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We all love Disney's enormous selection of classic films and characters, but without these people, we might not have ever gotten all of those classics made! So here's a veritable pantheon of notable Disney staff, past and present, for your reading pleasure.

Compare to Noteworthy Fleischer Staff, Noteworthy Looney Tunes Staff and Noteworthy MGM Cartoon Staff.

Names boldened are Disney Legends who received the award while still alive; names boldened and italicized are Disney Legends who received the award posthumously.

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Noteworthy Disney Staff:

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    A 
  • Aaron Blaise: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; supervising animator of Rajah in Aladdin, Yao and the Ancestors in Mulan, and young Nala in The Lion King . Co-director of Brother Bear.
  • Aaron Springer: One of the creators and showrunners of the multi-award winning Mickey Mouse (2013) rebooted cartoon series.
  • Abbe Raven: The chairman of the A&E network, which is a collaboration between Disney/ABC and Hearst Corporation.
  • Abbey Konowitch: General manager of Walt Disney Records.
  • Adam Green: Head of animation on the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece, Get a Horse!.
  • Al Dempster: Animator and background artist who worked with Walt during The Golden Age of Animation, up until Walt's death; backrground supervisor of The Jungle Book.
  • Al Eugster: A former Fleischer veteran who migrated to Disney and specialized in animating the Donald Duck cartoons. He eventually returned to the Fleischer studio in 1940.
  • Al Konetzni: Helped develop and market Disney merchandise.
  • Al Milotte: Husband of Elma Milotte, producer for various Disney nature documentaries.
  • Al Taliaferro: Worked on the Donald Duck comic strip.
  • Al Zinnen: Animator on several Disney Classics.
  • Alan Bergman: President of the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Alan Fine: President of Marvel Entertainment.
  • Alan Horn: Succeeded Rich Ross as studio head, he is the current incumbent in the position.
  • Alan N Braverman: Senior executive vice president and general counsel for Disney.
  • Alan Wagner: The founder of the Disney Channel.
  • Albert Hurter: Animator and character designer. An experienced silent era animator, he joined Disney in 1931 and became the studio's first "inspirational artist" (what we now call a concept artist). Designed for various Silly Symphony and Mickey Mouse shorts, Snow White and Pinocchio.
  • Alex Kupershmidt: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; he animated Stitch in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Alfred L Werker: Hollywood director who was tapped by Walt to helm the first live-action/animation hybrid film from the studio, the experimental and touring The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Amy Rabins: One of the founders of Disney's It's A Laugh Productions.
  • Andre Fenley: Assistant supervising sound editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Andre Vanneste: Helped publish Disney comics in Europe.
  • Andrea Favilli: The creator of the Disney Legends award.
  • Andrea Romano: Voice director who worked on several Disney Afternoon cartoons.
  • Andreas Deja: Started at Disney as a concept artist for The Black Cauldron, animated Mickey in The Prince and the Pauper, and was the supervising animator for King Triton, Gaston, Jafar, Scar, Hercules, Lilo, Mama Odie, and, most recently, Tigger. Currently, he deals with some independent short film animation and maintains his own blog.
  • Andrew Millstein: Current president of Walt Disney Animation Studios.
  • Andrew Probert: A tech designer on Tron and worked 4 years as a Show Designer at Walt Disney Imagineering.
  • Andrew Stanton: The director of Finding Nemo and its sequel Finding Dory, Pixar's masterpiece WALL•E, and John Carter.
  • Andy Mooney: The former chairman of Disney Consumer Products and the person who pushed for the creation of the Disney Princess franchise after attending a Disney On Ice show, now the CEO of Fender Guitars.
  • Angel Angelopoulos: Helped market Disney in Greece and the Mediterranean countries, establish the California Institute for the Arts.
  • Ann Daly: Executive in charge of Walt Disney Home Video. She left the company in 1997 and was with Jeffrey Katzenberg and DreamWorks Animation until 2016, when both had to walk away for the most part after DWA's sale to Comcast/Universal.
  • Anne Sweeney: Longtime Disney executive of the Disney Channel, Disney/ABC, and Disney Media. She stepped down in 2014 to become a television director.
  • Annie Guenther: Animator who reportedly inserted a shot of a bare-chested woman in a flying scene from The Rescuers; this shot was edited when it was discovered on the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection VHS version of the film.
  • Anthony De Rosa: Lead animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Antonio Bertini: Helped market Disney in Italy.
  • Armand Bigle: Helped market Disney in Europe and many other countries.
  • Armand Palivoda: Helped distribute Disney films in Switzerland.
  • Arnoldo Mondadori: Published and managed Disney's Topolino magazine in Italy.
  • Arthur "Art" Babbitt: Most known for turning Goofy into the character we all know and love. He also animated such characters as the Wicked Queen in Snow White, Geppetto in Pinocchio, the mushrooms in the Nutcracker Suite scene of Fantasia, and the stork in Dumbo—as well as contributed to the disastrous 1941 Disney studio strike, which led to his termination and feud with Walt and his family that went on until the 90's.
  • Art Linkletter: Commentator for the opening day ceremonies for Disneyland who returned for the park's 50th anniversary.
  • Art Stevens: Major Disney animator who started with Fantasia and eventually co-directed The Rescuers and The Fox and the Hound before retiring.
  • Arthur Hiller: The director did at least two films for Disney, the second of which was his final major film, Burn Hollywood Burn. This film killed both his career (along with Joe Eszterhas's) and the Alan Smithee alias, which he took in a botched attempt to disown it.
  • Arthur Schmidt: The editor of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Rocketeer, and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.
  • Ava DuVernay: Director of A wrinkle in Time.

    B 
  • Baker Bloodworth: Associate producer on Pocahontas.
  • Barbara Walters: Regular contributor to ABC.
  • Barry Cook: One of the co-directors of Mulan.
  • Barry Josephson: One of the producers of Enchanted.
  • Barry Sonnenfeld: Hollywood producer who co-produced Enchanted with Josephson.
  • Bart Decrem: General manager of Disney Mobile.
  • Basil Davidovich: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Becky Fallberg: Longtime Disney member, manager of the Ink and Paint Department from 1975 to 1986.
  • Ben Burtt: Sound designer for the Star Wars movie and the man who gave the vocal effects to the character of WALL•E.
  • Ben Donovan: Co-founder and president of the Maker Studios online company.
  • Ben Lyons: TV personality who took over the At The Movies program from Disney for its next-to-last year of broadcast.
  • Ben Mankiewicz: Radio personality who took over the At The Movies program for its semifinal year alongside Lyons and later co-hosts the Treasures From The Disney Vault program on Turner Classic Movies with Leonard Maltin for the first several broadcasts of the block (Maltin eventually hosted the block solo).
  • Ben Sharpsteen: Was an early animator for Disney, and became a sequence director on Snow White, co-director on Pinocchio, director of Dumbo, production supervisor on Fantasia, Fun and Fancy Free, Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland.
  • Ben Sherwood: President of Disney-ABC Domestic Television.
  • Ben Stein: The host and main opponent in Win Ben Stein's Money, which was made by Disney's Valleycrest Productions unit (the production company for Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, on Comedy Central.
  • Bill Anderson: Produced a handful of Disney live-action films, and served on Disney's board of directors.
  • Bill Damaschke: The longtime DreamWorks Animation supremo and Chief Creative Officer until their rut in The New Ten's started out as an office assistant on Pocahontas (which he was credited on; it's the only time he worked with Disney before he became a major opponent to them) prior to joining DreamWorks the year that film was released, where he would be until 2015.
  • Bill Ernest: Managing director of Disney Parks & Resorts Asia.
  • Bill Justice: Animator on some of the classic Disney cartoons.
  • Bill Kelly: Writer who wrote Enchanted.
  • Bill Martin: Imagineer who contributed to the designs of many attractions, including Sleeping Beauty Castle, Snow White’s Adventures, Peter Pan’s Flight, and more.
  • Bill Mechanic: Major player in Walt Disney Home Video; he had some input in the critical Walt Disney Classics series that saw the Disney Animation library finally reach the private home market. He left Disney in 1993 and became an independent producer.
  • Bill Melendez: Most famous for creating the Peanuts TV specials, he worked at Disney in the early 40s until he left due to the animators' strike. He went on to work for Warner Bros. and UPA before setting up his own shop.
  • Bill Peet: Bill began his Disney career as an In-Betweenernote , and got recognized for his original characters designs, working his way up to storyboard artist, and eventually becoming a Story Man in his own right, working on full-length films (such as The Jungle Book (1967)) and shorts before a personal falling out with Walt Disney led to Bill leaving the company and eventually becoming an acclaimed children's author.
  • Bill Perkins: Art director on Aladdin.
  • Bill Roberts: A sequence director for The Three Caballeros.
  • Bill Walsh: Comic author who was a producer and writer for a multitude of Disney Studio Classics and who also wrote a few Mickey Mouse strips here and there.
  • Blaine Gibson: Inbetweener and assistant animator working on most features through 101 Dalmatians. Later became known as a key sculptor and modelmaker at Disneyland and other subsequent parks/resorts.
  • Bob Bacon: Former Disney executive; now the boss of Alpha Group's Alpha Animation.
  • Bob Allen: Vice president of Walt Disney World from 1977 to 1987.
  • Bob Booth: Disney Imagineer who helped set up the Manufacturing and Production Organization, or MAPO, which was responsible for research and development for Disney productions, which he led from 1965 to 1985.
  • Bob Broughton: Camera effects artist to nearly every Disney motion picture from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1937 to The Black Hole in 1979
  • Bob Chapek: Succeeded Tom Staggs as the boss of Walt Disney Parks & Resorts when Staggs became president and Chief Operating Officer.
  • Bob Clampett: He didn't work in Disney's animation department (although he wanted to), but he and his grandma did help make one of the earliest Mickey Mouse dolls. He and Walt Disney would become friends later in life.
  • Bob Gurr: Imagineer who designed most of the ride vehicles at Disneyland.
  • Bob Hathcock: The director and one of the producers of Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp, which had a key plot point recycled into Aladdin.
  • Bob Iger: Originally the boss of ABC, he was promoted to the President and Chief Operating Officer position after Wells's death, Katzenberg's failure to claim the position, and Michael Ovitz's failure to hold onto it left the COO position open for Iger; he subsequently succeeded Eisner on short notice and immediately began negotiations to buy Pixar and bring Steve Jobs and John Lasseter into the full Disney fold. He succeeded, and under Iger's watch, Disney also bought Marvel and then Lucasfilm, and expanded their theme park business. Iger will retire in 2021.
  • Bob Matheison: Helped develop Walt Disney World and create its executive training program.
  • Bob Moore: Helped animate several classic Disney films, later worked in publicity and marketing.
  • Bob Peterson: Pixar storyboard artist who co-directed Up and who came up with the original concept for The Good Dinosaur, which he originally directed.
  • Bob Roath: Associate producer for Andrew Stanton's John Carter and Finding Dory.
  • Bob Schiffer: Head of Disney's makeup department from 1968 to 2001.
  • Bob Tzudiker: One of the screenwriters of Tarzan and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Bob Weis: President of Walt Disney Imagineering.
  • Bob Weinstein: Brother of Harvey and the co-founder of Miramax/Dimension Films, who had a distribution deal with Disney as set up by a pre-ouster Jeffrey Katzenberg from 1994 to 2009.
  • Bob Wickersham: The animator for the Mickey Mouse cartoon Thru the Mirror. (He also directed Oscar-nominated short Imagination for Columbia.)
  • Bonnie Arnold: Animation vet who produced Toy Story and Tarzan. She moved to DreamWorks Animation in the mid 2000s alongside Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois and produced the How to Train Your Dragon films, becoming co-president of their feature animation field following the firing of Bill Damaschke.
  • Bolhem Bouchiba: Supervising animator for "evil genius" Dr. Jumba, the creator of Stitch in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Brad Bird: A graduate of CalArts' first generation, Brad's tenure at Disney was brief before going to have an illustrious career working on The Simpsons and The Iron Giant. He became director of The Incredibles, Ratatouille,Tomorrowland, and Incredibles 2.
  • Brad Lewis: Producer who was the producer of Ratatouille and a co-director of Cars 2. He had previously worked from DreamWorks Animation and moved on from Pixar to be associated with Warner Animation Group.
  • Bran Ferrin: Former president of research and development at Walt Disney Imagineering after his company was acquired by Disney in 1993. His team created ABC's curved ticker display in Times Square.
  • Brenda Chapman: Animator who has worked on-and-off for Disney, first as a story artist on Beauty And The Beast and The Lion King, and then as a creative force at Pixar following a stint at DreamWorks; she directed Brave, but transferred to ILM to get out of Disney, only to transfer back to DreamWorks when Disney bought ILM that month (although she finished up work she did at ILM).
  • Bret Iwan: Took over as the voice of Mickey Mouse from Wayne Allwine when he died, and voices the character in every incarnation now except for Paul Rudish's cartoons.
  • Brian Cummings: Announcer on Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Brian Fee: A member of Pixar's senior creative team.
  • Brian Smits: Software engineer at Pixar who who received an In Memoriam honor in Inside Out.
  • Brigham Taylor: Co-producer of the 2016 version of Walt Disney's Classic The Jungle Book alongside director Jon Favreau.
  • Broose Johnson: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; two of the characters he animated are Chien-Po and Ling from Mulan.
  • The Brothers Chaps: Did writing for a few Disney Cartoons (Mostly Wander over Yonder and Gravity Falls), as well as made their own series of shorts for Disney XD called Two More Eggs
  • Bruce Broughton: Composed the score for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Bruce Rosenblum: President of business operations at Disney/ABC Television Group as of 2016.
  • Bruce Vaughn: Former Chief Creative Executive at Disney Imagineering.
  • Bruce W. Smith: Animator for various feature, television and theme park projects; animated Pacha in The Emperor's New Groove, Dr. Facillie in The Princess and the Frog and pulled double duty on Winnie the Pooh (2011) animating both Rabbit and Piglet. Created the Disney Channel original series The Proud Family, the first animated series to star a black family.
  • Bruno Maglione: President of Marvel International.
  • Bruno Tonioli: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Buddy Baker: Composed over two-hundred scores for films, shorts, and Disneyland attractions.
  • Burny Mattinson: Animator who started with Robin Hood and directed The Great Mouse Detective.
  • Burt Gillett: Stuck with Disney in the early years, known for directing Mickey's Orphans, The Three Little Pigs, and Lonesome Ghosts. At one point he left Disney to work on Van Beuren Studios "Rainbow Parade" cartoons, but returned as soon as the studio shut down. He worked at the Walter Lantz studio in the late 30s before retiring from the business.
  • Byron Howard: The eventual co-director of Bolt and then Tangled and Zootopia.

