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  • Since video games are usually dubbed in Milan, Italian dubs of video games based on movies or even television series, with a few exceptions, can't avoid this trope. This leds to a situation similar to the usual one in the voice acting industry in Venezuela (e.g. a voice actor younger than a character he voices).
  • Lara Croft of Tomb Raider has had four voice actresses over 12 years and 8 games, each one bringing a totally different spin on Lara's personality. She even changes in appearance, and has been played in live action promo shots by at least five different women, not even counting Angelina Jolie and Alicia Vikander in the film adaptions. She pretty much must be a Time Lord.
    • This is done deliberately so that no actress will be able to dominate the character.
    • Sofia Vergara played what is essentially the Jolie version of the character in this TV spot for Visa credit cards.
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  • Max in Sam & Max Save the World had his voice replaced after the first episode, though the voices are so similar it's not really that important - some of the original actor's voice clips have even been retained.
  • In an extreme case, the entire English voice cast of the Sonic the Hedgehog series were replaced with the cast used for the anime Sonic X. The original cast didn't even know they were being replaced until after the change. This came about because Yuji Naka, who was the head of Sonic Team at the time, made a comment that he would like for the voices for the characters to remain consistent across all media (as it was in Japan), either not knowing or caring that following through with this meant firing the previous English cast.
    • And it happened after that too; Vector the Crocodile was voiced by Carter Cathcart in Sonic X and Shadow the Hedgehog, but Dan Green in Mario and Sonic at the Olympic Games onward, while Omega went from Jeff Kramer (Shadow the Hedgehog) to Maddie Blaustein (Sonic 2006).
    • Sega replaced the entire voice cast (except Mike Pollock) again in 2010. The new cast's first appearance was in Sonic Free Riders.
    • Before the big cast change, Tails went through several voice actors that were actual children (3 in English and 2 in Japanese), while Knuckles was voiced by Michael McGaharn in Sonic Adventure, Ryan Drummond (who also voiced Sonic) in Sonic Shuffle, and Scott Drier from Adventure 2 to Heroes.
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    • Ultimately, if you count the short voice clips in Sonic CD, you would find that Sega has gone through 5 voice actors for Sonic. That's a lot compared to others.
    • Before Sonic CD, Sonic had been voiced by Takeshi Kusao in a handful of arcade games, including SegaSonic the Hedgehog.
    • In Japan, Big the Cat was voiced by the late Shun Yashiro in Sonic Adventure and Takashi Nagasako everywhere else.
    • Likewise, Dr. Eggman was voiced by the late Chikao Ohtsuka from Sonic Adventure up until his death in 2015, where he was replaced by Kotaro Nakamura the following year.
    • Not counting the cartoons, the first time Sonic got a dub in Italian was in Sonic Generations. While most of the cast remained from that game on, there are a few exceptions:
      • In Generations, Shadow was voiced by Maurizio Merluzzo (who also voices Knuckles) during his rival battle and by Riccardo Lombardo for the remainder of the game. In subsequent games, Claudio Moneta voiced the character, except in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and 3DS where Riccardo Lombardo took the role back.
      • In Mario & Sonic at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, Alice Bongiorni (who regularly voices Omochao) replaces both Sabrina Bonfitto as Cream and Emanuela Pacotto as Charmy, and Claudio Moneta replaces Silvio Pandolfi as Espio.
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    • And then Troy Baker's role as Espio was replaced by Matthew Mercer in Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympics.
    • Team Sonic Racing saw Dave B. Mitchell and Patrick Seitz replace Travis Willingham as Knuckles and Zavok (respectively), Erica Lindbeck replace Laura Bailey as Blaze and Omochao (many fans believe Laura was out on maternity leave and Travis was with her for it), Aaron LaPlante replacing Vic Mignogna as E-123 Omega (due to the allegations surrounding him at the time) and Bryce Papenbrook replacing Quinton Flynn as Silver.
  • The entire English cast of Valkyrie Profile changed between the first game and the second due to a switch in dubbing groups (TAJ Productions did the first game; Bang Zoom! Entertainment did the second). The only exception was Valkyrie Lenneth's voice actress, Megan Hollingshead, who voiced her in both games; this was actually because Hollingshead had transitioned from TAJ/4Kids Entertainment (New York) to Bang Zoom! (California) a few years after the first game was released. Also, Kikuko Inoue voiced Valkyrie Hrist in the first game, and Atsuko Tanaka voiced her in the second.
  • Devil May Cry
    • Dante has had three voice actors, four if you count the one in the Japanese version of the anime. His voice actor (who, incidentally, is also his Ink-Suit Actor) only began to remain consistent starting from Devil May Cry 3: Dante's Awakening.
    • The same could be said of every recurring character excluding Lady (who has kept Kari Wahlgren as her voice actress since Devil May Cry 3: Dante's Awakening, though she too had a different voice in The Animated Series) and Nero (who has consistently been voiced by Johnny Yong Bosch). The aforementioned Dante example is muddled further if one considers Dante's Special Guest appearance in the PlayStation 2 version of Viewtiful Joe. Although it came out a year after Devil May Cry 2 (where he was voiced by Matthew Kaminsky), Dante is based on his DMC1 appearance and keeps his DMC1 voice actor voice actor (Drew Coombs). Thus, the voice actor progression went from Drew Coombs, to Matthew Kaminsky, then back to Drew Coombs, and then finally to Reuben Langdon, who has stayed as Dante's voice since the third game.
    • Devil May Cry 2 also features Dante's outfit from the first game as an unlockable costume; when using this outfit, his voice clips in normal gameplay are replaced with those of Drew Coombs from the first game.
    • DmC: Devil May Cry has Tim Phillipps voice Dante, but that's a different Dante; appearances of the classic Dante since continue to be voiced by Reuben Langdon in English and Toshiyuki Morikawa in those games with Japanese vocals.
  • The voice of Carmelita Fox in Sly Cooper was replaced in each game. She was played by Roxana Ortega in Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus, then by Alesia Glidewell in Sly 2: Band Of Thieves, then Ruth Livier in Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves, and then by Grey DeLisle in Sly Cooper: Thieves in Time. It didn't help that each voice actress gave Carmelita a different accent.
  • The English dub for chapters 9-11 in the Story Mode of ShadowVerse drastically changed the voice actresses for Arisa. In the Tempest of the Gods expansion, many cards ended up having new voice actors.
  • StarCraft II has several significant examples:
    • Sarah Kerrigan, the penultimate Big Bad from the first StarCraft, is now voiced by Tricia Helfer for the sequel trilogy. Notably, a flashback cinematic in the Wings of Liberty campaign, which featured Kerrigan's lines from the first StarCraft Terran campaign by her original voice actress Glynnis Talken-Campbell, were entirely redubbed by Helfer. Fred Tatasciore has taken over the role for Zeratul, as the original voice actor Jack Ritschel had passed away sometime before the production of Starcraft II. Patrick Seitz is the voice actor for Artanis in StarCraft II. All in all, only the voice actors for Jim Raynor and Arcturus Mengsk got to keep their roles from the original installment.
    • Jim Raynor had a different voice actor complete with a very pronounced Southern accent in the initial gameplay trailers released for StarCraft II. Interestingly, Blizzard eventually changed their minds and brought back the original voice actor, Robert Clatworthy. But in a bizarre twist, Talken-Campbell initially confirmed that she was supposed to play Kerrigan in StarCraft II all along, and a released trailer showcasing storyboard sketches for the flashback cinematic actually featured her voice (and the redubbed lines for Jim Raynor complete with the Southern twang). Sometime after Clatworthy announced his reinstatement as the voice of Jim Raynor, Talken-Campbell took to the internet and announced that Blizzard decided to replace her as the voice for Sarah Kerrigan. Subsequent fan backlash never swayed the developers to reconsider their decision.
    • The trilogy manages to provide an interesting subversion that is only revealed to be one much later than when the example happens. Tassadar was voiced by Michael Gough in the first game but he (or rather, his spirit) is voiced by Michael Dorn, and sounds noticeably different from before. In Heroes of the Storm, however, Michael Gough once again voices him. So why the discrepancy? Turns out that the spirit of Tassadar was actually an illusion displayed by the Xel'naga Ouros, as explained in Legacy Of The Void... and Ouros is voiced by Michael Dorn.
  • Etna from Disgaea was originally voiced by Amanda Winn-Lee, but Michelle Ruff took her place in pretty much all of the character's other appearances.
    • However, Nippon Ichi games in general tend to avert this. The most notable example of this: Barbara Goodson played Laharl in Disgaea 1. Every NIS game since in which Laharl talks (that's the Disgaea 1 remakes, Disgaea 2, 3 and Disgaea Infinite; Makai Kingdom; and Phantom Brave), he is played by Barbara Goodson.
      • Goodson even voiced him in a ten-second cameo appearance in Soul Nomad & the World Eaters where Laharl wasn't even seen. It doesn't help that she voices another kid character with the same voice she uses for Laharl.
    • Also from the same series (and most other Nippon Ichi games as well) there's Asagi. She is voiced by a different voice actor in EVERY SINGLE APPEARANCE. This is done deliberately and the one time they reused a voice actor she outright says "I'm being voiced by the same person for the first time, dood."
    • In Makai Kingdom Zetta was voiced by Crispin Freeman, but in every other installment he has different voice actors (Richard Epcar in Disgaea 2 and Patrick Seitz in Disgaea 4).
  • Gwent: The Witcher Card Game: Charles Dance did not return to reprise his role of Nilfgaardian Emperor Emhyr var Emreis from The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt and his replacement sounds noticeably different.
  • In an unusual inversion, when Lunar: The Silver Star, was being remade into Silver Star Story, the original five English actors who did the original returned (along with other local talent from the area the Working Designs studio was), while all four Japanese voice actors from the original were replaced with an entirely new cast. The most notable change was Alex originally having Kikuko Inoue, and then going to Akira Ishida.
    • This occurs again in the Silver Star Harmony remake for the PSP, which was localized XSEED Games instead, as Working Designs had long gone out of business. The story as to why depends on who you talked to - Victor Ireland, the former head of Working Designs, claimed the entire voice cast was loyal to him, aside from Jenny Stigle who "broke rank". XSEED, on the other hand, stated that most of the old cast wasn't actually in the business anymore, hence they hadn't tried to find them. Accordingly, Stigle got involved because fans of the original games put her in touch with XSEED. So which story you believe depends on who you trust more, though it was no secret that Ireland had a very bitter falling out with XSEED during the localization process.
    • The sequel, Lunar: Eternal Blue, maintained consistent casts for both languages, on the other hand. The only change was Hiro's English voice going from Mark Zempel (Eternal Blue) to Chad Letts (Eternal Blue Complete), but they sound similar to the point that they're almost indistinguishable.
