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This is a special sub-page for all of the predictions for future One Hit Wonderland episodes.

Note that these lists reflect artists who charted on Billboard's Hot 100 chart in the US. Some artists & groups listed here may have had considerable success outside the US or on genre-specific charts. For bands & artists with considerable genre-specific chart success and/or a large cult following (such as Modest Mouse), Todd most likely won't review them on OHW. Some bands & artists listed as one-hit wonders, especially in the "Very False" category, are often considered as such in the more general sense: "an artist or band whom your average person would only recognize one song from".

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    True One Hit Wonders 

Artists who only had one Top 40 hit on the Hot 100, and their other work either did not chart or charted below the Top 40; artists who only charted in the top 40 of the airplay chart due to the lack of a physical single release in the 1990s are also included in this category).

  • "1234" by Feist
  • "1985" by Bowling for Soup: The group preformed the theme song for Phineas and Ferb, and frontman Jaret Reddick had a recurring role as Danny, the frontman for in-show band Love Händel. Reddick is also the voice for Chuck E. Cheese since 2012.
  • "99 Luftballoons" by Nena: She was most popular in her native Germany with moderate success in Austria and Switzerland as well. Notably, the English version never charted, but the German version hit #2.
  • "3 Strange Days" by School of Fish
  • "A Bay Bay" by Hurricane Chris
  • "Aaron's Party (Come Get It)" by Aaron Carter: If Todd reviews this, he'll almost certainly bring up his more successful older brother Nick.
  • "About Us" by Brooke Hogan: Todd might not have kind words to say about this song, considering that Brooke is the daughter of WWE superstar Hulk Hogan.
  • "According to You" by Orianthi
  • "Addicted" by Saving Abel: The band had five Top 10 Mainstream Rock singles, but never came close to having another pop hit. Unlike acts like Shinedown or Seether, who remain successful on rock radio, Saving Abel has fallen into almost complete obscurity.
  • "Addictive" by Truth Hurts
  • "Afternoon Delight" by Starland Vocal Band: Todd already discussed the song in his "Worst of 1976" retrospect, calling it his #1 worst hit song of the year, so a more in-depth review of the band is not likely. However, 5 years before "Afternoon Delight", Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert co-wrote John Denver's first Top 10 hit song, "Take Me Home, Country Roads".
  • "A Girl Like You" by Edywn Collins
  • "All For You" by Sister Hazel
  • "All the Things She Said" by t.A.T.u.: Mentioned in the "Video Killed the Radio Star" episode.
  • "Amazing" by Alex Lloyd
  • "American Boy" by Estelle: Her role on Steven Universe would certainly be a talking point.
  • "Angel" by Amanda Perez: This song is notable for sounding extremely similar to Mariah Carey’s big comeback hit "We Belong Together", which it predates by two years.
  • "Another Dumb Blonde" by Hoku
  • "Anything" by 3T: Another major example of musical nepotism (they're nephews of Michael Jackson and were signed to his label MJJ Productions). They had multiple hits overseas, but this was their only charting single at home.
  • "Are You Jimmy Ray?" by Jimmy Ray
  • "Are You Gonna Kiss Me Or Not" by Thompson Square
  • "Around the World (La La La La La)" by A Touch of Class
  • "Babylon" by David Gray
  • "Back Here" by BBMak
  • "Bad Day" by Daniel Powter - The #1 song of 2006; he briefly touched on it in his "Drive By" review saying it was terrible, so he might go more into it.
  • "Barely Breathing" by Duncan Sheik
  • "Because I Got High" by Afroman
  • "Beds are Burning" by Midnight Oil: "Blue Sky Mine" and "The Dead Heart" almost breached the Top 40, and the band had more popularity in the alternate charts, plus in their native Australia and Europe.
    • Confirmed.
  • "Believe It or Not" (the theme to The Greatest American Hero) by Joey Scarbury
  • "Better Days (And the Bottom Drops Out)" by Citizen King
  • "Better Off Alone" by Alice Deejay
  • "Better Than You" by Lisa Keith
  • "Bitch" by Meredith Brooks: He used it for during the credits of his "Sexy Bitch/Chick" review, so he may revisit it. Her third single, "What Would Happen", was actually pretty successful at the time, peaking at #15 on the Mainstream Top 40, but it didn't quite crack the Hot 100's top 40 and is hardly remembered whatsoever today. If Todd does review her, he'll likely make comparisons to Alanis Morissette.
  • "Bitter Sweet Symphony" by The Verve: The band was essentially Screwed by the Lawyers after the manager of The Rolling Stones successfully sued The Verve for credit and royalties for the song's sampling of "The Last Time". After losing the writing credits, The Verve frontman Richard Ashcroft called "Bitter Sweet Symphony" "the best song Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have written in 20 years".
  • "Black Betty" by Ram Jam: Another victim of the "cover as a first hit" curse; the original (by Lead Belly) predates their version by almost 40 years.
  • "Blue (Da Ba Dee)" by Eiffel 65: Pretty much the definition of an Ear Worm and also incomprehensible lyrics. The group's follow up, "Move Your Body", reached the Top 10 on several European charts, but not in the States. The group were most successful in their native Italy.
    • Confirmed; however, Todd wanted to skip this one, if not for being his first OHW episode requested on Patreon.
  • "Born To Be Alive" by Patrick Hernandez
  • "Boston" by Augustana
  • "The Boys of Summer" by The Ataris: Similar to Alien Ant Farm, they are a pop punk/alternative rock group whose only big hit was a cover of a Top 10 song from the 1980s, with the original from Eagles frontman Don Henley. Like Alien Ant Farm, Todd likely won't have much good to say about the band.
  • "Breakfast at Tiffany's" by Deep Blue Something: It was #1 on his top 10 songs about mediocre romance. He can revisit it in its own episode.
  • "Breathless" by The Corrs
  • "Brokenhearted" by Karmin
  • "Bulletproof" by La Roux: The preceding single, "In for the Kill", reached #1 on the US Dance charts, and was featured prominently in trailers for Bayonetta and Dredd.
  • "Butterfly" by Crazy Town: If Todd does review them, he'll likely call them the "poor, poor, poor man's Red Hot Chili Peppers", not helped by the fact Crazy Town's only hit samples the RHCP song "Pretty Little Ditty".
    • Confirmed; however, Todd called them a poor man's 311.
  • "Call to the Heart" by Giuffria
  • "Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)" by Us3
  • "The Captain of Her Heart" by Double
  • "Cashin' Out" by Ca$h Out
  • "Chain Hang Low" by Jibbs
  • "Chanté's Got A Man" by Chanté Moore
  • "Chasing Cars" by Snow Patrol
  • "Check Yes Juliet" by We The Kings
  • "Chinese Food" by Alison Gold: Todd may decide to avoid this one because Alison Gold was so young at the time. On the one hand, he has claimed on Twitter that she made the song bad on purpose to become the next Rebecca Black, which might kill most of the sympathy he could've had for her. On the other hand, he might put most of the blame on Ark Music Factory — even if Alison herself did think making intentionally bad songs was a great idea, the adults at Ark should've stopped her from embarrassing herself with bad songs she'd likely regret in the future (the fact that we haven't heard anything from her for years suggests that she might indeed regret them). If Todd does make a video on her, expect him to bash the infamous "Shush Up" music video, which sexualized the still-preteen Alison and generated so much backlash for it that Alison never released anything else and Wilson's career never recovered.
  • "Cigarettes will Kill You" by Ben Lee
  • "Coco Jamboo" by Mr. President: Because of the band's name this could be fitting for the 2016 election season.
  • "Collide" by Howie Day
  • "Come With Me Now" by KONGOS
  • "Constant Craving" by k.d. lang: She had more success on the alternative charts and in her native Canada.
  • "Counting Blue Cars" by Dishwalla: Hinted in his "Flood" review along with "One of Us" by Joan Osborne.
  • "Crazy" by Gnarls Barkley: Cee Lo Green is a rather interesting case in terms of being a one-hit wonder. Technically, Cee Lo himself is not a one-hit wonder (although he only had one hit as a lead and the other a featured spot); however, his four hits came from three different acts. Brian Burton, on the other hand, has only gone top 40 as part of this duo.
  • "Crazy for This Girl" by Evan and Jaron: Todd mentioned the duo in his review of Nine Days' "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)".
  • "Criminal" by Fiona Apple
  • "Cruel To Be Kind" by Nick Lowe
  • "Crush" by Jennifer Paige
  • "Dancing in the Moonlight" by King Harvest
  • "Dangerous" by Kardinal Offishall: Despite being wildly popular in his native Canada for over a decade when this song was released, he hasn't touched the Hot 100 since.
  • "Days Go By" by Dirty Vegas
  • "Dead Skunk" by Loudon Wainwright III
  • "Der Kommissar" by After The Fire: A victim of the "cover as a first hit" curse, the original was from Falco; speaking of whom, the cover version was briefly mentioned in his review of "Rock Me Amadeus".
  • "Do You Love Me" by The Contours: The band also had several songs chart under the Top 40, and the song also remains well known for being in Dirty Dancing.
  • "Dog Police" by Dog Police: When Todd first showed it in his review of "Mexican Radio", fans had a field day. Considering that he even suggested in that video that he wanted to make a video on this song, it's only a matter of time.
  • "Don't Give Up on Us" by David Soul: Best known as Hutch from Starsky & Hutch.
  • "Don't Wanna Fall in Love" by Jane Child
  • "Don't Worry, Be Happy" by Bobby McFerrin
  • "Drank in My Cup" by Kirko Bangz: He hasn't even reached the rap charts since, let alone the Hot 100. The Rap Critic already reviewed it, but that didn't stop Todd from reviewing "Ridin'".
  • "Drop It Low" by Ester Dean
  • "Duffle Bag Boy" by Playaz Circle: The presence of a pre-fame 2 Chainz in the duo would certainly be a major talking point.
  • "Face Down" by Red Jumpsuit Apparatus
  • "Fall For You" by Secondhand Serenade
  • "Fantasy" by Aldo Nova: While new wave had already been popular since 1978, this was one of the first American hits that embraced the Big '80s aesthetic full-on, complete with a lengthy intro, shredding guitar riffs, loud synthesizers, and deliciously over-the-top vocals. Todd has stated he considers 1982 the first true year of the '80s, so like Toni Basil, expect an episode on Aldo Nova to focus heavily on how MTV was just starting to massively influence the pop charts at the time. Unlike "Mickey", this seems like the type of retro cheese song that Todd would absolutely love.
  • "Far Behind" by Candlebox
  • "Flagpole Sitta" by Harvey Danger
    • Confirmed
  • "Flava in Your Ear" by Craig Mack
  • "For You I Will (Confidence)" by Teddy Geiger: He released only one other single (which failed to reach the Hot 100). As hinted in the review of "Stitches" and "What Do You Mean?" (the former was cowritten by Geiger), Todd DOES NOT have very nice things to say about him.
  • "The Freshmen" by The Verve Pipe
  • "Fuck It (I Don't Want You Back)" by Eamon: He hinted about visiting Eamon again after putting the song on in his "Worst of 2004" list.
  • "Funkytown" by Lipps Inc.: In the "Worst of 1987" retrospect, Todd stated that he doesn't like the song, but acknowledged that it earned its place in pop culture history thanks to its Ear Worm hook. Said episode brought up the song due to a cover by Pseudo Echo, who themselves are a one-hit wonder outside of their native Australia. Todd called the band a "poor, poor, poor man's INXS", and stated that "Funkytown" worked better as a disco song rather than a blaring, synth-heavy rock song.
  • "The Future's So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades" by Timbuk3
  • "Get Ready for This" by 2 Unlimited: The duo were more popular on many European pop charts; however, they had a few additional hits on the US dance charts.
  • "Gigolo" by Nick Cannon
  • "Girl" by Paul Wall
  • "Girl Next Door" by Saving Jane