    C 
  • Carl Bongirno: Imagineer who oversaw the growth and development of Disney's theme parks through the 1980s.
  • Carl Barks: Started as an inbetweener and storyman, but later went on to work of his beloved Donald Duck comic books, as well as create Scrooge McDuck and the Disney Ducks Comic Universe.
  • Carl W Stalling: The man who composed the score for Steamboat Willie, and the Trope Namer for Mickey Mousing. Later worked with Warner Bros. on the Looney Tunes cartoons.
  • Carrie Ann Inaba: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Carson Van Osten: Comic artist.
  • Channing Dungey: President of ABC's drama division who became the president of ABC Entertainment Group on short notice in 2016.
  • Charles Boyer: Drew art for Disneyland.
  • Charles Gibson: A major anchor on Good Morning America.
  • Charles Jarrott: Director who oversaw three Dark Age live-action Disney films, including The Last Flight of Noah's Ark and Condorman.
  • 'Nick' Nichols: He began as an animator on the shorts and had most of the responsibility on the Pluto cartoons and was also the supervising animator for the Coachman in Pinocchio. He later went to work at Hanna-Barbera, where he directed the animated version of Charlotte's Web.
  • Charles Wolcott: One of the music composers for The Three Caballeros.
  • Charlie Ridgway: Major player in coordinating media coverage of Walt Disney World, including a Donald Duck 50th birthday show. He died on Christmas 2016.
  • Chen Yi Chang: Character design supervisor for Mulan.
  • Cheryl Butler: Started off as a 19-year old merchandise cashier in the Emporium gift shop on opening day (October 1, 1971) at Walt Disney World in Florida, and as a result was the first Disney cast member to sell a guest a souvenir on that day. Worked her way into merchandise management, specializing in innovating and reorganizing how Disney merchandise was advertised, presented (and conceived of in the first place). Two years before she officially retired, she "demoted" herself — and took a massive pay cut in the process — from management in order to return to being a sales associate. She wanted to spend the last years of her career interacting with Disney guests, and that's just what she did.
  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra: The orchestra responsible for the music of Fantasia 2000.
  • Chris Buck: Longtime animator who co-directed Tarzan and Frozen.
  • Chris Harrison: The host of ABC's The Bachelor series and the current host of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.
  • Chris Meledandri: Former Disney executive who ran Dawn Steel Pictures and co-produced Cool Runnings, the last film with John Candy to be released during Candy's life. He moved to Fox and stayed there until 2007, and then founded Illumination Entertainment at Comcast/Universal.
  • Chris Sanders: One of the quirkiest people to have worked at Disney, Chris Sanders was one of the key animators of the Marahute's flight in The Rescuers Down Under. He later went on to contribute heavily to Mulan, and co-wrote and co-directed Lilo & Stitch with Dean DeBlois. He was originally the director of Bolt, but was fired by John Lasseter and moved on to DreamWorks Animation, where he ended up co-directing How to Train Your Dragon to massive acclaim, followed by The Croods. He voiced and continues to voice the character of Stitch whenever he appears,note  such as the Kingdom Hearts series,note  Kinect: Disneyland Adventures and Disney Infinity. His most recent film, The Call of the Wild, was released by Disney after their purchase of 20th Century Studios, as the first film under that banner after the company's acquisition of 20th Century Fox banner.
  • Chris Williams: Replaced Sanders as the director of Bolt and one of the co-directors for Big Hero 6.
  • Christine Mc Carthy: The current Chief Financial Officer of Disney, succeeding Jay Rasulo.
  • Christophe Beck: Music composer who has several Disney movies and shorts to his name.
  • Chuck Abbott: One of Disneyland's foremost Attractions Hosts
  • Chuck Jones: Had a very brief stay at Disney's with Ward Kimball after Warner Bros. briefly shut down their animation studio. While he respected Walt, he couldn't stand the lack of creative control there that he was used to at his old studio, and as soon as Warner Bros. reopened their studio, Chuck was gone. The only other work he did with Disney was on the "Dueling Pianos" sequence in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, but he hated the final result. He has, however, praised Aladdin as the funniest animated film created.
  • Cicely Rigdon: Supervisor of Guest Relations at Disneyland, later helped lead and develop the Disneyland Ambassador Program.
  • Clarence Nash: The voice of Donald Duck until his death in 1985. He was replaced by animator Tony Anselmo.
  • Clark Spencer: Producer of Wreck-It Ralph and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Claude Coats: Background painter, who worked on Snow White, Fantasia, Dumbo, Saludos Amigos, Make Mine Music!, Lady and the Tramp, Cinderella, and Peter Pan. Became a notable Imagineer during Disneyland's construction as a ride developer. Known for being very tall but a Gentle Giant.
  • Claudio Chiaromonte: Executive VP and managing director of The Walt Disney Company.
  • Clay Morrow: One of the creators and showrunners of the multi-award winning Mickey Mouse (2013) rebooted cartoon series.
  • Clyde Geronimi: Originally with the Lantz studio, he defected to Disney in 1931 and ascended to directing shorts, then becoming a co-director on the Disney Animated Classics from Cinderella to 101 Dalmatians (he actually walked away from Disney in 1959). He then worked on the Spider Man cartoon in the 60's before retiring.
  • Courtney Holt: The Chief Strategy Officer at Maker Studios.
  • Craig Gerber : Worked as an apprentice writer for the Disney Fairies franchise before creating the Disney Junior shows Sofia the First and Elena of Avalor
  • Craig Reylea: Senior Vice President for global marketing of Disney Interactive Studios from 2007 to 2013.
  • Cy Young: Major animator at Disney until the 1941 strike; he resigned for his part in it and to join the Air Force. Cy committed suicide in 1964.
  • Cyril Edgar: Helped market Disney in the United Kingdom.
  • Cyril James: Managing director of Disney in the United Kingdom and Europe.
  • Cynthia Hariss: Succeeded Paul Pressler as the boss of the Disney Theme Parks for a few years.
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    D 
  • Dan Buckley: Publisher and chief operating officer at Marvel Worldwide.
  • Dan Fogelman: The screenwriter for Cars and Tangled.
  • Dan Mac Manus: Effects animator, working on most of the Disney features during the period between 1935 until 1973. Also wrote the story for the short The Trial of Donald Duck.
  • Dan Molina: Major editor at Disney/Pixar; one of his works is Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Dan Rounds: Animator who is the producer of The Prince and the Pauper in 1990, the first Mickey Mouse-centric cartoon after The Simple Things in 1953 and the only one made during Frank Wells and Jeffrey Katzenberg's tenures.
  • Dan Scanlon: Pixar employee who directed Monsters University.
  • Dana Terrace: Creator of the The Owl House, worked as director, storyboard artist and animator on Gravity Falls and Ducktales 2017.
  • Daniel Gerson: One of the screenwriters for Big Hero 6, and he worked on Monsters Inc. and Monsters University. Gerson died of cancer in 2016, a year that also claimed Carrie Fisher and many others.
  • Danny Troob: One of Disney's most prolific orchestra conductors/arrangers starting with Beauty And The Beast.
  • Daron Nefcy: The creator of the animated series Star vs. the Forces of Evil.
  • Dave Burgess: Disney Renaissance animator; he worked on Tarzan and Hunchback (the latter had him as the supervising animator of the Archdeacon).
  • Dave Filoni: Supervising director & executive producer of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Star Wars Rebels, and all upcoming Star Wars animation projects.
  • Dave Hollis: Publicity manager and vice president of Disney's theatrical endeavors.
  • Dave Michener: An animator during Walt's time. He also co-directed The Great Mouse Detective with Burny Mattinson, John Musker and Ron Clements.
  • Dave Smith: The first archivist for the Walt Disney Archives.
  • Dave Stevens: The creator of The Rocketeer graphic novel and a creative consultant for the film adaptation.
  • Dave Wasson: Storyboard artist and a primary writer for the Mickey Mouse (2013) series; he also cameos in a few of these cartoons. Also the executive producer of Star vs. the Forces of Evil and was the director for The Buzz on Maggie
  • David Agnew: President of Walt Disney Records.
  • David Hall: Storyman who produced horrific story sketches and paintings for Alice in Wonderland and a few for Peter Pan.
  • David Hand: The director of many of Disney's animal cartoons, and was the director of Snow White and Bambi. He would later go over to Europe to make the obscure, short lived Animaland cartoon series.
  • David Hartley: The producer, arranger, and conductor of the "Perfect World" song, which opens and closes The Emperor's New Groove. Also arranged vocals for the credits song, "My Funny Friend and Me".
  • David Hoberman: Producer who helmed a handful of Disney films; one of the most noteworthy is 2011's The Muppets. He also co-created Monk, which Disney had a hand in.
  • David Maisel: An associate of Michael Ovitz who followed him to Disney and then out. He took over Marvel in 2005 and facilitated their acquisition by Disney, at which point he left.
  • David Newman: Composed the soundtrack to Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp.
  • David Perry: Game designer for Virgin Interactive who worked with Disney on the Sega Genesis version of Aladdin, which involved Musker, Clements and Katzenberg and was the third highest selling game on the system after the first two Sonic the Hedgehog games, and was involved with The Jungle Book as well; Perry later founded Shiny Interactive.
  • David Reynolds: Screenwriter for The Emperor's New Groove; had previously provided additional screenwriting for Tarzan.
  • David Schrader: Executive vice president of the Disney Theatrical Group, who administers the Broadway shows.
  • David Stainton: Former animation executive at Disney. He got replaced by Lasseter and Catmull.
  • David Weimers: Co-producer of DuckTales past its first season.
  • David Zippel: Alan Menken's lyricist on Hercules and the "Star-Spangled Man" musical number in Marvel's Masterpiece Captain America: The First Avenger.
  • Dean Cundey: Cinematographer for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and The Parent Trap remake, and directed Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves, which is his only directing job and the third and final Honey film; this one was sent Direct to Video, was the first live-action Direct to Video film from Disney, and was the last appearance of Rick Moranis in a live-action role to date.
  • Dean DeBlois: Chris Sanders's partner who co-directed Lilo & Stitch and followed Sanders to DreamWorks Animation, directing the How to Train Your Dragon films for that company (the first with Sanders, the second and third solo).
  • Debbie Mc Clellan: The vice president of The Muppets Studio.
  • Deems Taylor: The host and one of the main helmers of Walt Disney's Masterpiece Fantasia. His voice recordings for the movie have sadly been lost; the remaining traces of it are on the 1991 Walt Disney Classics VHS and Laserdisc version of the film. note 
  • Del Connell: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Denise Ream: The producer of The Good Dinosaur.
  • Dev Ross: Voice director who worked with Disney on Chip 'n' Dale Rescue Rangers.
  • Diane Sawyer: A major anchor at ABC News.
  • Dick Cook: Marketing mastermind who succeeded Peter Schneider as studio head, he spearheaded a revival of Disney's movie business. He now sits on Legendary Pictures's board and started his own studio a la Katzenberg and Roth in 2015.
  • Dick Huemer: Former Fleischer veteran who became a prominent animator, storyboard artist and writer for the studio throughout the decades. He even directed two shorts; "The Whalers" and "Goofy and Wilbur".
  • Dick Lundy: A very skilled animator and director, created the character of Donald Duck and directed several of his shorts. He would later go on work at MGM's cartoon department on the Barney Bear and Droopy cartoons, and after that went to Walter Lantz's studio to work on their Andy Panda, Musical Miniatures and Woody Woodpecker short subjects. He would contribute animation to Ralph Bakshi's Fritz the Cat and several Hanna-Barbera projects later on.
  • Dick Nunis: The boss of the Disney theme parks throughout the Dark Years, his success with the parks made him one of the few executives to survive the 1984 management shift.
  • Didier Fouret: Helped publish Disney works in France.
  • Dodie Roberts: Animator for Fantasia, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty.
  • Don Bluth: Got his start as an assistant animator on Sleeping Beauty, did animation for Robin Hood and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, and was the directing animator for The Rescuers. Directed The Small One and was animation director on Pete's Dragon (1977) before leaving.
  • Don Chaffey: The live-action director of Pete's Dragon.
  • Don Da Gradi: Screenwriter of several films, most notably Mary Poppins.
  • Don Edgren: Imagineer who worked on structural design during construction of Walt Disney theme parks.
  • Don Escen: Assistant to Roy O. Disney, in charge of Disney's financial affairs.
  • Don Graham: A critical figure in the development of Disney animation, Graham hosted "Action Analysis" classes daily for animators at Disney from 1932 to 1941, not only giving them formal art training, but also having them analyze live action film at different speeds, as well as critique their own shorts as a means of how to improve them. He would later publish his own art book, "Composing Pictures", which is highly valued by many veteran animators.
  • Don Griffith: Layout artist on the Disney films from Victory Through Air Power to The Black Cauldron.
  • Don Hahn: Began working for Disney on Pete's Dragon. He also worked as associate producer on the animated sequences in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and later produced Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King (1994), Fantasia 2000, The Emperor's New Groove, and Atlantis: The Lost Empire, and the executive producer of Waking Sleeping Beauty, the Disneynature movies, and the live-action Disney Animated Canon remake movies.
  • Don Hall: One of the co-directors for Big Hero 6.
  • Don Harper: The conductor of the Disneynature jingle and Tarzan.
  • Don Lusk: A prominent Disney animator, and notably one of the last surviving Golden Age Disney artists—as of 2015, he is 102 years old!
  • Don Mink: One of the founders of Disney's It's A Laugh Productions.
  • Don Rosa: Noted writer for the Donald Duck comics.
  • Donald W Ernst: The primary editor for Ralph Bakshi's films in the 70's who moved from Bakshi to Walt Disney Feature Animation after the Management Shift and became a major helmer for Aladdin and Fantasia 2000.
  • Donn Tatum: A previous boss of Disney after Walt's death. He served as Director Emeritus of the company for the last year of his life.
  • Dorothea Redmond: Participated in building and interior design at Disneyland and Walt Disney World.
  • Dorothy Mc Kim: The producer of the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse! and other Disney Shorts Classics.
  • Doug Sweetland: Former Pixar employee and star who directed, wrote and starred in their mini classic Presto, which became the name of one of their animation systems.