  • In the Prince of Persia: Sands of Time series, the Prince's voice actor went from Yuri Lowenthal in the first game, to Robin Atkin Downes in Warrior Within, then back to Lowenthal for The Two Thrones, but with a slightly different voice and accent. Other characters' voices/accents (Farah and the Vizier) also changed between the games, and Kaileena's voice was not just changed between games, but changed during the game in Warrior Within.
    • Interesting international tidbit: the voice actor for the Spanish voice track was changed between Sands and Warrior, and the one from Warrior remained for Two Thrones. But what's interesting is that the first voice actor sounds younger and more arrogant, while the second voice actor sounds grimmer and older... which fits perfectly with the timeline of the game, since Warrior happens after a noticeable Time Skip, while Two Thrones is immediately after Warrior.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
  • Every character in the Star Fox series has gone through at least two different voice actors, with previous ones sometimes returning after a while. For example, Fox McCloud is voiced by Mike West in Star Fox 64 and its remake, Star Fox Zero, and the two most recent installments of Super Smash Bros. In the animated short "The Battle Begins", he's voiced by Joe Zieja. In the fourteen years between 64 and its remake, Fox was voiced by Steve Malpass (Super Smash Bros. Melee and Star Fox Adventures) and Jim Walker (Star Fox: Assault and Super Smash Bros. Brawl).
    • The Japanese versions aren't free from this. Unlike most examples, though this was the result of them expanding the cast to reduce the amount of Talking to Himself, as 64 had only six voice actors. One example is Shinobu Satouchi voicing both Fox and Leon in 64, before Kenji Nojima came into to take over as Fox for Assault and Brawl. The only seiyuus who stayed throughout were Hisao Egawa (Falco), Kyoko Tonguu (Slippy and Katt in 64), and Tomohisa Aso (Peppy)... until the remake of 64 replaced the entire Japanese cast.
  • In between Condemned: Criminal Origins and Condemned 2: Bloodshot, lab tech Rosa Angel dropped 30 lbs and 20 years. Ethan, the Vanhorns, and Ferrel also got new voice actors as well, two of the four switching to Paul Eiding.
  • Many major Warcraft characters have gotten a new voice actor for their World of Warcraft incarnation (although a few have retained their original lines).
    • The most notable example would be Illidan, the Big Bad of the first expansion and many others directly connected to him.
    • At least Illidan's new voice actor sounds quite like his old one. Arthas (the titular villain of Wratch of the Lich King and the focal character for much of Warcraft III and its expansion) was given an entirely new actor to voice for Wrath of the Lich King. As for the Lich King himself, his new voice is Michael McConnohie, who already plays Kel'thuzad and, strangely, Uther the Lightbringer.
    • Partway through the Wrath of The Lich King expansion, Sylvanas was abruptly re-voiced by a new actress who gave her a more prominent accent. Many fans of the character were upset with this, claiming the accent doesn't fit the character.
    • Its card game spinoff, Hearthstone, gets a lot of this as well. Chances are, if a character from a card set reappears 2 or so years later, there's a good chance they'll sound significantly different. One obvious example you can compare in-game live is with Khadgar, the Mage hero skin, with Khadgar, the Mage legendary minion from Rise of Shadows.
  • Super Smash Bros. mostly has this occur when the character in question was subject to this in their home franchise, with one example being Sonic the Hedgehog switching from Jason Griffith to Roger Craig Smith. Examples separate from this are:
  • Ratchet was played by Mikey Kelley in the first Ratchet & Clank, and James Arnold Taylor for the rest of the series, which most fans of the series actually prefer anyway, as right when Taylor took over the developers toned down his attitude and laziness and made him far more willing to do the right thing and heroic.
  • The Legend of Spyro: Sparx's voice changes in each game, from David Spade to Billy West to Wayne Brady. In Dawn of the Dragon, when voiced by Wayne Brady, he tells Spyro that "[his] voice keeps changing" when Spyro asks how he feels.
    • Also Spyro himself has had many different voice actors as well: Carlos Alazraqui in the first game, Tom Kenny in the second through fourth games, Jess Harnell in the fifth and sixth games, and Elijah Wood in the sixth, seventh and eighth games.
    • In the Skylanders series, Josh Keaton voiced Spyro in the first through fifth games while Matthew Mercer voiced him for the first and only time in the sixth and final game.
      • The new series is set in an Alternate Universe from the previous games, which helps explain the different voices.
    • Cynder also got different actresses for each Legend of Spyro game. First was Cree Summer, who made "possessed" Cynder sound menacing. Next was Mae Whitman, who sounded suspiciously older (despite Cynder being returned to normal - the same age as young Spyro). Last was Christina Ricci, who was higher-pitched and added Chickification to Cynder.
    • After Spyro left Insomniac, each new game got a cast change for pretty much every recurring character, and often along with it, changes in personality.
    • While the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy notably brought back none of the original actors, the Spyro Reignited Trilogy is taking efforts to minimize this, with Tom Kenny returning as Spyro being one of the first announcements, albeit still replacing Alazraqui for the first game. Gregg Berger, the original voice for Hunter and Ripto, was also confirmed to return not long after—though he only returned as Ripto, with Robbie Daymond voicing Hunter.
  • The Xenosaga games had three entries in the series, and mixed and matched their actors throughout; for example, Episode 2 replaced Lia Sargent as Shion with Olivia Hack; Bridget Hoffman as KOS-MOS with Colleen O'Shaughnessey; Sherry Lynn as MOMO with Christina Puccelli; and Derek Stephen Prince as Chaos with Joshua Seth. Episode 3 replaced Shion and KOS-MOS with their original voice actors while keeping the rest of the main cast from Episode 2.
  • Square Enix has a great track record of Role Reprises for characters from the Final Fantasy series. Whether characters were first voiced in their original game, sequel, prequel, spin-off, or through their appearances in the Kingdom Hearts series, chances are a character's respective voice actor will make a reprise for another project. So, when this trope occurs, it really stands out.
  • Kirby:
    • Kirby mostly averts this, being almost universally voiced by Makiko Ohmoto, but he was voiced by Mayumi Tanaka instead in his first three voiced appearances: a Kirby's Adventure drama CD, the Mario Kirby Masterpiece OVA, and Kirby Super Star.
    • Meta Knight's universally Atsushi Kisaichi in Japanese, except for main series games starting with Kirby's Return to Dream Land, where he's voiced by one of the designers. English is a different story, he's Eric Stuart in the anime and Eric Newsome in Super Smash Bros., and the designer's voice was kept for Return to Dream Land onwards. Fans are split as to which one is better.
    • King Dedede originally was universally series creator Masahiro Sakurai, but after he left the series in Kirby Air Ride to pursue personal goals, he only returned for Smash Bros., while Shinya Kumazaki took over for the games and Kenichi Ogata for the anime. This is the same for English releases, except for the anime, where he's dubbed over by Ted Lewis. An odd case as both Darrins have coexisted with each other between releases, with both Smash Bros. and Kirby receiving titles each with their own voice actor.
  • Tales Series:
  • Jak and Daxter:
    • Jak's voice actor was replaced in The Lost Frontier (from Mike Erwin to Josh Keaton). Given that early-stage production footage exists in which he's still voiced by his original voice actor, the switch is quite baffling. It seems most fans much prefer the original voice, with some even saying they didn't bother picking up PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale because Jak is voiced by "the replacement".
    • Keira, the hero's main love interest, changed voice for the third game (from Anna Garduno to Tara Strong). They decided to try and cover this by only giving her a handful of lines, and shifting Ashelin into the love interest position, despite Ashelin's obvious relationship with Torn providing a key plot point in the previous game. Keira also for some reason got a completely new facial structure along with her new voice.
  • This has occurred with at least 3 characters in the Monkey Island series. Most notably, the character of Elaine Marley. In Escape from Monkey Island, she not only has a completely different voice actress, but she has also inexplicably dropped her British accent from the previous game. Oddly enough, she has both her original voice actress and her accent back again in Tales of Monkey Island.
    • In the first chapter of Tales of Monkey Island, LeChuck was voiced by skilled VG voice actor Adam Harrington instead of Earl Boen, who had been voicing the character for years prior, though they managed to get Boen back for chapters 4 and 5.
  • From Tekken 3 up until Tekken 6, the role of Heihachi Mishima belonged to Daisuke Gōri. Following Gōri's suicide, the role was given to Unshō Ishizuka (which also corresponds to Heihachi becoming younger for the release of Tekken Tag Tournament 2).
  • Also in Kingdom Hearts II, David Warner was invited back to voice his TRON characters Sark and The MCP, and apparently was very enthusiastic about revisiting the roles, but was unable to do so because of previous commitments. The parts were instead voiced by veteran voice actor Corey Burton, with many fans not even realizing it wasn't Warner.
    • Like with Star Wars, Corey Burton also replaced Christopher Lee as DiZ for RE:Chain of Memories, though this imitation is not as good as others of his. Strangely, Christopher Lee came back as DiZ in 358/2 Days.
    • Also related to Kingdom Hearts, but not Tron, they had replaced Naminé's Brittany Snow and even Kairi's (of all characters) Hayden Panettiere, with Meaghan Jette Martin and Alyson Stoner respectively, in RE:Chain of Memories and 358/2 Days. Alyson Stoner also voices Xion (it's significant later in the game).
    • Perhaps most notable of all was the replacement of Ansem's voice actor Billy Zane with the decidedly less hammy Richard Epcar.
    • Plus in general, the characters voiced by big stars had their original voice actors not return such as Genie (Robin Williams), Mushu (Eddie Murphy), and Phil (Danny DeVito) in Kingdom Hearts (or really any Disney property aside from the original film). Some of them such as James Woods (Hades), Angela Lansbury (Mrs. Potts), and David Ogden Stiers (Cogsworth) did return, however.
      • This became interesting in II, where two actors (Tate Donovan and Glenn Shadix) reprised roles they didn't in the first game (Hercules and the Mayor of Halloween Town respectively). In other words, they became the other Darrins to their own other Darrins.
    • Almost the entire cast of The Lion King had new voices in Kingdom Hearts II with the exception of Pumbaa and Banzai and Ed who did have their original voice actors return. Young Simba and Mufasa had their original VA's return by way of reusing audio from the original film. Also the entire cast of Pirates of the Caribbean was replaced as the original cast was shooting the sequels and couldn't return (although they did want to).
      • On the subject of Pirates, Captain Jack Sparrow was voiced by James Arnold Taylor in Kingdom Hearts II, and by Jared Butler in Kingdom Hearts III.
    • While Eugene and Mother Gothel's voice actors reprised their role in the Tangled world for Kingdom Hearts III, one VA that did not return was Rapunzel who was voiced by Kelsey Lansdowne rather than Mandy Moore.
    • All the Organization XIII members introduced in Chain of Memories (who were voiced by staff members), gained different voices in the remake and later appearances. The exception to this was Axel, but only in the Japanese version—since they didn't bother dubbing the voices, we have an interesting case where an English voice actor plays the other Darrin to his Japanese counterpart. Though this is all justified as the original Chain of Memories had mostly Voice Grunting and small phrases recycled from the original game (hard to get a fully voiced Game Boy Advance game).