  • "Glad You Came" by The Wanted: Sure, it's recent, but that doesn't mean Todd can't do an episode on them. They did well in the UK and were a major act of the new boy band wave of the 2010s, but their career across the pond was blown to pieces by One Direction. This is the kind of act Todd would say "deserved better," because they're a group who were ruined by a rival act rather than undergoing a natural decline. He even put the song on the honorable mentions for 2012's best list.
  • "Goin' Crazy" by Natalie
  • "Goodbye" by Kristinia DeBarge
  • "Gotta Tell You" by Samantha Mumba
  • "Got to be Real" by Cheryl Lynn
  • "Groove is in the Heart" by Deee-Lite.
    • Confirmed.
  • "Handlebars" by Flobots
  • "Harper Valley PTA" by Jeannie C. Riley: First woman to top the Country Charts and Hot 100 with the same song.
  • "Hate Me" by Blue October
  • "Haunted House" by Jumpin' Gene Simmons: It's barely remembered whatsoever today, but it was a sizable hit in 1964, and Todd could easily revive the annual Spooktacular episode of One Hit Wonderland with it. No, the performer has nothing to do with the member of Kiss.
  • "Headstrong" by Trapt
  • "Heart and Soul" by T'Pau
  • "Heartbeat" by Don Johnson: Like Eddie Murphy, Don Johnson tried to capitalize on his popularity by adding a singing career.
  • "Heaven" by DJ Sammy: Another victim of the "cover as first hit curse", the original was from Bryan Adams.
  • "Heaven" by Los Lonely Boys
  • "Here Comes The Hotstepper" by Ini Kamoze
  • "Here (In Your Arms)" by Hellogoodbye
  • "Here It Goes Again" by OK Go
    • Confirmed
  • "Hemorrhage (In My Hands)" by Fuel: The band were more successful on the alternative and mainstream rock charts.
  • "Hey Baby!" by Bruce Channel: This song was highly influential to The Beatles, who started using the harmonica in their songs after touring with the track's harmonica player Delbert McClinton, who became a one-hit wonder himself nineteen years later with "Giving It Up for Your Love".
  • "Hocus Pocus" by Focus: The band's follow up, "Silvia", hit number 89 on Billboard and is largely forgotten today.
  • "Hood Figga" by Gorilla Zoe
  • "Hot Child in the City" by Nick Gilder: Was the lead singer of the band Sweeney Todd, who were not one-hit wonders in Canada.
  • "How Can I Ease the Pain" by Lisa Fischer
  • "How Do You Talk to an Angel" by The Heights: The theme song to the short-lived TV series of the same name about a Fake Band. They never released another single. Jamie Walters, who starred in the show and sang lead on the song, had a hit on his own with 1995's "Hold On", but it's nowhere near as remembered.
  • "The Hustle" by Van McCoy
    • Confirmed.
  • "I Can't Stand the Rain" by Ann Peebles.
  • "Ice Cream Paint Job" by Dorrough: Briefly discussed during his review of Wiz Khalifa's "Black and Yellow".
  • "If I Could Go" by Angie Martinez
  • "I Got 5 on It" by Luniz
  • "I Love College" by Asher Roth
  • "I Loved Her First" by Heartland
  • "I Love You Always Forever" by Donna Lewis: Her follow up, "Without Love", just missed the Top 40.
    • Confirmed
  • "Iko Iko" by The Belle Stars: A cover of the '60s song by the Dixie Cups, popularized by the movie Rain Man. They also recorded "Sign of the Times", which was a huge hit in their native UK during the early '80s but only reached #75 in America, although it's better remembered now. The band itself is notable for its large, all-female lineup and distinct blend of new wave and pop-dance.
  • "I'm Awesome" by Spose: Canadian audiences may recognize the song as the Real Song Theme Tune of the CBC sitcom Mr. D; his Cracked article on his experiences with the music industry would certainly be a talking point.
  • "I'm Too Sexy" by Right Said Fred: Todd mentioned the group in his review of "Sexy and I Know It", so a more in-depth review may be inevitable.
    • Confirmed; however, Todd stated that he deliberately avoided this one for a long time due to being too obvious and his desire to cover more obscure acts on the show.
  • "In a Big Country" by Big Country
  • "In My House" by Mary Jane Girls
  • "In the Meantime" by Spacehog
  • "In The Year 2525" by Zager & Evans: If Todd covers them, expect a reference to the parody version of the song from the Futurama episode "The Late Philip J. Fry".
  • "It Feels So Good" by Sonique
  • "I Touch Myself" by Divinyls: The group were most successful in their native Australia.
    • Confirmed
  • "I Try" by Macy Gray
  • "It's My Life" by Talk Talk: The 2003 version by No Doubt, which peaked at #10, eclipses the original, which only peaked at #31.
  • "It Takes Two" by Rob Base & DJ EZ Rock
  • "I've Never Been Me" by Charlene
  • "I Wanna Be Bad" by Willa Ford
  • "I Wanna be Rich" by Calloway: Called "Milli Vanilli with talent".
  • "I Will Love Again" by Lara Fabian
  • "Joey" by Concrete Blonde
  • "Jump Around" by House of Pain: In his FAQ, he calls this his favorite one-hit wonder. You know he's going to review it one day, perhaps for his last "One-Hit Wonderland" episode.
    • Confirmed.
  • "Just the Girl" by The Click Five: Todd mentioned them in his review of "Tonight, Tonight" and later in his "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)" review, calling the group a throwaway act, meaning he's not likely to cover them.
  • “Just the Two of Us” by Grover Washington, Jr.
  • "Keep Your Hands to Yourself" by The Georgia Satellites: The group did have a handful of hits on the Mainstream Rock chart.
  • “Key Largo” by Bertie Higgins
  • "King Without A Crown (Live from Stubb’s)" by Matisyahu: "One Day" (featuring Akon) scraped the bottom of the pop chart four years later, but its Hot 100 run was less impressive.
  • "Knockin' Boots" by Candyman
  • "Knock on Wood" by Amii Stewart
  • "Kryptonite (I'm on It)" by Purple Ribbon All-Stars
  • "Laffy Taffy" by D4L
    • "Dey Know" by Shawty Lo
    • Confirmed
  • "Lean Back" by Terror Squad: It's doubtful that Todd would review this, as frontman Fat Joe was not a one-hit wonder.
  • "Lean like a Cholo" by Down AKA Kilo
  • "Legend of a Cowgirl" by Imani Coppola: One of the more unique hits of the late ‘90s, which spins a sample of Donovan’s "Sunshine Superman" into a bubblegummy alternative rap song with a country twist. Ten years later, she was one half of the duo Little Jackie, which achieved some minor success in the UK. If Todd covers her, expect a few comparisons to Lil Nas X, another black musician who released a genre-defying rap single with a country aesthetic.
  • "Liar" by Profyle
  • "Life is a Highway" by Tom Cochrane: Peaked at #6 in 1992. For a lot of people, especially for those born after 2000, the Rascal Flatts cover is the better-known version, due to its appearance in the opening credits for Cars; however, this version was never officially released as a single.
    • "Lunatic Fringe" by his former band Red Rider would be only "Somewhat True". #11 on the Mainstream Rock chart, nowhere on the Hot 100.
  • "Listen to Your Heart" by DHT: Pretty much identical circumstances to DJ Sammy.
  • "Little Talks" by Of Monsters and Men: While the follow-up, "Mountain Sound", didn't chart on the Hot 100, it was certified Platinum by the RIAA and peaked at #2 on the Alternative Charts. Todd may not cover this one since the song has only been out since late 2011/early 2012.
  • "Living Next Door to Alice" by Smokie: They were much more successful in their native UK.
  • "Love Like Woe" by The Ready Set: Briefly mentioned in the "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)" review.
  • "Lovefool" by The Cardigans: The song never charted on the Hot 100 due to their rules on airplay-only singles at the time; rock audiences may recognize "My Favorite Game".
    • Confirmed.
  • "Lovin' You" by Minnie Riperton: Todd even used a clip of the song in the "Grenade" review.
  • "Lullaby" by Shawn Mullins.
    • Confirmed
  • "Macarena" by Los Del Río
  • "MacArthur Park" by Richard Harris
  • "Makin' It" by David Naughton: An actor turned singer with only one song to his name.
  • "Mama Used to Say" by Junior
  • "Mambo #5" by Lou Bega
  • "Mary's Prayer" by Danny Wilson
  • "Me & U" by Cassie
  • "Me and my Broken Heart" by Rixton: Its sampling of "Lonely No More" is bound to be mentioned.
  • "Mercy" by Duffy: Came from Britain and pushed "retro-soul" around the same time as Adele started. But whereas Adele became one of the biggest pop stars in the world, Duffy disappeared. Todd would say she definitely deserved better!
  • "Miami Vice Theme" by Jan Hammer: The last true instrumental to be a #1 hit.
  • "Mickey" by Toni Basil
    • Confirmed
  • "The Middle" by Jimmy Eat World: The band had several hits on the Alternative charts, though are nowhere near as well-known as blink-182 or Incubus are. On his FAQs, Todd admits that he loves the band.
  • "Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm" by Crash Test Dummies: They had greater success in their native Canada.
  • "More and More" by Captain Hollywood Project
  • "Move Ya Body" by Nina Sky: They were featured on a top 20 N.O.R.E. song, but since it wasn't their hit, it doesn't count.
  • "Mr. Vain" by Culture Beat
  • "The Mummers' Dance" by Loreena McKennitt
    • Confirmed.
  • "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" by Steam: A huge staple at sporting events to this day.
  • "Never Leave You (Uh Oooh, Uh Oooh)" by Lumidee
  • "The Night Chicago Died" by Paper Lace: Todd mentioned it in the "Kung Fu Fighting" episode as an example of awful pop music from 1974. Their only other notable song, "Billy Don't Be A Hero", is better known in the US via its covered-up version by Bo Donaldson.
    • Confirmed.
  • "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia" by Vicki Lawrence: Even though it reached #1 on the Hot 100 in 1973, the 1991 version by country superstar Reba McEntire is better remembered. Vicki Lawrence did have a second hit on the adult contemporary charts with "He Did with Me"; however, she is probably more well known as a comedy actress than as a singer.
  • "No Letting Go" by Wayne Wonder
  • "No More (Baby I'ma Do Right)" by 3LW: A girl group from the early 2000s that eventually morphed into The Cheetah Girls. Former member Kiely Williams infamously attempted a solo career that went immediately up in flames, due to the enormous controversy of her debut single "Spectacular".
  • "No Myth" by Michael Penn
  • "No Pigeons" by Sporty Thievs: Released as a response song to TLC's chart-topping "No Scrubs".
  • "No Rain" by Blind Melon
  • "Ocean Avenue" by Yellowcard
  • "The One and Only" by Chesney Hawkes
  • "One of Us" by Joan Osborne: Hinted at in the "Flood" review along with "Counting Blue Cars" by Dishwalla.
  • "One Toke Over the Line" by Brewer & Shipley
  • "Ooh Aah… Just a Little Bit" by Gina G: One of the very few Eurovision songs to have crossed over into the Hot 100, and Todd does watch the show every year.
  • "Ooh Child" by The Five Stairsteps
  • "Pac-Man Fever" by Buckner & Garcia: Todd mentioned the song in his review of "Tubthumping", fearing that he may end up covering a novelty act after covering a more serious one-hit wonder, which indeed happened, albeit with "Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer".
  • "Paper Planes" by M.I.A.: Though she was a big deal when she first came out and had faint glimmers of critical acclaim, nothing she ever did critically or commercially even comes close.
  • "Party Like a Rockstar" by Shop Boyz
  • "Pass the Dutchie" by Musical Youth
  • "People Are Still Having Sex" by LaTour: A novelty dance song by a full-time radio disc jockey, similar to Rick Dees' "Disco Duck". It was released as a charity single for AIDS research. The controversially subversive spoken word lyrics, plus LaTour's unique resumé could make for a lot of interesting OHW material.
  • "Pictures of You" by The Last Goodnight
  • "Po' Folks" by Nappy Roots
  • "Pop, Lock & Drop It" by Huey
  • "Pop Muzik" by M
  • "Popcorn" by Hot Butter: Generally regarded as the first Synth-Pop song to become a hit, released way back in 1972. This song is actually an example of the cover as a first hit curse, as the original by Gershon Kingsley came out in 1969.
  • "Popsicles and Icicles" by The Murmaids
  • "Pray for You" by Jaron & the Long Road to Love
  • "Pump up the Volume" by M/A/R/R/S: An absolutely literal example, this being the only song they recorded.
  • "Pure" by The Lightning Seeds
