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Album cover of a particularly meta band.

Music's way of straddling the line between No Title and In Case You Forgot Who Wrote It, a self-titled (or "s/t", or "eponymous") album is one that's named after the artist(s) who created it. Often used for debut albums or albums that mark a change in an artist's sound or lineup.

For brevity's sake, the examples below are limited to unusual cases, as delineated in each section.

Occasionally overlaps with Chronological Album Title and Numbered Sequel. See also Premature Encapsulation.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Repeated Artist Instances 
Numbered Examples
  • Brave Belt's Brave Belt and Brave Belt II. Brave Belt III turned into Bachman-Turner Overdrive's debut (see below).
  • BeForU's BeForU, BeForU II and BeForU III: Breaking into the Probability Changes
  • Billy Talent's Billy Talent I, Billy Talent II, and Billy Talent III.
  • Black Sabbath technically released two self-titled albums, the second of which (Black Sabbath Vol. 4) is often shortened to simply Vol. 4.
  • The entirety of Chicago's discography, with only a few exceptions, in the form of Chicago and a Roman numeral. (The Chicago Transit Authority, Chicago's debut, was also a self-titled release prior to a change of name due to legal trouble with the actual CTA.)
  • The Chieftains' first ten albums were titled The Chieftains, The Chieftains 2, The Chieftains 3 and so on. A few of them had subtitles: The Chieftains 6: Bonaparte's Retreat, The Chieftains 9: Boil the Breakfast Early, and The Chieftains 10: Cotton-Eyed Joe.
  • Electric Light Orchestra's first album was self-titlednote . Their second album was ELO 2.
    • Said second album should not be confused with Electric Light Orchestra Part II, which is the self-titled debut for the spin-off band of the same name.
  • Kraftwerk's first album was self-titled, and its second album was simply titled Kraftwerk 2 (with artwork nearly identical to the first).
  • Led Zeppelin's first three albums, titled Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin II, and Led Zeppelin III. The album usually referred to as Led Zeppelin IV or Zoso (after Jimmy Page's sleeve symbol) actually has No Title officially; the band refused to give it one as part of an experiment to see if they could sell a record without any of the Led Zeppelin branding attached to it.
  • Neu!'s entire official discography: Neu!, Neu! 2, Neu! '75, and Neu! 4 (which was rereleased later as Neu! '86).
  • Orbital's debut was named Orbital, and its follow-up was named Orbital 2. They're generally referred to instead as Green Album and Brown Album, respectively.
  • Queen's first two albums, Queen and Queen II.
  • Rare Americans follows this naming scheme, albeit 3 has a subtitle to it: Jamesy Boy & The Screw Loose Zoo.
  • Every Run the Jewels album title is (the group's name) + a number, with the latest being Run the Jewels 4.
  • Kenji "Julie" Sawada released two albums called Julie and Julie II, then five more (three of which were live) called Julie (number) (subtitle), followed by Jewel Julie 追憶 before he finally started using proper titles.
  • The Traveling Wilburys, as Vol. 1 and Vol. 3. There is no Vol. 2 — their second album was intentionally mistitled. Often put down to 'George being George'.
  • Van Halen has Van Halen, Van Halen II and Van Halen III (which is fact their eleventh, but marks the third formation/singer).

