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In 2009, Ubisoft released a then-new breed of dance-based Rhythm Games for the Wii. Unlike the "press buttons to the rhythm" gameplay such dance games exhibited at the time, a notable example being DanceDanceRevolution, the gameplay capitalizes on the motion controls which defined the Wii and has the player mirror the on-screen dancer's choreography, expanding on the dance minigame in Rayman Raving Rabbids: TV Party. What also made the game stand out is that the dancers aren't digital 3D models animated by hand or mo-cap; they are real actors in makeup and costumes, performing the choreography (although animated and motion-capture routines appeared in later installments).

Enter Just Dance.

Critics panned the game for its poor motion detection and lack of unlockables, and it seemed Ubisoft's prediction of the game's failure was right. However, the casual audience the game targeted loved it, as they cared more about dancing to music and having a good time than scoring big or unlocking new content. The game became a runaway hit, maintaining sales even over a year after its release.

Surprised by this, Ubisoft started working on the sequel and spinoffs immediately. Because they listened to the critics and improved on the mechanics, and gave the game actual marketing, unlike most Wii sequels, the sequel sold even better than the first. The Just Dance series was born and new entries are released annually, with newer songs and fancier routines for players to enjoy and dance along to. Just Dance remains Ubisoft's second-biggest Cash-Cow Franchise, behind Assassin's Creed, to this day.

    Main Series 
  • Just Dance
  • Just Dance 2 — Introduced duet routines, Downloadable Content, medleys, a Nonstop Shuffle feature, colored gloves on the dancers' right hands, a new scoring system with stars and new move ratings and Gold Moves replacing Shake moves.
  • Just Dance 3 — Introduced Dance Crews (4-player routines), Mashups (routines that include bits and pieces of past routines), alternative modes, Sweat routines (meant specifically for workout), the Just Create feature (which allowed players to create their own dances), and was the first installment to be available for PS3 and Xbox 360 alongside the Wii.
  • Just Dance 4 — Introduced Battle Modes, Dance Quests, the Party Master Mode feature, and was the first installment to be available for Wii U.
  • Just Dance 2014 — Introduced dancing with up to six players (8th-generation consoles only), On-Stage Modesnote , the World Dance Floor feature (in which one can dance at the same time as others around the world), and was the first installment to be available for Xbox One and PS4.note 
  • Just Dance 2015 — Introduced unique and classic Trio routines, Alternates with specific motifs, and the Community Remix and Just Dance VIP features.
    • Alongside the standard version, there is also a Chinese version that adds five songs by local artists.
  • Just Dance 2016 — Introduced the Just Dance Unlimited streaming service replacing DLC, revamped Dance Quests different from Just Dance 4, and World Video Challenge replacing the World Dance Floor.
  • Just Dance 2017 — Introduced Just Dance Machine, a side story mode and the "Superstar" ranking.
    • Alongside the standard version, there is also a Chinese version that removed all online features plus adds two songs by local artists.
  • Just Dance 2018 — Introduced "Super", a new move rating in between "Good" and "Perfect", another new score ranking achieved after "Superstar" being "Megastar" and Kids Mode, a mode that allows easier dance routines for kids under 12 and Dance Lab, a mode similar to Just Dance Machine.
  • Just Dance 2019 — Introduced a much simpler GUI than the past games.
  • Just Dance 2020 — Introduced All Stars Mode, a story mode featuring the Panda visiting 10 routines from past main games. Final Just Dance game (and game in general) for the Nintendo Wii, the series' debut console.
    • Alongside the standard version, there is also a Chinese version that includes songs by local artists and removes the All-Stars Mode. It also includes its own version of Just Dance Unlimited that includes songs by local artists and songs from Just Dance 2021, Just Dance 2022 and Just Dance 2023 Edition. Quick Play mode, initally introduced in Just Dance 2021, was also introduced in an update.
  • Just Dance 2021 — Introduced Quick Play Mode.
  • Just Dance 2022 — Re-Introduced animated coaches, shifting camera angles, as well as introduced more robust intros.
From here onward, every installment is only a song pack that you buy for one gamenote  that's live-service with future content coming in updates. You can play songs from a pack you have not bought yourself if it's off another player's game that has that pack. Songs from previous games are ported to this game via a new service replacing Unlimited named Just Dance+.
  • Just Dance 2023 Edition — Introduced online private groups so players can dance with anyone wherever they are, a revamped progression and dancer card customization system and the ability to download the 40 base game songs to play offline.
  • Just Dance 2024 Edition — The first game to be released as a DLC song pack.