  • "Puttin' On the Ritz" by Taco
  • "Rapper's Delight" by The Sugarhill Gang
  • "The Reason" by Hoobastank: Todd already discussed the song in his "Worst of 2004" retrospect; however, he stated that Hoobastank wasn't a bad band, albeit Incubus wannabes. Also, Hoobastank also had a few other hits on the alternative charts, but their overall body of work is less known than Incubus's or even Jimmy Eat World's.
  • "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)" by Digable Planets
  • "Respect Yourself" by Bruce Willis: A double whammy of a one hit wonder: it's both a film actor's vanity project and it's a cover. Todd did not include this song in his "Worst of 1987" retrospect, citing that he only wanted to include songs that he legitimately hated, although Todd did admit that Bruce Willis' only hit was an easy target for comedy material, so a more in depth review is a possibility.
  • "Return of the Mack" by Mark Morrison: A rare example of a black urban singer from the UK scoring a big crossover hit in America. The song is notable for sampling the beat from "Genius of Love", which was also the basis for Mariah Carey's "Fantasy". Mark Morrison actually scored several other hits off his debut album in the UK, but none of them were successful stateside, and even abroad they're forgotten today.
  • "Rock Yo Hips" by Crime Mob: The beat for "Knuck if You Buck" was used in the 2016 dance hit "Juju on That Beat", which Todd thoroughly trashed as the worst Vine song ever.
  • "Rush Hour" by Jane Wiedlin: Also known as the rhythm guitarist for The Go-Go's, she would make for a particularly interesting episode thanks to her kooky persona, bohemian lifestyle, and playing Joan of Arc in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure.
  • "Save Tonight" by Eagle-Eye Cherry
  • "Say Hey (I Love You)" by Michael Franti & Spearhead
  • "Seasons in the Sun" by Terry Jacks: A translation of a song in French by Jacques Brel. One of Todd's least favorite songs ever, according to his FAQ.
  • "Second Round K.O." by Canibus
  • "Sex & Candy" by Marcy Playground
  • "Sh-Boom" by The Chords: It's notable for being one of the first doo-wop songs to become a smash hit and is also one of the many contenders for the title of first rock and roll song. However, at the time, it was commercially overshadowed by the more conventional version by white Canadian boyband the Crew Cuts, and the group never had another hit in spite of their influence. Decades later, it was featured prominently in Pixar's Cars franchise. Surprisingly, the Crew Cuts version hasn't faded with time like Pat Boone's whitewashed covers have, in large part thanks to its use in film and television.
  • "Shackles (Praise You)" by MaryMary
  • "Shake It" by Metro Station
  • "Shattered (Turn the Car Around)" by O.A.R.: It reached #36, but "Love & Memories" reached #30 on the alternative charts. They have both a pop hit & a rock hit; either would be acceptable.
  • "She Blinded Me with Science" by Thomas Dolby
    • Confirmed.
  • "She's So High" by Tal Bachman: Mentioned during the Nine Days review.
  • "Shoulder Lean" by Young Dro
  • "Signs" by Five Man Electrical Band: It was covered by Tesla twenty years later, though only the original has endured in the public consciousness.
  • "Single White Female" by Chely Wright: She is nowadays most famous for being the first high-profile traditional country singer to come out as a lesbian.
  • "So Alive" by Love and Rockets
  • "Something in the Air" by Thunderclap Newman
  • "Sorry" by Buckcherry: They had a few rock hits (including "Crazy Bitch", their possible Signature Song to rock fans), but this is all pop audiences know them for. Todd hates the band and song, so he'll likely come down hard on them.
  • "Spirit in the Sky" by Norman Greenbaum
  • "Stacy's Mom" by Fountains of Wayne: Todd mentioned the group in his retrospect of "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)", calling the band one of the more respectable power-pop groups, so he would likely say that they deserved better if he reviews them.
  • "Standing Outside a Broken Phone Booth With Money in My Hand" by Primitive Radio Gods: This song is another victim of Billboard's rule regarding non-physical singles in the 1990s.
  • "Stars Are Blind" by Paris Hilton: If Todd does review her, he'll likely not have kind words for her, given that she is basically famous for being a socialite.
  • "Steal My Sunshine" by Len
  • "Stereo Love" by Edward Maya
  • "Still Not a Player" by Big Pun
  • "Stolen Dance" by Milky Chance
  • "Stumblin' In" by Chris Norman & Suzi Quatro: Chris Norman had a second top 40 hit with Smokie ("Living Next Door to Alice"), making him a double one-hit wonder. Suzi Quatro was more successful overseas than she was in the US.
  • "Sugar Hill" by AZ: Though he's probably most famous for his part on Nas's "Life's a Bitch", he managed to score a solid hit of his own a year later, ironically outperforming any of Nas' own Hot 100 singles (except "Street Dreams", which, unlike "Sugar Hill", missed Billboard's Year-End list) until "I Can" (which isn't even close to being his most famous track). AZ is often considered to be one of the most underrated rappers in history, so he would be quite an ideal subject for the show.
  • "Sukiyaki" by Kyo Sakamoto: Mentioned in the "Like a G6" episode.
  • "Surfin' Bird" by The Trashmen
  • "Tainted Love" by Soft Cell: Another victim of the "cover as a first hit" curse, at least in the States; Soft Cell was more successful in their native UK. Best of all, you can expect a Marilyn Manson end-of-video stinger!
  • "Take a Picture" by Filter: "Hey Man, Nice Shot" was more representative of the band's sound (and the only other song they're really known for); however, "Take a Picture" is the song they are better remembered for in the mainstream. Also, frontman Richard Patrick was a former touring guitarist for the more well known and popular Nine Inch Nails.
  • "Take Me to Church" by Hozier: While he is still recent, if he doesn't make a new album soon people will forget about him. Todd could elaborate on why he made it an Honorable Mention for the Worst list in 2014, which was a contentious opinion to say the least.
  • "Tarzan Boy" by Baltimora: This was the only song of the popular Italo Disco movement of the 1980s to become a real hit in America. It briefly recharted in 1993 upon its appearance in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III.
  • "Telephone Man" by Meri Wilson: A bubblegum novelty hit notable for its cheesy double-entendres. It became a staple hit of the Dr. Demento Radio Show.
  • "Tempted to Touch" by Rupee
  • "That's Not My Name" by The Ting Tings: The follow-up "Shut Up and Let Me Go", only reached #55 on the Hot 100; however, it was certified platinum by the RIAA and reached #1 on the US Dance chart.
  • "That's What Love Can Do" by Boy Krazy: A true anomaly on the American pop charts in 1993, when manufactured bubblegum was quickly falling out of style and R&B groups like TLC, SWV, and En Vogue were taking over. Despite being one of the last major hits by 1980s super-producers Stock Aitken Waterman, the most famous version of the song was stylistically a harbinger of the late '90s/early 2000s TRL pop movement and was even sampled on "We Can Work It Out", a non-album track by S Club 7.
  • "The Politics of Dancing" by Re-Flex: Another ‘80s British new wave one-hit wonder, whose sole hit is notable for its grim meta perspective of the music industry. It was recently featured on the soundtrack to Atomic Blonde.
  • "There It Go (The Whistle Song)" by Juelz Santana: Santana had a few hits as a featured artist, most famously Chris Brown's Breakthrough Hit "Run It!", but this was his only major success by himself.
  • "They're Coming To Take Me Away, Ha-Haa" by Napoleon XIV
  • "Throw Some D's" by Rich Boy
  • "Tonight Is the Night" by Outasight
  • "Too Shy" by Kajagoogoo: In the "Take On Me" review, he states that "Too Shy" wasn't a good song, and the band had bad hair.
    • "Neverending Story" by Limahl
  • "Total Eclipse of The Heart" by Nicki French: Another victim of the cover as first hit curse; the original was from Bonnie Tyler.
  • "Troublemaker" by Olly Murs
  • "Turn Me On" by Kevin Lyttle
  • "Turning Japanese" by The Vapors.
    • Confirmed.
  • "Turn the Beat Around" by Vicki Sue Robinson
  • "Under the Milky Way" by The Church
  • "Undercover Angel" by Alan O'Day
  • "Untouched" by The Veronicas
  • "Vehicle" by The Ides of March
  • "Venus" by Shocking Blue: While the original version did top the Hot 100, the 1986 cover by Bananarama may be the better known version to younger audiences.
  • "Video Killed the Radio Star" by The Buggles
    • Confirmed
  • "Wagon Wheel" by Old Crow Medicine Show
  • "Walk Away (Remember Me)" by Paula DeAnda: Her appearance on The Voice in 2014 would certainly be a talking point.
  • "The Warrior" by Scandal: Notably, this band is barely a true one-hit wonder because they had not one, but two follow up singles that peaked at #41. Frontwoman Patty Smyth eventually had one smash solo hit in 1992, "Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough", a duet with Don Henley, that went to #2, eclipsing this song's peak of #7.
  • "Wasting My Time" by Default: The group were much more popular in Canada and did about as well as Saving Abel on the rock charts.
  • "The Way I Live" by Baby Boy da Prince
  • "We Like to Party" by Vengaboys
  • "We No Speak Americano" by Yolanda Be Cool & DCUP: Neither act ever had another hit anywhere in the world.
  • "We Run the Night" by Havana Brown
  • "What I Am" by Edie Brickell and New Bohemians
  • "What Is Love" by Haddaway
    • Confirmed.
    • "What It's Like" by Everlast
  • "What You Got" by Colby O'Donis: He's probably best-known for his appearance in Lady Gaga's "Just Dance", but since it wasn't his hit and did nothing to help his career, it doesn't count.
  • "What's Left of Me" by Nick Lachey: Despite the success of 98 Degrees, his solo career didn't go nearly as well.
  • "What's Up" by 4 Non Blondes: He's mentioned on Twitter and in his FAQ that he hates this song, to the point that he may never review it, but you know he's going to give in one day, since ranting for 15 minutes about songs he hates pays the bills.
  • "When I'm With You" by Sheriff: This hit #1 four years after the band broke up. After a failed attempt to reform the band, the only members who were interested ended up forming Alias, who became a Two-Hit Wonder.
  • "Wherever You Will Go" by The Calling: Frontman Alex Band did have another hit with Santana in 2003, but this was the group's only top 40 hit. The group also had a few minor hits on the Adult Pop charts.
    • Confirmed
  • "Whine Up" by Kat DeLuna
  • "Who Dat" by JT Money: Money did have another minor hit as a featured artist.
  • "Whoomp! (There It Is)" by Tag Team: They're also notable for "Pig Power in the House", the tie-in rap song for the 1995 movie Gordy.
  • "Wicked Game" by Chris Isaak
  • "Wobble Wobble" by 504 Boyz
  • "You Gotta Be" by Des'ree: Her later single "Life" was a Top 10 hit basically everywhere but the US.
  • "You Get What You Give" by New Radicals: Mentioned in the "Flagpole Sitta" review.
    • Confirmed.
  • "You're Beautiful" by James Blunt: Hinted at in the "Lullaby" one-hit wonder review.
    • Almost reviewed it as a joke for a Patreon request, then backpedaled and did "Turning Japanese" instead. He could still do it, but it seems like this will only be as a last resort if he runs out of ideas at some point.
  • "Your Woman" by White Town: This song was written to be interpreted various different ways. Todd can explore them all. He can also talk about White Town being a one-man band.
  • The many one-hit wonder groups of Tony Burrows: Edison Lighthouse ("Love Grows [Where My Rosemary Goes]"), The Pipkins ("Gimme Dat Ding"), White Plains ("My Baby Loves Lovin'"), First Class ("Beach Baby"), and Brotherhood of Man ("United We Stand"), and by extension, the second Brotherhood of Man ("Save Your Kisses For Me")
  • An American Idol megasode, where he marathons a whole bunch of people on the show who either had only one top 40 hit or are remembered for only one (like David Cook, Kris Allen, Diana DeGarmo, Bo Bice, Josh Gracin, Mario Vazquez, Taylor Hicks, Elliott Yamin, David Archuleta, Blake Lewis, Lee DeWyze, Scotty McCreery, Phillip Phillips, and Lauren Alaina).