Non-Numbered Examples

  • The 77's have two, though not by choice. They released The 77's in 1987. In 1992, they tried to release an album named Pray Naked. The record label balked and bowdlerized it without consulting the band, releasing it as The Seventy Sevens instead. But nearly everyone just calls the latter Pray Naked anyway, so there's not much confusion.
  • Air Supply's debut album was self-titled and released in 1976. After getting some international success, their eighth album was also self-titled and released in 1985.
  • Big Bad Voodoo Daddy's first album is self-titled and self-released. Their third album, released after they were picked up by Interscope, is officially titled Americana Deluxe per the liner notes, but since the only text on the front cover is the band's name it's often thought to be self-titled as well. (To make matters even more confusing, both the self-titled album and Americana Deluxe contain many of the same songs.)
  • Michael Bolton has two examples—his 1975 debut Michael Bolotin, recorded under his birth name, and 1983's Michael Bolton, his first album under his longstanding professional name.
  • David Bowie has two different self-titled albums; the first is virtually forgotten (most who do remember it generally regard it as mediocre at best), and the second is better known by its re-release title, Space Oddity, added after RCA Records acquired the rights to it. He also has two self-titled albums named after his hard rock band, Tin Machine. And a self-titled song, as seen below.
  • Roberto Carlos has released 58 albums in a career spanning five decades; 35 of them are titled simply Roberto Carlos.
  • Eric Carmen has two of these: The first one, released in 1975 and the last one, in 1984 (at least for sixteen years, until he released a new studio album in 2000). Both are titled simply Eric Carmen.
  • Cheap Trick's 1977 debut Cheap Trick and the band's 1997 thirteenth album of the same name.
  • Collective Soul's first album was self-titled, ten years later they released another self-titled album (although the latter is usually known as "Rabbit" due to the rabbit on the cover).
  • Days of the New have three albums, all of which are self-titled. Fans usually differentiate the albums by the color of the disc itself (Yellow, Green, and Red) or by release order (I, II, and III). Their long-awaited fourth album is going to break the pattern by only being nearly-eponymous: the title has been announced as Days of the New Presents Tree Colors.
  • Daughters has both a self-titled EP and a self-titled album.
  • Duran Duran released two self-titled albums, one in 1981 and another in 1993. The second is often referred to as The Wedding Album due to its wedding-themed cover art.
  • All of Jacques Dutronc's albums released under the Vogue label were named Jacques Dutronc. Fans and streaming services usually choose the most popular song on the albums to refer to them.
  • Fleetwood Mac had two eponymous albums, one in 1968 (the true debut album, also known as Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac after the frontman at the time Peter Green) and one in 1975 (the first album with Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks), which some fans call The White Album (not to be confused with The Beatles' self-titled album.)
  • Peter Gabriel's first four albums, all literally titled Peter Gabriel — though due to Executive Meddling courtesy of Gabriel's North American distributor, the fourth was released in the U.S. and Canada as Security, and maintained that title in those territories until Gabriel reacquired the rights in 2010. The first three are often listed as Car, Scratch, and Melt, after their album covers. Gabriel intended to treat his albums like issues in a magazine, hence the repeated eponymous titles, but was eventually forced out of the practice completely by his U.K. label, Charisma Records; Gabriel responded by giving his next three albums — So, Us, and Up — curt, two-letter, one-word anti-titles.
  • The Hollies released an album called Hollies in 1964, and then another with that title in 1974 (after reuniting with original lead singer Allan Clarke). Some sources list the second album as Hollies '74 to avoid confusion, but its official title is simply Hollies.
  • Jimmy Eat World briefly had two self-titled releases: The first was a 1998 self-titled EP, and the second was a 2001 album that ended up temporarily becoming self-titled when its original title, Bleed American, was considered to be in poor taste after September 11th. After enough time passed, Bleed American went back to its original title.
  • Killing Joke has two self-titled albums: Their 1980 debut and a 2003 album.
  • Killswitch Engage's debut album in 2000 and fifth in 2009, each featuring a different vocalist (Jesse Leach on the former and Howard Jones on the latter).
  • Leatherwolf's debut EP and first two albums were all self-titled. The EP and the first album even shared the same cover art.
  • The first two Lukas Graham albums are both titled Lukas Graham. Their sophomore album is also known as Blue Album.
  • Country Music band The Mavericks released two self-titled albums. One was their first; the other, their last until a 2012 reunion.
  • Mike + the Mechanics released two such albums, with their debut album in 1985 using the plus sign (+) and a 1999 release substituting an ampersand (&).
  • Kylie Minogue has two, her debut and her fifth album. She briefly had three, when her sixth album Impossible Princess was retitled Kylie Minogue following the death of Diana, Princess of Wales.
  • Michael Martin Murphey has two such albums—Michael Murphey in 1973, when he did not use his middle name as part of his professional name, and Michael Martin Murphey in 1982, one of his first releases under his full name.
  • The punk band Rancid did this. Their first album and fifth album were both simply titled Rancid. The latter album is often called Rancid 2000 after the release year to avoid confusion.
  • Red House Painters released two in the same year. The two albums were later retitled based on their artwork (Rollercoaster and Bridge). This is one of those few times the band was actually deliberately trying to confuse people.
  • Diana Ross has two solo albums named Diana Ross, one released in 1970 (and retitled Ain't No Mountain High Enough when that single became a hit) and one released in 1976. Also the artwork for one of her nearly-eponymous albums Ross (1978) has Diana Ross on the front.
  • Santana's first and third albums are both named Santana; the latter is often referred to as Santana III or just III to differentiate.
  • The Spits, a punk band, have released four full-length LPs all entitled The Spits (although the fourth one is unofficially titled Volume 4). One theory says that they're all one album that they just can't stop writing.
  • Starflyer 59's first two albums were officially self-titled, but almost universally referred to as Silver and Gold (after the color of each album's monochromatic cover)—ten years later, these nicknames were used for the rereleased versions.
  • Stone Temple Pilots had two. The 2010 album marked their reunion after disbanding from 2002-2008. The 2018 album marks their reformation with a new singer after the death of original singer Scott Weiland in 2015.
  • Thalía has three self-titled albums: her 1990 debut, then two consecutive albums in 2002 and 2003. The 2003 album is commonly known as The English Album since it was her only LP predominantly in English.
  • Throwing Muses have two, their 1986 debut Throwing Muses and their 2003 regroup album Throwing Muses.
  • Tokyo Blade's debut album and one of their compilations were self-titled. Their fourth album Ain't Misbehavin' was reissued as a self-titled album at one point.
  • Keith Urban has two: a rare self-titled album released only in his native Australia in 1991, and his first solo American album in 1999. In between, he was one-third of a trio called The Ranch, who put out an album in the US in 1997; after Urban became popular, the Ranch album was reissued in 2004 as Keith Urban in The Ranch.
  • The Velvet Underground, both with (The Velvet Underground & Nico) and without Nico (The Velvet Underground).
  • Weezer's color albums ("blue", "green", "red", "white", "teal", and "black").