    Spinoffs 
  • Dance on Broadway
  • Just Dance Kids (or Dance Juniors in PAL region)
  • Michael Jackson: The Experience
  • Just Dance: Summer Party
  • The Smurfs Dance Party
  • Just Dance Wii (Japan)
  • Just Dance Kids 2 (or Just Dance Kids in PAL region)
  • The Black Eyed Peas Experience
  • ABBA: You Can Dance!
  • Just Dance: Best Of (Europe)
  • Just Dance: Greatest Hits (North America)
  • Just Dance Wii 2 (Japan)
  • Just Dance: Disney Party
  • The Hip Hop Experience
  • Just Dance Kids 2014
  • Just Dance Wii U (Japan)
  • Just Dance Disney Party 2
  • Yo Kai Watch Dance: Just Dance Special Edition) (Japan)
  • Just Dance Now (Smartphone app)
    • Just Dance: Vitality School or 舞力全开:活力派, a Chinese spinoff of Just Dance Now. Shut down in February 17, 2020.
  • Just Sing, a Karaoke spinoff. Online features were shut down in June 29, 2018.

The surprise success of the first game caused a revival in dance game releases, not only for the Wii, but also Dance Central, Dance Paradise, and Dance Masters for the Xbox 360 Kinect, and Singstar Dance for the PlayStation 3.

On January 14, 2019, it was announced that Just Dance would be receiving a film adaptation by Screen Gems. For now, the DanceDanceRevolution film adaption in works has a rival.

Compare We Cheer, an earlier motion-controlled dance game series yet with different gameplay, and DanceDanceRevolution, another popular dance game series.


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If you wanna wiki, then you can just trope!