    • Justified for the voice of Mickey in Kingdom Hearts. After the passing of Wayne Allwine in May 2009, Bret Iwan took over starting with Birth by Sleep.
    • The Japanese dub did quite a bit of this. As with the dub of Houseof Mouse, Tōru Ōkawa Darrined Akira Kamiya as Iago.
    • Due to the unfortunate loss of both Chikao Ohtsuka and Leonard Nimoy, Master Xehanort in Kingdom Hearts III was voiced by Akio Ōtsuka and Rutger Hauer in Japanese and English, respectively. With Hauer's death a mere six months after III, he was himself replaced with Christopher Lloyd in the Kingdom Hearts III Re Mind DLC.
    • Hayner, Pence, and Olette were originally voiced respectively by Justin Cowden, Sean Marquette, and Jessica DiCicco in Kingdom Hearts II. In Kingdom Hearts III, they're instead voiced by Zach Gordon, Tristian Chase, and Ashley Boettcher. In Japanese, Hayner and Olette were voiced by Kazunori Sasaki and Yuka Hirasawa in II and by Makuto Suto and Yuna Watanabe in III.
  • The 5 main characters of The World Ends with You appear in Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance, and 4 of them are voiced by their original voices. They are Neku (voiced by Jesse David Corti), Shiki (Heather Hogan-Watson), Joshua (Aaron Spann), and Beat (Crawford Wilson). That leaves Rhyme, who was originally voiced by Kate Higgins, but in Dream Drop Distance, she is now voiced by Ashley Rose Orr.
  • The English version of the spinoff series Dynasty Warriors: Gundam had to recast all the characters, since Bandai couldn't get ahold of the men and women at The Ocean Group to have them reprise their roles. Also, one of the actors had left a long time ago.
    • In the second game, the voice for Judau changed from Sean Broadhurst to Andrew Francis.
    • Most of the original voices did return for DWG. The only notable replacements were Louis Chirillo as Heero (Mark Hildreth refuses to reprise the role after bad convention experiences) and Phil Fulton as Domon (Mark Gatha is now a dentist and no longer does voice acting).
  • Halo:
  • Super Mario Bros.
    • Princess Peach and Bowser has had a multitude of voices, whereas Charles Martinet has consistently voiced most of the male characters. For Peach, there is:
    • And for Bowser, there is:
      • Naoki Tatsuta: BS Super Mario Collection
      • Akiko Wada: The Great Mission to Rescue Princess Peach! OVA.
      • Masaharu Satō: Amada OVA series
      • The late Harvey Atkin: The Super Mario Bros. Super Show!, The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3, and Super Mario World cartoons.
      • Rob Wallace: Mario Is Missing!!
      • Marc Graue: Hotel Mario
      • Scott Burns: Super Mario Sunshine up to Mario and Sonic at the Olympic Winter Games
      • Eric Newsome: Super Paper Mario and Mario Party 8
      • Kenny James voiced him in Super Mario Strikers/Mario Smash Football but he didn't return until Super Mario Galaxy where he became Bowser's current voice actor.
    • While Charles Martinet has voiced both Mario Bros. for a long time now, this wasn't the case early on in the Nintendo 64 era, when the bros were first Suddenly Voiced. In the Japanese version of Mario Kart 64, Luigi's voice was instead provided by Julian Bardakoff, the then-president of Nintendo of France, who gave him a noticeably higher pitched voice than we're used to now. While Martinet would replace Bardakoff in the international version of Mario Kart 64, the latter's voice clips would be reused in all versions of many future spinoff games such as the first two Mario Party games and all versions of Mario Kart: Super Circuit, so it wasn't until the GameCube era that Martinet was consistently the voice of Luigi.
    • Wario was also originally voiced by Thomas Spindler, an employee of Nintendo's German division, in the Japanese version of Mario Kart 64 and the first two Mario Party titles. It wasn't until Mario Party 3 that Martinet became Wario's permanent voice actor.
    • Princess Daisy from Super Mario Land was voiced by Jessica Chisum for her return to the series in Mario Tennis and Jen Taylor for her first three appearances in the Mario Party series. Starting with Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, Deanna Mustard became Daisy's current voice actress. Needless to say, Deanna Mustard's take on Daisy is much, much different from Chisum and Taylor's.
    • Rosalina had been voiced by Mercedes Rose in Super Mario Galaxy 1 and 2 and Mario Kart Wii, and she was voiced by Kerri Kane in Mario Kart 7, Mario Golf: World Tour, the fourth and fifth Super Smash Bros., and is currently voiced by Laura Faye Smith. There seems to have been a strange bit of flipflopping between Smith and Kane, as Smith voiced Rosalina in Super Mario 3D World, which was released before World Tour, but she has since gone back to voicing Rosalina from Mario Kart 8 onwards.
    • The Koopalings have also had some voice changes in the series. In Amada Anime Series: Super Mario Bros. They were voice by were voiced by Masaharu Satō (Larry and Iggy), Miyako Endō (Morton and Wendy), and Naoki Tatsuta (Roy, Lemmy, and Ludwig). In the DIC Cartoons they were voiced by James Ransken (Larry aka Cheatsy), Gordon Masten (Morton aka Big Mouth), Tabitha St. Germain (Wendy aka Kootie Pie), Tara Strong (Iggy and Lemmy aka Hop and Hip), Dan Hennessey (Roy aka Bully), and Michael Stark (Ludwig aka Kooky). In the Super Mario Games starting with New Super Mario Bros Wii, they were given in-game dialogue for the first time. In the New Super Mario Bros. games and the fouth and fifth Super Smash Bros. Games, Larry, Morton, Wendy and Lemmy were voiced by Lani Minella, Iggy and Ludwig were voiced by Mike Vaughn, and Roy was voiced by Dan Falcone. However in Mario Kart 8 Lani Minella was replaced by Michelle Hippe (Larry), David Cooke (Morton), Ashley Flannegan (Wendy), and Carlee McManus (Lemmy), while Mike Vaughn was replaced by Ryan Higgins (Iggy) and David J. Goldfarb (Ludwig) respectively. This makes Dan Falcone (Roy) the only voice actor who was not replaced.
    • Yoshi was originally voiced on the Super Mario World cartoon by Andrew Sabiston, while in the games he's voiced by Kazumi Totaka starting with Yoshi's Story and continuing to the present day.
    • In her first voiced appearance in Super Mario Advance, a remake of Super Mario Bros. 2, Birdo was voiced by Jen Taylor. She was then voiced by Jessica Chisum in Mario Tennis for the Nintendo 64. From Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour onwards, Birdo is voiced by Kazumi Totaka.
    • Donkey Kong was originally voiced by the late Soupy Sales in the Donkey Kong segments of Saturday Supercade, then by Gary Chalk on Captain N: The Game Master, and by Richard Yearwood for the Donkey Kong Country cartoon (with Sterling Jarvis providing his singing voice). In the games proper, Grant Kirkhope voiced DK from Donkey Kong 64 all the way through Mario vs. Donkey Kong, after which Takashi Nagasako took over from Mario Power Tennis onwards.
    • Diddy Kong was voiced on the Donkey Kong Country cartoon by Andrew Sabiston (who funnily enough had previously voiced Yoshi on the Super Mario World cartoon) and by Chris Sutherland in the games from Diddy Kong Racing until Mario Power Tennis, where Katsumi Suzuki took over from that point onwards.
    • From his debut in Super Mario Sunshine until Mario Party DS, Bowser Jr. was voiced by Dolores Rogers. Starting with Mario Strikers: Charged, he is voiced by Caety Sagoian.
    • Although Charles Martinet consistently voices Mario ever since he got the role, there was a flip-flop of voices before he joined.
  • Any Resident Evil character that has been in more than one game will likely have a different voice actor per game due to Capcom's habit of changing casting agencies. The most notable exception of this was Claire Redfield, who had been voiced by Alyson Court from her debut in Resident Evil 2 (early 1998) through Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City (early 2012), before being replaced by Danielle Nicolet (under the pseudonym "James Baker") in Resident Evil: Revelations 2 and then Stephanie Panisello in Resident Evil 2 (Remake). Court was nearly going to be replaced a lot earlier for Resident Evil – Code: Veronica. When Capcom considered using a local talent agency from Japan for the game, the Canadian studio that provided the voice acting for RE2 and Resident Evil 3: Nemesis successfully lobbied for her return.
    • Some characters have switched back and forth. Richard Waugh voiced Wesker in Code: Veronica, but was replaceqd by Peter Jessop in the GameCube version of the first game, only to return in 0 and 4, then he was replaced by D.C. Douglas in 5 and The Umbrella Chronicles.
    • Sally Cahill, who voiced Ada Wong in Resident Evil 2 and Resident Evil 4, was replaced by Megan Hollingshead in The Umbrella Chronicles, but returned to voice Ada in The Darkside Chronicles, and was then replaced again by Courtenay Taylor for Operation Raccoon City and Resident Evil 6. Most of the regular VAs from the time of 4 onward (including the aforementioned people) also reprised their roles in The Darkside Chronicles, although most of characters from the games before 4 were given new voice actors.
    • Leon S. Kennedy has also been a notable partial aversion. He had been consistently voiced by Paul Mercier in all of his appearances after his debut in Resident Evil 2, where he was voiced by Paul Haddad. Then Christian Lanz took over for Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City, only to be immediately replaced by Matthew Mercer in Resident Evil: Damnation and Resident Evil 6.
    • So far, Jill Valentine has been voiced by 8 English voice actresses since 1996, more than any other character in the series. First, Una Kavanagh voiced her in the first Resident Evil game, then Catherine Disher took over the role in Resident Evil 3: Nemesis and Marvel vs. Capcom 2, then Heidi Anderson voiced her in the Nintendo GameCube REmake of the original Resident Evil, then the Japan-only PACHI-SLOT Biohazard pachinko game used Tara Platt, then it was Patricia Ja Lee's turn in The Umbrella Chronicles, Resident Evil 5, and Mercenaries 3D, then Kari Wahlgren shows up for Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, then Michelle Ruff voiced her in Revelations and Operation Raccoon City, and then, finally (for now), Nicole Tompkins took over for the 2020 remake of RE3.
    • Chris Redfield has been somewhat better in this regard, having four different actors between the original game (Scott McCulloch), Code Veronica (Michael Filipowich), the REmake (Joe Whyte), and The Umbrella Chronicles (supposedly Kevin Dorman), but ever since RE5 he has been consistently voiced by Roger Craig Smith. During his cameo appearance at the end of Resident Evil 7: Biohazard, Smith was darrin'd with David Vaughn assuming the role, which continues on into the Not a Hero DLC where Chris returns as a playable character.