Mix of Both

  • Bachman-Turner Overdrive's first two albums, Bachman-Turner Overdrive and Bachman-Turner Overdrive II. Eleven years later, the band released another album titled Bachman-Turner Overdrive, without a number.
  • Hardcore punk and alternative rock band The Bronx have released six albums under that name, of which only the fifth and sixth were numbered. They also put out some mariachi music under the side project Mariachi El Bronx, and all of those albums are named Mariachi El Bronx. (Though the third album is sometimes called Mariachi El Bronx III instead.)
  • Crystal Castles' 2008 debut LP and 2010 sophomore album. The latter was dubbed Crystal Castles II by fans and digitally reissued as such, sometimes dropping the group name altogether.
  • Doctor Steel's albums Dr. Steel, Dr. Steel II: Eclectic Boogaloo, The Dr. Steel Collection and the Dr. Steel Read-A-Long. (Also extends to his video series, The Dr. Steel Show. And his songs, "Dr. Steel" and "The Dr. Steel Show".)
  • The Rolling Stones' debut UK album in 1964 is their self-titled album. Their EP that predates their debut album is also called The Rolling Stones. Their self-titled debut album was followed by The Rolling Stones No.2.
  • Seal released two consecutive albums named Seal (the second is often called Seal II since the fourth is Seal IV).