    Technically True One Hit Wonders 

Artists who have minimal top 40 success on the Hot 100; however, these artists are well known in the US, are massively successful internationally, very critically acclaimed, have a large and devoted fanbase, have multiple top selling albums, have multiple Top 10 hits on a genre-specific chart, and/or are influential in their genre. This also includes any artist who had success as part of one band, but had little to no success either as a solo artist or as part of another band. Todd most likely won't review these artists.

  • "4'33" by John Cage: Not even a "hit" in the literal sense. John Cage is also a noted experimental composer and one of the best modern classical composers. But still this is his most notable work and it would be fun to hear Todd review a song that is literally silence.
  • "All Along the Watchtower" by Jimi Hendrix: Although Jimi Hendrix is considered one of the most influential guitarists of all time and was right behind the Beatles and the Rolling Stones as the most legendary musicians of the 1960s, he did not see much Hot 100 chart success with his singles, but his albums did peak in the Top 20 in the Billboard 200. Technically, Jimi fell under the "cover as a first hit curse" as the original was from Bob Dylan.
    • Jossed in the Floaters OHW.
  • "All the Small Things" by Blink182: While the band only had one Top 40 hit, they received significant airplay on pop radio and MTV in the late 1990s & early 2000s and have several Top 10 hits on the Alternative Rock charts.
  • "Autobahn" by Kraftwerk: Despite having only having one Top 40 hit, Kraftwerk are considered to be one of the biggest pioneers of the electronic music genre and have influenced many artists including David Bowie, Björk, Depeche Mode, and Gary Numan to name a few.
  • "Axel F" by Harold Faltermeyer: This song is notable for being one of the few instrumental pop smashes of the 1980s. Faltermeyer generally abstained from the pop market, but has an extensive resumé as a soundtrack composer.
  • "Back for Good" by Take That
    • Jossed in the S Club 7 OHW episode.
  • "Bang a Gong (Get It On)" by T. Rex: While this was their only US Top 40 hit, Todd most likely won't review it because of the band's popularity in the UK (which he mentioned in the S Club 7 episode) as well as Marc Bolan's influence on Glam Rock.
  • "Because the Night" by Patti Smith
  • "Been Caught Stealing" by Jane's Addiction: A very influential hard rock band and one of the defining figures of the hard rock movement from the late 80s-early 90s. Also known for having trade off with Red Hot Chili Peppers with Flea and Dave Navarro playing for both bands. Nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016. Arguably, this isn't even their Signature Song, that being "Jane Says".
  • "Beverly Hills" by Weezer: "Buddy Holly" undoubtedly would've been a true hit had it not been banned from the Hot 100 due to Billboard's controversial rules at the time, as it reached #18 on the Hot 100 Airplay chart.
  • "Black Horse and The Cherry Tree" by KTTunstall, Although "Suddenly I See" is decently remembered.
  • "Blowin' Me Up (With Her Love)" by JC Chasez: Unlike Justin Timberlake, JC's solo music career didn't pan out. However, since he was part of *NSYNC and a member of The Mickey Mouse Club as a teenager, Todd might not review him.
  • "Broken" by Seether: Despite only one Top 40 hit (possibly due to the presence of Evanescence frontlady Amy Lee), the band remains a mainstay on the Mainstream Rock charts with multiple Top 10 singles.
  • "B.Y.O.B"note  by System of a Down: The band is well known for its political views, particularly if it involves Armenia, and have three #1 albums on the Billboard 200 as well as several hits on the Alternative and Mainstream Rock charts.
  • "Cars" by Gary Numan: An episode covering him is unlikely, considering that he is one of progentiors for electronic music and his success in the UK.
  • "Cat Scratch Fever" by Ted Nugent: While the Nuge only had one Top 40 hit, Todd is unlikely to review him on OHW. Ted Nugent is a very outspoken advocate for gun rights, hunters' rights, and other conservative values.
  • "Chariots of Fire" by Vangelis: The song is best known for its numerous parodies; however, Vangelis was also known for his work on the soundtrack for Blade Runner.
  • "Cherry Bomb" by The Runaways: Or perhaps he'll just review the movie instead. He could talk about how the band, specifically Cherie Currie inspired artists like Madonna, Lady Gaga and Miley Cyrus to perform with onstage outfits. Joan Jett and Michael Steele had considerable success post-breakup with the former as a solo artist and the latter as a member of The Bangles.
  • "Did My Time" by Korn: The creators of Nu Metal had a minor hit in 2002 with a song that isn't even close to being their signature.
  • "Don't Know Why" by Norah Jones: Despite only one hit, all five of her studio albums peaked in the Top 3 of the Billboard 200.
  • "Down with the Sickness" by Disturbed: To mainstream (i.e., Hot 100) listeners, they're almost solely known for this song, despite numerous Top 10 hits on the Mainstream Rock chart. Their cover of "The Sound of Silence" came this close to the Top 40 in 2016.
  • "Drive" by Incubus: Despite only one Top 40 hit, the band remains a mainstay on the alternative rock charts with multiple Top 10 hits and 4 albums peaking in the Top 5 of the Billboard 200.
  • "Epic" by Faith No More: People who watched Dirty Jobs may recognize its theme song, "We Care a Lot" (albeit only for the chorus), and "Midlife Crisis" topped the Alternative Charts. Also, Faith No More was considered one of the forefathers of the Alternative Metal genre, and Krist Novoselic stated that Faith No More was a huge influence on Nirvana. Metallica and Guns N' Roses, two of the biggest metal acts of the 1980s and early 1990s, called Faith No More one of their favorite bands, hiring them as the opening act for their co-headlining Stadium Tour back in 1992. A case can be made for them as a true One-Hit Wonder, as it's their only song known to mainstream listeners.
  • "Feel Good Inc." by Gorillaz. Their only 40 hit in the US, but were more successful in the UK, and "Clint Eastwood" is also fairly well-known in the States despite its low peak. He's made reference to them at least twice, so it's likely that he's a fan, and their Virtual Celebrity status would provided a different angle than the usual backstories.
  • "Firestarter" by The Prodigy: Technically, this was their only top 40 hit in the States; they were more successful in Europe. "Smack My Bitch Up" is better-known because of controversy surrounding the song and its music video, both of which were outright banned by certain networks and radio stations. MTV eventually decided to air the video due to high demand, albeit only after midnight with a disclaimer.
  • "For What It's Worth" by Buffalo Springfield: Both Steven Stills and Neil Young had greater success as part of Crosby, Stills and Nash, and the latter as a solo artist. Jim Messina, who was on the group's last album for two songs, also had some success with Kenny Loggins as part of Loggins and Messina.
  • "Genius of Love" by Tom Tom Club: Tom Tom Club is basically one-half of Talking Heads, comprised of husband/wife duo of Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth.
  • "Get Lucky" by Daft Punk. Another song that is very recent and could've been covered in "Pop Song Reviews", and Todd's favorite song of 2013. Daft Punk were big in Europe in their prime, but weren't very successful in the United States. The group has not returned to the Hot 100 since "Get Lucky", and since the comeback hype will be gone when their next album comes out, may never have another hit (on the Hot 100 at least) again.
    • Likely jossed, as they notched another Top 10 hit through a collaboration with the Weeknd called "Starboy" — and yet another Top 10 hit with the Weeknd with "I Feel It Coming".
  • "Give It Up" by Public Enemy
  • "Got a Hold on Me" by Christine McVie: Unlike Stevie Nicks, Christine only had two solo hits outside of Fleetwood Mac.
  • "Hallelujah" by Jeff Buckley: Though the circumstances behind it were, let's just say...tragic, the leadoff track from his one album is the one thing most people will know about him. Despite this, he is remembered as a great case of what could have been with a great legacy of just a few short tracks.
  • "Hallelujah" by Leonard Cohen: Likewise, the original song by Leonard Cohen is the only song general audiences know him by.
  • "Haven't Met You Yet" by Michael Bublé
  • "Hunger Strike" by Temple of the Dog: Todd most likely won't review this one, since the band was essentially Pearl Jam plus Chris Cornell from Soundgardennote ; both Pearl Jam and Soundgarden were part of the "Big Four of Grunge" and were popular in the earlier half of the 1990s.
  • "Icky Thump" by The White Stripes: The duo are one of the most successful and influential bands of the 2000s, having several hits on the alternative charts and three Top 10 albums. Also, Jack White is involved with two other successful bands: The Raconteurs and the Dead Weather, both of whom also have two Top 10 albums. Moreover, "Icky Thump" is not their most famous song: that distinction belongs to "Seven Nation Army."
  • "If We Make It Through December" by Merle Haggard
  • "Insane in the Brain" by Cypress Hill
  • "I've Got a Tiger By The Tail" by Buck Owens
  • "I Want You" by Thalia: She's one of the biggest pop stars in Mexico and managed to score one big hit in the English market in 2003.
  • "I Will Not Bow" by Breaking Benjamin
  • "Layla" by Derek and the Dominos: Eric Clapton himself is not a one-hit wonder; however, this was the only hit under this band.
  • "Loser" by Beck: Beck has several hits on the alternative charts as well as several Top 20 albums on the Billboard 200.
  • "Lost in You" by Garth Brooks (under the pseudonym Chris Gaines): Even though Chris Gaines was the short-lived rock alter-ego of country megastar Garth Brooks, Todd could look into this as an entity separate from Garth, particularly because the Chris Gaines persona was developed for a movie that never came to fruition. Also, despite his success, Garth Brooks never released any of his many country hits to pop radio.
  • "Me and Bobby McGee" by Janis Joplin: She had another Top 20 hit with "Piece of My Heart" as part of Big Brother and the Holding Company. Despite minimal success on the Hot 100, she paved the way for female musicians in rock music.
  • "Me, Myself, and I" by De La Soul: While their guest appearance on the Gorillaz' "Feel Good Inc" charted higher on the Hot 100, "Me, Myself, and I" remains their best known work (since, well, it's actually their song). Also, De La Soul were known as one of the progenitors of the Alternative Hip Hop subgenre and earned a respectable number of hits on the Hot Rap Songs chart with their eclectic sampling and quirky lyrics.
  • "Miss Murder" by AFI: Despite only one Top 40 hit, they were far more successful on the alternative charts & aren't usually considered a one-hit wonder.
  • "Never Had a Dream Come True" by S Club 7. Not only do they have numerous hit singles globally, they were just as famous in the US for their television series, which made their other international hits fairly well-known in America even though they didn't chart on the Billboard Hot 100.
    • Confirmed.
  • "New World Man" by Rush: Despite only having one Top 40 hit which is not even considered their Signature Song (that distinction belongs to either "Tom Sawyer", "Limelight" or "The Spirit of Radio"), Rush's discography is very well known with several Top 10 hits on the Mainstream Rock charts and over 25 million albums sold in the US. The band's members are also widely well known for their musical proficiency.
  • "No Hands" by Waka Flocka Flame: Despite having only one top 40 hit, he's very successful on the urban format & isn't usually considered a one-hit wonder.
  • "Nothing Compares 2 U" by Sinead O'Connor: She is no stranger to controversy; one of O'Connor's many infamous moments was her destroying a photograph of Pope John Paul II during her performance on Saturday Night Live, which earned her a lifetime ban from the show.
  • "One Nation Under a Groove" by Funkadelic
  • "Pepper" by Butthole Surfers: Possibly the most likely candidate from this category. "Pepper" (#26 on the airplay charts) was the only time the band flirted with the mainstream. However, the band has a notable cult following and combined punk with psychedelia, being considered a precursor to grunge. They are prominent and influential, but intentionally avoided the mainstream.
    • Confirmed
  • "Pictures of Matchstick Men" by Status Quo: Although this debut single, which isn't even representative of their signature sound, was their only American hit, they went on to become infamous in their native UK not only for being an boogie rock band whose songs all sound the same, but also their longevity; they're one of the only music acts in history to score major hit singles in five consecutive decades, spanning all the way from this track's release in 1968 to "The Party Ain't Over Yet" hitting #11 in 2005.
  • "Praise You" by Fatboy Slim: Has other famous songs, such as "The Rockerfeller Skank" (peaked at #76 in the Hot 100), "Weapon of Choice" (specially the music video starring Christopher Walken) and "Right Here, Right Now". He is most successful in his native Britain.
  • "Radar Love" by Golden Earring: About ten years after "Twilight Zone" hit #10 and is about as well remembered, but this is still their Signature Song. Notable as one of the most successful Dutch acts in the English-speaking world.
  • "Ramblin Man" by The Allman Brothers Band: Despite only a handful of Top 40 hits, the Allman Brothers are considered one of the big three of Southern Rock along with Creedence Clearwater Revival and Lynyrd Skynyrd. Also, "Jessica" was well known as the theme for the BBC motoring program Top Gear.
  • "Rehab" by Amy Winehouse: Even though she only had one Top 40 hit in the US in her relatively short career, Amy Winehouse was very influential among recent female pop singers, including Adele, Lady Gaga, and Lana Del Rey to name a few.
  • "Relax" by Frankie Goes to Hollywood: It was hugely popular to the point of cultural phenomenon, not to mention pretty dirty even by modern standards. However, while it's their only huge hit in America, the band were hit-making giants in their native Britain, where "Two Tribes", "The Power of Love", "Welcome to the Pleasuredome", and "Rage Hard" all reached the top 5, with the former two peaking at #1 and still being fairly well known today. Since Todd stated that an artist's level of success in the UK weighs heavily over whether or not he chooses to cover them on OHW, he may instead opt to cover Frankie Goes to Hollywood on Trainwreckords for their infamous Sophomore Slump album Liverpool.
  • "Remember The Name" by Fort Minor: "Where'd You Go" was their actual one hit, but "Remember The Name" is their more famous song, particularly for its use as a sports anthem and as a recurring movie soundtrack song. However, Todd might not review this since Fort Minor is the hip-hop side project of Linkin Park frontman Mike Shinoda.
  • "Rockit" by Herbie Hancock
  • "Running Up That Hill" by Kate Bush
  • "Say Man" by Bo Diddley
  • "Say You Won't Let Go" by James Arthur: In the UK, he's one of the biggest stars of the same male singer/songwriter craze of the 2010s that produced Ed Sheeran, but this has been his only charting hit in America. While it only attained stateside popularity in 2017, Todd never commented on it on his show.
  • "Second Chance" by Shinedown: Even though Todd said "Second Chance" was terrible during his "Best of 2009" retrospect, they had a long streak of Top 5 Mainstream Rock hits. Notably, "If You Only Knew" came within inches of being a top 40 hit but fell short in the end.
  • "Song 2" by Blur: Despite being one of the progenitors for the Britpop movement, their rivals Oasis were the face of Britpop Stateside. While Blur are very popular and influential in Britain, "Song 2" is pretty much the only thing they're known for in the U.S., and even then, most Americans only recognize the "Woo-hoo!" part of the chorus to the point that they don't know the song is called "Song 2". However, frontman Damon Albarn is also known for the Gorillaz project.
    • Jossed in the S Club 7 OHW episode.
  • "South Side" by Moby: This was his only hit in the American mainstream; however, Moby had much more success on the US Dance chart and on the UK chart.
  • "Stay" by Eternal. One of the biggest British girl groups of the 1990s, famous in the US only for their debut single.
  • "Straight Outta Compton" by N.W.A.: It became their sole top 40 hit upon the release of its eponymous film. During the group's late '80 prime, however, their music was simply too controversial to garner the mainstream promotion necessary to do well on the Hot 100. Todd could possibly cover this track for the show if the episode's specific focus is how different the pop charts are today, when controversial rappers handily swallow up the Hot 100, compared to 1988, when anything remotely provocative tended to show up on niche charts at best.
  • "Summertime Sadness" by Lana Del Rey
  • "Swear It Again" by Westlife: The group had several #1's in the UK and their native Ireland, though this was their only Top 40 hit in the US.
  • "Thinkin' bout You" by Frank Ocean: Despite only one Top 40 hit, he remains popular on R&B circles and is well known for his collaborations with Jay-Z and Kanye West. Also one of the most outspoken LGBT people in the Urban music circle.
  • "Through Glass" by Stone Sour: Stone Sour has several top 10 hits on the Mainstream Rock charts, making the song more of a fluke pop hit than an actual one hit wonder. Moreover, Stone Sour is fronted by Corey Taylor, the lead singer of the metal band Slipknot, who, although far better known than Stone Sour, have never once cracked the Hot 100.
  • "Touch of Grey" by The Grateful Dead: Though they had only one mainstream hit, The Grateful Dead are a highly influential classic rock jam band and were known for being especially innovative as a live act, and have an extremely devoted fanbase, especially in the concert tape trading community.
  • "Uprising" by Muse: Probably Jossed once and for all when Todd brought them up in his "Beds are Burning" video. He said they did fine despite only one Top 40 hit and may have redefined the definition of the term.
  • "Valley Girl" by Frank Zappa: Frank Zappa's discography spans nearly 100 albums. Zappa's career covered many genres, and many artists and bands cite Zappa as a major influence, including, but definitely not limited to, Black Sabbath, Alice Cooper, George Clinton, Primus, System of a Down, and "Weird Al" Yankovic.
    • Jossed in the Floaters OHW.
  • "Walk On The Wild Side" by Lou Reed
  • "The Way I Am" by Ingrid Michaelson: Despite only one Top 40 hit, two of her albums have gone Top 5 on the Billboard 200 album chart; "Girls Chase Boys" is also somewhat well-known despite its lower peak.
  • "We're Not Gonna Take It" by Twisted Sister: "I Wanna Rock" is also considered their Signature Song, however, it only peaked at #68.
  • "Werewolves of London" by Warren Zevon
  • "Where Are U Now" by Skrillex & Diplo
  • "Whip It" by Devo: Though most casual listeners regard them as a one-hit wonder, Todd will most likely not review Devo because of their influence on the new-wave and electronic pop genres. Also, frontman Mark Mothersbaugh has a considerable career as a composer for many TV show, film, and video game soundtracks. Todd is a fan of Devo as well.
  • "Why Can't I?" by Liz Phair
  • "Wonderwall" by Oasis: Oasis was one of the biggest acts from Britain during the 1990s despite only one major Billboard Hot 100 hit; and even in the U.S. are an important figure of '90s pop culture and very influential on today's indie rock. Aside from their music, the band was quite notorious for their fascination with The Beatles as well as the volatile tempers of brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher, the latter of which ultimately broke up the band.
    • Likely jossed, since Todd already covered Oasis on Trainwreckords.
  • "Youth of the Nation" by P.O.D.