    • Richard in the Nintendo DS version of the first game was voiced by a different voice actor soley because in the Rebirth mode, he had one brand new line of dialogue to give the player a hint about a secret ammo stash in the dining room. Likewise, Chris and Jill were given new voice actors purely for the one liners the characters gave in Rebirth mode when solving or failing certain puzzles and they still kept the original voice recordings for the rest of the game.
  • JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: All Star Battle was released back in 2013, when only the first two manga storylines had been adapted in the anime, meaning many of the characters didn't yet have anime voice actors who could reprise their roles. In 2022, All-Star Battle received an Updated Re-release entitled All-Star Battle R, which redid the voice lines for most of roster in order to incorporate the actors who'd been cast in the anime after the release of the original game. As such, Yuki Ono replaced Wataru Hatano as Josuke Higashikata, Kensho Ono replaced Daisuke Namikawa as Giorno Giovanna, and Fairouz Ai replaced Miyuki Sawashiro as Jolyne Cujoh, among many other recasts.
  • In Star Wars: Rebel Assault, Ru Murleen was originally played by an actress with the same name, but recast with Julie Eccles in the sequel.
  • Mortanius from Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain was originally voiced by Tony Jay, who would voice the Elder God in the sequels. To prevent confusion, they had Alastair Duncan voice Mortanius in Defiance.
  • After a contract disagreement with THQ, Richard Horvitz and Grant Albrecht were replaced as Pox and Crypto for the spin-off game Destroy All Humans!: Big Willy Unleashed. The fans did not take to well to the replacement actors, but the originals came back for later games in the series.
  • In the Metal Gear Solid remake for GameCube, all the English voice actors from the original game reprised their roles with one notable exception: the voice of the Cyborg Ninja was changed from Greg Eagles, who was credited as George Byrd in the original, to Rob Paulsen. Eagles still reprised his other role as the DARPA Chief for the remake.
    • In the Japanese version of Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots, Ryōtarō Okiayu, the seiyu of Vamp from Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty, ended up being replaced by Shinya Tsukamoto, a film director.
    • When Solid Snake and Roy Campbell appeared in Ape Escape 3, the localization staff were too lazy to track down David Hayter and Paul Eiding to reprise their role, so they got Peter Lurie, incidentally the voice of Vulcan Raven, and Michael McColl respectively.
    • In Metal Gear Solid 3, EVA was voiced by Suzetta Miñet (although, given the reveal that she was actually an alias for another actress, exactly who played her is a subject of debate). However, in Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops, her voice actress was replaced with Vanessa Marshall for some reason (although to be fair, she never actually got any actual voiced scenes and at best did grunts), and in Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker, EVA was voiced by Suzetta Minet again.
    • In Metal Gear Solid 4, Liquid Ocelot's voice actor in the Japanese version was Banjo Ginga (the voice of Liquid Snake), not because of the fact that he was possessed by Liquid (hint, he was faking all along), but because Revolver Ocelot's original Japanese voice (Kōji Totani) died before Metal Gear Solid 4 began production.
      • The English dubs have had three different voice actors for Ocelot in three different periods of the character's life - in his 60s during Metal Gear Solid 1, 2 and 4, he's Patric Zimmerman; in his 20s during Metal Gear Solid 3 and Portable Ops, he's Josh Keaton, and then in his 40s for The Phantom Pain, he's Troy Baker.
    • Master Miller was originally voiced by Cam Clarke, but the role was recast to Robin Atkin Downes for Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker. This could be forgiven, though, since it was a thirty-years-younger Miller and Miller died before the events of Metal Gear Solid, with Liquid Snake, also voiced by Clarke, assuming his identity.
    • The Substance rerelease of Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty includes a VR mission where you fight Meryl. For this fight, however, rather than recording new lines, they reused voice clips from Olga Gurlukovich's fight early in the main game. This would have made sense in the Japanese version, as the two characters share the same seiyuu (Kyoko Terase), but every Japanese version of Substance, up until the HD Edition nearly a decade later, just used the English voice acting.
    • Same for Rosemary's voiceovers in the above "Snake Eraser" short in MGS3, where her lines are all done by the same actor as The Boss - it works in the original because both characters are voiced by Kikuko Inoue, whereas in English it went from Lara Cody to Lori Alan. The Digital Graphic Novel version of MGS2 replaced Rose's voice again, this time with Kari Wahlgren.
    • In Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Kiefer Sutherland takes over David Hayter's role as Big Boss. Appropriately enough, this Big Boss is a body double of the original.
  • Backyard Sports has had four voice casts: 1997-2001, 2002-2003, 2003-2005, and 2006-present. All except 2002-2003 were made up of mostly the same people, but playing different characters each time.
  • Tenchu: The series in general, in both English and Japanese; they constantly changed studios from game to game. To mention the English examples:
    • Rikimaru went from Paul Lucas in the first game, to Rino Romano in the second, to Daniel Dae Kim in the third and Liam O'Brien in the fourth.
    • Ayame went from Terry Osada in the first game, to Debi Mae West in the second, to Michelle Krusiec in the third and an unknown voice actress in the fourth.
    • As for other characters, Onikage went from Seiichi Hirai in the first game to Paul St. Peter in the fourth; while Tatsumaru went from David Moore in the second to Quinton Flynn in the third.
  • Jump Force averts this for almost all of its characters, except for Kenshiro, who was originally voiced by Akira Kamiya. While Kamiya reprises his role as Ryo Saeba, his age prevents him from performing Kenshiro's iconic "ATATATATATATA" battle cries. As such, Kenshiro's role is taken over by Katsuyuki Konishi.
  • In the Syphon Filter series, Mara Aramov has had four noticeably different voice actresses, the latter two being American rather than native Russian. Lian Xing has been voiced by three actresses; Ava Fang (her only known acting role) in 1, Zoe Galvez in 2 and 3, and Kim Mai Guest in all subsequent games, complete with different looks and personalities. Gabe Logan also switched voice actors from John Chacon to James Arnold Taylor starting with The Omega Strain.
  • Magneto and Colossus lose their well-known voice actors (Tony Jay and Earl Boen) for the X-Men Legends sequels, in which they were replaced by Richard Green and Jim Ward respectively. Cyclops and Pyro (both voiced by Robin Atkin Downes) were also recast so Josh Keaton and John Kassir took his roles.
  • While Street Fighter does this frequently, the most notable cases are...
  • In Koei's Samurai Warriors, Toyotomi Hideyoshi's American voice actor portrayed him with a screeching, annoying voice. In Samurai Warriors 2, with Hideyoshi's role in the story expanded, he was assigned a much better actor who was able to convey a great deal of depth and humor, making him much more tolerable. And then when Warriors Orochi hit, they went back to his old voice actor.
  • Akoya Sougi voiced Mai Shiranui in both the Fatal Fury and The King of Fighters series. In the KOF: Sky Stage game, she's replaced by Ami Koshimizu, who takes over as Mai in the main series starting in KOF XIII.
    • Athena Asamiya is the uber-example of Darrining. She's had five seiyuus: Reiko Fukai (KOF '94) to Moe Nagasaki ('95) to Tamao Satou ('96) to Yukina Kurisu ('97) to Haruna Ikezawa ('98). They've seemed to have stuck with Ikezawa since, though.
    • Robert Garcia is an interesting example. His first voice actor (Eiji Yano in Art of Fighting) was replaced by Kazuhiro Inage for Art of Fighting 2, The King of Fighters '94 and '95. After that, Mantaro Koichi replaced him for Art of Fighting 3 and The King of Fighters '96, and provided Robert's voice for every game up to KOF 2003. Then in Neo Geo Battle Coliseum, Inage returned to voice Robert and continued until Go Shinomiya took over the part in The King of Fighters XIV.
    • Geese Howard's first voice was Katsuhisa Namase in Fatal Fury Special. Kong Kuwata took the reins for Fatal Fury 3, and is now the voice most closely associated with Geese.
    • Overall, however, SNK is a large aversion of this, with most voice cast changes only happening when the company has lost contact with a seiyuu, the seiyuu retires, or (unfortunately) the seiyuu passes away. This means that a vast majority of their characters have been voiced by the same person on at least a semi-regular basis for a good period of time, some even approaching 10 or 20 years of voicework. Or at least that was the case until....
    • The King of Fighters XIV marked the series' official transition from 2D graphics to 3D ones, with a number of characters being recast in the process. These included Tomoaki Maeno replacing Masahiro Nonaka as Kyo Kusanagi, Takashi Kondo replacing Satoshi Hashimoto as Terry Bogard, Takanori Hoshino replacing Kunihiko Yasui as Iori Yagami, Seiko Yoshida replacing Masae Yumi as Leona, Tomo Kasaya replacing Yoshinori Shima as Clark Still, Daiki Takakura replacing Masaki Usui as Ryo Sakazaki, Ai Kakuma replacing Kaori Horie as Yuri Sakazaki, Hiroshi Okamoto replacing Keiichi Nanba as Andy Bogard, Sarah Emi Bridcutt replacing Harumi Ikoma as Blue Mary, Yūma Uchida replacing Eiji Takemoto as Rock Howard, Kōzō Mito replacing Nobuyuki Hiyama as Joe Higashi, Yoshihisa Kawahara replacing Yuuki Matsuda as K' and Miki Ogura replacing Mayumi Shintani as Angel. The King of Fighters XV would continue this trend, with KENN replacing Nozomu Sasaki as Krohen/K9999 and Tsuguo Mogami replacing Toshimitsu Arai and Norio Wakamoto as Rugal Bernstein, among others.
  • Mega Man Legends:
    • Mega Man Volnutt's voice changed between the first and second games; from the then-child actor Corey Seiver in the first to Susan Roman in the second (in other words, they went from averting Crossdressing Voices to playing it straight). Seeing as how both games were recorded in the same studio (and the rest of the cast remained unchanged), it was probably due to Corey reaching puberty between the two.
    • Less notably, Glyde also suffered a voice change between The Misadventures of Tron Bonne and Mega Man Legends 2, going from Michael Daingerfield to Toby Proctor. Tron Bonne herself remained consistent throughout the PS1 games (being voiced by Caroly Larson), but was voiced by Tara Platt in Marvel vs. Capcom 3.
  • Mega Man (classic): Ignoring the various cartoons (from both sides of the pacific) based on the franchise, only three games in the series featured voice overs: Mega Man 8, Mega Man Powered Up and Mega Man 11, all recorded in three different studios. Thus, Mega Man has been voiced by Ruth Shiraishi in 8, Cole Howard in Powered Up and Benjamin Diskin in 11. Roll was voiced (respectively) by Michelle Gazepis, Angie Beers and Erica Lindbeck, Proto Man by Jack Evans (8) then Jonathan Love (Powered Up), Dr. Light by Darryl Stogre, Randall Wiebe and Doug Stone, and Dr. Wily by Douglas Kendall, Dean Galloway and Keith Silverstein.