    Nearly-Eponymous Albums 
Artist Names Contained within the Title
  • Many artists have released albums titled The (name of artist) Album.
    • The Rod Stewart Album was called An Old Raincoat Won't Ever Let You Down outside North America (but was released in North America first).
  • !!!'s Thr!!!er (they also have a regular self-titled album).
  • The 13th Floor Elevators' The Psychedelic Sounds Of The 13th Floor Elevators.
  • The Aquabats! have The Return of the Aquabats (which was actually their first album), The Fury of the Aquabats!, and The Aquabats! vs the Floating Eye of Death
  • Barenaked Ladies have the two albums Barenaked Ladies Are Me and Barenaked Ladies Are Men.
  • The Beach Boys' The Beach Boys Today! and Beach Boys' Party!
  • The Beatles' With the Beatles and Beatles for Sale. Many of the band's American releases also included the word Beatles in the title, including Meet The Beatles, Beatles VI, and Beatles '65.
  • Bon Iver's sophomore album uses the band's name twice, so it's called Bon Iver, Bon Iver.
  • Buffalo Springfield's self-titled debut was followed by Buffalo Springfield Again.
  • Cream's Fresh Cream.
  • Terence Trent D'Arby's Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby.
  • Dag Nasty's Dag With Shawn. The Shawn in question is original vocalist Shawn Brown: The album is a set of previously unreleased demos they recorded with Brown, all of which would be remade with Dave Smalley for their proper debut Can I Say.
  • De La Soul is Dead.
  • Deep Purple's Shades of Deep Purple and Deep Purple in Rock.
  • Devo has three: Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! Oh, No! It's Devo and Total Devo
  • The Dismemberment Plan's The Dismemberment Plan Is Terrified.
  • Divine Fits' debut, A Thing Called Divine Fits.
  • Bob Dylan's The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan and Another Side of Bob Dylan, both of which followed a proper self-titled release.
  • Eels's Greatest Hits Album Meet The Eels. There's also The Cautionary Tales of Mark Oliver Everett, which contains the full name of the band's principal member, who usually goes by E.
  • Eminem's The Eminem Show.
  • Aretha Franklin's Aretha Arrives, Aretha Now, Aretha in Paris...
  • Franz Ferdinand's Tonight: Franz Ferdinand, though often referred to as just Tonight.
  • Macy Gray's Macy Gray On How Life Is
  • Heavenly (the indie pop band rather than the metal band) released four albums, all titled like this: Heavenly vs Satan, Le Jardin de Heavenly, The Decline and Fall of Heavenly and Operation Heavenly. For good measure, they also had compilations called This is Heavenly and A Bout de Heavenly.
  • The Kinks' Kinda Kinks, The Kink Kontroversy, Something Else by the Kinks, and The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society. Also their compilation album The Kink Kronikles.
  • The Knack's Get The Knack.
  • Korn's 2010 album Korn III: Remember Who You Are.
    • The 2007 untitled album can also be seen as this, but...you be the judge.
  • Lady Macbeth's debut EP, simply entitled The Lady Macbeth EP
  • Long-running Pop Punk group Lagwagon have an EP with the somewhat self-effacing title I Think My Older Brother Used To Listen To Lagwagon.
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd's first album is named (Pronounced 'Lĕh-'nérd 'Skin-'nérd). The cover art is even framed so the album title is basically a subtitle for the band's name that functions as a pronunciation guide.
  • Madvillain's Madvillainy.
  • The Mamas and the Papas' fourth was The Papas and the Mamas.
  • Tim McGraw's first album was self-titled. He later released an effectively self-titled album in 2001: Tim McGraw and the Dancehall Doctors.
  • Jazz bassist and bandleader Charles Mingus liked to play with his name for album titles. Examples include Charles Mingus presents Charles Mingus, Mingus, Mingus Ah Um, Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus, Mingus Dynasty, and Mingus Moves.
  • Miyavi: MYV☆POPS, Miyavizm, and Miyaviuta -dokusou-.
    • His first two albums, Galyuu and Gagaku, are written with the kanji for his name.
    • Room no. 382, his remix album, also qualifies—382 is the kun-yomi for Miyavi.
  • The Monkees had 1967's More of The Monkees, 1968's The Birds, The Bees and The Monkees and 1969's The Monkees Present.