    E 
  • Earl Felton: Screenwriter on 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.
  • Earl Hurd: One of the silent cartoon animator's final works was Walt Disney's Masterpiece Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; he died three years after that film's theatrical release.
  • Ed Catmull: One of Pixar's notable members, he's the current head of animation at Disney.
  • Ed Gombert: A longtime animator at Disney. In addition to working on a lot of the Disney Renaissance movies, he's also the author of the notorious fabricated memo written in Peter Schneider's name that changed the names of all the Disney Animated Classics in protest of The Great Mouse Detective's renaming, but he got his department in trouble instead when the bogus memo got to Jeffrey Katzenberg's desk and Jeffrey thought it was real.
  • Ed Grier: Longtime Disney executive who was president of the Disneyland Resort until 2009.
  • Ed Love: An animator for Disney, later went on to work for Walter Lantz (animated the earliest incarnations of Buzz Buzzard), MGM and Hanna-Barbera.
  • Edward Meck: Helped advertise the newly-opened Disney theme park.
  • Elissa Margolis: The Senior Vice President and General Manager of The Disney Store.
  • Elma Milotte: Wife of Al Milotte, producer of various Disney nature documentaries.
  • Emery Hawkins: Sporadically worked at Disney for very short periods of time. Did some animation for Dumbo.
  • Enrico Casarosa: The director of the Pixar Mini Classic La Luna.
  • Erdman Penner: The writer of Sleeping Beauty and the Mini Classic cartoon The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Eric Coleman: Senior vice president of Disney Television Animation.
  • Eric Goldberg: After working for Richard Williams and running a commercials studio in England, came to Disney as supervising animator on Genie in Aladdin. Later animated Phil in Hercules, Louis in The Princess and the Frog and Rabbit in Winnie the Pooh (2011). Co-directed Pocahontas and directed the "Rhapsody in Blue" and "Carnaval of the Animals" segments on Fantasia 2000. Briefly worked at Warner Bros. as animation director on Looney Tunes: Back in Action, which ended up being a "That's All, Folks!" scenario for Warner Animation for about a decade. He recently headed the 2D animation for the short Get a Horse! and animated Maui's living tattoo in Moana.
  • Eric Radomski: Senior vice president at Marvel Television.
  • Ernest Terrazas: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Ernie Nordli: Animator who worked as layout artist on Dumbo, Fantasia, Sleeping Beauty, and 101 Dalmatians.
  • Esmond Cardon 'Card' Walker: Major Disney executive who oversaw the studio during its Dark Years. He remained an adviser to the studio until his death in 2005, and his last 6 years were as Director Emeritus.
  • Eyvind Earle: Background artist and color stylist on such films as Peter Pan and Lady and the Tramp. He is also credited with giving the 1959 animated feature Sleeping Beauty its medieval look. Earle first rose to prominence at the studio in 1953, when an animated short that he worked on, "Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom", won both an Academy Award and a Cannes Film Festival Award.