  • Mega Man X: The series has circulated through three studios, so:
    • X was voiced by Ruth Shiraishi in Mega Man X4, Peter von Gomm in Mega Man X7 and Mark Gatha from Mega Man X8 to Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X. Additionally, Michael Donovan voiced him in the Ruby-Spears cartoon.
    • Zero was voiced by Wayne Doster in Mega Man X4, Jack Merluzzi in Mega Man X7 and Lucas Gilbertson from Mega Man X8 to Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X. Additionally, in Marvel vs. Capcom 3, he is voiced by Johnny Yong Bosch.
      • In Japan, Zero was first voiced by Ryōtarō Okiayu in Mega Man X4, but when the first Mega Man Zero was released, he was voiced by Yuuto Kazama. This is a strange case, because Capcom hires either one of these actors depending on which form of Zero is being used (Okiayu for X series Zero and Kazama for Zero as he appears in his own series) and they have always reprised their roles respectively.
    • Sigma was voiced by Charlie Fontana in Mega Man X4, Walter Roberts in Mega Man X7, Dave Pettitt in Mega Man X8, and Gerald Matthews in Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X.
  • Mega Man Battle Network: MegaMan.EXE has had three voice actors total: Andrew Francis voices him in the anime, Jeffrey Watson takes the part in 5 Double Team DS and Colleen O'Shaughnessey took over in his special participation in Onimusha Blade Warriors.
  • Done within the same game in Heavy Rain for the DLC The Taxidermist, where the character of Madison Paige (the only returning character) quite blatantly has a completely different voice. This was because The Taxidermist had been created as a gameplay demo a couple of years before release, when the final voice actors hadn't been cast. Quantic Dream just decided to save the trouble of recording Madison's lines again with the actress from the main game.
    • Fans of Quantic Dream's previous games will notice that Madison's voice actress for The Taxidermist is the same as Carla Valenti from Indigo Prophecy.
  • Although James McCaffrey voiced the character in all three games, in Max Payne series writer Sam Lake modelled for Max in the first game, was replaced by the irreconcilably different-looking Timothy Gibbs in the sequel owing to the project's bigger budget, and then in the third game Max is modeled after his actor. Lampshaded in one of the second game's fourth-wall-breaking dream sequences, when one of Max's doubles looks at himself and says "I've been switched! I didn't use to look like this!"
    • Max was originally to have a different voice actor in the third game, due to the Time Skip. However, Rockstar Games bowed to fan outcry and cast McCaffrey again; it helps that, with the long period of development, McCaffrey had aged about the same rate Max had between the two games.
  • One of the changes made for GoldenEye (2010) was to replace Pierce Brosnan's James Bond with Daniel Craig. To make the replacement less jarring, all of the other characters in the single player campaign have also had their appearances completely altered as well. They're all new designs (some based on the voice actors), but it does fail a little in terms of polish.
    • Most of the Electronic Arts-published Bond video games were only able to secure the likenesses of the film characters, but not their voices (the exceptions being Agent Under Fire, which modeled Bond after Andrew Bicknell; Everything or Nothing, with one of its major selling points being that they managed to get Brosnan, Judi Dench, and John Cleese voicing Bond, M, and Q, respectively; and 007: From Russia with Love, in which Sean Connery returned to voice Bond as he'd played him in the film; notably, the latter two were respectively Brosnan's and Connery's last times playing the character). After Craig replaced him and Activision acquired the game license, however, it was almost guaranteed that Bond and the other MI6 staff would be voiced by the same people playing them in the films - the only time it wasn't the case was 007 Legends, as Craig was busy actually acting as Bond in a film during its development.
  • For Conduit 2, Mark Sheppard's Agent Ford was replaced by Jon St. John. Kevin Sorbo's Prometheus was also replaced.
  • Marty McFly in Back to the Future: The Game is not voiced by Michael J. Fox (for understandable reasons), but by a voice-acting newcomer named AJ Lo Cascio. The story goes that when AJ first spoke his lines as Marty during a recording session, it was similar enough to Fox that it completely surprised Christopher Lloyd.
    • Later on however, Michael J. Fox voiced multiple characters in the fifth episode of the game ("OUTATIME") as cameo roles.
    • Biff Tannen and George McFly have been given new voices in the form of Kid Beyond and Michael X. Sommers (respectively, who also voice Kid Tannen and Arthur McFly), replacing Tom Wilson and Crispin Glover.
  • Ulala was the only major returning character in Space Channel 5 Part 2 to keep the same (English) voice actor (besides Space Michael).
  • Video game versions of Mobile Suit Gundam in America tend to go through Other Darrin moments. Among those were any game that used Heero Yuy (Mark Hildreth, who came to absolutely hate the character due to how he was treated by "fans" during recording of the series) and Domon Kasshu (Mark Gatha, who retired from voice acting in 2006 to become an orthopedic surgeon).
    • A noticeable change was in Mobile Suit Gundam: Encounters in Space, which had replaced the voices of everyone from Mobile Suit Gundam 0080: War in the Pocket and Mobile Suit Gundam 0083: Stardust Memory both in game and the 0083 cutscenes. This was because 0080 and 0083 were dubbed by Bang-Zoom and the game was using Ocean Group.
    • Gundam vs. Zeta Gundam makes this noticeable in a particularly weird way in its English version. In the game, there's a mission mode where, if you play your cards right, you can initiate a What If? story in which the original Mobile Suit Gundam's One-Year War is fought with characters and technology from Mobile Suit Zeta Gundam. Thing is, Gundam was dubbed by Ocean Group, while Zeta was dubbed by Bluewater, and the game goes out of its way to use the appropriate voice clips for characters depending on the setting (e.g. Amuro talking in Brad Swaile's voice in OYW-set fights and in Matthew Erickson's for Zeta-set ones), so characters who showed up in both series will randomly change voices depending on what happens in that story mode (such as Amuro talking in Erickson's voice for story dialogue, then butting in with Swaile's voice to shout about Char).
  • In the Broken Sword series, the main character George Stobbart's voice is always Rolf Saxon. But Nicole Collard, the second main character in most of them, has been voiced by a different actress in each game: Hazel Ellerby in The Shadow of the Templar (also known as "Circle of Blood"), Jenny Caron Hall in The Smoking Mirror, Sarah Crook in The Sleeping Dragon, Katherine Pageon in The Angel of Death (also known as Secrets of the Ark) and Emma Tate in The Serpent's Curse.
  • Dead or Alive: Kasumi was first voiced by Sakura Tange. From Dead Or Alive 3 onwards, she is voiced by Houko Kuwashima - although Dead Or Alive Ultimate 2 had the option to choose between Tange and Kuwashima.
    • Tina also had a different VA in the first game before her current actress Yuko Nagashima took over. Bayman was voiced by Hisao Egawa in the first two games and by Banjo Ginga in all the following ones. Dimensions had numerous replacements, notably seeing Jann Lee, Brad Wong, Raidou, Leon, Bass, and Gen Fu all recast with new voice actors (though in the latter three examples, it's justified as their original voice actors [Koji Totani, Daisuke Gori and Takeshi Aono, respectively] passed away before recording for the new game).
    • On the English side of things, almost all of the characters returning for Dead or Alive 5 from DOA Dimensionsnote  had different voice actors, with the only exceptions being Ryu Hayabusa (Troy Bakernote ), Hayate (Yuri Lowenthal), Hitomi (Eden Riegel), Tina (Kate Higgins) and Brad Wong (Grant George).
  • Castlevania: Rondo of Blood for the PC-Engine starred Jin Horikawa as Richter Belmont, Yoko Teppozuka as Maria Renard and Hiroya Ishimaru as Dracula. In its PlayStation sequel Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, they were replaced by Kiyoyuki Yanada, Chisa Yokoyama, and Norio Wakamoto in that order.
  • Between Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, a few characters were recast. Victoria Kruger replaced Mika Simmons as Isabela, because there were concerns about the vocal similarity between Isabela and Queen Anora being too obvious with Isabela in a more major role. Adam Howden replaced Greg Ellis as Anders because Ellis couldn't commit to the recording schedule for such a major character. Merrill was a bit part in the first game voiced by Erin Matthews, and when she became a full party member for Dragon Age II, she was recast with Eve Myles.
  • The first expansion pack for First Encounter Assault Recon has a brief section where you meet up with Norton Mapes again, who has a different voice actor than he did in the base game. What makes this especially odd is that the other major returning characters (Holiday, Jin, and Fettel) all kept their original voice actors, and the second expansion managed to bring back Commissioner Betters' actor as well (his only lines in Extraction Point were re-used from the original). Most other characters to show up in more than one game are subject to this, however - Genevieve Aristide goes from Meg Savlov in the first game to Jen Taylor in the second, Jin Sun-Kwon goes from Susanna Burney in the first to Kim Mai Guest in the third, and Harlan Wade, though keeping Grant Goodeve as his voice for a single line in the second game, is replaced by a different actor entirely for the third; the only characters to keep the same voice across every appearance in the series are Paxton Fettel, who is consistently Peter Lurie, and the Replica soldiers, who are always Mark Lund.
  • BlazBlue has a nasty habit of changing VAs every time there is a new Continuum Shift game. Some were quasi-identical (Julie Ann Taylor as Mu-12 sounds like Cristina Vee's Mu-12 and Spike Spencer as Hazama), others were quite jarring (Steve Kramer as Bang in place of Tony Oliver, and Laura Bailey as Rachel instead of Mela Lee) and Doug Erholtz makes a better Hazama than Erik Davies when back then, people thought it was Erholtz who plays him in Calamity Trigger and Continuum Shift.
    • Keeping with Extend, the next game, BlazBlue: Chronophantasma has reversed almost all of the VA changes (which was due to time constraints causing a rushed localization effort), though the switches for Bang and Hazama look to be permanent for the time being.
  • Bishop, Token Evil Teammate for Neverwinter Nights 2, was voiced by Asa Siegel in the first campaign. He, or rather his Wall of the Faithless-absorbed-soul, reappears in a Dream Sequence in Mask of the Betrayer voiced by Dave Walsh.
  • Between [PROTOTYPE] and [PROTOTYPE 2], Alex Mercer's voice actor went from Barry Pepper to Darryl Kurylo.
  • The voice actor of Mordin Solus was changed from Michael Beattie in Mass Effect 2 to William Salyers in Mass Effect 3.
    • In the Italian version of Mass Effect 2, male Sheppard is voiced by Giacomo Zito rather than Claudio Moneta, who voiced him in the first and third games. The fact is actually explained as an extra tidbit in the Italian version of the ending credits: Claudio Moneta was involved in a car accident when he already voiced 4/5 of the game, and rather than replacing him for the last part of the game they just redubbed all his lines from scratch. The dub also replaced Tali, Liara and Udina's voices, but Liara's voice from the first game came back for the third game.
    • In the Polish dub of Mass Effect 2, Shepard's voice actors went from Marcin Dorociński and Magdalena Różczka to Łukasz Nowicki and Agnieszka Kunikowska.