  • Monty Python's Another Monty Python Record, Monty Python's Previous Record, Monty Python Live at Drury Lane, The Monty Python Matching Tie and Handkerchief, Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album
  • Motörhead has "We Are Motörhead", from We Are Motörhead.
  • Eddie Murphy's Eddie Murphy: Comedian
  • Nayeon's Im Nayeon.
  • The O.C. Supertones had Adventures of the O.C. Supertones, Supertones Strike Back, and Revenge of the O.C. Supertones.
  • Phantom Planet's Phantom Planet Is Missing. They also have a just plain Self-Titled Album.
  • Elvis Presley did this all the time: From Elvis in Memphis, Having Fun with Elvis on Stage...
  • The Rentals' Return of the Rentals (though the title implies otherwise, it's their first release).
  • Robyn has both Robyn Is Here and Robyn. Robyn Is Here in particular is a nearly-eponymous album with a self-titled nearly-eponymous song also called "Robyn Is Here".
  • The Rolling Stones' The Rolling Stones, Now!
  • Jill Scott's Who is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds Vol. 1.
  • Sebadoh's Sebadoh Vs. Helmet and The Sebadoh.
  • The Sex Pistols' Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols.
  • Paul Simon's There Goes Rhymin' Simon.
  • Michael W. Smith's first two albums were Michael W. Smith Project and Michael W. Smith 2.
  • Sparks' Introducing Sparks. Which, despite the title, was their seventh album.
  • The Spice Girls' second album, Spiceworld.
  • Stanford University's band, officially known as the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band, was one of the first US college bands to release albums. Its first three releases, in 1970, 1972, and 1974, were all titled The Incomparable Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band.note 
  • George Strait played with this a bit on some of his early albums, some of which were puns on his last name (e.g. Strait from the Heart). Strangely, he did not release a truly self-titled album until 2001... and it was his worst-selling and -performing at the time.
  • The Stranglers' debut album Stranglers IV. No, there are no other releases beforehand, they simply chose that title to mess with people.
  • Talking Heads' debut album Talking Heads: 77, with the "77" referring to the year of its release (1977).
  • Played for laughs by Ten Masked Men (hey, they are a death metal group that does covers of pop songs), who inject a Star Wars theme: Ten Masked Men, Ten Masked Men Strike Back, Return of the Ten Masked Men and The Phanten Masked Menace.
  • TWICE's Twicetagram
  • The Vaccines' What Did You Expect From The Vaccines?
  • Wavves have one self-titled album and one album that's so "nearly-eponymous" that it might as well be self-titled: the debut is Wavves, while the second album is Wavvves (yes, with three v's this time). To further the confusion, both albums have Textless Album Covers with different pictures of the same kid skateboarding in a backyard.
  • Weezer's 2021 album Van Weezer, a Shout-Out to a famous rock band from the 1970's and 1980's.
  • The Who's The Who Sing My Generation, Ready Steady Who, The Who Sell Out, Who's Next, The Who By Numbers, Who Are You, Who's Last and Who.
  • Wilco released Wilco (The Album), on which the first track is entitled "Wilco (The Song)".
  • Some Wings albums include "Wings" in their true title — most notably Wings at the Speed of Sound and Wings Over America. This also makes Wings Greatest an awkward compilation to talk about.
  • "Weird Al" Yankovic's "Weird Al" Yankovic in 3-D
  • After several nearly-eponymous albums including Earth vs. the Wildhearts and The Wildhearts Must Be Destroyed, The Wildhearts' 2007 self-titled album was their fifth or sixth (depending on how you count during 1994-96), but marked a reformation, a new line-up and a partial return towards what most fans regard as their classic sound.
  • Yes's The Yes Album (1971 studio album) Yessongs (their 1973 live album), Yesshows (1980 live album), House Of Yes (2000 live album), Yesterdays (their first greatest hits record) Yesyears (a 4-CD box set of their career up to 1990), and Yesstory (a 2-CD version of the box set). All came after their first album, Yes, which is completely different.
  • ZZ Top's first album is appropriately named ZZ Top's First Album.