    F 
  • Fabian Dib: The captain of the Disney Wonder ship.
  • Felix Arvid Ulf Kjellberg: The Let's Player known as PewDiePie (who is THE most subscribed-to channel on Youtube) was signed with Maker Studios, which is a Disney Consumer Products company, until February 2017, when he released nine videos that were perceived as anti-Semitic that led to both Disney and YouTube Red severing ties with him.
  • Ferrell Barron: The producer of Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Floyd Gottfredson: Got his start as an early Disney animator, but moved on to being the top artist for the Mickey Mouse comic strip for 45 years.
  • Floyd Huddleston: Co-composed the "Love" song from Robin Hood.
  • Floyd Norman: One of the first African-Americans hired by the studio. To this day he still works at Disney as a storyboard artist.
  • Ford Beebe: One of the writers for Fantasia.
  • Fox Carney: Manager of the Animation Research Library.
  • Frank Armitage: Noted Disney architect and Imagineer; he passed away on Jan 7, 2016.
  • Frank Churchill: Music composer during the 1930's and early '40's. Composed songs for Snow White, Alice in Wonderland Dumbo and Bambi.
  • Frank Gifford: Husband of Kathie Lee Gifford who worked on Disney's Wide World of Sports.
  • Frank Marshall: Lucasfilm/Spielberg collaborator who worked on most of the Star Wars/Indiana Jones films, M. Night Shyamalan's films The Sixth Sense and Signs, and several Studio Ghibli films.
  • Frank Wells: President and Chief Operating Officer from 1984 to 1994. Said to have been the voice of reason amongst the executives of the time. Known for wanting to climb the highest mountains in the world. Tragically died in a helicopter crash in 1994, which was the last straw that led to the split with those executives; Well's death eventually ended both Jeffrey Katzenberg and his boss/rival Michael Eisner's careers at Disney along with their decades-long relationship.
  • Fred Joerger: Created many scale models of film sets and theme park attractions, including Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle, and later served as field art director for EPCOT Center.
  • Fred Moore: Animator on Snow White and credited with updating Mickey Mouse's appearance in the late 1930s. Moore also served as an animator or directing animator for most of the animated features from Snow White to Peter Pan. Worked at the Walter Lantz studio for a brief period in the late 1940's.
  • Fred Wolf: Supervising producer of Ducktales for its first season; more well known for bringing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1987) to television.
  • Friz Freleng: Was an animator for Walt on the Oswald shorts.
  • Frode Fjellheim: Norwegian musician who composed the opening music to Frozen.

    G 

    H-I 
  • Hal Ambro: A major animator during Walt's time; from 1946's Make Mine Music! to 1967's The Jungle Book (1967), he worked on all the classic films including Cinderella, Peter Pan, Lady and the Tramp and Mary Poppins.
  • Hamilton 'Ham' Luske: Was the man who brought several of the Nine Old Men into Disney, and one of the directors of Lady And The Tramp.
  • Harlan Ellison: Worked as a script-writer. For less than one day. The story of his rather abrupt firing before his first day at work was even over has become a legend among both Disney fans and science fiction fans in general.
  • Hugh Attwooll: Worked on a number of live-action Disney films.
  • Hugh Harman And Rudolph Ising: Two of Disney's top animators on the Oswald shorts. They would later go on to found the Warner Bros. animation studio, as well as MGM's animation department. They would also occasionally outsource some of their inkers and animators to Disney to help them out.
  • Harold D Schuster: Hollywood director who was one of the helmers of Disney's hybrid classic So Dear To My Heart.
  • Harold Young: A sequence director for The Three Caballeros.
  • Harper Goff: Art director for 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, later assisted in designing Disneyland.
  • Harriet Burns: First woman Imagineer.
  • Harrison 'Buzz' Price: Research economist who was crucial in the siting and development of Disneyland and Walt Disney World; CEO Michael Eisner called him as being "as much responsible for the success of the Walt Disney Co. as anybody except Walt Disney himself."
  • Harry Arends: Writer and producer for the Disney Sing-Along Songs home video series.
  • Harry Clork: One of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Harvey Weinstein: The boss of Miramax Films, who worked with Disney for 15 years and distributed several cinema classics such as Pulp Fiction.
  • Hayao Miyazaki: Acclaimed Japanese Anime maker and friend of John Lasseter. He was one of the main minds at Studio Ghibli, which Disney has a distribution deal with; all of Miyazaki's films are handled in America by the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Hendel Butoy: One of the directors of Fantasia 2000; also co-directed The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Helene Hahn: Feared attorney who represented Disney during Katzenberg's tenure at the company; also known as "Attila The Hahn".
  • Henry Andersson: Current captain of the Disney Dream ship.
  • Henry Jackman: Music composer for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Henry Mancini: Wrote the music and three songs for The Great Mouse Detective.
  • Henry Selick: Associate of Tim Burton's who departed Disney with him. He worked with Burton on several other projects for Disney.
  • Herb Ryman: A talented concept artist who created the first designs of Disneyland. He also served as an art director on Dumbo and Fantasia. He developed artwork and designs for the other Disney resorts until his death in 1989.
  • Hideo Amemiya: Served in executive positions at Disney resorts in Japan.
  • Hideo 'Indian' Aramaki: Trained many chefs for Tokyo Disneyland.
  • Hiro Narita: Cinematographer who worked on Never Cry Wolf, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, and The Rocketeer for Disney; the first of these won him the Boston Critics Award and the National Critics Award.
  • Homer Brightmen: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Horst Koblischek: Helped market Disney in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.
  • Howard Ashman: Songwriter who was suggested for the studio by Katzenberg's friend and future business partner David Geffin, who oversaw Little Shop Of Horror, which Ashman co-wrote alongside Alan Menken (ironically, another Disney alumni, Peter Schneider, was also a part of that production). He teamed up with Menken for the first few films of the Disney Renaissance, but died before production on Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin could be completed.
  • Howard Roffman: Executive vice president of franchise management at Lucasfilm.
  • Ilene Woods: The voice of Cinderella in the original masterpiece.
  • Irene Mecchi: A major screenwriter who has worked often with Disney. She's one of the screenwriters for The Lion King, and also contributed to The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Hercules.
  • Irving Ludwig: Vice president (1953-1959) and later president (1959-1980) of Buena Vista Distribution Co., helped distribute Disney films.
  • Issac 'Ike' Perlmutter: The CEO of Marvel Entertainment.
  • Itzhak Perlman: Famed violinist who was the lead violin for Fantasia 2000; he also introduced the second number of the film, Pines of Rome.
  • Ivo Coveney: Lead costume and specialist costume designer, works for Disney and Industrial Light and Magic and has most notably created the Darth Vader suit, all of Amidala's wardrobe, and the Ant-Man suit.
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    J 

    K 
  • Karen Dufilho: The producer of the Pixar mini classic Geri's Game.
  • Karey Kirkpatrick: One of the animation screenwriters for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Karl Holz: President of the Disney Cruise Line.
  • Katherine Ringgold: The editor of the Pixar short Presto.
  • Katherine Sarafian: Pixar employee who produced their short Lifted.
  • Kathie Lee Gifford: Was Regis Philbin's co-host on the Live morning show (which was distributed by Buena Vista Television) until 2000.
  • Kathleen Battle: Sung a soprano vocal at the end of the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Kathleen Gavin: Associate producer on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Kathleen Kennedy: Longtime associate of Steven Spielberg and Amblin, which she co-founded, she became part of Lucasfilm and was made the president of the studio and the brand manager and executive producer of Star Wars when Disney purchased Lucasfilm.
  • Kathy Zielinski: Animator for the Disney Animated Canon; she was the supervising animator for the notorious Judge Claude Frollo, the Big Bad of the Walt Disney Classic The Hunchbackof Notre Dame; this character has more screentime than the other Disney villains.
  • Kay Kamen: Helped license Disney characters.
  • Kay Nielsen: Sketch artist, storyman, and designer. Nielsen created designs for "The Night on Bald Mountain" segment in Fantasia. During the 1940s, he worked on concept designs for an early version of The Little Mermaid and "Ride of the Valkyries". In the mid-1980s, his sketches were brought out of the Disney Archives to inspire the animators who worked on the 1989 The Little Mermaid, and he ended up getting a posthumous "visual development" credit.
  • Kelly Ripa: Replaced Kathie Lee Gifford as Regis Philbin's co-host on Live.
  • Kelsey Mann: One of the story writers for Pixar's The Good Dinosaur and the director and writer of the Monsters Inc. short Party Central.
  • Kem Weber: The architect of the original Walt Disney Studios complex in Burbank in 1939.
  • Ken Anderson: Art director on Snow White, designed Shere Khan and Elliot, and production designer on Sleeping Beauty, One Hundred And One Dalmatians and The Aristocats.
  • Ken Annakin: Director of two live-action Disney films.
  • Ken Bunt: President of the Disney Music Group, which includes Walt Disney Records. Hollywood Records, and Disney Music Publishing.
  • Ken Duncan: Animator of the Disney Renaissance; he animated Jane Porter in Tarzan, which included a very difficult continuous scene when it was improvised by Minnie Driver.
  • Ken Koonce: Co-producer of Ducktales for its second thru fourth seasons.
  • Ken O Brien: Animator on features from Snow White to Sleeping Beauty.
  • Ken O Connor: Layout artist on thirteen features and a hundred shorts. Features including Snow White, Fantasia and Lady and the Tramp. After a short retirement, O'Connor returned to Disney to help develop shows such as World of Motion and Universe of Energy at EPCOT, and the film Back to Neverland for the Animation Tour at the Disney/ MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida.
  • Ken Potrock: Vice president of the Disney Vacation Club.
  • Ken Stuart Duncan: The supervising animator for Jane Porter in Tarzan.
  • Kevin A Mayer: Senior vice president, general counsel, and secretary for the Walt Disney Company as a whole.
  • Kevin Deters: Animator at Disney who dealt with a few shorts including The Ballad Of Nessie and How To Hook Up Your Home Theaters.
  • Kevin Feige: The president of Marvel Studios.
  • Kevin Lima: Directed Tarzan, Enchanted, and A Goofy Movie.
  • Kevin Munroe: The producer of Strange Magic.
  • Kevin Reher: Casting director at Pixar.
  • Kevin Yasuda: Story writer for the opening number of Fantasia 2000, Beethoven's Symphony No. 5.
  • Kira Lehtomaki: Animation supervisor on Zootopia.
  • Kirk Bodyfelt: Assistant artistic coordinator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire and primary artistic coordinator on Brother Bear.
  • Kirk Hansen: Story writer for the live-action scenes of Fantasia 2000.
  • Kirk Wise: Received his first feature-directing credit on the Academy Award-winning Beauty and the Beast, alongside Gary Trousdale. In 1996, he re-teamed with Trousdale and producer Don Hahn on The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and then in 2001 on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Klay Hall: The director of Disneytoon Studios' Planes.
  • Kori Rae: Producer of Monsters University.
  • Kristen Anderson and Robert Lopez: Wife-and-husband composer duo who made the music of Winnie the Pooh (2011) and Frozen, the former of which had Kristen voice Kanga (her husband Robert is also one of the main minds behind Avenue Q and The Book of Mormon, the latter of which was his first association with Josh Gad, who was in Frozen. Their next project is Disney's Bob The Musical.
  • Kristina Reed: An alumni of DreamWorks Animation and associate producer on Kung Fu Panda who transferred to Disney and became the co-producer of Big Hero 6 and the producer of the short films Paperman and Feast.
  • Kyle Laughlin: Senior vice president of Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media Labs.