  • Don Jordan, who played Irving Lambert from Splinter Cell, was inexplicably replaced by Dennis Haysbert for Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow and then just as inexplicably returned for the rest of the series. Anna Grimsdóttir was in the same boat - first voiced by Claudia Besso, replaced by Adriana Anderson for Pandora Tomorrow, then back to Besso for Chaos Theory and Conviction. In Blacklist, Grim's voice was replaced again, by Kate Drummond, as was Sam's, going from Michael Ironside to Eric Johnson for that game; mirroring the Pandora Tomorrow instance, however, Ironside came back to voice him for a crossover mission in Ghost Recon Wildlands. Ironside can also be heard as Sam in the teaser for Ghost Recon Breakpoint's first DLC, "Deep State".
  • The video game adaptation of Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law had the entire cast reprise their roles except for Stephen Colbert as Phil Ken Sebben and Myron Reducto; they were instead respectively voiced by Stephen Stanton and Crispin Freeman.
  • Between Rainbow Six: Vegas 1 and 2, every voice actor except for Jung Park's was replacednote . Michael Walters is the only other returning character who really sounds anything like he originally did, by way of having the only new actor who bothered retaining the character's distinctive accent - most notably, Logan Keller's Texan accent in the first game disappears entirely in the day or so between its missions and the final one of the second.
    • An example between mediums came about from the beginning of the series, where John Clark was played by Willem Dafoe in the 1994 film version of Clear and Present Danger, but then for the Rainbow Six games, from the original through Raven Shield and its expansions and console ports, he's voiced by Douglas Rye. For Lockdown he was replaced by Jamieson Price, who was in turn replaced again for his brief speaking-only role in the prologue to Vegas 2.
  • Persona:
    • For Persona 4: Arena and Persona 4 Golden, Erin Fitzgerald voices Chie Satonaka in place of Tracey Rooney, who played her in the original English dub of Persona 4. Sam Riegel also took over for Dave Wittenberg's Teddie.
    • Likewise, Fuuka Yamagishi had her English voice actress from Persona 3 (officially uncredited, but probably Paula Tiso) replaced for Arena and Persona Q: Shadow Of The Labyrinth (also unofficially uncredited, but probably Wendee Lee).
    • Also, in the second half of Persona 4: The Animation, Kanji Tatsumi's English lines are done by Matthew Mercer, since Troy Baker was on honeymoon. Baker reprised the role for Golden and Arena, but in the next Persona installments, Matt was chosen to reprise Kanji instead, as Baker had become a unionized voice actor (Wittenberg did not return to play Teddie for the same reason).
    • Naoto was voiced by Anna Graves in 4, Golden, and the original Arena; it was changed to Mary Elizabeth McGlynn for the anime, and for the second Arena game and Persona Q, it changed again to Valerie Arem.
    • Due to scheduling conflicts, Ashly Burch took over as Rise in Persona 4: Dancing All Night for Laura Bailey. At this point, the entire Investigation Team has been Darrin'd with three exceptions: Johnny Yong Bosch (Yu), Yuri Lowenthal (Yosuke), and Amanda Winn-Lee (Yukiko) are the only returning dub voices for the Investigation Team.
    • In Persona 3, Ken Amada was voiced by Mona Marshall; for Persona 4: Arena Ultimax and Q, he is instead played by Cindy Robinson, who also voiced the new character Labrys from the Arena games. Also changed for Ultimax and Q were Margaret (Marisha Ray replacing Michelle Ann Dunphy) and Theodore (Bryce Papenbrook replacing Travis Willingham).
    • The very first Persona had a revolving door of actors for the Japanese version, with most of the characters having two to three VAs apiece: one for the game, and two different actors for two different CD dramas. The main protagonist, for example, actually had Akira Ishida (the VA for Persona 3's protagonist) as his VA for the first CD drama, but had two different ones for the second and for the game itself.
    • Igor, the mysterious proprietor of the Velvet Room, had a reduced presence in the Persona 3 and 4 spinoffs due to the death of his original Japanese VA. His lines in the anime and Arena are recycled, with the Velvet Siblings taking up most of his role instead. They finally got a replacement voice actor, Masane Tsukayama, just in time for Persona 5. This is actually a plot point. Tukayama actually voices Yaldabaoth posing as Igor, and this trope is invoked by the game to draw away suspicion from him. The real Igor still uses recycled lines. In the English version, Dan Woren is replaced by David Lodge. Double subverted when it turns out Lodge's Igor is an impostor, but the real Igor is voiced by a third guy, Kirk Thornton.
  • Midway replaced half of the digitized actors from the first two Mortal Kombat games in Mortal Kombat 3. The only ones who returned were Tony Marquez (Kung Lao), Richard Divizio (Kano, Baraka and Kabal), John Parrish (Jax) and Brian Glynn (Shao Kahn).
    • Eddie Wong replaced Ho Sung Pak as Liu Kang.
    • Kerri Hoskins replaced Elizabeth Malecki as Sonya Blade.
    • John Turk replaced Phillip Ahn as Shang Tsung and Daniel Pesina as Sub-Zero. Turk would go on to play all of the masked ninjas in Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3 as well.
    • In Ultimate, Becky Gable was brought in to replace Katalin Zamiar as the female ninjas (Kitana, Mileena and Jade).
    • Johnny Cage would be the last character whose actor was replaced. Originally, Midway was planning to leave him out of Mortal Kombat Trilogy due to the Creator Backlash that resulted when Dan Pesina posed in character as Cage for an ad for BloodStorm. But then they decided to bring Cage back by replacing Pesina with Chris Alexander.
    • On the voice-acting side of the coin, series creator Ed Boon provided the voice of Scorpion for the series up through Mortal Kombat: Armageddon. Starting with Mortal Kombat 9, the role was passed on to Patrick Seitz, although Boon still provides the voice-work for Scorpion's iconic "GET OVER HERE!"
  • In the Japanese version of Pokémon the Series: Black & White, Bianca is voiced by Shizuka Itō; in the trailer for Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, however, she is voiced by Ayana Taketatsu. This also happened in English: Bianca is voiced in the anime by Erica Schroeder (Bella Hudson), but in the trailer by Eileen Stevens. It's most likely because the aforementioned trailer and anime series are created by separate teams.
    • Same for the Italian version: Anime!Bianca is Benedetta Ponticelli, Trailer!Bianca is Sabrina Bonfitto.
  • Beat from Jet Set Radio does not have any of his original voice actors in the Sega Superstars series. Instead, he has a voice that sounds like a 12-year-old boy (even in All-Stars Racing, in which he appears in his Future incarnation, who is older, but yet he still sounds like he's 12!).
    • On the topic of Sega Superstars/All-Stars, Wreck-It Ralph has a replacement VA in All-Stars Racing Transformed, because it would've cost too much to get John C. Reilly (most game developers not published by EA or Activision can't afford big-name actors).
  • Perfect Dark: Joanna Dark's voice actress switched from Eveline Fischer in the original, to Laurence Bouvard in the prequel, also contributing to the loss of her accent (The former actress is British, the latter is American). Daniel Carrington's voice likewise switched from Chris Sutherland in the original to John Kay Steel; conversely to the above, this voice switch contributed to Carrington becoming, as noted on another page, 200% more Scottish than he was originally.
  • Due to the obvious effects of a ten year gap between it and the game before it, a vast majority of the characters from Marvel vs. Capcom 3 ended up gaining new voices, the Marvel side using voice actors from recent animated works such as Hulk Vs., The Spectacular Spider Man, Wolverine and the X-Men (2009), Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes and The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes. A few examples:
  • The cast between .hack//Roots and .hack//G.U. shifted. Roots was dubbed in Canada by The Ocean Group, while GU's voice work was done in America (Bang Zoom!).
  • In the first Call of Duty: Black Ops, Jason Hudson was played by Ed Harris. However, for Call of Duty: Black Ops II, he was replaced by Michael Keaton. Doesn't sound too bad on paper, but Keaton's voice is considerably less deep and gravelly than Harris's, and since the character was supposed to be 20 years older in the second game, the transition is quite rough.
    • Black Ops has a single-game example with John F. Kennedy - in the singleplayer mission "U.S.D.D." he is voiced by Chriss Anglin, who attempts to realistically mimic JFK's voice, while in the Zombies level "Five" he's voiced by Jim Meskimen, who goes the So Bad, It's Good route of the stereotypical, comedic exaggeration of JFK's voice.
    • Modern Warfare 3 replaced the actors for Overlord and MacMillan, though that can be justified (someone new could have taken over as "Overlord Actual" between the two games, and MacMillan is twenty years older than he was when we last saw him). Less justifiably, Nikolai's actor has also been replaced, complete with his final line from MW2 being redubbed with the new actor in the intro to MW3.
  • Advanced Variable Geo: Chiho is voiced by Hekiru Shiina in the first game and Yōko Asada in the second. The Variable Geo OVA, clips of which appear in Advanced V.G. II, features a completely different voice cast.
  • In Dark Seed Mike Dawson is portrayed by the creator of the same name, Mike Dawson. In Dark Seed II, Mike is portrayed by Chris Gilbert and apart from the wardrobe, there's almost no similarity between the two.
  • 007: From Russia with Love recast almost the entire film, due largely to the fact that the game was made forty-odd years later and, for example, Bernard Lee (M) died in 1981. However, the game traded itself in part on the fact that Sean Connery was convinced to voice James Bond, reprising the role for the first time since Never Say Never Again.
  • Borderlands 2 replaced the voice actors for both Roland and Mordecai. Roland went from sounding less like Unreal Tournament III's version of Malcolm (complete with gangsta-isms) who took everything not very seriously, to a very straight-faced leader-sounding sort of person. Mordecai was given an accent and a bit of a slur.
  • Ace Attorney: From the first through the fourth games in the series, Phoenix Wright was "voiced" (in "Objection!" shouts and the like) by Capcom producer Ben Judd. For both Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and Dual Destinies (where the character has actual lines), the part went to Sam Riegel. Also, Trevor White voices him in Professor Layton vs. Ace Attorney.
  • Isabela Keyes went through three voice actresses in the Dead Rising trilogy, where she was voiced by Kim Mai Guest in the original, Venus Terzo in the Case West portion of Dead Rising 2, and Veronica Diaz in Dead Rising 3.
  • Super Robot Wars BX features the following changes (due to the originals having already passed):
  • Super Robot Wars UX:
  • Super Robot Wars V
  • Mashin Hero Wataru received new voice actors in Super Robot Wars X; with the latter 2 due to the original passed away:
  • In Team Fortress 2 the Engineer is ordinarily voiced by Grant Goodeve, but when he was occupied Nolan North took over for the "Expiration Date" short. Likewise, the Soldier's voice actor Rick May came down with throat cancer and North had to do his trademark scream. May has since passed (to general mourning in the community), so it is assumed that Soldier will have to be recast in any future projects.