  • Achievement System:
    • Games since 3 have Xbox 360/Xbox One achievements as usual, though 3, 4 and 2016 also have their own sets of achievements on all consoles.
    • The avatars in 4 and games that support Just Dance Unlimited are earned through achievements, mostly playing an Unlimited song. 2017 and 2018 also offer skins, while 2019 implemented aliases to customize the player profile.
  • Aerith and Bob: 2023 Edition gives all the dancers official names and they run the gambit from normal, such as Sara, Dolores, and Blake to extremely out there such as Wanderlust, Epsilon, and Night Swan. Justified in that it depends on the who and/or what the coach is that determines how normal the name may be, whether they may be portraying a normal person, or specifically a performer/someone in costume or someone with special powers who could come from another world.
  • Afrofuturism: 2020's "Ma Itù" features futuristic elements with African tones in its routine and dancer.
  • Air Guitar:
    • A Running Gag in the main series which is featured in "Lump", "Louie Louie", and "Funplex (CSS Remix)" in the original, "Girlfriend", "Call Me", "Sympathy for the Devil" (Fatboy Slim Remix), and "Crazy Christmas" (As DLC) in 2, "I Was Made for Loving You" in 3 (which also has air drums, air vocals, and air bass), "So What" and "Livin' La Vida Loca" in 4, and "Get Lucky" in 2014.
    • "Rasputin" & "Here Comes The Hotstepper" in 2 along with the extreme dance for "Fine China" (and its battle against "Gentleman") in 2014 also feature Air Violins.
    • "Cotton Eyed Joe" has an Air Fiddle!
  • Amazing Technicolor Battlefield: While the majority of coaches are simply recordings of real people's performances, the level backgrounds are usually bright and vibrant colors, with special effects that go for visual awe instead of being faithful to reality.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: The Disco Ball in 2023 Edition.
  • Annual Title: Just Dance 2014, 2015, 2016, and so on eventually to 2023 Edition. Curiously, their titles refer to the year that follows on their release.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: To help players with unlocking all the rewards exclusive to the progression systems for a season in 2023 Edition since they're only there for the season's duration, the seasons were made much longer in general than those in games since 2019 to hopefully allow enough time to get the rewards, as previously the only new things that came in a season were new songs (and returning ones in Unlimited) that were permanent. To make progress go even faster, those with a Just Dance+ subscription will also earn double the points towards the seasonal progression.
  • The Artifact: Downplayed. The single (or odd-colored) right-hand glove that the dancers wear originally served as a guide for Wii remote movement, back when the series was exclusive to the Wii. With the PlayStation Move and the Switch's Joy-Cons, they still serve that purpose, but they are also present in the Xbox 360 and One versions, which use the Kinect for full-body movement capture. However once 2023 Edition launched only on the Switch, Xbox Series X & S and PS5, the Kinect became fully discontinued and controls went back to only remote-operated, now either by the Joy-Con on Switch or via the Just Dance 2023 Controller app on smartphones, which is also the only controller option on Xbox Series or PS5 as they don't have vertically-shaped remote equivalents.
  • Art Evolution:
    • From 4 onwards, the dancers became more lifelike, with more realistic hair and clothing textures. Some older routines are also updated to blend in with the newer ones whenever they are added to the franchise's streaming services.
    • To go with the theme of beginning a new era of the series, 2023 Edition has 2D art of the coaches in a new style used for promotional material as well as in game for the menus and dancer cards.
  • Art Shift:
    • Routines that features animated coaches or background elements, especially with techniques such as clay animation and stop motion.
    • The dancers in 2021's "Uno" are stylized after scribbled drawings, with their bodies heavily rotoscoped and their heads replaced with cartoony counterparts.
  • Ascetic Aesthetic: The coaches of "Wet Tennis" dance around in a completely chrome and minimalist tennis ball-shaped spaceship.
  • Awesome Anachronistic Apparel: Coaches sometimes wear period articles of clothing for no immediate reason, usually mixed with contemporary fashion. For example, the quartet in "Everybody (Backstreet's Back)" wears 18th century European-styled coats and shirts, only neon-colored and paired with sneakers, and "Can't Hold Us" gets a tricorner hat and 18th century naval jacket during the chorus over his ripped tank top, ripped tight jeans and golden chain.
  • Babies Ever After: Following what happens in Save Your Tears (Remix), official illustrations of Si'Ha Nova performing self-care routines were released to celebrate Mother's Day and Wellness Day of 2022. Notably, the last picture depicts her with a baby bump. Going into the next game, Wanderlust, P2 of "CAN'T STOP THE FEELING!", is implied to be the son of Si'ha Nova and The Traveler, as he inherited the former’s skin tone and the latter's ability to travel through worlds. The latter fact is proven in the ending cutscene, where he opens a portal that leads to the party in "Physical" and brings P1, Sara, along.
  • Bait-and-Switch: "Walking On Sunshine" seems to start with exact setting of "Levitating", only to the pictogram version of the coach to come out, bump said coach away and start dancing.
  • Bewitched Amphibians: "Love is All" features a frog prince as one of the two dancers, the other being a Princess Classic type who kisses him and turns him human at the end of the instrumental break.