    L 
  • Lane Merrifield: The founder of Club Penguin; he resigned in 2012 after clashing with Disney.
  • Larry Clemmons: Story animator at Disney; two of his works are Robin Hood and The Rescuers, and he's one of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Larry Lansburgh: Producer and cameraman for various Disney films.
  • Larry Morey: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs and later was one of the music directors for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Laurel Ladevich: The producer of the Monsters Inc. short Party Central.
  • Lauren Mac Mullan: The director of the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse!.
  • Laurene Powell Jobs: The wife of Steve Jobs, she inherited his fortune and holdings in Disney when he passed away; this currently makes her the largest shareholder in Disney.
  • Lawrence Kasdan: A major player in Disney's continuation of the Star Wars franchise through the Sequel Trilogy; his previous work with Disney was 1999's Mumford, a film he directed.
  • Dr. LC Williams Johnson: Vice Chairman of the Board until 2016.
  • Lebo M: African folk music composer who arranged the Swahili chants in The Lion King.
  • Lee Blair: The husband of Mary Blair and the younger brother of Preston Blair, he was an artist at Disney.
  • Lee Unkrich: The director of Toy Story 2 & 3, Finding Nemo (he was co-director with Stanton), and Monsters, Inc. (which he co-directed with Pete Docter).
  • Leigh Harline: One of the music composers for Snow White.
  • Len Goodman: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Leonard Goldenson: Former president of ABC; he passed in 1999.
  • Leonard Maltin: Film historian who has spoken and written extensively about Disney and Star Wars, and hosts the Treasures From The Disney Vault specials on Turner Classic Movies with Ben Mankiewicz, and then solo after a few blocks. He's also the creator of the Walt Disney Treasures DVD video series prior to that.
  • Leslie Ferraro: The president of Disney Consumer Products.
  • Leslie Moes: Post-production supervisor on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Lewis M Allen: One of the Hollywood producer's later projects was Never Cry Wolf, the first film released under the Walt Disney Pictures banner (but without the iconic Cinderella's Castle logo; that didn't come until after the Management shift that let Eisner, Katzenberg, and Wells into Disney, and it premiered with The Black Cauldron.
  • Linda Larkin: The voice of Jasmine from Aladdin.
  • Linda Woolverton: One of Disney's most prolific screenwriters from the Disney Renaissance onward.
  • Lindsey Collins: The producer of Andrew Stanton's films since Wall*E. Not to be confused with the late Lindsay Collins, who was male and ironically was a marine biologist who died one year before Finding Dory.
  • Lisa Keene: Concept and background artist who started at Disney during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Lisa M Poole: Associate producer of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Creator;Lisa M Smith: Production manager of Mulan.
  • Lisa Mc Cormick: Assistant editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Lloyd Braun: Boss of ABC for the late 90's and early 2000's, when the network was really struggling; this struggle earned Braun the title of "worst executive of the year" in 2001 from the San Francisco News. Braun DID pitch Lost and Desperate Housewives, but they were too little, too late to save his ABC career or Michael Eisner's Disney career when the problems hit their boiling point in 2004.
  • Lloyd Richardson: Edited various Disney films.
  • Lori Korngiebel: Post production supervisor of Lilo & Stitch for its California operations (a lot of it was done at the Florida studio prior to Disney shutting their doors).
  • Louis D Esposito: The co-president of Marvel Studios.
  • Lucille Martin: Secretary to Walt Disney, later vice president and special assistant to the Walt Disney Company Board of Directors.
  • Lyle Underkoffler: The vice president of the digital angle of Disney Publishing Group.
  • Lylle Breier: Senior vice president of global marketing partnerships and strategic alliances, promotions, synergy and special effects at the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Lyndsey Collins: The producer of Finding Dory.
  • Lynwen Brennan: The executive vice president and general manager of Lucasfilm.

    M 

    N-O 

    P 
  • Pam Coats: Producer of Mulan.
  • Pamela L Travers: The author of the original Mary Poppins novel series, she was actually approached by Walt Disney very early on for adapting the premiere novel, but resisted for decades until financial pressures got her to cave in. This led to the development of the movie, and while everyone else was impressed, it made an opposite impression on her because she HATED animation (the standing ovation the movie received did not help her feelings), and she barred Disney from adapting the rest of the book series, although this mandate may have been relaxed with a sequel being announced in 2015. Her dilemma with the movie and her life events leading to it and the original novels is detailed in Saving Mr. Banks, the first movie to feature an actor (Tom Hanks) playing Walt.
  • Pamela Mann Francis: Script supervisor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Pamela Ribon: One of the story writers for Moana.
  • Pat Ventura: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Patricia Hicks: Associate producer on the Walt Disney Classic, The Emperor's New Groove, and the production manager on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Patrick Deremer: Musician who composed the Disney Sing-Along Songs theme.
  • Patrick Moran: Executive Vice President of ABC Studios.
  • Patrick Osborne: The director of the Disney short Feast.
  • Patrick Pacheco: The writer of the Waking Sleeping Beauty documentary.
  • Paul Brizzi and Gaetan Brizzi: French twins who were two of the directors of Fantasia 2000.
  • Paul Ekman: Psychologist, emotion research expert, and founder of the Paul Ekman social group, he was a consultant for the Emotions of Inside Out.
  • Paul Felix: Production designer for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Paul Lee: President of the ABC Entertainment Group until 2016.
  • Paul Pressler: The former boss of The Disney Store, he was put in charge of Disneyland in 1996 to help with the construction of what became Disney's Californian Adventure as well as address the lack of parkgoers in recent years (the original idea was for a new Epcot called Westcot, but this was abandoned after Wells and Katzenberg's runs at the company ended). He wound up cutting maintenance and attractions, mostly focusing on shopping. He became boss of the entire theme park division in 2000, but his failed attempt to take this concept further and Californian Adventure hitting an instant Dork Age the minute it opened, along with problems with Eisner, convinced him to pull the plug on his Disney job and never look back; he joined The Gap, and Pressler was succeeded by Jay Rasulo and eventually Tom Staggs, who revitalized the parks, with Staggs becoming president in 2015. Paul Pressler's tenure and the results of it was one of the factors in Eisner leaving the company himself.
  • Paul Rudish: Television animator who is the executive producer of the critically, popularly and Emmy/Annie acclaimed new series of Mickey Mouse cartoons.
  • Paul Satterfield: One of the writers for Fantasia.
  • Paul Smith: The creator of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? and one of the executive producers of the American version for its first decade. Also the name of a different man who was one of the music composers for Snow White.
  • Paul Smith: Not to be confused with the above, a music composer for the first Disney Animated Masterpieces.
  • Paul Winkler: Helped establish Disney in France.
  • Peabo Bryson: The male vocalist on the end-credits versions of the songs "Beauty and the Beast" and "A Whole New World", which he won Grammys for.
  • Perce Pearce: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Walt Disney's Signature Classic, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.
  • Pete Docter: One of the MVPs at Pixar, he's worked on a lot of their movies and is the man behind their 2015 hit Inside Out. He also co-directed Monsters. Inc and Up, and is currently Pixar’s Chief Creative Officer.
  • Peter Del Vecho: Producer of Frozen.
  • Peter Ellenshaw: Major matte artist on Walt Disney's studio classics from 1949 to his retirement in 1979. Despite this, he would return to the industry briefly to assist his son Harrison on Superman IV: The Quest for Peace.
  • Peter Jennings: A major personality at ABC until his death in 2005; his long on-air time during the aftermath of September 11th and other contributions earned him a Disney Legend award posthumously.
  • Peter Montgomery: The creator of the Mickey's Fun Songs video trilogy; these were folded into the main Disney Sing-Along Songs series.
  • Peter S Seaman: One of the two screenwriters for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and a movie called Trenchcoat.
  • Peter Schneider: Originally a co-worker of Menken and Ashman, he was brought in by Roy E. Disney and Jeffrey Katzenberg to help head up animation. He got tangled up in an infamous fake memo that was sent to Katzenberg and then Jeopardy!, but was otherwise effective. He became the studio head in 2000, replacing Joe Roth, but his own budding problems with Eisner convinced him to resign.
  • Peter Sohn: Pixar employee who directed The Good Dinosaur. He also is a voice actor for the studio, voicing Emile in "Ratatouille".
  • Peyton Reed: The eventual director of Ant-Man.
  • Phil Dike: One of the story developers for the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor number in Fantasia.
  • Phil Hawley: Former senior director of Walt Disney Productions.
  • Phil Johnston: One of the story writers for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Phil Lofaro: Associate producer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Phil Savenick: Writer and producer for the Disney Sing-Along Songs home video series.
  • Philadelphia Orchestra: The orchestra led by Leopold Stokowski in Fantasia. When the film hit video in 1991 under the Walt Disney Classics heading, the orchestra sued Disney for half the profits; the case was dismissed with a settlement in 1994.
  • Philip Giffin: Composed the music for Darkwing Duck.
  • Philip La Zebnik: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Philippe Gas: The general manager of the upcoming Shanghai Disney Resort.
  • Pinto Colvig: Storyman at Disney, and the original voice of Goofy and Pluto. He co-directed Mickey's Amateurs.
  • Pixote Hunt: Animator who was one of the directors of Fantasia 2000.
  • Poul Brahe Pedersen: Helped publish Donald Duck in the Nordic countries.
  • Pres Antonio Romanillos: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; one of the characters he animated is Shan-Yu, the Big Bad of Mulan.
  • Preston Blair: An animator for Disney, later famous for the animation he did for the girl from Tex Avery's "Red Hot Riding Hood".