Artist Names Cut Short

  • Mary J. Blige's Mary.
  • Bobby Brown's Bobby
  • Boyz II Men's II doubles as this and a Numbered Sequel.
  • Camila Cabello's Camila.
  • Bob Dylan's 1973 release called Dylan, but the artist has officially disavowed that one (since it was cobbled together from unreleased outtakes by his former label after he signed with a different label).
  • Aretha Franklin has released three albums titled Aretha over the course of her career.
  • Delta Goodrem 's Delta.
  • Grand Funk Railroad's Grand Funk
  • Paul Hardcastle's smooth jazz albums are named Hardcastle followed by number or Roman numeral (except the first, which lacks a number). As of this writing, he's gotten up to Hardcastle X.
  • Whitney Houston's Whitney (which followed Whitney Houston)
  • Janet Jackson's fifth Hotter and Sexier album janet.
  • Gordon Lightfoot's Lightfoot!
  • Paul McCartney titled his first solo album McCartney, a solo album released in 1980 McCartney II and another one in 2020 called McCartney III. They're named so because they're the only "fully solo" albums, where he played all instruments.
  • Elvis Presley has two albums just titled Elvis from 1956 and 1973.
  • Diana Ross (see above) also has two albums named Ross from 1978 and 1983, respectively, and one album named diana (1980).
  • Earl Sweatshirt's debut mixtape Earl.
  • Britney Spears' third album is titled Britney.
  • The Spice Girls' Spice.

Abbreviations and Vice Versa

  • Average White Band's AWB, based on the official abbreviation of the band's name.
  • The Click Five's TCV (V being 5 in Roman numerals, of course).
  • Missy Elliott's Miss E...So Addictive
  • My Bloody Valentine's comeback album m b v.
  • P.O.D.'s Payable on Death.
  • Pentatonix are sometimes referred to by the nickname PTX. Their three non-holiday albums are titled PTX Volume 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Their first Christmas album? PTXmas.
  • Rocket from the Crypt's RFTC.
  • School of Seven Bells' final album is SVIIB, based on the official abbreviation for their name (using the Roman numeral for seven).
  • The Velvet Underground's outtakes compilation VU. The cover is also a Visual Pun as it shows a VU meter.