  • Big Bad: Night Swan is this for 2023 Edition, and also the first one in the series who only cares for perfection in dancing and is thus abducting and turning coaches from across the Danceverse into her minions.
  • *Bleep*-dammit!:
    • Several lines are omitted in "Promiscuous" due to some light innuendo, despite the fact that the most inappropriate thing about this song is its very name.
    • The Lazy Song, which is DLC in 4, had the word "birthday" was removed ("birthday suit") but not "freaking" ("I'm the freaking man"). Ironically, "freaking" is removed from Gentleman in 2014.
    • "C'mon" censors a whole bunch of words with sexual connotations (including "get it on", "screw", "lollipop", and "hooters"), and "wine", but not "Budweiser". Huh?
    • "New World" censors "sake" (the Japanese beverage), but not "vodka" in the same stanza.
    • Why is "drunk" removed from "The Other Side" in 2014 if "Teenage Dream" allowed it in 3?
      • The same applies to the removal of "drunk" from "stay" in 2023 Edition.
    • Speaking of "Stay" the word "wasted" is removed even though it was allowed in "Don't Wanna Know"
    • Why is "cherry" removed in "I Kissed a Girl", but not in "Cool For the Summer", where the innuendo is even more blatant?
    • Sometimes entire lines are censored, such as in 2015, in which "Bang Bang" had an entire line censored due to an allusion to Auto Erotica, despite "Walk This Way" getting away with a similar allusion.
    • Taken to extreme levels in "Kissing Strangers", where Nicki Minaj's verse is subjected to such a degree of censorship that one can only wonder why it wasn't just removed altogether.
    • In "Despacito" the word "gritos" is removed the first two times it was said but not the last time. To further add to the inconsistent censorship an entire line was removed, but instead of removing the explicit line "Vamos a hacerlo en una playa en Puerto Rico" (Let's do it in a beach in Puerto Rico) they removed the line "Hasta que las olas griten '¡Ay Bendito!'" (Until waves yell "Good Gracious") which, while still having innuendo, it was less explicit.
    • In "Chantaje", the word "loba" (female wolf) is removed, but not the line "I am a masochist".
    • "Old Town Road" censors "bras" and "booty", even though "Timber" allowed both in. "SloMo" also has no problem with the "booty-hypnotic" in the chorus.
    • In "Provenza", "lo hago" from "yo te lo hago rico" (I do it to you nicely) is censored, but not "en mi cama" from "en mi cama la recompensa" (on my bed the reward).
  • Bookends:
    • In "Positions", the coaches end the song in the exact positions and poses they started it in.
    • In 2020's Extreme version of "7 Rings", the starting and ending pose are the same.
  • Bowdlerise: The games do it when songs have lyrics that my be too inappropriate for its younger players. It's not really consistent from game to game (as cited above, lines in "Bang Bang" that alluded to Auto Erotica were censored despite "Walk This Way" getting away with the same allusions).
  • Breaking Old Trends: 2022 has the first routines for a song to have the coach actually be the artist for the song, in this case, "Nails, Hair, Hips, Heels" by Todrick Hall. Both routines are made to look just like the music video, though the "Just Dance Version" has the series' logo in the background instead. Because of this, he appears exactly how he does in the music video, as well as not being painted white. He's also the first coach to just wear a bracelet on his right wrist instead of a differently colored glove.
  • Breakout Character:
    • The Panda was just an avatar for "C'mon" and "Timber" (understandably so, since both feature Kesha), but his popularity was such that he later got a cameo in the background of "Happy" in 2015, before finally getting a routine all his own, none other than "I Gotta Feeling", in 2016. He has since become a Recurring Character in the franchise, appearing in at least one song per game.
    • The twerking reindeer from "Make It Jingle" became the franchise's secondary mascot, appearing alongside the Panda in songs like "Water Me" and "Con Calma".
  • Briffits and Squeans: Pictograms use "blurgits" to indicate small movements like wiggling, foot stomping and head turning. A cartoonish explosion version represents stronger, snappier moves, like punching the air.
  • Camera Abuse: Arleen, the coach for "abc (nicer)" knocks the camera over at the end of her map.
  • Camp: Several choreographies and especially the Gold Moves that require players to strike a pose involve performing exaggerated motions. Characters performed by Mehdi Kerkouche stand out too.
  • Canon Welding: Until the later games, none of the characters and their worlds weren't confirmed to really be connected, with only some assets regarding coaches and things making small cameos in other routines. That was until The Traveler was introduced, a man with the ability to travel to other worlds, who meets another coach from a different song and appears to get together and possibly having a son. Excluding Duets with a love theme, these coaches (Rock Your Body and Levitating) are the first coaches of the series to be conceptualized as a couple, one of the first big examples of the series starting to build lore and a potential story.
    • A possible precursor to this is the routine Sugar that has several couples comprised of coaches from different previous songs dancing together. The main one depicted is The Bride and Rasputin, the coaches for Hot N Cold and Rasputin respectively, likely chosen because of their songs being their most famous ones from the first two games respectively. Them meeting for the first time is depicted in Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) and their breakup is implied in Sweet but Psycho.