    Q-R 
  • Quentin Tarantino: The eccentric director of several Miramax classics that were distributed by Disney, including Pulp Fiction and the Kill Bill movies.
  • Rachel Field: Children's novelist who wrote the English lyrics for the closing "Ave Maria" number of Fantasia.
  • Randy Sklar and Jason Sklar: Comedians who hosted the Cheap Seats show on ESPN Classic in the mid 2000's.
  • Raj Murari: A co-senior vice president of group publishers at Disney Publishing Group.
  • Ralph Eggleston: The production designer for Inside Out.
  • Ralph Grierson: Played the piano for the Rhapsody in Blue number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Ralph J Guggenheim: Executive at Pixar.
  • Ralph Kent: Legend in Imagineering and attractions.
  • Ram Bergman: Hollywood screenwriter who is writing Star Wars Episodes VIII & IX.
  • Randy Bright: Vice president of development for shows and attractions at Disneyland.
  • Randy Cartwright: Animator who has worked with Disney on-and-off; supervising animator of Chief and adult Copper in The Fox and the Hound, and the Magic Carpet in Aladdin.
  • Randy Fullmer: Producer of The Emperor's New Groove and Chicken Little, and artistic coordinator of The Hunchback Of Notre Dame and The Lion King.
  • Randy Haycock: Animator from the Disney Renaissance; supervising animator of Clayton (Tarzan), Kida (Atlantis: The Lost Empire), Naveen (The Princess and the Frog), Eeyore (Winnie the Pooh (2011)), and young Hercules.
  • Randy Parker: Digital production manager of Brother Bear.
  • Randy Thornton: Producer of the Disneyland soundtrack.
  • Ray Chew: The band leader on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Ray Watson: Disney executive who is partially responsible for Michael Eisner coming to Disney.
  • Raymond S Persi: One of the story writers for the short Feast.
  • Raymond Singer: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Rebecca Cline: Director of the Walt Disney Archives.
  • Regina Belle: Performed "A Whole New World" for the closing credits of Aladdin with Peabo Bryson. This is the second song Belle recorded with Bryson; they previously did "Without You" for the infamous Leonard Part 6 5 years earlier.
  • Regina Conroy: Disney Animation short film producer; one of her works is The Ballad Of Nessie.
  • Regis Philbin: A major personality at ABC, he chaired the morning talk show Live with Regis and Kathie Lee/Kelly and hosted the ABC version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, which temporarily got ABC out of the hole and ushered in a new generation of programming.
  • Reggie Williams: Retired linebacker for the Cincinnati Bengals and an ex-member of that city's council who founded Disney's Wide World of Sports in Disney World and then named Vice President of Disney Sports Attractions. He was forced to retire in 2007 when injuries he sustained while in the NFL began to come back.
  • Renu Thomas: The Executive Vice President of media operations, engineering and IT at Disney/ABC.
  • Retta Scott: Disney's first woman animator to receive a screen credit, in Bambi.
  • Reuben Cannon & Associates: The U.S. casting directors for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Rian Johnson: The director of The Last Jedi, the second installment in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy. His last major film prior to that was Looper; while this movie was distributed by TriStar Pictures/Sony in most markets, in Italy it was distributed by Walt Disney Pictures.
  • Ric Sluiter: Art director of Mulan.
  • Rich Franks: Disney executive who was sent out the door alongside Jeffrey Katzenberg.
  • Rich Moore: Animator and Rough Draft Studios partner who directed Wreck-It Ralph and Zootopia.
  • Rich Ross: Succeeded Dick Cook as studio chief, he oversaw a few big-budget tentpoles, but a few too many tentpole bombings, which culminated in John Carter, got him fired and replaced by Alan Horn (the movie's failure also put Ross on the top of John Lasseter's "really deep shit list"); the failure of The Lone Ranger added an extra nail to that coffin.
  • Richard Creedon: One of the story writers for Snow White.
  • Richard Fleischer: A director who helmed a multitude of Disney films, the most notable being 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. He's the son of Fleischer studio founder Max Fleischer, who was a good rival of Disney's for the 1930's.
  • Richard Hollander: The producer of the Pixar short Presto.
  • Richard Irvine: Senior Imagineer who headed design and planning for Disneyland attractions and then became executive vice president and chief operations officer of Imagineering in 1967. He retired in 1973 and died three years later.
    • Maggie Irvine: His daughter who joined WDI after him
    • Kim Thomas/Kim Irvine: Daughter-in-law who is a current art director at WDI.
  • Richard Loomis: Head of marketing for Disney Channels Worldwide until 2016.
  • Richard Purdum: Pupil of Richard Williams who was supposed to direct Beauty and the Beast, but his original version of the film didn't quite fly with studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg, who said, "It didn't work at all", and forced a Reset Button on the production (he would do this again with Aladdin, which led to the elimination of a character from that film). Purdum pulled out of the project, leading to Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise to direct and Katzenberg "buttonholing" Howard Ashman and Alan Menken and getting them to successfully turn the final film into a musical, which would wind up being the first animated Best Picture nominee and Ashman's Grand Finale thanks to Author Existence Failure. Purdum would return to Disney and provide some supplementary animation for Hercules a few years later.
  • Richard Rich: An animator who helmed The Fox and the Hound, his next film was The Black Cauldron. That movie's massive bombing and his headbutting with Peter Schneider led to his termination and having to start his own studio. He fell out of relevance after The King and I flopped and earned an anti-animation mandate from the Rodgers and Hammerstein estate.
  • Richard Roeper: A stretch, he's a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, but he succeeded Gene Siskel as Roger Ebert's critic partner in the At The Movies program, which was distributed by Disney.
  • Richard Williams: Worked as a temporary assistant animator time and time again, and was the animation director for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Rick Law: Artist who designed a multitude of covers for Walt Disney Home Video. Currently a creative manager at Disney Publishing Worldwide.
  • Rick Reinert: His animation firm helped make the fourth and final main Winnie The Pooh short, Winnie The Pooh And A Day For Eeyore (this short has a brand new cast and was made past The Many Adventures' theatrical and VHS release, but is included in the Winnie The Pooh's Storybook Classics series that make up the individual shorts along with the Walt Disney Mini Classics line prior to that).
  • Ricky Strauss: Marketing president at the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Riders In The Sky: The country western folk singers performed the "Woody's Roundup" song and several additional add-ons, including a "You've Got a Friend In Me" remix, for Pixar's Toy Story 2, which propelled them to the national spotlight and earned them a Grammy; these songs have become part of their classic playlist.
  • Rita Hsiao: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Rob Minkoff: Began his career in the Studios as an inbetweener on The Black Cauldron. He helped design the character of Basil in The Great Mouse Detective and Ursula in The Little Mermaid. He is associated with the character Roger Rabbit as the director of "Tummy Trouble" and "Roller Coaster Rabbit" and co-producer of "Trail Mix-up". He directed The Lion King (1994) with Roger Allers.
  • Rob Renzetti: Supervising producer of Gravity Falls and will executive produce the Ducktales reboot.
  • Robert AM Stern: The designer of several Disney World hotels, most notably the Yacht and Beach Club; these were Eisner's favorite hotels due to their location and design, and got Stern on the board of directors.
  • Robert Cormack: A major art director in Fantasia, dealing with the Toccata and Fugue and Nutcracker Suite numbers.
  • Robert Crawford: Wrote the U.S. Air Force/United Nations jingle in The Rescuers.
  • Robert D San Souci: Children's book author who provided the original concept for the Disney Animated Classic Mulan and was a consultant on the film; he died from a head injury in 2014.
  • Robert Jani: Produced numerous Disneyland festivities and shows.
  • Robert Kraft: A major record producer for Walt Disney Records.
  • Robert L Baird: One of the screenwriters for Big Hero 6.
  • Robert Langer: Vice president and CFO for Disney-ABC Television Group.
  • Robert Matschullat: Board member at Disney.
  • Robert S Garber: An associate producer on Mulan.
  • Robert Steinbrecher: One of the two production managers for Walt Disney Picture's first classic, Never Cry Wolf.
  • Robert Stevenson: Director of several Disney Live-Action Classics, the most notable being Mary Poppins.
  • Robert Ty Stanton: Art director for the Disney short John Henry.
  • Robert Watts: Lucasfilm producer who was one of the producers of Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Robert Zemeckis: The director of Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the boss of Image Movers Digital, which made the 2009 adaptation of A Christmas Carol. Their next film, Mars Needs Moms, however, tanked heavily and ended the partnership between Disney and Zemeckis prematurely.
  • Roberto De Leonardis: Helped translate various Disney films.
  • Roberts Gannaway: The director and lead writer of Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Rod Taylor: Narrated 101 Dalmatians as dog Pongo.
  • Roger Allers: Animator who co-directed The Lion King (1994) with Rob Minkoff.
  • Roger Broggie: The original Imagineer, Broggie helped make special effects and model trains prior to Disneyland's conception. Most notably, he and Wathel Rogers invented the audio-animatronic.
  • Roger Ebert: A stretch; the famed critic worked for the Chicago Sun-Times, but his review show with Gene Siskel and then Richard Roeper was distributed by Disney.
  • Roger Hector: Director of product development for Walt Disney Computer Software from 1989 to 1993.
  • Rolly Crump: Major Imagineer who designed a good chunk of Disneyland attractions and shops, including It's a Small World.
  • Ron Clements: Assistant and animator on Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, The Rescuers, Pete's Dragon (1977), The Fox and the Hound, and The Black Cauldron. He, along with John Musker, directed The Great Mouse Detective, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin and Moana.
  • Ron Dominguez: Former vice president of Walt Disney Attractions.
  • Ron Jones: The music composer for Ducktales.
  • Ron Logan: The first president of the reborn Disney Theatrical Group, which was revived by Peter Schneider and Thomas Schumacher with Roy Disney and Jeffrey Katzenberg supervising; their first play back was the stage adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. He is also responsible for producing a lot of live entertainment projects at the Disney Theme Parks, including Fantasmic!.
  • Ron Meurin: Story developer for the Piano Concerto No. 2 number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Ron Schneider: Played the Dreamfinder at EPCOT's Journey Into Imagination.
  • Ronald L Iden: Senior vice president of global security at Disney.
  • Ronnie Del Carmen: Co-director and one of the story writers for Inside Out.
  • Ronnie Screwvala: Executive at UTV Software Communications.
  • Roone Arledge: President of ABC Sports from 1968 to 1986, president of ABC News from 1977 to 1998.
  • Roy Conli: Producer of several Disney Animated Classics such as Big Hero 6.
  • Roy Williams: Worked on a few Disney shorts before becoming the senior Mouseketeer on The Mickey Mouse Club for 4 seasons. Died in 1976.
  • Ruben Aquino: Animator who worked on Ursula in The Little Mermaid, he sadly got laid off in 2013 alongside Ranieri.
  • Ruben Procopio: Clean-Up supervisor on Mulan.
  • Rune Brandt Bennicke: Major character designer on ''Brother Bear'. He animated Tug & Koda's mother in this film.
  • Russ Edmonds: The supervising animator for a lot of characters from the 2D Disney Animated Classics; one of them is Phoebus from The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Russell Hall: Supervising animator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Russi Taylor: The voice of Minnie Mouse, and the wife of Mickey Mouse voice Wayne Allwine until his death in 2009.
  • The Russo Brothers: Marvel Cinematic Universe directors.
  • Ruth Lambert: Casting director for Mulan and Tarzan.
  • Ruthie Tompson: Scene planner and final checker for animation cels.
  • Ryan Lissack: The Chief Technology Officer of Maker Studios.