  • The cast of Hatoful Boyfriend is entirely birds, played by single still images of said birds, sometimes with clothes or blood drawn over top. Their creator refers to the birds photographed as their 'actors' and meticulously credits sources and requests the use of their images for each game and project. When Anghel's source didn't respond she brought in a new 'actor', likewise with Ryouta.
  • DuckTales Remastered is well known for WayForward being able to recruit virtually every possible voice actor from the old cartoon, even Alan Young (who was 94 at the time) and June Foray (who was 95). However, three actors had already passed on prior to this - Joan Gerber, Hal Smith, and Hamilton Camp, the voices of Mrs. Beakley, Gyro Gearloose, Flintheart Glomgold, and Fenton Crackshell/Gizmoduck. For this, Wendee Lee, Chris Edgerly, Brian George and Eric Bauza took up their roles respectively.
  • Under Night In-Birth:
    • In Melty Blood, Sion Eltnam Atlasia was voiced by Rio Natsuki. When she became a guest fighter in UNIB, Satomi Akesaka (Sion, now known as "Eltnum") took over the roles.
    • Subverted by the other Guest Fighter, Akatsuki from Akatsuki Blitzkampf: the trope seems to be played straight since the credits for Blitzkampf cite "Shouji Hijikata" as his seiyuu and UNIB lists Shinobu Matsumoto instead... but it looks like "Shouji Hijikata" is the aforementioned Shinobu Matsumoto, only now using his birth name rather than a pseudonym.
  • The video game Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers is notable for featuring Gyro Gearloose and Gladstone Gander as supporting characters as well as Merlock from DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp as the Big Bad, but Hal Smith, Rob Paulsen, and Christopher Lloyd did not get to reprise any of the characters (Hal Smith because he died long before the game was developed and the other two because they apparently weren't available). As a result, the former character is instead played by Frank Welker while the latter two are played by Corey Burton.
  • Altaïr from Assassin's Creed has a completely different voice and ACCENT between his appearances in the first game and Revelations, with a short repeated dialogue re-dubbed with the new actor. The change in accent could however be explained that in the first game it was being viewed with Abstergo's Animus, while in Revelations it's being viewed with the Assassins' Animus viewing Ezio viewing one of the Memory Seals, so it's possible the different Animi have different translation software.
  • BioShock 2 has Jodelle Ferland voicing the Little Sisters, as opposed to Juliet Landau - which was at least a teenager doing a Creepy Child, instead of a woman over 40. Landau still returned to the role in Burial at Sea.
  • Saints Row:
    • Somewhat present with the character creator system - players can choose from multiple different voices, which are made to fit different nationalities. The problem is that some of the nationalities change in almost every game. This is a problem because the player character is always the same one, meaning that the character's nationality might change from game to game. In addition, between Saints Row 2 and The Third, almost all of the voices changed, with only Kenn Michael hanging on as an option for male voices. Between the Third and IV, the voices remained consistent with the exception of the gimmick voice, changing from Steve Blum as a zombie to Nolan North as Nolan North.
    • In Saints Row: The Third, Shaundi is voiced by Danielle Nicolet rather than Eliza Dushku from her Saints Row 2 rendition. While the 2 version of Shaundi reappears in Saints Row IV, she is voiced by Jennifer Jules Hart rather than Dushku.
    • Saints Row IV features many characters returning from the earlier games in the series, either as simulations or their real selves. However, while many stayed, many underwent voice changes.
      • Benjamin King was voiced by the late Michael Clarke Duncan. Although Duncan was rescheduled to appear in the game, he died during production, so Terry Crews replaced him.
      • Tanya Winters was voiced by Mila Kunis in her original appearance. Here, Kunis is replaced by Ursula Taheriane.
      • Mr. Sunshine's voice went from Phil LaMarr to Phil Morris.
      • Phillipe Loren is voiced by JB Blanc rather than game designer Jacques Hennequet.
      • While William Sharp was cut from the final, unused voice lines of his still exist within the games files. However, his voice is drastically different and went uncredited in the games files. Justified in the sense that David Carradine, Sharp's original voice actor, had passed away in 2009.
      • A strange case with Cyrus Temple, who is voiced by Tim Thomerson in nearly all of his appearances in the game bar the first mission, where Richard Epcar voices him isntead.
  • The voice clips for Boogerman in his eponymous game were provided by Michael McConnohie. His Guest Fighter appearance in ClayFighter 63⅓ was voiced by Dan Castellaneta.
  • Multiple characters in Webkinz have had their voices changed repeatedly, most notably Ms. Birdy. While her original voice was almost grandmother-like, her new voice is higher-pitched and sounds younger. Tabby von Meow's voice was also changed in 2011.
  • Harry Flynn got another voice for the Uncharted 4 multiplayer. Valentine claims that he wasn't even contacted, while ND claims that they couldn't come to an agreement to get him to return.
  • Crash Bandicoot:
    • In the original game, Crash, Dr. Neo Cortex, and Dr. Nitrus Brio were all voiced by Brendan O'Brien. Chip Chinery provided Crash's voice in Crash Team Racing, then he was voiced by Steve Blum in Crash Nitro Kart and by Jess Harnell starting from Crash Tag Team Racing. Cortex was voiced by Clancy Brown from Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back to Crash Nitro Kart, where Lex Lang took over in Crash Twinsanity. Maurice LaMarche voiced Brio in Crash: Mind Over Mutant and Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy before being replaced by Tom Kenny in Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled.
    • David Siller originally provided Aku Aku's voice when he appears and disappears during gameplay in all of the games where he appeared as an item. In the cutscenes of Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped he's voiced by Mel Winkler up until Crash of the Titans, where he's now voiced by Greg Eagles.
    • N. Gin was voiced by O'Brien in his first appearance in Cortex Strikes Back. Corey Burton voiced him in the intro of Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of Cortex, Quinton Flynn voiced him in Crash Nitro Kart and Twinsanity, and Nolan North voiced him starting from Crash Tag Team Racing until Burton returned in N. Sane Trilogy and Nitro-Fueled.
    • In Cortex Strikes Back, Coco was voiced by Vicky Winters. Hynden Walch took over in Crash Team Racing, then starting from The Wrath of Cortex she was voiced by Debi Derryberry.
    • Papu Papu's grunts in the first game were provided by David Siller. Michael Gollom voiced him in Crash Team Racing, then Dwight Schultz in Twinsanity and beyond.
    • Uka Uka was voiced by Clancy Brown in his first appearances, up until Twinsanity where he's voiced by Alex Fernandez. In Crash of the Titans, he's given a completely new design and to go with it is voiced by John DiMaggio. In N. Sane Trilogy he goes back to his original design, with DiMaggio's take on the character sounding more like Brown's voice, though in Nitro-Fueled he went back to a voice that sounds more like his other roles.
    • DiMaggio also voices Ebenezer Von Clutch in Nitro-Fueled, who was originally voiced by Danny Mann.
    • Dingodile was voiced by William Hootkins in Warped, then by David Anthony Pizzuto in Crash Team Racing, Dwight Schultz in Crash Nitro Kart and Twinsanity, and Fred Tatasciore in N. Sane Trilogy.
    • Fake Crash was voiced by Michael Connor in Warped and Crash Team Racing, then by Dwight Schultz in Crash Nitro Kart and by Andrew Morgado in Nitro-Fueled.
    • N. Oxide was voiced by David Anthony Pizzuto in Crash Team Racing, then by Quinton Flynn in Nitro Kart and by Corey Burton in Nitro-Fueled.
    • Crunch was voiced by Kevin Michael Richardson in The Wrath of Cortex and Nitro Kart, then by Chris Williams in subsequent appearances until Nitro-Fueled had him voiced by Ike Amadi. Ironically, Richardson was in the same game, but as the voice of Stew Gizzard Lips, taking over from Duane Shepard.
    • Nina Cortex was originally The Voiceless, but her grunts in Twinsanity were provided by Susan Silo. In Crash Tag Team Racing to Mind Over Mutant she was voiced by Amy Gross, but was voiced by Debi Derryberry in the Nintendo DS version of Crash of the Titans, who reprised her role as the character in Nitro-Fueled.
    • Derryberry also took over as the voice of Pasadena O'Possum in Nitro-Fueled from Shanelle Workman in Tag Team Racing.
    • Roger Craig Smith replaces Quinton Flynn as the voice of Chick Gizzard Lips in Nitro-Fueled.
    • Crash Bandicoot 4: It's About Time sees yet another major cast shakeup, as Scott Whyte and Eden Riegel replace Jess Harnell and Debi Derryberry as Crash and Coco respectively, Ursula Taherian replaces Derryberry (who provided her various gasps and grunts in N. Sane Trilogy) and Misty Lee (her voice actress in Nitro-Fueled) as Tawna, J.P. Karliak replaces Corey Burton as N. Tropy despite Burton still voicing N. Gin and Oxide, and Roger Craig Smith replaces Tom Kenny as N. Brio. Lex Lang, Fred Tatasciore, and Greg Eagles do reprise their respective roles as Cortex, Dingodile, and Aku Aku, however.
    • Finally, Crash: On the Run! sees Harnell and Derryberry returning to replace Whyte and Riegel by way of reused voice lines from N. Sane Trilogy and Nitro-Fueled.
  • While many alternate skins in Marvel Heroes have different voice actors due to being different characters (Sam Wilson!Cap, Jane Foster!Thor, Spider-Gwen, etc.), some have different voice actors despite being the same character, including Spidey's alternate costumes being voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes instead of Drake Bell, film!Rocket being voiced by Nolan North as opposed to Steve Blum, and TV!Jessica Jones being voiced by Tara Strong instead of Mary Elizabeth McGlynn. Additionally, when Black Cat and Iron Fist were moved from being a boss and an NPC respectively to playable characters, Black Cat was voiced by Jennifer Hale instead of Ali Hillis and Iron Fist by Johnny Yong Bosch instead of JP Karliak.
  • DC Universe Online:
    • When the game first started, Arleen Sorkin had reprised her role as Harley Quinn. However, when creating new content, Arleen wasn't doing the voice anymore. Instead, they went for Jen Brown (Pyrrha Nikos of RWBY, Agent Carolina of Red vs. Blue).
    • When the game was first released, Adam Baldwin reprises his Superman: Doomsday role as the titular Man of Steel and Gina Torres voiced Wonder Woman. However, in later content, they were replaced with George Newbern and Susan Eisenberg in the respective roles, which, given Kevin Conroy was already Batman, means the DCAU Trinity is complete.
  • Injustice 2 features some characters change voice actors from the first game, including Steve Blum replacing Adam Baldwin as Hal Jordan, and Scott Porter and Taliesin Jaffe replacing Neal McDonough in the respective roles of Damian Wayne and Barry Allen.
  • From the English dub of the Neptunia series:
    • 5pb. is voiced by Mela Lee in the first game, and by Julie Ann Taylor in mk2, ReBirth2, and Re;birth3.