    Somewhat True One Hit Wonders 

Artists and bands who never had a Top 40 hit on the Hot 100, but had one low charting single (or one high charting single on a genre-specific chart) which received significant exposure, such as regular airplay, being in a highly popular film, being a viral internet sensation, or being controversial in some capacity. Many of these songs didn't chart high due to Billboard's rules in place at the time of their release and some never became well-known until long after their heydays.

  • "1901" by Phoenix: "Lisztomania" was also pretty popular, though.
  • "212" by Azealia Banks: Nowadays better known for being a firebrand on Twitter than a rapper.
  • "6 Underground" by Sneaker Pimps
  • "88 Lines About 44 Women" by The Nails: Todd expressed interest in covering the song in the "I Love You Always Forever" episode.
  • "Alright" by Supergrass
  • "Axel F" by Crazy Frog
  • "The Bad Touch" by Bloodhound Gang: While discussing LMFAO's "Sexy and I Know It" during the "Worst of 2011" retrospect, Todd noted that the Bloodhound Gang put a high level of thought and creativity in every line.
  • "Blind" by Hercules and Love Affair
  • "Bodies" by Drowning Pool: The band has a respectable number of hits on the Mainstream Rock chart; however, "Bodies" remains the only song they are well known for outside of rock audiences. The song often draws controversy, especially after tragedies occur, due to the misinterpretation of the lyrics; the song also drew attention when it was used as audio torture in Guantanamo Bay. Notably, while the band's instrumental lineup has remained the same from its beginning, the band had four different lead singers on their six albums, with only Ryan McCombs and Jasen Moreno lasting for two albums each; the band's original lead singer (and the one that sang "Bodies"), Dave Williams, died unexpectedly of an undiagnosed heart problem while on tour.
  • "Born Slippy .NUXX" by Underworld
  • "Bounce" by Sarah Connor: She's a major pop star from Germany who briefly crossed over to America during the early 2000s, when pop music was increasingly flirting with hip hop. Also, her name is a pretty big elephant in the room.
  • "Bound for the Floor" by Local H
  • "Boyz-n-the-Hood” by Dynamite Hack
  • "Breakdown" by Tantric
  • "Brimful of Asha" by Cornershop
  • "Cha Cha Slide" by DJ Casper: Still an iconic dance song, played regularly at school dances across the country.
  • "Chocolate Rain" by Tay Zonday: A hit in terms of the viral sense. Mentioned in the "Here It Goes Again" review.
  • "Click Click Boom" by Saliva: They had five Top 10 hits on mainstream rock radio, and a #1 alternative hit with "Always", but they're best remembered for a song that didn't chart that well. The only other songs by them that anyone seems to remember are the ones used for WWE pay-per-view events, the revived ECW brand, and Batista.
  • "Clubbed to Death" by Rob Dougan: This song was popularlized through The Matrix.
  • "Common People" by Pulp: Only by an American perspective and debatably could be placed with the "Technically True" category. Got a Colbert Bump when Shatner covered this, but in their native UK were definitely NOT one-hit wonders.
  • "Crank it Up" by Static Major: The #1 smash hit "Lollipop" was his true "hit" but that was a Lil Wayne song with him as merely a featured credit. Blame Author Existence Failure for his small catalog (even "Lollipop" was a posthumous hit).
  • "Don't Walk Away" by Toni Childs: Since Todd doesn't normally talk about world music, it could be an interesting episode.
  • "Dragostea Din Tei" by O-Zone: The song achieved notoriety Stateside in the "Numa Numa" viral video, and was later sampled in TI's "Live Your Life".
  • "Enter the Ninja" by Die Antwoord: A very controversial rap group from South Africa. Never reached the Hot 100 in the States but ruffled feathers worldwide regardless.
  • "Ever Fallen in Love (With Someone You Shouldn't've)" by The Buzzcocks
  • "Fairytale of New York" by The Pogues feat. Kirsty MacColl: This has become a Christmas staple in the UK.
  • "Flavor of the Weak" by American Hi-Fi: This just missed the top 40 of the Hot 100, peaking at #41, but it did much better on the Mainstream Top 40, reaching #15, not to mention #5 on the Alternative Songs chart.
  • "Friday" by Rebecca Black. Didn't even hit the Top 40, but was still notorious via Memetic Mutation. Had Billboard incorporated YouTube views in its chart calculations back in 2011, it could have very well made at least the Top 20, even possibly #1, at its peak. The Glee cover did crack the Top 40 at #34, however.
  • "Friends & Family" by Trik Turner
  • "The Funeral" by Band of Horses: This song never charted and the band actually had three songs chart higher on the AC and Alternative charts. But this song has been used in so many trailers and sampled by everything under the sun, so it is their most notable song regardless.
  • "Ghost Town" by The Specials: They were leaders in the 2 Tone movement, which dominated the UK but never gained any traction in America, which was in the midst of its post-disco, pre-MTV recession for popular music at the time. However, the band's debut album (which did not contain "Ghost Town") is a beloved cult classic, and their version of "A Message to You, Rudy" continues to get airplay, even in the US.
  • "Go Cubs Go" by Steve Goodman: With the Cubs winning their first World Series in over a century, this song from the '80s has reappeared on the radar.
  • "Grace Kelly" by Mika: He had several hits in the UK but this is his most notable song in America.
  • "Gucci Gucci" by Kreayshawn
  • "Hallelujah" by Jeff Buckley: See "Technically True" above. On the 20th anniversary of Grace and after an American Idol cover, this song hit #1 on iTunes and were it not for Billboard's policy regarding re-entries, could very well have cracked the Top 40.
  • "Hallelujah" by Leonard Cohen: See "Technically True" above.
  • "Heaven Coming Down" by The Tea Party: A hugely popular band in both Canada and Australia, but only hit #1 on the rock charts with this song.
  • "He's Gonna Step On You Again" by John Kongos: One of the first songs to use tape looping effects. This was Covered Up by Happy Mondays, but John found vicarious success through his sons (themselves a one-hit wonder).
  • "Hideaway" by Kiesza
  • "Home" by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes: Only #9 on Hot AC and nowhere on the Hot 100. This is another case where Revival by Commercialization made this song more popular than the charts would suggest.
  • "Hot Hot Hot" by Arrow or Buster Poindexter: Poindexter is an alter ego of New York Dolls frontman David Johansen, and the songs sounds nothing like those he makes with his band.
  • "Hot Problems" by Double Take: This "song" didn't even chart on the Hot 100; however, like "Friday", it got notoriety by Memetic Mutation, with some people even claiming that the song is worse than "Friday".
  • "How You Like Me Now?" by The Heavy: Peaked nowhere near the Hot 100, but Revival by Commercialization made this song popular regardless, especially amongst Borderlands fans.
  • "I Am Very Glad, as I'm Finally Returning Back Home" by Eduard Khil (a.k.a the "Trololo" song): Memetic Mutation has made this a must-listen.
  • "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" by The Darkness: They were much bigger in their native U.K. but this is all they're really known for on the other side of the pond.
    • Confirmed.
  • "I Don't Want a Lover" by Texas: Despite their name, this band is actually from Glasgow (they derived their name from the movie Paris, Texas). They managed to attain some mild attention with this song in 1989, a year when both alternative rock and neotraditional country were just starting to blow up, but have been mostly forgotten in America since. Notably, they mounted a huge Career Resurrection with their 1997 New Sound Album White on Blonde, but this only cemented their one-hit wonder status in the US, where the record failed to chart and only produced one mild hit on the Adult Top 40 chart with "Say What You Want". A big reason for their lack of post-comeback success in America is that they had completely shed their country influence in favor of a mixture of hip hop and adult alternative, making their name even more misleading than before.
  • "If You Can Only See" by Tonic: Its excellent performance on Billboard's Hot 100 Airplay chart implies it would've easily been a true hit had the rules not excluded it from the Hot 100.
  • "I Know What Boys Like" by The Waitresses: Chris Butler, the mind behind the band, went on to make a song that lasts more than two hours.
  • "I Like to Move It" by Reel 2 Real: The song is known for appearing in Madagascar eleven years after its release.
  • "I Melt With You" by Modern English
  • "The Impression That I Get" by The Mighty Mighty Bosstones
  • "I'm Ready" by Cherie: The song is best known for either sampling Foreigner's "Urgent" or its appearance on the Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen soundtrack. In her native France and the rest of Europe, Cherie has performed mononymously under her actual first name Cyndinote  since 2007 and as Cindy Alma since 2012.
  • "I'm Shipping Up to Boston" by Dropkick Murphys: The song gained considerable popularity when it was featured in The Departed. However, it never entered the Hot 100 despite being certified platinum by RIAA by digital sales; the song reached #1 on the "Bubbling Under Hot 100" chart. The band remains popular in the New England area (making them an unlikely candidate for a OHW review), and the song continues to serve as an anthem of Boston-area sporting events, especially at Boston Red Sox games.
  • "It's Thanksgiving" by Nicole Westbrook
  • "I Want Candy" by Bow Wow Wow: Another victim of the "cover as a first hit" curse; the original was by The Strangeloves.
  • “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” by Gayla Peevey: She later scraped the bottom of the Hot 100 with “My Little Mariner” (under the pseudonym Jamie Horton), but it’s completely forgotten today.
  • "Jerk it Out" by Caesars: notable for its presence in the iPod silhouette ads during the mid-2000s.
  • "The Ketchup Song (Aserejé)" by Las Ketchup: This was a #1 hit in several countries but only charted at #54 in the US.
  • "Ladies" by Sarai: This white female rapper scored one moderate airplay hit in 2003, eleven years before Iggy Azalea emerged an international superstar.
  • "Lay Me Down" by Dirty Heads: They had a few more hits on the alternative charts.
  • "Lemon Tree" by Fools' Garden
  • "Letters from the Sky" by Civil Twilight
  • "Life Less Ordinary" by Carbon Leaf: Considering he grew up in southern Virginia, he has confirmed to be familiar with this band. The song only peaked at #5 on the AC charts, but is still well-known enough to be considered one hit.