    S 
  • Saaschka Unseld: The director and writer of the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Salvador Dalí: Alright, this is a stretch, as he didn't actually work for Disney so much as he did a collaboration with Walt on his animation project "Destino"—which wasn't finished until 2003.
  • Salvatore 'Tutti & Toots' Camarata: The man who founded Disneyland Records and supervised several recordings of classic Disney soundtracks.
  • Sam Armstrong: Storyman and background artist from 1934 to 1941, director of Fantasia.
  • Sam Mc Kim: Sketched various Disneyland rides and maps.
  • Sammy Fain: Wrote the Oscar-nominated "Someone's Waiting For You" from The Rescuers.
  • Sanford 'Sandy' Litvack: A former Disney executive who was a competitor to Jeffrey Katzenberg and then Michael Ovitz for the president's position at Disney. He earned an acting chief operation officer job after Ovitz's acrimonious departure and became a co-vice chairman in 1999, but he was forced out of the company in 2000.
  • Sanjay Patel: The director of the Pixar short Sanjay's Super Team, which came from Patel's childhood.
  • Scott Derrickson: Marvel Cinematic Universe director.
  • Scot Stafford: Composed the music for Pixar's short Presto.
  • Sean Bailey: The current president of production at Walt Disney Pictures.
  • Sean Mc Grath: The VFX coordinator of Marvel films since Disney took over the company, and for other Disney properties.
  • Shane Morris: One of the writers of Frozen.
  • Shelby Flint: Sung the songs in The Rescuers.
  • Shelley Miles: Former VP/GM of Disney Software/Disney Music.
  • Sheryl Sandberg: Current board member at Disney.
  • Shinji Hashimoto: The man who came up with the original concept for Kingdom Hearts.
  • Shirley Pierce: Screenwriter who dealt with the Disney short John Henry.
  • Sid Bass: Became the majority stockholder of Disney in the 80's and was directly responsible for Eisner's rise. The 9/11 attacks forced him to sell out.
  • Siddharth Roy Kapur: The CEO of Disney subsidiary UTV Software Communications.
  • Simon Kinberg: This producer is normally involved with Fox and their separate Marvel universe which, apart from Deadpool (2016), Disney/Marvel proper is not fond of, but he IS involved with Disney as a major player in the remake of Walt Disney's Classic Cinderella, as well as being a creative consultant on The Force Awakens and being an executive producer of Star Wars Rebels.
  • Simon Wells: Supervising animator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the director of Mars Needs Moms.
  • Skarpi Hedinsson: The chief technology officer at Disney/ABC Television.
  • Stan Kinsey: Executive of technology during the early 80's who initially wanted to move into animation with Pixar right at 1984, but clashed with Jeffrey Katzenberg over the subject. Kinsey resigned, but Katzenberg backpedaled and allowed the CAPS system into future Disney productions anyway, with Bob Iger purchasing Pixar in the end.
  • Stan Lee: The founder of Marvel Comics and Studios, he makes cameos in every Marvel film and is an executive producer on them.
  • Stan Spohn: One of the background painters for The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Stanley Gold: Friend of Roy E. Disney and Disney executive who coordinated the "Save Disney" campaigns with him.
  • Stephane Sainte Foi: Animator, beginning as part of the team who animated Ariel in The Little Mermaid (1989); supervising animator of Nani Pelekai in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Stephen A Rotter: Award winner who was one of the editors on Enchanted.
  • Stephen Anderson: Director of Meet the Robinsons and story supervisor of Brother Bear.
  • Stephen 'Steve' Bollenbach: A former executive who started with serving ice cream at Disneyland and in the 80's and early 90's worked for Marriott, Holiday Inn and Donald Trump before working at Disney for a year and helping with the ABC takeover. He left the next year and joined Hilton. Bollenbach died in 2016.
  • Stephen Scott: Art director on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Steve Bornstein: Ex-CEO of ESPN, now at Activision.
  • Steve Burke: Joined Disney in 1992 and helped with the development of The Disney Store prior to the Euro Disney project. After getting put on ABC, he resigned and moved to the Comcast cable company, which attempted to take over the Walt Disney Company in 2004 but failed, instead merging with Universal; Burke took over the doddering NBC in 2011 and is their current CEO.
  • Steve Jobs: The boss of Pixar and Apple Computers; he purchased the firm from George Lucas in the 80's, and hired John Lasseter to run it alongside Ed Catmull. They eventually made a landmark deal with Disney and created Toy Story, and following Jobs and Lasseter's feud with Disney boss Michael Eisner and his rivals, were indirectly partially responsible for Eisner's exit from the company; Disney purchased Pixar afterwards and put Lasseter back in charge of animation and creativity and making Jobs the largest shareholder in the company until Jobs's death in 2011.
  • Steve Levitan: The co-creator of one of ABC's modern classics, Modern Family.
  • Steve Mc Beth: Former president of Disney Interactive Studios/Walt Disney Computer Software
  • Steve Nelson: Co-composer of the theme music for Darkwing Duck.
  • Steve Pilcher: Production designer on Finding Dory.
  • Steve Rucker: Provided additional music for the first season of Ducktales and wrote music for Disney's Gummi Bears.
  • Steve Starkey: Assistant producer on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Steve Whitmre: The puppeteer of Kermit the Frog, Beaker, Statler and others in the Muppet films done by Disney.
  • Steven Chorney: Designed the poster for Who Framed Roger Rabbit amongst other Disney designs.
  • Steven Keller: Disney animation employee; one of his jobs was producing the Walt Disney Mini Classic John Henry.
  • Steven Spielberg: While Spielberg has mostly associated himself with rival Universal (he got his start there in the 70's, during Disney's Dark Age), he has worked as the executive producer of one of Disney's landmark films, Who Framed Roger Rabbit. He's also a good friend of George Lucas and directed the Indiana Jones movies (which started at Paramount while that studio employed Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, who took over Disney right after the second Indiana Jones movie hit theaters). Friends with studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg, the two formed DreamWorks in 1994 after Katzenberg walked out of Disney, broke up somewhat 10 years later, and the live-action DreamWorks and Spielberg would enter a 7-year distribution deal with Disney note  which ended with The BFG, which Spielberg directed before having his company being distributed by Universal, his old home. Spielberg, however, is still on call for future Indiana Jones films.
  • Steven Tyler: The frontman for the legendary rock/metal band Aerosmith, whose soundtracks are used by Disney in Disney World and on Disney Infinity and Inside Out.
  • Stevie Wermers: Animator at Disney who worked on a few features and directed the Goofy short How To Hook Up Your Home Theater.
  • Sting: Member of The Police who was contracted by Disney to compose music for Kingdom of the Sun. When this film hit troubled waters and prompted Michael Eisner to threaten a shutdown to the film's directors' faces, it got one of the most noteworthy retoolings in Disney's history, sending a good chunk of its crew down the valley to other projects and dropping almost all of Sting's work except for two songs, though he remained part of what became the Walt Disney Classic The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Stuart 'Stu' Bloomberg: Major force at ABC during the late 90's, but this was when the network was slumping. In 2001, he got hailed by a San Francisco columnist as the "worst executive of the year" when Millionaire's strength started to really ebb and sent ABC back into the hole, prompting Disney to fire him only days after he signed an expensive contract with them (which they had to eat). ABC's severe slump became one of the factors in Eisner following Bloomberg out the door a few years later.
  • Stuart Buchanan: Disney animation staff member who voiced the Huntsman in Snow White, as well as Goofy on the Mickey Mouse radio show.
  • Sue Bea Montgomery: Manager of post production on The Emperor's New Groove and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Susan Arnold: Board member at Disney.
  • Susan Harris: The creator of Disney/Touchstone's classic show The Golden Girls starring Betty White, Bea Arthur and Estelle Getty.
  • Susan Mc Kinsey Goldberg: Art director for the Rhapsody in Blue number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Susan O Day: Chief Information Officer of Disney.

