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Music / Sinéad O'Connor

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Oh, take me to church,
I've done so many bad things it hurts
Yeah, Take me to church
But not the ones that hurt
'Cause that ain't the truth
And that's not what it's worth
Yeah, take me to church
—"Take Me to Church"
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Shuhada' Sadaqat (formerly Magda Davitt, born Sinéad Marie Bernadette O'Connor, December 8, 1966) is an Irish singer-songwriter well-known for her honest lyrics, whose subjects tend to range from the Irish famine to feminism. She is also known to straddle extremely different genres, such as Folk Rock, Reggae, and Indie Pop. Since her 1987 debut The Lion and the Cobra and her 1990 follow-up I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got, O'Connor has continued to remain relevant in the music industry, collaborating with a wide variety of artists and experimenting with various styles.

She is best known for her cover of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U", which topped the charts in 1990. The music video, which featured a close-up of O'Connor performing the song in a single take, became iconic and received heavy rotation on MTV, going on to win the channels Video of the Year at the Video Music Awards that year. While she won multiple awards for the song, and her album I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got won a Grammy Award for Best Alternative Album in 1991, O'Connor began to distance herself from the fame. She boycotted the Grammys and eventually withdrew her name from consideration for all future awards. This led to her Creator Breakdown during the mid-Nineties, though she has since recovered.

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She is also a contentious figure, sparking controversy after she refused to have the US National Anthem performed at her concerts (Frank Sinatra was very offended). She accused Prince of domestically abusing her (though this was later patched up), she made certain comments against people who criticized her shaved head... but she is probably most notorious for ripping up a picture of the pope on Saturday Night Live in 1992 to protest child abuse in the Catholic church. Yes, that's right, O'Connor single-handedly unleashed the wrath of virtually every Catholic in the Western world, and she will officially Never Live It Down. While she does not regret her actions, she did state in an interview that she wished it wouldn't have inspired that knee-jerk reaction and instead have had more of an impact toward ending the actual abuse. And she also attracted negativity regardless of herself from Madonna, who, according to Sinead, in her own words, said, "that I look like I had a run in with a lawnmower and that I was about as sexy as a Venetian blind."

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O'Connor tends to keep her views on religion and and her own sexuality ambiguous, and continues to maintain her bald hair to challenge preconceived attitudes toward female beauty. She is an enigmatic figure but keeps an assertive and opinionated attitude, and she continues to inspire attention no matter what she decides to discuss next.


Discography:

  • The Lion and the Cobra (1987)
  • I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got (1990)
  • Am I Not Your Girl? (1992)
  • Universal Mother (1994)
  • Faith and Courage (2000)
  • Sean-Nós Nua (2002)
  • Throw Down Your Arms (2005)
  • Theology (2007)
  • How About I Be Me (And You Be You)? (2012)
  • I'm Not Bossy, I'm the Boss (2014)


Tropes about Sinéad O'Connor and her work:

  • Abusive Parents: "Fire On Babylon" from Universal Mother is about her abusive mother.
  • All Love Is Unrequited: Her cover of "I Don't Know How To Love Him."
  • As the Good Book Says...: The title of her debut album, The Lion And The Cobra, and her double-album compilation She Who Dwells In The Secret Places Of The Most High Must Abide Under The Shadow Of The Almighty. Both are references to Psalm 91, which is recited in Irish Gaelic by Enya at the beginning of her song "Never Get Old."
  • Bald Women/Boyish Short Hair: Shaved her head clean when she first made a name for herself. Later grew it out but mostly kept it short.
  • Beat Still, My Heart: "You Made Me The Thief Of Your Heart" is not speaking in metaphorical terms.
  • Bi the Way: Subverted - she's kinda been figuring it out throughout her career. Briefly she said she was a lesbian, but later in '05 she called herself "three-quarters heterosexual, a quarter gay." She's had four marriages with men, and three relationships with women, but doesn't care for the bisexual label.
  • Break-Up Song: Red Hot Chili Peppers singer Anthony Kiedis was in a brief relationship with her sometime during the early nineties. When he confessed his love to her, O'Connor left him, prompting Kiedis to write "I Could Have Lied" about her. This song was included in the 1991 album Blood Sugar Sex Magik.
  • Cover Album: Am I Not Your Girl? (standards and torch songs), Throw Down Your Arms (classic reggae songs), Sean-Nós Nua (Irish folk songs), and her contributions to Red Hot + Blue (Cole Porter, "You Do Something To Me") and Red Hot + Rhapsody (George Gershwin, "Someone To Watch Over Me").
  • Cover Changes The Meaning: Her version of "Don't Cry For Me, Argentina", which might have been written in the first place about her own difficult relationship with her home country.
    • Her versions of folk songs like "Peggy Gordon" and "Molly Malone" become songs of lesbian, rather than heterosexual, love. Word of God says the former was intentional—she recorded the song for a female friend who had lost her lover.
  • The Cover Changes the Gender: Her cover of Prince's "Nothing Compares 2 U" does this indirectly; instances of "boy" are changed to "girl" and vice-versa, which in combination with the change in performer shifts the perspective from that of a man pining after a recently departed ex-girlfriend to a woman pining after a recently departed ex-boyfriend.
  • Cultural Rebel: She often goes against the traditionalist attitudes of Catholicism, the dominant religion of her home country. Most (in)famously, she ripped up a photo of The Pope on a live TV broadcast, and converted to Islam in late 2018.
  • Does Not Like Men: "No Man's Woman"
  • Fan of the Past: Has covered a lot of torch songs and standards, most first recorded before she was born.
  • Fisher King: In "Nothing Compares 2U" she says all the flowers in her garden died when her boyfriend left her.
  • Intercourse with You: "I Want Your (Hands On Me)"
  • The Lad-ette: Can come off as this. Shaved head, tomboyish clothing, smokes like a chimney, fond of bawdy jokes, and swears like a sailor.
  • Letters 2 Numbers: "Nothing Compares 2U".
  • Lighter and Softer: Sean-Nós Nua as well as her EP The Gospel Oak.
  • Long Title: "Success Has Made A Failure Of Our Home" and "You Made Me The Thief Of Your Heart." Okay, not Fall Out Boy long, but a bit of a mouthful. Also her compilation album She Who Dwells In The Secret Places Of The Most High Must Abide Under The Shadow Of The Almighty.
  • Neoclassical Punk Zydeco Rockabilly: Has dabbled in pop, folk, folk-rock, reggae, jazz, funk, and dance. Also put out an album of standards and torch songs (Am I Not Your Girl), an album of reggae songs (Throw Down Your Arms), an album of Irish folk songs (Sean-Nós Nua),and contributed to the Cole Porter and George Gershwin tributes Red Hot + Blue and Red Hot + Rhapsody.
  • The Masochism Tango: "Troy"
  • Mohs Scale of Lyrical Hardness: In her self-penned songs, she rarely goes below 4 and has gone as high as 9.
  • Mohs Scale of Rock and Metal Hardness: Rarely goes above 4, but watch out for those lyrics.
  • The Mourning After: "I Am Stretched On Your Grave" from I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got, and arguably "You Made Me The Thief Of Your Heart" from the soundtrack of In the Name of the Father.
  • Police Brutality: "Black Boys on Mopeds" is inspired by a Real Life case of racially biased police violence.
  • Voice Types: A mezzo-soprano. However, she studied Bel Canto singing for eighteen months in the early '90s, and has a truly stunning range.
  • Yandere: The narrator of "You Made Me The Thief Of Your Heart" was this.

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