  • "Like a Feather" by Nikka Costa: Although she has collaborated with many other successful artists and had her music featured in many commercials, this song, popularized by a Tommy Hilfiger commercial, was her only charting hit.
  • "Love Missile F1-11" by Sigue Sigue Sputnik: In the mainstream, it is best known as the background song in the opening monologue of Ferris Bueller's Day Off and was also featured in the Wave 103 playlist in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City.
  • "Love Will Tear Us Apart" by Joy Division: Reputable among critics but have this one song as somewhat ubiquitous. Is tied directly with Ian Curtis' Author Existence Failure. Spinoff band New Order are generally not considered one-hit wonders.
  • "Low" by Cracker: "Teen Angst" hit #1 on the alternative charts in 1994, but it's not nearly as well remembered.
  • "Mad World" by Gary Jules and Michael Andrews: This cover of a popular Tears for Fears song hit #1 in the UK, eclipsed the original, and was memorably featured in Donnie Darko. Jules disappeared afterwards and Andrews is mostly known as a composer & producer. In the "I Believe In A Thing Called Love" episode, Todd mentioned that the Jules version was overrated.
  • "Marquee Moon" by Television
  • "Mexican Radio" by Wall of Voodoo
    • Confirmed
  • "Midnight City" by M83: Todd says this is the only band he knew before they were popular.
  • "Miss Misery" by Elliott Smith: Is a similar case to Jeff Buckley, but has a larger discography.
  • "Mother Mother" by Tracy Bonham: Like Meredith Brooks, she's mostly notable for her stylistic similarities to Alanis Morissette, who was at the height of her fame at the time of this song's release.
  • "Mountain Man" by Crash Kings: Rock band without a guitar section, just a bass and a few keyboards. #1 rock hit in 2010, but were so broke after that they were forced to Kickstart their second album.
  • "Move Your Feet" by Junior Senior: Although a smash in the UK it didn't chart in America, but was later used in the media on a regular basis.
  • "Music Sounds Better with You" by Stardust: A side project of Daft Punk's Thomas Bangalter; this was the only track the group recorded.
  • "My Girls" by Animal Collective
  • "My Jeans" by Jenna Rose
  • "My Own Worst Enemy" by Lit: Although the group had a few other hits on the alternative charts, this is all they're really remembered for.
  • "Nearly Lost You" by Screaming Trees: Though this is the only song of theirs that jogs any memories, Mark Lanegan has made a career for himself both in other bands like Queens of the Stone Age and through collaborations with other artists.
  • "New Shoes" by Paolo Nutini: Had more success on AC charts and in his native UK, but this song used in a Puma sneaker campaign is the closest he had to a hit here.
  • "Oh Yeah" by Yello: This song is best remembered for its use in Ferris Bueller's Day Off.
  • "Party Hard" by Andrew W.K.: Although it wasn't a real hit, it became a sports anthem and movie song. He later gained notoriety as for his involvement in the infamous "CN Real" block.
  • "Percussion Gun" by White Rabbits
  • "Prisencolinensinainciusol" by Adriano Celentano: Very popular in his native Italy but virtually unknown outside of Europe. Memetic Mutation kept this song alive.
  • "Pull Me Under" by Dream Theater: The band often facetiously calls this their only big hit; indeed, it was the group's only top 10 hit on the Mainstream Rock chart. However, the group's members are often considered virtuosos on their respective instruments, particularly guitarist John Petrucci, keyboardist Jordan Rudess, and former drummer Mike Portnoy. The band does have a solid following, especially thanks to Rock Band and Guitar Hero, so Todd is unlikely to cover them.
  • "Possum Kingdom" by Toadies
  • "Push it to the Limit" by Paul Engemann: Todd mentioned Engemann and his Scarface (1983) song in the "St. Elmo's Fire" review. Engemann had a minor hit shortly afterwards with a band called Device and joined Animotion (of "Obsession" fame; see below) for their other top 10 hit.
  • "Ready to Go" by Republica
  • "Roadrunner" by The Modern Lovers
  • "Rumors" by Lindsay Lohan: Released at the height of Lindsay’s fame as an actress, this song failed to reach the Hot 100 but got extensive airplay on pop radio, landing it a Gold certification. Her only Hot 100 hit was actually the much darker "Confessions of a Broken Heart (Daughter to Father)", but that song still missed the top 40 and did not have the same staying power as her debut single.
  • "Sandstorm" by Darude: Darude had a moderately successful follow-up with "Feel The Beat", and several more hits in his native Finland, but he's remembered almost exclusively for this song. It was later popularized by an Internet meme in 2014.
  • "Scotty Doesn't Know" by Lustra: This song is best known for its use in the film Euro Trip. Lustra never did much afterwards.
  • "Send Me on My Way" by Rusted Root: Although it didn't make it very high up the charts, it was later used in several movies.
  • "Shadilay" by P.E.P.E.
  • "Scatman (Ski Ba Bop Ba Dop Bop)" by Scatman John
    • Confirmed.
  • "Shooting Stars" by Bag Raiders
  • "Situation" by Yazoo: While they didn't chart in America, "Only You" and especially "Don't Go" were both #1 hits in the UK and are a bit more well-known stateside as well. Frontwoman Alison Moyet had a highly successful solo career during the mid-eighties that also landed one American top 40 hit with "Invisible", while producer Vince Clarke soon formed the legendary Synth-Pop duo Erasure with Andy Bell.
  • "Skinny Love" by Bon Iver: The band has a large following on the indie scene, but this is the only song general audiences know them for (not counting a feature on Kanye West's "Monster").
  • "Smalltown Boy" by Bronski Beat: The band had a few other hits in the UK but only this in America. It later became a popular gay anthem.
  • "Stay" by Coal: From Chasing Amy. Another extreme example, as neither the band nor singer Mary Born ever did anything else.
  • "Stop the Rock" by Apollo 440: The group had several other hits in the U.K., but only this in America.
  • "Suavemente" by Elvis Crespo: He had several hits on Latin-based charts but he is only known for this to English-speaking audiences.
  • "Such Great Heights" by The Postal Service: Technically had another single from their only album outchart it, but Revival by Commercialization made this far and away their best-known song.
  • "Sweatshirt" by Jacob Sartorius
  • "Sweet Disposition" by The Temper Trap: While well-respected as an alt-rock band, this is their only notable song in America. Its use in 500 Days of Summer is likely enough to call it their one hit.
  • "Sweet Victory" by David Glen Eisley: The song is best known for its appearance in the 2001 Spongebob Squarepants episode "Band Geeks", and for the petition created by Spongebob fans to have the song played during Super Bowl LIII to honor the death of series' creator Stephen Hillenburg. Eisley was a member of an actual one-hit wonder group, Giuffria, in the 1980s, but their song is nowhere near as remembered.
  • "Take Me Out" by Franz Ferdinand: The band was more successful on the British charts and on the American alternative charts.
  • "Teenage Dirtbag" by Wheatus. The group is considered a straight example in many countries (with the UK being the biggest exception), but only made the alternative charts in the US. Still, it was their only alternative hit, so they could still be considered an example. Even in the UK they're remembered mostly for this and nothing else.
  • "Teenage Kicks" by The Undertones: Todd is bound to mention One Direction's cover-mashup of it when talking about it.
  • "That Thing You Do!" by The Wonders: The title song of the film of the same name about a one-hit wonder band. While in real life, it just missed the top 40, peaking at #41, it's still remembered as a classic one-hit wonder.
  • "There She Goes" by The La's
  • "Through the Fire and Flames" by DragonForce: TTFAF is best known for its appearance in Guitar Hero III and its notoriously Nintendo Hard chart. The song would later appear in Guitar Hero's chief rival Rock Band 3 and bumps the difficulty Up to Eleven with a pro guitar chart.
  • "Tomorrow" by Silverchair: More famous in Australia, but only had this one song chart in the States.
  • "Tongue Tied" by Grouplove: Peaked at #42 in the US, so it just barely missed the cutoff.
  • "Torn" by Natalie Imbruglia: She had more success in her native Australia and the UK. Also, "Torn" was originally performed by Ednaswap, so Natalie fell victim to the "cover as a first hit" curse in the US, where it only peaked at #42. Keep in mind that her song was #1 on the airplay charts for weeks, and while a follow up "Wishing I Was There" also made the top 40, it's all but forgotten today outside of Australia. If Todd does review Natalie, he'll likely try to compare her to the more successful Kylie Minogue. note 
  • "The Touch" by Stan Bush: Also mentioned alongside Engemann in the "St. Elmo's Fire" review; this song was made famous by The Transformers: The Movie.
  • "Touch, Peel, and Stand" by Days of the New: Didn't chart too high on the Hot 100, but was a #1 Rock hit and Top 10 Alternative hit.
  • "United States of Whatever" by Liam Lynch
  • "Walk this World" by Heather Nova
  • "Wash it Away" by Black Lab: One of only two singles they ever released and "Time Ago" didn't get nearly as high on the rock charts. Notable as an anti-abortion song.
  • "Wavin' Flag" by K'naan: He had a few other hits in his native Canada, but he's mostly remembered for this song because of Coca-Cola and the World Cup.
  • "Who Booty" by Jonn Hart: His only other single was a remix of the song replacing Iamsu!'s verses with new ones by French Montana, which is the version played on most rhythmic stations; a third version featuring E-40 was never released as a single.
  • "Wouldn't It Be Good" by Nik Kershaw: While this song only peaked at #46 in America, it was a huge hit internationally and was featured as a cover on the Pretty in Pink soundtrack. While Kershaw had several other hits in his native UK, the only other one that came close to the global impact of his breakthrough single was "The Riddle", which failed to chart in America.
  • "Young Folks" by Peter, Bjorn and John
  • "You're The Best" by Joe Esposito: See Engemann and Bush above. This song is best known for its use in The Karate Kid. Esposito's group Brooklyn Dreams did back Donna Summer on "Heaven Knows", but few people are aware of that.
  • "Zoot Suit Riot" by Cherry Poppin' Daddies: This song just missed the Top 40, peaking at #41 during the swing revival of the late 90s.