    • Some sources claim that Erika Lenhart voiced Rom in mk2, Victory, and Producing Perfection, before Carrie Keranen took over the role starting with Re;birth1. However, others claim that Carrie has played the role since day one.
    • Vert is voiced by Tara Platt in everything from the start of the series up to 2015 (that's nine games and the anime), but starting with Megadimension Neptunia VII, she is voiced by Carrie Keranen, who also voices Rom and Red. However, this may only be temporary as Tara said, in response to a tweet from a fan, that she was unavailable at those times.
    • Noire is voiced by Erin Fitzgerald throughout the entire series until 2016. At Anime Expo'17, an english trailer for Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online was showcased. During the showcase, a fan noticed and tweeted that Noire is voiced by a different person. Erin responded to the tweet by confirming that she is no longer voicing Noire as she stands on getting all games with SAG contracts. The voice actress replacing her is Erica Mendez. However, the strike ended on September 23, 2017, so while Mendez remained as Noire's VA in the game, the possibility of Fitzgerald returning to voice Noire again in future games is present.
  • The Wolfenstein series since it got proper voice work in 2001's Return to Castle Wolfenstein has nevertheless almost never retained voice actors between games, as per its tendency to go on near-decade-long Sequel Gaps and get handed off to a new company:
    • In Return to Castle Wolfenstein, what little B.J. Blazkowicz says is voiced by Matt Kaminsky, while the Director of the OSA is Tony Jay and Wilhelm "Deathshead" Strasse is voiced by an unknown and uncredited actor. For the 2009 Wolfenstein, B.J. is now Peter Jessop, and the Director and Deathshead are both Robin Atkin Downes. Interestingly, his assistant "Jack" isn't an example, as other sources indicate that the James Alcroft-voiced Jack from Return is a different person from the Shaun O'Hagan-voiced Jack in 2009.
    • In the 2009 game, Caroline Becker is Anna Graves, while in Wolfenstein: The New Order, she is now Bonita Friedericy, and B.J. is now Brian Bloom. Deathshead is a double-example, as his English lines are provided by Dwight Schultz, while those in German are Kaspar Eichel.
    • Wolfenstein: The Old Blood is a retake on the events of the first chapter from Return, but those characters who aren't replaced by expies have different voices - Agent One went from Jim Piddock to Ronan Summers, and Kessler went from another unknown actor to Urs Remond.
  • The Soul Series has had its own run in with the trope in the English version. In the jump from Soul Calibur II to Soul Calibur III, every character who had been in the series up to that point and had a voice actor got a new VA, with the weird exception being Xianghua, who kept Wendee Lee as her voice actress for the entire series. However, there have been even more changes for a few other characters, with little to no explanation for the change:
    • Tira's voice actress for her debut in SCIII is unknown, but Katie McNulty is known to have voiced her in every game since.
    • Setsuka was voiced by Kari Wahlgren originally, only for Tara Platt to take over in the subsequent game for no known reason.
    • Nightmare (Inferno) already had a different voice from Knightmare (Siegfried) but this is justified by the fact that they are technically different characters. However, he changed voice actors between III and IV from Patrick Ryan to Michael McConnohie, also justifiable due to the fact that this version of Knightmare physically changed between the two games and the voice change was one way to reflect this.
    • Cervantes got it worse than the rest of the cast; he was originally voiced by Warren Rodgerson in Soul Calibur II (who gave quite the hammy performance), but was replaced by Wally Wingert starting in III. He was then replace in Soulcalibur V by Patrick Seitz, justified by the fact that Cervantes actually gained a new body in V.
    • However, the most egregious vocal change is what happened with Siegfried. Nightmare (Siegfried) was voiced by Ted D' Agostino. When Siegfried became his own character in III, he was voiced by Crispin Freeman, a justifiable change due to the change in character, and a good one due to Crispin's great acting. However, Freeman was replaced by Roger Craig Smith for no reason whatsoever, and it's noticeable because the two actors sound nothing alike and Crispin's voice was much deeper. Smith continued to voice the character from IV onward.
  • In the Postal series, the title character of the Postal Dude has been more or less consistently voiced by Rick Hunter in every game, with two exceptions due to Rick Hunter being unavailable:
    • Hunter was dealing with personal issues during Postal III's development, so the role went to Corey Cruise. Interestingly, both actors returned for the Postal 2 DLC Paradise Lost (which was released after III), where Hunter regularly voices the Dude and Cruise acts as a split personality who suggests the Dude towards violence, occasionally takes over to threaten it, and eventually splits off into his own Dude.
    • For Postal 4, Hunter was once again unavailable due to existing work commitments, so Jon St. John takes over as the Dude.
  • Mafia II sees this as Rick Pasqualone voices Vito, who turns out to be the one to deliver the Pre-Mortem One-Liner to Tommy Angelo, the hero of the original Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven. In the original game, the line was voiced by Bill Buell.
    • Mafia: Definitive Edition, the remake of the original game, has completely new voices for the characters. For example, Andrew Bongiorno voices Tommy Angelo instead of Michael Sorvino, and Jeremy Luke voices Paulie instead of William DeMeo.
  • Fire Emblem:
  • Champions in League of Legends occasionally have their original voice actor replaced when they're given a legendary skin or a visual and/or gameplay overhaul:
    • Olaf is normally voiced by an unlisted VA in English and by Vicente Gil in European Spanish. His Brolaf skin is voiced by Logan 'Lomar' Margulies in English and by Paco Vaquero in European Spanish.
    • Kevin M. Connolly ordinarily voices Vladimir, but Gavin Hammon provides a Darker and Edgier voice for his Blood Lord skin.
    • Danielle McRae originally voiced Karma. After her 2013 rework, she's voiced by Rashida Clendening.
    • Nasus was voiced by Eugene McDaniels until his visual update in 2013 replaced him with Jonathan Adams.
    • Sejuani was voiced by an unlisted actor until Nicki Burke took over for her rework in 2013.
    • Veigar is ordinarily voiced by Bob Beal, but Scott McNeil takes over for his Final Boss Veigar skin. McNeil also voiced Maokai before his rework had him now voiced by Jay Preston, and Sion after his rework, taking over the role from J.S. Gilbert.
    • Elspeth Eastman voices Tristana after her 2015 rework, taking over from an unlisted actor.
    • Gangplank and Taric were originally voiced by Dennis Collins Johnson until their respective reworks had them now voiced by Matthew Mercer and Yuri Lowenthal.
    • Master Yi is ordinarily voiced by Micha Berman, but Greg Chun voices him in his PROJECT skin.
    • Poppy was voiced by an unlisted VA, then by Kate Higgins with her rework in 2015.
    • In English, Ryze was initially voiced by Adam Harrington until his third rework had him now voiced by Sean Schemmel. Likewise, his Mexican Spanish VA went from Humberto Vélez to Gerardo Vásquez, and his European Spanish VA went from Miguel Ayones to Antonio Abenójar.
    • Galio was voiced by David Lodge, then by Josh Petersdorf with his rework in 2017. Likewise, his Mexican Spanish VA was Blas García before being replaced by Beto Castillo for the rework.
    • Urgot was voiced by an unlisted actor before Paul M. Guyet took over for his 2017 rework.
    • Lucian is ordinarily voiced by Patrick Seitz, but T.J. Storm voices him in his High Noon skin.
    • Nunu and Willump were voiced by Cristina Milizia and Brian Sommer before their rework in 2018. After, Nunu is voiced by Lucas Jaye while an unlisted actor provides Willump's noises.
    • Ezreal was voiced by Kyle Hebert, then by Daniel Amerman with his visual update in 2018.
    • Renekton's first Mexican Spanish VA was Gabriel Pingarrón before he was replaced by Octavio Rojas.
    • Rumble's first Mexican Spanish VA was Manuel Bueno before he was replaced by Bruno Coronel.
    • Riven's normal European Spanish VA is Celia de Diego, but Alma Naranjo voices her Dawnbringer skin.
  • Destiny and Destiny 2:
    • In the original base game, your Ghost was voiced by Peter Dinklage, but it quickly became apparent that Dinklage's schedule wasn't free enough for him to regularly come back for expansions and sequels, so he stepped down and Nolan North took over (and has played the role ever since). They didn't even bother to try and hide the switch, as Dinklage and North's voices for the character are completely different.
    • North later had to fill in again, this time for Nathan Fillion, when a prior commitment prevented him for coming back to voice Cayde-6 for “Forsaken”. Unlike the above example, North does an extremely good imitation of Fillion, to the point that some people never even noticed the switch until it was pointed out. What's crazy about this example is that the commitment Fillion had was an Uncharted fan film where he played Nathan Drake... a role typically played by Nolan North. So North was being the Other Darrin for his own Other Darrin.
    • In her first appearance, Ana Bray was voiced by Jamie Chung. From Season of the Worthy onwards, the role was recast with Erika Ishii. Presumably, like Dinklage, Chung's schedule wasn't free enough to make regular returns.
    • Gina Torres was Ikora Rey's voice for the entirety of the first game and for most of her appearances in the second up until Season of the Splicer, which saw her replaced with Mara Junot.
  • In Zero Time Dilemma, almost none of the voice actors from Virtue's Last Reward return.
  • In Ghost Recon Breakpoint, Alex Mallari Jr. and Alix Wilton Regan replace Steve Byers and Andrea Deck as Nomad (male and female respectively).
  • Mortal Kombat 11 sees many of the returning characters were recast in this game:
  • The rerelease of the 1992 X-Men (1992) arcade game had redubbed the lines with all the characters voiced by Kyle Hebert and Mela Lee.
  • The Brazilian dubs for the Harry Potter games were made in São Paulo, thus they lacked the voice cast from the movies, all from Rio. (and at times it was limited: in the first game, Harry and Draco shared the same voice!)
  • God of War
  • In the tie-in game for Finding Nemo, Jess Harnell replaces Albert Brooks as Marlin and Barry Humphries as Bruce, and Jennifer Hale replaces Ellen DeGeneres as Dory. Bizarrely, Bruce's lines in the movie cutscenes were completely redubbed while Marlin and Dory's lines remain untouched.
  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom features Candi Milo voicing Chuckie Finster instead of Nancy Cartwright (who herself had replaced Christine Cavanaugh after the latter retired from voicing acting the previous year).
  • Half-Life: Alyx has James Moses Black replacing the late Robert Guillaume as the voice of Eli Vance. The role of Alyx herself, previously held by Merle Dandridge, was given to Ozioma Akagha in order to give her a more youthful voice, since Alyx is set five years prior to Half-Life 2.
  • Green Lantern: Rise of the Manhunters has Ryan Reynolds reprise his role from the film the game is based on as Hal Jordan, but every other character involved is voiced by a different actor from the one who played them in the movie.
  • MultiVersus:
  • When Nickelodeon All-Star Brawl had voice acting added in June 2022, most of the characters' previous actors reprised their roles, while others had stand-ins:

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