopkins as the lead, a light-skinned African American man passing as white.
  • The Hunger (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,979,292. This is the only feature film screenplay credited to one Ivan Davis. (He has only written three other films, all made for TV, and no credits after 1987.)
  • The Hunt (2020) - Budget, $14 million. Box office, $5,812,500 (domestic), $6,562,393 (worldwide). The satirical action thriller was originally pulled from its original September 27th, 2019 release after a series of real-life shootings in the US and criticism over its apparent premise of liberals hunting right-wing extremists for sport, especially from US President Donald Trump (despite the film advocating against such violence), and later released on March 13th with the advertising focused on the controversy. Unfortunately, it arrived right as fears from the COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic exploded in the US, placing 5th in the worst domestic weekend since 1998. With theaters closing around the country to encourage social distancing, Universal made the bold move to release the film to home video early as a VOD rental only a week after its debut, along with The Invisible Man, Emma, and the then-upcoming Trolls: World Tour.
  • The Hunted (1995) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $6,609,661. J.F. Lawton didn't direct another film for 13 years.
  • The Hunted (2003) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $45,496,534. This film sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for a year due to its subject matter and the 9/11 attacks. When it did come out, it was dismissed as a Cliché Storm action thriller that played like a low-quality version of First Blood, though it earned a small following from action fans for its brutal knife-fighting sequences. Director William Friedkin did two more films after this.
  • Hunter Killer (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $15,767,460 (domestic). This experienced a protracted Development Hell, with much of the trouble due to production company Relativity's bankruptcy. It was subsequently dumped with Invisible Advertising and was trampled by its lackluster reviews and holdover Halloween.
  • The Hunters (1958) — Budget, $2,440,000. Box office, $2.1 million. This movie killed off Dick Powell's directing career, though he remained an executive until he died from cancer that he may have received from filming The Conqueror a few years earlier. He also ended his relationship with Fox.
  • The Hunting Party (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $7,644,409. Its widest release was in 329 theaters.
  • The Huntsman: Winter's War (2016) — Budget, $115 million. Box office, $48,390,190 (domestic), $164,989,338 million (worldwide). While it did well overseas, it needed that overseas gross to have any chance of being viable after it received considerably worse reviews than the first film and opened right after the acclaimed live-action remake of Walt Disney's classic The Jungle Book became king of the box office; Huntsman failed to dethrone it in any way (some of the reviews also accused the film of being an "angrier" version of Frozen (2013) and copying its sister plotline). Even if it manages to recoup its budget, it's anticipated to cost Universal $70 million in lost box office revenue, ensuring any chance of continuing their fairy tale universe would be dead. This is the first of two fairy tale sequel misfires for Joe Roth in 2016; it was quickly followed by Alice Through the Looking Glass, which Frozen/The Jungle Book maker Disney ironically made.
  • Hurlyburly (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,798,862. This is the last feature film Anthony Drazan has directed to date. (He's mostly done television work since then.)
  • Hurricane (1979) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $4,541,000. The second film version of James Norman Hall and Charles Nordhoff's novel The Hurricane, following John Ford's 1937 film, suffered a very Troubled Production and was greeted with an equally disastrous critical response. This is the final film for composer Nino Rota, who died two days before it came out.
  • The Hurricane Heist (2018) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $6,115,825 (domestic). The film was swept away from most theaters after two weeks.
  • Hurry Sundown (1967) — Budget, $3,785,000. Box office, $4,050,000 (domestic rentals). The film version of K.B. Gilden's novel was the first film to feature black actors to be filmed in the South. It was not a good time on the set, which dealt with, among other things, the Ku Klux Klan, and animosity between director Otto Preminger and Faye Dunaway, who made her film debut here. The end result was eviscerated by critics and Moral Guardians for its painfully-outdated racial and southern stereotypes and treatment of sexuality. Dunaway sued her way out of a five-film contract with Preminger; later that year, she bounced back with Bonnie and Clyde.
  • Hush 1998 (1998) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $13,583,690. The film was held from release after poor test screenings, which led to disastrous reshoots featuring Gwyneth Paltrow in a bad wig. The only feature film written and directed by Jonathan Darby, and an Old Shame for Jessica Lange.

Top