    Albums and Songs 
  • This effect is given off in musical cast recordings where all the songs are attributed to the cast of the show as opposed to the individual singers. For example, "Phantom of the Opera", by the Cast of The Phantom of the Opera, on the Original Broadway Cast Recording of The Phantom of the Opera.
  • "The 1975" by The 1975, the opening track of every one of their albums, including the self-titled debut.
  • "Amesoeurs", from the album Amesoeurs, by the now broken up French shoegaze-black metal band Amesoeurs.
  • "Angel Witch", Angel Witch, Angel Witch.
  • Downplayed with BABYMETAL, the album BABYMETAL and the song "BABYMETAL DEATH".
  • "Bad Company", Bad Company, Bad Company.
  • "Bang Camaro", Bang Camaro, Bang Camaro.
    • Lyrics: "Bang! Camarooooooo..." (repeats)
  • "Big Time Rush" by Big Time Rush, although technically the album is titled BTR.
  • "Black Sabbath", Black Sabbath, Black Sabbath
  • "Blackfield" by Steven Wilson's side project Blackfield, from their debut album Blackfield.
  • Blue Öyster Cult by the Blue Öyster Cult
  • "Body Count", Body Count, Body Count. The self-titled album also featured two more songs with the band's name in their titles, "Body Count's in the House" and "Body Count Anthem".
  • "Buena Vista Social Club"... rinse and repeat.
  • "Carolina Rain", etc., etc.
  • "Damn Yankees", Damn Yankees, Damn Yankees
  • "Death Grips (Next Grips)" by Death Grips off of their EP Death Grips.
  • "Deep Forest", etc., etc.
  • "Deicide", by Deicide, off their debut Deicide.
  • Dschinghis Khan had an album called Dschinghis Khan, featuring their song "Dschinghis Khan".
  • Eisbrecher did this as well.
  • "Electric Wizard", etc., etc.
  • Funker Vogt's first demo tape was self-titled and included a song of the same name, which also appeared on their commercial debut album Thanks for Nothing.
  • For a particularly hellish example, "The Good, The Bad, And The Queen". According to the band's frontman, Damon Albarn, the band was nameless and TGTB&TQ was just the title of the album, but everyone ended up calling the band by the album's name for the sake of sanity.
  • "The Grave Digger", so on and so forth.
  • Great Big Sea's debut album was Great Big Sea, and its first track was "Great Big Sea/Gone By the Board".
  • Before Green Day was Green Day, they were Sweet Children, and had songs written under both names before the name change, but not recorded and released until after the fact: "Green Day" appeared on their 1990 debut LP 39/Smoothnote , while "Sweet Children" appeared on the EP of the same namenote .
  • "Hellyeah", Hellyeah, Hellyeah...HELL YEAH!
  • "Iced Earth"... you know the drill.
  • "Iona - Mother of Lindisfarne" by Christian progressive rock group Iona, from their self-titled 1990 debut album.
  • "Iron Maiden", Iron Maiden, Iron Maiden.
  • "Iron Savior", etc., etc.
  • Barely averted by King Crimson, with "In the Court of the Crimson King" from In the Court of the Crimson King.
    • King Crimson did this twice, actually. In 1981, having just changed their name back from "Discipline" to "King Crimson", they put out the album "Discipline" containing the tracks "Discipline" and "Indiscipline".
  • La Düsseldorf's debut album, La Düsseldorf, contains the tracks "Düsseldorf" and "La Düsseldorf".
  • "Living in a Box" from the album Living in a Box by the band ... wait for it ... Living in a Box.
  • "Meat Puppets", Meat Puppets, Meat Puppets.
  • "Megasus", on the album Megasus, by the band Megasus.
  • "Metal Church", by the band Metal Church, on their debut album, Metal Church.
  • "Motörhead", etc., etc., which is a rerecording of the last song that frontman Lemmy wrote for his previous band, Hawkwind.
  • Hey, Hey! The Monkees, The Monkees, "(Theme From) The Monkees".
  • "My Indigo", My Indigo, My Indigo. Side project of Within Temptation's lead singer Sharon den Adel.
  • "October Country", the debut single by the obscure Psychedelic Rock band October Country, which became the opening track on their 1968 album October Country, all obviously a Shout-Out to Ray Bradbury's book The October Country. Alas, it was their only album.
  • "Outworld", by the band Outworld, on their debut/only album, Outworld.
  • K-pop girl group Playback's debut single "Playback", from the single album Playback..
  • Double slightly averted? Slightly double averted? "Killer Queen" from Sheer Heart Attack, as well as "White Queen" and "March Of The Black Queen" from Queen II.
  • Queensrÿche come close with the song "Queen of the Reich" on their first, self-titled, EP. ("Rÿche" isn't a real word in any language, but is pronounced roughly the same as the German "reich".)
  • The School of Rock soundtrack has a song called "School of Rock" by School of Rock.
  • "Sierra" by Christian pop trio Sierra, from their self-titled 1994 debut album.
  • "SPRORGNSM" (pronounced superorganism), Superorganism, Superorganism.
  • "Theocracy", on Theocracy, by Theocracy.
  • "Tin Machine", Tin Machine, Tin Machine. There was also a Tin Machine II, but no title track for that one.
  • Train's debut album, which has a self-titled Hidden Track.
  • "Victor" by Victor from Victor, the solo project of Alex Lifeson from Rush.
  • "Wavves", from the album Wavves, by the bedroom-musician-turned-noise-pop-band Wavves.
  • White Dynomite, etc. For extra redundancy, the self-titled album makes Book Ends of the title song, starting with the song itself and ending with a short reprise of it.
  • "Wilco (The Song)", Wilco, Wilco (The Album).
  • Witchfinder General, etc., etc.