    T 
  • T Daniel Hofstedt: Animator who was part of the Disney Renaissance; supervising animator of Ben and Lon in Pocahontas, Mr. Arrow in Treasure Planet, and The Emperor in Mulan.
  • Tab Murphy: Writer who wrote several Disney Renaissance films such as The Hunchback Of Notre Dame.
  • Tad Stones: Creator of Darkwing Duck and Show Runner on shows like Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers, and the Aladdin series and Hercules: The Animated Series. Went on to direct two animated Hellboy DTV movies.
  • Taika Waititi: Director of Thor: Ragnarok; also wrote the initial draft of Moana.
  • Tania Steele: Former vice president and spokesperson of Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Ted Berman: One of the co-directors of The Black Cauldron. He had retired from Disney prior to the 1984 management shift, and the film's failure ensured he would stay retired.
  • Ted Sears: A key member of Walt's team who was involved with writing.
  • Teddy Newton: A key member of Pixar who directed their Mini Classic Day And Night.
  • Terry Gilkyson: Composer of several songs on projects during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Terry Naughton: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Terry Notary: Prominent stuntman, stunt coordinator and movement coach in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He also provides the voice of Cull Obsidian in Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Tetsuya Nomura: Square Enix game designer who is the director of the Kingdom Hearts RPG franchise for Disney.
  • Theodore Anthony Lee Ty: Animated Captain Gantu in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Thom Enriquez: Directing animator for The Prince And The Pauper.
  • Thom Sharp: Co-composer of the theme music for Darkwing Duck.
  • Thomas Cardone: Co-art director on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Thomas Murphy: Former boss of ABC who joined the Disney board of directors when Disney purchased ABC. He left the company at some point.
  • Thomas Schumacher: Musical director at Disney Animation. He transferred to their Broadway productions in the 2000's, after serving as producer of The Rescuers Down Under, executive producer of The Lion King, and President of Walt Disney Animation.
  • Thornton 'T.Hee' Hee: Worked for Disney as a caricaturist, stylist, director, and story artist. He co-directed the "Dance of the Hours" segment of Fantasia, directed the Honest John and Gideon sequence in Pinocchio, and worked on story in Make Mine Music!.
  • Tim Allen: Not to be confused with the actor, he's been an animator for several Disney films from the 90's and onward, including working on Gaston for Beauty and the Beast, Pumbaa for The Lion King, Kuzco for The Emperor's New Groove, and Tiana for The Princess and the Frog.
  • Tim Burton: Hired to be part of the concept staff on The Black Cauldron; the experience led to him bolting from Disney before the 1984 management shift. He also made two short films at Disney, Vincent and Frankenweenie, and has directed films for Disney since the early 90's; a live-action version of Dumbo is his current project.
  • Tim Hodge: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Tim Mertens: Editor of Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Toby Bluth: The late brother of Don Bluth, who worked on a handful of Disney Theme Park attractions and a few Disneytoon productions such as Mickey, Donald & Goofy: The Three Musketeers.
  • Todd Lieberman: Co-worker of David Hoberman who co-produced The Muppets with him.
  • Tom Adair: Composed the songs for Sleeping Beauty.
  • Tom Bancroft: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; supervising animator of Mushu.
  • Tom Bergeron: The current host of ABC's Dancing with the Stars and America's Funniest Home Videos.
  • Tom Brevoort: Executive editor and senior vice president of publishing at Marvel Worldwide.
  • Tom Codrick: One of the art directors on The Sorcerer's Apprentice from Fantasia.
  • Tom Cohen: VP of production at Marvel.
  • Tom Fitzgerald: Veteran Imagineer who now handles creative direction at Epcot. He is the one who wrote the iconic "If you can dream it, you can do it" line, which was originally used in the 1980's for Horizons, long after Walt had died.
  • Tom Gately: Lead animator of Tanana in Brother Bear.
  • Tom Mac Dougall: The music supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph and the music production manager on Tarzan.
  • Tom Murphy: Vice president of Capital Cities/ABC Inc., oversaw the company's growth.
  • Tom Nabbe: Played Tom Sawyer as a boy on Tom Sawyer Island, later managed other attractions.
  • Tom Staggs: Was hired by Disney in 1990, he became the Chief Financial Officer in the mid 2000's, before swapping his job for the theme park side of things; after a long time, he took the President and Chief Operating Officer position after Iger left it vacant following Eisner's ouster (Iger had taken the position originally after Frank Wells died and after Jeffrey Katzenberg and Michael Ovitz couldn't claim it.) He sadly lasted just over a year before he found himself unable to hold onto the position and subsequently resigned.
  • Tom Wilhite: Was the studio head until the 1984 management shift. He had to give up his position to Jeffrey Katzenberg.
  • Tom Wolber: The president of Disneyland Paris, aka, Euro Disney.
  • Tommy Tallarico: Music composer, video game critic/host and cousin of Steven Tyler who composed the music for the Virgin Interactive Disney games in the early 90's.
  • Tony Anselmo: The current voice of Donald Duck, having been so since 1985, and even before that, animating the duck in Mickey's Christmas Carol and then in The Prince and the Pauper.
  • Tony Bancroft: Animator during the Disney Renaissance (supervising animator of Pumbaa and Kronk) and twin brother of Tom Bancroft; One of the co-directors of Mulan.
  • Tony Baxter: Former senior vice president of Disney Imagineering, which involved him overseeing construction of Journey into Imagination, Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, Star Tours, Splash Mountain, The Indiana Jones Adventure, and Disneyland Paris among other projects.
  • Tony Fucile: The supervising animator for Esmeralda and Mufasa.
  • Tony Gilroy: Was brought in by Disney to help rewrite the final screenplay of Rogue One during the film's reshoots.
  • Tony L Marino: Storywriter for Disney; one of his works is Mickey's Christmas Carol.
  • Tony Smeed: Co-head of animation on Zootopia.
  • Tony Stanley: Lead animator of Rutt the moose in Brother Bear.
  • Tony To: President of production and development at Lucasfilm.
  • Toshio Kagami: CEO of Tokyo Disney Resort.
  • Tracy Balthazor Flynn: The producer of Disneytoon's classic Planes.
  • Tyrus Wong: Chinese-born artist who served as main production designer (background department) of Bambi.

    U-V-W 
  • Ub Iwerks: Co-creator (with Walt Disney himself) of Mickey Mouse and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit.
    • Don Iwerks: Ub's son, he pushed for further technology and a 360-degree camera. He left the company in 1985 after 35 years to start Iwerks entertainment.
      • Leslie Iwerks: Don's daughter and Ub's granddaughter who is a major documentary director for Disney; her filmography includes films like The Pixar Story
  • Ugo D'Orsi: One of the studio's first effects animators, best known for handling the water effects on "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" on Fantasia.
  • Vance Gerry: One of the great Disney artists, working on a number of Disney Animated Classics.
  • Van France: Founder of the Disney University training program.
  • Vesey Walker: Bandmaster of the Disneyland Band.
  • Vicki Dummer: Executive vice president of Times Square Studios, which manages ABC's daytime shows except for Live with Kelly (Ripa).
  • Victoria Strouse: One of the story writers for Finding Dory.
  • Virginia Davis: Child actress who tried out for roles in Snow White and Pinocchio, but didn't make the cut. She did have a stint in Disney's Ink and Paint division, which won her the second Disney Legend award in 1988 alongside Norman Palmer.
  • Vladimir "Bill" Tytla: One of Disney's most skilled animators, doing the animation for Grumpy in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Chernabog in Fantasia, and Stromboli in Pinocchio. Left Disney in the early 40's to work at other studios like Famous Studios and Terrytoons after he became part of the infamous Disney strike, and he regretted never working with Disney again for the rest of his life.
  • Wally Boag: Disneyland performer known for his roles in the Golden Horseshoe Revue and The Enchanted Tiki Room who was attached to the character of Tigger in Winnie The Pooh and the Blustery Day, but got replaced by Paul Winchell. Was also something of a mentor to comedian Steve Martin.
  • Wally Feignoux: Helped market Disney in France.
  • Walt Kelly: While most known for his Pogo newspaper comics, he got his start working at Disney.
  • Walt Stanchfield: Was part of Disney's masterclasses for years. Much of his advice is included in the Disney book series "Drawn to Life".
  • Walter Afanasieff: Recording arranger who was part of the production of the signature songs that Peabo Bryson sung for Beauty And The Beast and Aladdin.
  • Walt Peregoy: Color and background artist on a handful of Disney projects (e.g. 101 Dalmatians and The Sword in the Stone).
  • Walter Sheets: Provided orchestrations for Robin Hood and The Love Bug, among others.
  • Warren Spector: The boss of Junction Point Studios and the man behind the Epic Mickey games; the second one, sadly, got Junction Point shut down and led to Spector being fired.
  • Wathel Rogers: Co-created the Audio Animatronic with Roger Broggie.
  • Wayne Allwine: The official voice of Mickey Mouse from 1977-2009
  • Webb Smith: Storyman, he is credited with coming up with the idea of storyboards.
  • Wes Anderson: Directed a few film that were released by Touchstone.
  • Wes Craven: The director of the classic Scream trilogy, which was originally distributed by the Walt Disney company in the 1990's after Jeffrey Katzenberg had made a deal with production company Miramax Films/Dimension Films, who made these movies.
  • Wilfred Jackson: Animator for several Disney features, including Lady And The Tramp.
  • Will Finn: Supervising animator for Cogsworth on Beauty and the Beast, Iago on Aladdin and Laverne on The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Co-director of Home on the Range.
  • William Cottrell: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Walt Disney's Signature Classic, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, also of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • William Everett 'Joe' Potter: The man built much of the underground infrastructure for Walt Disney World.
  • William 'Bill' Garity: Inventor and technician who created the multiplane camera and the stereo system "Fantasound" at Disney.
  • William Reeves: One of the original members of Pixar who produced Luxo Jr. alongside Lasseter and assisted with their films up to Ratatouille.
  • William Sullivan: Operations supervisor at Disneyland, later performed supervisory work for Walt Disney World.
  • Wink Martindale: Game show host who helmed Debt, which was produced by Disney's Buena Vista TV unit.
  • Winston Hibler: Story supervisor for Winnie The Pooh And The Blustery Day and the narrator on several Disney movies such as the True-Life Adventures.

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