    Somewhat False One Hit Wonders 

Artists and bands who had either exactly two Top 40 hits OR whose Signature Song never made the Top 40, but they had another single make the Top 40.):

  • "1 Thing" by Amerie
  • "867-5309/Jenny" by Tommy Tutone: It's going to be really funny when Todd realizes that Tommy Tutone is a band, and not a singer. They had another song barely crack the top 40 two years before their big hit.
  • "96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
  • "All or Nothing" by O-Town
    • "Let U Go" by Ashley Parker Angel
  • "Alone Again Or" by Love: It only reached #99 while "7 and 7 is" hit the top 40. It's #442 on Rolling Stones magazine greatest songs of all time.
  • "Are You Gonna Be My Girl" by Jet: Todd mentioned his hate of the song in his review of "Tonight, Tonight", since the song sounds like a commercial jingle. Later on Twitter, he mentioned his hatred for the band. Their other Top 40 hit was "Look What You've Done".
  • "Bad Boys" by Inner Circle: Thanks to Cops, this song completely eclipses their follow-up "Sweat".
  • "The Ballad of the Green Berets" by Barry Sadler: The follow up, "The A-Team"note , reached #28.
  • "Barbie Girl" by Aqua
  • "Black Velvet" by Alannah Myles: She hit #36 previously with "Love Is" and had far more hits in Canada between 1989 and 1997, but "Black Velvet" is pretty much all she's known for in America. Also, as someone who grew up on country in the early 90s, he is very likely aware of Robin Lee's knockoff version which was sent to country radio.
  • "Blinded by the Light" by Manfred Mann's Earth Band: Mann is not considered a one hit wonder ("Do Wah Diddy"), but the Earth Band usually is.
  • "Blurry" by Puddle of Mudd: "She Hates Me" was also a top 20 hit, but they're known mostly for this song. Also, Todd has previously stated his dislike of the band.
  • "Break My Stride" by Matthew Wilder: "The Kid's American" reached #33, but this is his only truly famous song.
  • "Bust a Move" by Young MC
  • "Come and Get Your Love" by Redbone
  • "C'mon N' Ride It (The Train)" by Quad City DJ's: Their theme song for Space Jam is just as well known, if not more remembered than "C'mon N' Ride It". However "C'mon N' Ride It" is their highest charting song.
  • "Chantilly Lace" by The Big Bopper: He’s easily the least famous of the three victims of the Day the Music Died, but he had a pretty distinct identity and wrote some songs that other performers made famous. He had one other top 40 hit, "Big Bopper's Wedding", but it only peaked at #38, compared to "Chantilly Lace" making it to #6.
  • "Chuck E.'s In Love" by Rickie Lee Jones: She's considered a hugely important figure in rock music to those in the know. Her followup single "Young Blood" just made the top 40, peaking at #40, but "Chuck E." is easily her most famous song.
  • "Convoy" by C.W. McCall: Unlikely, since he already discussed this song in the Worst of 1976 video (it was #2 on the list).
  • "Cult of Personality" by Living Colour
  • "Cum on Feel the Noize" by Quiet Riot: "Bang Your Head (Metal Health)" is also well known among glam metal fans; however, most mainstream music listeners only recognize them for their cover of "Cum on Feel the Noize".
  • "Do It to It" by Cherish
  • "Don't Dream It's Over" by Crowded House
  • "(Don't Fear) The Reaper" by Blue Öyster Cult: For an entire generation, this song is best known for the "More Cowbell" skit from Saturday Night Live.
  • "Don't Leave Me This Way" by Thelma Houston
  • "Do You Realize??" by Flaming Lips: "She Don't Use Jelly" was their true hit, but far more people know of this one. It was even made an official state song in their native Oklahoma.
  • "Electric Avenue" by Eddy Grant
  • "Every Time We Touch" by Cascada: "Evacuate the Dancefloor" was also a hit, but "Every Time We Touch" is much more associated with the band. Much like Tommy Tutone, they're often mistaken for a solo act.
  • "Everything You Want" by Vertical Horizon: The band had another minor hit but are mostly remembered for this #1. They were another contemporary of Nine Days.
  • "Fast Car" by Tracy Chapman: "Give me One Reason" peaked a bit higher at #3, but "Fast Car" is still considered revolutionary and one of the greatest songs of the '80s.
  • "Fireflies" by Owl City: His duet with Carly Rae Jepsen, "Good Time", was also a top 10 hit (and an honorable mention in Todd's Best of 2012), but "Fireflies" is the only thing he's known for solo.
  • "Gimme Some Lovin'" by the Spencer Davis Group
  • "Good Vibrations" by Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch: Mark Wahlberg's brother Donnie had three #1 singles as part of New Kids on the Block.
  • "Graduation (Friends Forever)" by Vitamin C: "Smile" was a much bigger hit, but it's mostly forgotten today. In 2012, she was appointed Nickelodeon's VP of Music.
  • "Hooked on a Feeling" by Blue Swede.
    • Confirmed
  • "I Can See Clearly Now" by Johnny Nash or Jimmy Cliff
  • "I Can't Wait" by Nu Shooz: In a decade flooded with British new wave one-hit wonders, this stands as easily one of the most unlikely breakout hits of the decade. The group itself hails from Portland, Oregon, a city generally associated with modern indie rock, and while they're primarily an R&B/freestyle act, their signature hit has a sound largely of its own, especially for 1986. They had another top 40 hit, "Point of No Return", which only peaked at #28, as well as one more song that just missed the top 40 two years later.
  • "Ice Ice Baby" by Vanilla Ice: His only other hit was a cover of "Play That Funky Music", which Todd included on his "Worst of 1991" retrospect.
  • "I Don't Want to Wait" by Paula Cole: "Where Have All the Cowboys Gone" charted higher; however, "I Don't Want to Wait" is best remembered as the theme to Dawson's Creek, lasted longer on the Hot 100, and is far better remembered today than her other hit.
  • "I Hope You Dance" by Lee Ann Womack: "I'll Think of a Reason Later" scraped the bottom of the top 40 towards the end of The '90s.
  • "I'll Be" by Edwin McCain: He also was the original artist for "I Could Not Ask for More"; however the country cover by Sara Evans eclipses McCain's version.
  • "I'll Be There for You" by The Rembrandts: "Just the Way It Is, Baby" charted higher on the Hot 100; however, "I'll Be There for You" is best remembered as the theme song for Friends. Keep in mind that "I'll Be There For You" was a #1 airplay hit, but was ineligible for the Hot 100 until a commercial single was released long after its popularity waned. Today "Just the Way It Is, Baby" is almost completely forgotten.
  • "I'm Free" by Soup Dragons: A victim of the "cover as a first hit" curse, albeit one the band Covered Up. "Divine Thing" actually charted higher on both the Hot 100 and Alternative charts, but is less remembered and had less of an impact.
  • "Informer" by Snow: If Todd does review it, he'll likely incorporate Jim Carrey's parody into the review. In the review of MAGIC!'s "Rude", he implies that the song isn't good.
    • Confirmed on both counts.
  • "It's Been a While" by Staind: "So Far Away" and "Right Here" (the latter which didn't technically go top 40 but got plenty of pop airplay) were their only other mainstream hits; however, the band has several hits on the rock charts. Like Puddle of Mudd, Todd has previously mentioned his dislike of the band.
  • “I’ve Been Thinking About You” by Londonbeat: Hinted at in the "What Is Love" episode.
  • "I Will Survive" by Gloria Gaynor: She had one other hit with a cover of "Never Can Say Goodbye".
  • "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None the Richer: Their only other Top 40 hit was a cover of "There She Goes" by The La's; however, "Kiss Me" is their better remembered song as it charted much higher and also for its use in the 1999 teen romantic comedy She's All That. Todd likely won't have much good to say about the band since they are a Christian band, and Todd usually reviles most Christian rock music.
  • "The Lady in Red" by Chris de Burgh: A household name across Europe and Australia, but only had this song hit the Top 3 in America. "Don't Pay the Ferryman" was bigger in some countries and was actually #34 in America, but has fallen by the wayside in the US. "The Lady in Red"'s status as a Black Sheep Hit would make this episode all the more interesting.
  • "Last Resort" by Papa Roach: While "Scars" was Papa Roach's only Top 40 hit, their breakout single is, by and large, the band's Signature Song, and their only Alternative #1. The band also has plenty of Top 10 rock hits.
  • "Life in a Northern Town" by The Dream Academy
  • "Lips of an Angel" by Hinder
  • "Lotta Love" by Nicolette Larson
  • "Lovergirl" by Teena Marie: Notable for being one of the few white female performers of Motown soul. Her only other American top 40 hit was "I Need Your Lovin'", but that only reached #37 and was quickly forgotten. She had a notable comeback in the mid-2000s in the R&B market before her untimely passing in 2010. Todd mentioned in the Rockwell episode that he didn't like her, but he may feel differently about her after studying her extensive career more closely.
  • "Luka" by Suzanne Vega: Her only other hit was a #5 remix of her song "Tom's Diner" by the production group DNA.
  • "Lump" by The Presidents of the United States of America: "Peaches" was their only entry in the Top 40 at #29; however, "Lump" is often considered their Signature Song as "Weird Al" Yankovic parodied it with "Gump", and it appeared on the Rock Band 2 soundtrack.
    • On Twitter, Todd said he did not consider them one hit wonders and actually liked them a lot.
  • "Milkshake" by Kelis: Todd already covered the song in his "Worst of 2004" retrospect, and called her "the world's warm-up for Fergie".
  • "More, More, More" by Andrea True Connection: Had a second hit with "NY, You Got me Dancing" at #27. Other than that, she's likely to be mentioned for her porn career and her hit being sampled in "Steal My Sunshine".
  • "More than Words" by Extreme
  • "Ms. New Booty" by Bubba Sparxxx: His other Top 20 hit was "Ugly" in 2001.
  • "Navy Blue" by Diane Renay: A novelty teen idol pop song that notably peaked right at the onset of Beatlemania. Her later single, "Kiss Me Sailor", reached #29, but is still basically a classic example of the followup single of a one-hit wonder.
  • "Never Say Never" by Romeo Void: "A Girl in Trouble (Is a Temporary Thing)" was the group's only top 40 hit at #35; however, "Never Say Never" is better remembered.
  • "Next to Me" by Emeli Sande
  • "On the Way Down" by Ryan Cabrera: His song "True" was nearly as big a hit, but only his first hit is remembered. Todd implied that he hates Ryan in his "Stitches" review.
  • "One More Try" by Timmy T: His other Top 40 hit "Time After Time" only barely made it, so he might consider talking about him, especially since he said so little about him in his Worst of 1991 list.
  • "One Week" by Barenaked Ladies: While the band is most successful in their native Canada, they are not exactly unknown in the US, with Stunt going 4X platinum. "One Week" is often considered the band's Signature Song; however, in Canada, that distinction belongs to "If I Had $1000000", to the point where in the band's early years, concertgoers would throw boxes of Kraft Dinnernote  on stage. More recently, the group is known for the theme song for The Big Bang Theory.
  • "Our House" from The Rise & Fall by Madness: They had an earlier minor hit with a cover of Labi Siffre's "It Must Be Love", peaking at #33. Back home in the UK, they were everything but one-hit wonders.
    • Jossed. Based on his tweets and what he said at the start of his "Never Had a Dream Come True" episode, Todd considers this band far too big to be one-hit wonders.
  • "Paralyzer" by Finger Eleven: "One Thing" was a hit 3 years before "Paralyzer," but the latter song completely overshadows it today.
  • "The Power of Love" by Jennifer Rush: Her actual one hit was "Flames of Paradise", a duet with Elton John, but this was her only major hit in most European countries and even in America has become her best remembered song.
  • "Ridin'" by Chamillionaire: "Good Morning" just barely qualifies as a Top 40 hit and "Turn It Up", the single preceding "Ridin'", just missed the Top 40. Chamillionaire was also a guest artist on another Top 10 hit: "Get Up" by Ciara. Moreover, Chamillionaire's two studio albums did peak in the Top 10 of the Billboard 200 and in the Top 5 for R&B/Hip-Hop albums. The Rap Critic reviewed it already, though, so it's not likely he'll do this one.
    • Confirmed
  • "Right Here, Right Now" by Jesus Jones: Their follow-up, "Real Real Real" hit #4 but was quickly forgotten.
  • "Rock and Roll Part 2" by Gary Glitter: May be uncomfortable as Gary is one of the ultimate cases of a Role-Ending Misdemeanor.
  • "Rockin' Robin" by Bobby Day
  • "Rock Me Amadeus" by Falco: He was more successful in Europe, especially in his native Austria, than he was Stateside.
    • Confirmed
  • "Rock Your Baby" by George McCrae: "I Get Lifted" was also a minor hit.
  • "Rock You Like A Hurricane" by Scorpions: "Wind of Change" charted higher, but "Rock You Like A Hurricane" is generally more remembered. The group had greater success on the Mainstream Rock chart, with "No One Like You" hitting the top of that chart.
  • "Round and Round" by Ratt: "Lay It Down" just barely cracked the Top 40.
  • "Run-Around" by Blues Traveler: "Hook" also went Top 40, but it's nowhere near as memorable. While their breakthrough single, "But Anyway", didn't chart, it's somewhat better remembered than "Hook".
  • "Run Runaway" by Slade: Slade were more popular in their native Britain; however the band had 2 Top 40 hits Stateside, the other being "My Oh My". Also, many Americans don't realize that the song "Cum on Feel the Noize" was originally composed and performed by Slade; however, the original did chart on the Billboard Hot 100 at #98.
  • "Save A Horse (Ride A Cowboy)" by Big & Rich: The serious ballad "Lost in This Moment" was the duo's actual one-hit; however, their breakthrough novelty hit is better remembered. On Twitter, Todd called Big & Rich "a breath of fresh air" at the time of the song's release; however, Todd considered rescinding that statement with the rise of "bro-country" artists of late such as Luke Bryan and Florida Georgia Line.
  • "Sell Out" by Reel Big Fish
  • "Sensitivity" by Ralph Tresvant: One of the former members of New Edition, who, like the rest of his bandmates, had a successful solo outing during the New Jack Swing craze of the early '90s, with two top 40 hits and one Platinum-certified album. His sophomore record bombed hard, but he did play a prominent role in New Edition's successful-but-brief comeback in 1996.
  • "Show Me Love" by Robyn: She had one Top 10 hit in the US before "Show Me Love": "Do You Know (What It Takes)". Though "Show Me Love" is her better remembered song Stateside, both songs we peaked at #7, so an episode is unlikely. Todd had mentioned more than a few times that Robyn was one of the better European popstars.
  • "Show Me What I'm Looking For" by Carolina Liar: Their only other notable hit was "I'm Not Over", which was a rock hit in 2008.
  • "Smokin' in the Boys Room" by Brownsville Station: Motley Crue came close but couldn't quite cover it up. Brownsville had another song hit #31.
  • "Still Tippin'" by Mike Jones: "Back Then" was his only Top 40 hit, but it isn't as memorable.
  • "Stuck in the Middle with You" by Stealers Wheel
  • "Summer Girls" by LFO: "Girl on TV", a love song to Jennifer Love Hewitt, was also a Top 10 hit for them.
  • "Sunshine" by Lil' Flip: Besides this song, he’s probably best-known for losing a feud with T.I., who Todd has praised in the past.
  • "Take My Breath Away" by Berlin: "No More Words" also reached the Top 30. The group's breakthrough single, "Sex (I'm A...)", didn't get much airplay (and thus didn't chart very high) because many stations refused to play the song due to its racy lyrics. "Take My Breath Away" is far more associated with Top Gun than it is with Berlin.
  • "Thank You" by Dido: "White Flag" charted at #18; however, "Thank You" is better known due to it being sampled in Eminem's "Stan" (which although not nearly as big a hit as "Thank You" itself at least in America, may actually be more known today).
  • "Thin Line Between Love and Hate" by The Persuaders
  • "This Is Why I'm Hot" by MIMS: Despite it being a chart-topping smash, the followup "Like This" fizzled at #32.
  • "A Thousand Miles" by Vanessa Carlton: Todd called the follow up, "Ordinary Day", an example of the kind of "white chick on piano" music he dislikes, having the "dreary, shallow, artless pretentiousness that lacks the talent or creativity to justify it".
  • "Two of Hearts" by Stacey Q: Follow-up "We Connect" was #35.
  • "Two Princes" by Spin Doctors: The preceding single, "Little Miss Can't Be Wrong", while not completely forgotten, isn't as well-remembered.
  • "Voices Carry" by Til Tuesday: They managed a #26 followup with "What About Love", only to disband soon afterwards and Lead Bassist Aimee Mann went solo.
  • "Walk It Out" by Unk: The follow up, "2 Step" peaked at #24 on the Hot 100, and earned #78 on the 2007 Year-End chart.
  • "Walk the Dinosaur" by Was (Not Was)
  • "The Way" by Fastball: "Out Of My Head" actually made #20. "The Way" did reach #5 but only on the airplay charts, and was held back by lack of a commercial single release. In the Nine Days review, Todd mentions that All the Pain Money Can Buy had several good songs.
    • In Part 1 of the Worst of 2016 retrospect, he josses the possibility of a OHW episode of Fastball while covering Machine Gun Kelly and Camila Cabello's "Bad Things", which samples "Out of My Head".
  • "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" by Jermaine Stewart
  • "What I Like About You" by The Romantics: Their two Top 40 hits were actually "Talking in Your Sleep" and its quickly forgotten follow-up "One in a Million"; "What I Like About You" only reached #49, but Revival by Commercialization made it one of the most famous songs of the '80s. While "Sleep" isn't completely forgotten (remembered enough to have a trope named after it), it's not nearly as iconic as their debut single.
  • "What Would You Do?" by City High
  • "You Dropped a Bomb on Me" by The Gap Band: Lead singer Charlie Wilson turned his life around in the 90's and became a respected R&B solo artist.