    Lampshaded Examples 
  • The Advantage have an album with the Pun-Based Title Elf-Titled.
  • The Audition's third album is actually titled Self-Titled Album.
  • Filter has an album called "Title of Record".
  • Metal band Ghost has its first album, called Opus Eponymous.
  • Similarly, Karp have an album called Self-Titled LP.
  • Lampshaded by rap artist Lifeseeker (he did the theme song for the convicts in Dead Rising) with his debut album Self Titled Debut Album.
  • NOFX punned on this by calling an album Self-Entitled.
  • R.E.M. has a compilation album called Eponymous.
  • The Tragically Hip made fun of this concept with the Greatest Hits album Hipeponymous.
  • Treble Charger had an album called self=title
  • Zao has an album named [Self Titled].

    Other 
  • Albums that have text other than the artist name on the front cover, but are still officially considered self-titled or untitled:
    • The B-52s' self-titled debut has the text "High Fidelity" alongside the band's name on the cover, which is sometimes mistaken for a title - instead the slogan was just intended to add to the artwork's retraux look.
    • Fantômas' debut album has the text "Fantômas amenaza al mundo" on the cover, which would be Gratuitous Spanish for "Fantômas threatens the world" - however, this is just because the album artwork was taken from a poster for the Spanish dub of the French film Fantômas se déchaîne, and the album is officially self-titled.
    • House of Pain's first album has the text "Fine Malt Lyrics" underneath the band's name. Rather than a title, it was meant to be understood as a slogan for the group (punning on "fine malt liquor", a phrase which appeared on the packaging for Mickey's beer, since the logo used for the group's name was meant to look like a beer bottle label).
    • KMFDM's twelfth album is officially known as Symbols), however some people simply call it "KMFDM".
    • Kyuss' third album was originally intended to be self-titled (as can be seen on promotional copies of the album, and the CD and cassette cases having no text other than "Kyuss" written on their spines). Ultimately, the album ended up being called Sky Valley (as can be seen on the cassette shell and the LP's centre label) after the "Welcome to Sky Valley" sign on the cover.
    • Technically, Rammstein's seventh album has No Title, however, for indexing purposes, most retailers refer to it as Rammstein. They also have a song named "Rammstein".
    • Trouble's self-titled has the text "psalm 9" on the corner of the cover art, but this was similarly never meant as a title.
    • The Yardbirds' Roger the Engineer was originally meant to be a self-titled album - the text "Roger the engineer" was just included in the front cover artwork because it was a caricature of Roger Cameron, the album's audio engineer, as drawn by member Chris Dreja. It caught on enough as a title that it was later officially reissued as Roger The Engineer, with that text appearing elsewhere on the packaging rather than just on the front.
    • Yeah Yeah Yeahs' self-titled EP has a close-up of Karen O wearing a necklace that reads "MASTER" on the cover, which became a Fan Nickname for the EP itself.
  • Albums that are named after the artist's real name:
  • American Recordings, the first album in what would come to be known as Johnny Cash's "American series", took this trope in a different direction. Instead of being named after an artist, it's named after the record label that released it.
  • The Beatles, tenth album by The Beatles which, ever since its release, has been called The White Album.
  • The Birthday Party's self-titled is an inversion, originally being credited to their original incarnation, The Boys Next Door. The band changed their name to The Birthday Party, and the album was re-released with the credit changed.
  • Black Sabbath released the album Heaven and Hell with Ronnie James Dio on vocals. In later years, a lineup similar to what is on the album toured and released an album under the band name Heaven & Hell. Additionally, Black Sabbath albums released under the Heaven and Hell lineup have been included in the Heaven & Hell discography making this retroactively a Self-Titled Album.
  • Blue Öyster Cult has a self-titled song not on their self-titled album, but one that was released 16 years later.
  • Dismember: one of the tracks on Like an Ever Flowing Stream is close enough for a self-titled song ("Dismembered"), then ended their career on a self-titled album in 2008.
  • Eminem's The Slim Shady LP, which is named after his alter ego.
  • ETHS changed its name a few times before choosing the definitive one in 1999, and thus release two distinct self-titled with two different names: Melting Point (1998) and Eths (1999).
  • Foo Fighters has Foo Fighters, composed entirely by Dave Grohl. Interestingly, Grohl had no intention of creating a band and intended it as a one-off side project, but it proved so successful that he continued the band and recruited members.
  • Franz Ferdinand originally planned to have every one of their albums self-titled, with each album being distinguished by its cover (especially the color schemes) rather than its name. They did this with their first album. However, when the time came to actually title the second album, they ended up deciding that You Could Have It So Much Better was... well... so much better. On the other hand, YCHISMB doesn't have the title of the album anywhere on the cover; instead, it has Alexander Rodchenko's famous photo of Lilya Brik with the band name written on it.
  • Sean O'Hagan, after leaving the band Microdisney, released a solo album in 1990 titled High Llamas. Shortly after, he started a band called The High Llamas.
  • Linkin Park's first album, Hybrid Theory. Hybrid Theory was the band's original name before the members had to change it to avoid being confused with another band, but they decided to name their debut LP after their "actual" title.
  • The Living End has a song called "The Living End" on their first EP (Hellbound). Their first album was self-titled.
  • Mindless Self Indulgence frontman Jimmy Urine released a solo album titled Mindless Self Indulgence a few years before the actual band was formed; it's now something of a sought-out item among fans, and copies sell for hundreds of dollars on eBay.
  • Minus the Bear's 2005 album is titled Menos el Oso, which is Spanish for "Minus the Bear."
  • Pink Floyd's debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was retitled Pink Floyd for its U.S. release. However, since the British title was still included on the back of the LP sleeve, everyone refers to it as The Piper at the Gates of Dawn anyways.
  • Prince and the New Power Generation's 1992 album, whose title was a modified transgender symbol officially known as "Love Symbol No. 2," which Prince later used as his stage name between 1993 and 2000 to circumvent Warner Bros. Record's trademark on his given name.
  • Contrarian indie band R.O.C.'s debut was self-titled; they reportedly wanted their second album (and major-label debut) to be self-titled as well, but when this was refused, they named it after their record label instead, Virgin.
  • Santigold's first album was Santogold. It actually was eponymous, briefly, but the artist's stage name got tweaked after somebody else threatened to sue over a trademark claim. Confusion ensued.
  • Stratovarius has a self-titled album, but their eponymous song features on the album Fourth Dimension.
  • They Might Be Giants have a self-titled album, and a self-titled song on a different album (Flood). They also have a b-side compilation called Miscellaneous T, named after the section their music is usually shelved in at record stores.
  • Testament's debut album, The Legacy, was recorded while the band was named Legacy. The band had to change their name just over a month before the album was released because Legacy was registered by a jazz band, but the album title stuck.
  • Voivod's debut album contained a self-titled song, with an actual self-titled album released almost twenty years later.
  • Justified in the case of Yellow Magic Orchestra's eponymous debut album from 1978, as it was intended to be a one-off parody of Exotica; it wasn't until after the album proved to be a success that the band decided to keep going.
  • Frank Zappa's Zappa in New York and Frank Zappa Meets the Mothers of Prevention, which is also a Pun-Based Title on his band the Mothers of Invention. There's also the album Francesco Zappa, in which Zappa covers Baroque Music by a composer who coincidentally shared a nearly identical name, zig-zagging the self-titled idea a bit.

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