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    Very False One Hit Wonders 

Artists and bands with three or more Top 40 hits; however, one particular song, regardless of whether or not it's their highest charting single, had overshadowed their other work.

  • "American Pie" by Don McLean
  • "American Woman" by the Guess Who
  • "Baker Street" by Gerry Rafferty
  • "Because I Love You (The Postman Song)" by Stevie B: He's had somewhat more success on the charts than his contemporary Timmy T, but he too is generally remembered as a one-hit wonder.
  • "Bette Davis Eyes" by Kim Carnes: Her first Top 10 hit was a cover of Smokey Robinson and the Miracles' "More Love", making her a rare aversion to the "cover as a first hit" curse.
  • "Billy Don't Be a Hero" by Bo Donaldson & the Heywoods
    • Most likely jossed, as he already talked about it in his "The Night Chicago Died" video.
  • "Breakeven" by The Script: Four Top 40 hits but only one Top 20. Although "Hall of Fame" is on the borderline for their second hit.
  • "Brown Eyed Girl" by Van Morrison
  • "Cat's in the Cradle" by Harry Chapin
  • "Crank That (Soulja Boy)" by Soulja Boy: Soulja Boy had two more hits in the Top 20, including "Kiss Me Thru the Phone", which reached #3 on the Hot 100 (and #6 on Todd's Worst Hit Songs of 2009, making him an unlikely candidate for an episode).
  • "Don't Forget Me (When I'm Gone)" by Glass Tiger
  • "Don't You (Forget About Me)" by Simple Minds
  • "Down Under" by Men at Work: They also topped the Hot 100 with "Who Can It Be Now", which isn't forgotten but not nearly as iconic as "Down Under", and had two more top 10 hits.
    • In his "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" OHW, he explicitly states that they're not one-hit wonders.
  • "Duke of Earl" by Gene Chandler
  • "Escape (The Piña Colada Song)" by Rupert Holmes: Todd already discussed this song on his "Top 10 Songs About Mediocre Romance" countdown, and already stated that he hated the song.
  • "Everybody Have Fun Tonight" by Wang Chung: Wang Chung were actually moderately successful in the US with 5 Top 40 hits. In their native UK, however, they have only one hit, "Dance Hall Days", which peaked at #16 in the US and had an appearance on the Grand Theft Auto: Vice City soundtrack.
  • "Everywhere" by Michelle Branch: The follow-up, "All You Wanted" charted higher and was her only hit to breach the Top 10, but it's not as well known as her breakthrough single, and she has fallen into relative obscurity since the mid-2000s.
  • "Eye of the Tiger" by Survivor: The band had 4 additional Top 10 hits, which should be enough to disqualify them. However, the general public only knows their only #1 as Survivor's other hits are somewhat obscure today. Late Survivor frontman Jimi Jamison was also known for writing and performing "I'm Always Here", the theme song for Baywatch.
  • "The Final Countdown" by Europe: "Carrie" was their highest charting single in the US, and it was thoroughly discussed by Todd in his "Worst of 1987" retrospect, which probably disqualifies them.
  • "Gangnam Style" by PSY: Even though PSY remains popular in Korea and had two more songs to enter the US Top 40, "Gentleman" and "Hangover" ft. Snoop Dogg, most Westerners will only remember him for "Gangnam Style", especially due to its memetic status. However, Todd most likely won't cover PSY on OHW since he already reviewed "Gangnam Style".
  • "Gangsta's Paradise" by Coolio
  • "Ghostbusters" by Ray Parker, Jr.: He had a Top 5 hit 2 years before "Ghostbusters": "The Other Woman", and his band Raydio had three top-10 hits. Also, there was the controversy of "Ghostbusters" sounding like Huey Lewis and the News' "I Want a New Drug".
  • "Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)" by C+C Music Factory: Though they had two other top ten songs "Things that Make you go Hmmm..." and "Here we Go (Let's Rock and Roll)".
  • "The Great Escape" by Boys Like Girls
  • "Hanging by a Moment" by Lifehouse: The band had three other Top 40 hits, including "You and Me" which hit #5; however, "Hanging by a Moment" is the song most people identify the band with.
  • "Happy Together" by The Turtles: Their first hit before "Happy Together" was a cover of Bob Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe", averting the "cover as a first hit" curse.
  • "Harden My Heart" by Quarterflash
  • "Heat of the Moment" by Asia
  • "Hey Leonardo (She Likes Me For Me)" by Blessid Union of Souls: "I Believe" was a much bigger hit, but "Hey Leonardo" tends to be better remembered today.
  • "Hey There Delilah" by Plain White T's: A song Todd has claimed to like in spite of everything going against it. A proper review is not only expected, but necessary. Plain White T's had two songs barely creep onto the Top 40, but nothing close to this #1 smash.
  • "Hold On Loosely" by 38 Special: The band's highest charting single was "Second Chance" at #6, but it's all but forgotten today. Their other top 10 hit, "Caught Up in You", while not forgotten, is not as well known as their breakthrough single.
  • "If You Leave" by Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark: In the US, it hit #4 on the Hot 100 due to its appearance in the 1986 hit film Pretty in Pink. In its native UK, however, the song only reached #48. However, this band is one of the most famous Synth-Pop acts of the 1980s, and to those a bit more familiar with them, their signature hit is probably "Enola Gay", which came out before the genre garnered full acceptance in America.
  • "(I Just) Died in Your Arms" by Cutting Crew
  • "I Wanna Sex You Up" by Color Me Badd. While the group had two #1 hits, neither was "Sex You Up".
  • "Jump" by Kris Kross: Todd mentioned it in his review of "S&M" as one of the more underrated hits of the 1990s. They had 3 other Top 20 hits.
  • "Kids in America" by Kim Wilde. Despite peaking at #25, it's overshadowed her #1 "You Keep Me Hangin' On". However, she was very successful in Germany and her native UK.
  • "Kryptonite" by 3 Doors Down: As one of the biggest post-grunge bands of the 2000s they're very unlikely to appear, but to most people this is the song that defines the band.
  • "Leader of the Pack" by The Shangri-La's: "Remember (Walkin' in the Sand)" and "I Can Never Go Home Anymore" were both top 10 hits, but this was their sole #1 and has by far the highest stream count of any of their tracks. While they were certainly not one-hit wonders at the time, they're a much more influential group than their extremely short career would suggest, so Todd could probably get a lot of substance out of a One Hit Wonderland episode on them (their downfall didn't involve a flop album that would've suited them for Trainwreckords).
  • "Leave (Get Out)" by JoJo: "Too Little Too Late" was a bigger hit eventually, but "Leave" is her best remembered song.
  • "Louie, Louie" by The Kingsmen: They had not one, but two Top 20 hits that were covers, the other being a cover of "Money (That's What I Want)", charting at #16 in 1964. They also had another top 10 hit with "Jolly Green Giant."
  • "Love Song" by Sara Bareilles: Her most recent hit, "Brave", got significant airplay and a heavy sales spike, after Katy Perry's "Roar", Todd's most hated song of 2013, came out, having stirred controversy for sounding similar. Also, all three of her major-label studio albums peaked in the Top 10 of the Billboard 200.
  • "MMMBop" by Hanson: Hinted at at the end of his "St. Elmo's Fire" OHW.
    • Confirmed.
  • "My Sharona" by The Knack: They had another #11 and a quickly forgotten #36, but today they're only remembered for their debut #1 smash.
  • "Never Gonna Give You Up" by Rick Astley: Todd's title card artist Krin made a fake title card as an April Fools joke. Astley had 4 additional Top 10 singles in the US, including another #1 hit, "Together Forever"; however, most people born after his prime only remember his first hit, especially thanks to the Rickroll meme.
    • Jossed. Todd declared that Rick Astley is not a one-hit wonder and stated that an episode covering him would never happen (along with other acts who had multiple number one hits in a tweet).
  • "No Diggity" by Blackstreet: They had another top 10 hit in 1994, "Before I Let You Go", as well as "Take Me There", from the soundtrack to The Rugrats Movie, but this #1 smash is their only song to really endure in the public consciousness, in part thanks to a popular cover by Chet Faker, as well its use in Pitch Perfect.
  • "Obsession" by Animotion: "Room to Move" (mentioned above) was another top 10 hit, but it was quickly forgotten.
  • "On the Dark Side" by John Cafferty & the Beaver Brown band
  • "One Headlight" by The Wallflowers: Had a handful of songs scratch the Top 40 Airplay, but are mostly remembered for this one (peaked at #2). Notable in that they are fronted by Bob Dylan's son and were considered prominent in the Adult Contemporary genre despite having only one truly memorable song. Played footage in his "I Love You Always Forever" video, indicating he may have plans for it and is at least aware of the song. He also mentioned liking them in the Lullaby review
  • "Pieces Of Me" by Ashlee Simpson: Ashlee had 3 more Top 40 hits; however, she is best remembered for the infamous Saturday Night Live lip-syncing incident and is somewhat overshadowed by her elder sister Jessica.
  • "Poison" by Bell Biv DeVoe: "Do Me" was also a huge hit, and Todd has previously referenced that song in one of his videos. However, "Poison" has a far higher stream count today.
  • "The Power" by Snap!: "Rhythm is a Dancer" is also fairly well known in the early 90s dance scene but not as well known as "The Power".
  • "Pump Up The Jam" by Technotronic
  • "Regulate" by Warren G
  • "Roll to Me" by Del Amitri
  • "She Drives Me Crazy" by Fine Young Cannibals: While Fine Young Cannibals notched plenty of hits in their native U.K., in the U.S. only three of their songs reached the top 40. Follow-up "Good Thing" also went to #1, which alone should disqualify the band from being covered, while its own follow-up "Don't Look Back" peaked at #11. Nowadays, however, "She Drives Me Crazy" is the only song of theirs that still receives substantial airplay.
  • "Shine" by Collective Soul: They had two more top 20 hits ("The World I Know" and "December"), and seven #1 hits on mainstream rock, but "Shine" was easily their biggest hit.
  • "Solid" by Ashford & Simpson: Although they had two minor top 40 hits in the late ‘70s, this is far and large the only track they’re really known for.
  • "Sugar, Sugar" by The Archies
  • "Sunglasses at Night" by Corey Hart: His highest charting single in the States was actually the ballad "Never Surrender." Hart was more popular in his native Canada with 10 singles in the Canadian Top 10. Todd has previously mentioned he loves this song, as well as Hart's second-biggest hit, "Never Surrender".
  • "Superman (It's Not Easy)" by Five for Fighting: "100 Years" as a single was certified higher than "Superman", but only reached #28. Five for Fighting's third big hit, "The Riddle", just barely made the Top 40 at #40.
    • Likely Jossed, given how he evaluated "A Hundred Years", and essentially called it a better version of "7 Years". This alone may disqualify Five for Fighting as a One-Hit Wonder.
  • "This Is How We Do It" by Montell Jordan: He had quite a few top 20 hits in the 1990s, but casual listeners and younger audiences only recognize him for this song.
  • "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" by Naked Eyes: They had a #11 with "Promises, Promises" later on.
  • "Thong Song" by Sisqo: "Incomplete" reached #1 on August 12, 2000, and he also had 8 Top 40 singles as part of Dru Hill. That should be enough to disqualify Sisqo from a OHW review; however, the stupidity of "Thong Song" by far overshadows his other work.
  • "True" by Spandau Ballet: They had two more hits with "Gold" (#29) & "Only When You Leave" (#34). They had even more success in the UK, where they were considered key acts of the New Romantic movement along with Duran Duran.
  • "U Can't Touch This" by MC Hammer: He was very popular in the early 90's with five Top 10 hits, and wouldn't be considered a one-hit wonder at all. However, people born after his prime will only recognize "Touch This", which was indeed his biggest hit in most countries… but not back in the USA, where it was the lowest-peaking of his hits.
    • Presumably jossed, due to MC Hammer being featured on Trainwreckords.
  • "Walking on Sunshine" by Katrina and the Waves: Maybe Todd might mention the time they won Eurovision.
  • "Want Ads" by Honey Cone: They had three subsequent top 40 hits, but none were anywhere near as popular as this one, which reached #1.
  • "What's On Your Mind (Pure Energy)" by Information Society: While "What's On Your Mind" is pretty much all the band's remembered for today, another single, "Walking" peaked at #9, and "Think" peaked at #28. Plus, the band had several more charting singles on the US Dance charts.
  • "When A Man Loves A Woman" by Percy Sledge
  • "When I See You Smile" by Bad English
  • "A Whiter Shade of Pale" by Procol Harum
  • "Wild Wild West" by The Escape Club: Notable for being the only British artist to have a #1 hit in America but never so much as chart in the UK! "I'll be There" peaked at #8, but is nowhere near as well-known.
  • "Your Love" by The Outfield: Unlike most British bands, the Outfield were the most successful in the US with 5 Top 40 singles; however, "Your Love" was their only Top 10 hit and only remembered song. The band never even cracked the Top 40 in Britain.
  • "You Sexy Thing" by Hot Chocolate: The group had two other top 10 hits, "Emma" and "Every 1's A Winner," but they are mostly remembered in America only for "You Sexy Thing."
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