    • In the trailer for 2022's Season 1: Astral, a villainous-looking woman with the name of "X" appears for a second on one of the tarot cards. She eventually was revealed to be in the ending for "CAN'T STOP THE FEELING!" appearing at the end abducting the background dancers while the main dancers manage to escape her by going to another world. Her name is later revealed to be Night Swan, and she is the main dancer of "Witch". Interestingly she also appears in Locked out of Heaven, and it's implied she's the mother of Jack Rose, the coach of said routine.
  • Character Level: Added in Just Dance 2023 Edition, with the max level for each prestige being 50 before you reset for the next set of rewards.
  • Chroma Key: Used in the production of almost all iterations of the series to film the on-screen dancers. The exceptions to this are Bad Romance (only their C1 forms) and Radical, along with routines that are animated with CGI coaches.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience:
    • The coach's left hands wear gloves of a different color to show that players should hold their controllers with the right hand. In solo routines, this color will be the accent color used for the symbols in the pictograms. In older games the glove color usually matched an accent color on the coach's outfit that doesn't appear on it much, but this changed to having it be a color that doesn't appear on the outfit at all.
    • Pictograms are usually painted after the main color in their respective coach's attire, helpful for routines with more than one character.
  • Color-Coded Multiplayer: The pictograms in the Duet, Trio and Dance Crew levels are of a different color for each playable character, even though they have visually distinctive dancers. For dances where all coaches share the same or at least a similar color scheme (For example the K/DA members in their ALL OUT outfits for DRUM GO DUM and MORE), their pictogram color will instead be the color of the their glove.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Dance Mashups, introduced in the third game, contain pieces of dances from all of the main series games up to that point, although it wasn't until the fourth game that the first game's dancers started being included. Sadly these got removed come 2018 likely due to the sheer growing total number of songs and their dances being too much and the newer routines not having coach extractions because they're now actual video files being played instead of coach put onto a background.
    • If you look closely at the dancer's TV head during the chorus of "Video Killed the Radio Star", you can see clips of past dances in the series playing in it.
    • The TV in the background of "So What" in 4 also displays earlier dances from time to time.
    • "Rock Lobster" in 4 contains backgrounds from past games.
    • Appropriately enough, the level for "Just Dance" is one big tribute to the entire franchise, featuring some fan favourite coaches from previous games in the glass windows in the background.
    • "YMCA" in 2014 has the Rasputin, Moves Like Jagger, Viva La Vegas, and DARE dancers, all slightly modified to match the style of the game.
    • The DLC routine "American Girl", at one point, features the opening cutscene to "Blame It on the Boogie" in the background.
    • "Happy" in 2015 features the return of the panda bear from "C'Mon" and "Timber" as one of the many background dancers. This was before 2016 made him a Recurring Character.
    • "Uptown Funk" in 2016 features several dancers from past games in the background.
    • “Watch Me” in 2017 reunites the following animal coaches from previous games: The lion from “Copacabana”, the zebra from “Istanbul (Not Constantinople)”, the fox from “What Does the Fox Say?”, and the frog from “Love is All”.
    • The dancers for the alternate Helmet routine of "Radical" in 2017 are the exact same dancers from "Animals" in 2016.
    • The level for "Fire" in 2019, which is themed after an arcade game, has fourteen coaches from previous games cameo during the character select segment.
    • "Last Friday Night" in 2022 features many previous coaches of Katy Perry songs ("Hot N Cold", "I Kissed a Girl", "Dark Horse", "California Gurls", "Firework" and "Swish Swish") and references said coaches' choreographs. It also features non-Katy Perry coaches too, such as "Rasputin", "Never Gonna Give You Up" and "Mr. Saxobeat", the last of whom is playing the saxophone.
    • "Telephone" in 2023 Edition features past coaches of Lady Gaga songs starting from the first chorus ("Born This Way", "Bad Romance", "John Wayne", "Judas", "Just Dance", "Rain on Me", "Stupid Love" and "Applause")
  • Cool Shades: Way too many examples to count. Exaggerated in 2019, where it's easier to list the coaches who do not fit this trope.
  • Cover Version:
    • Several tracks across the games are covered to avoid copyright issues. The most notable example would be every single Britney Spears song, before 2016 broke the pattern by featuring the original version of "Circus". However, it went back to covers for her in 2021 with "Till The World Ends", but then 2023 Edition featured a remake of a previously covered song of hers, "Toxic", now sung by Britney herself.
    • In the Kids versions of the franchise, almost all of the songs are covers.
    • Nearly every Disney song featured in the main series titles are covers. So far the only exceptions have been "Into The Unknown" in 2020 (although it uses a slightly different instrumental backing track for whatever reason) and "We Don't Talk About Bruno" in 2023 Edition.
  • Coy, Girlish Flirt Pose: The dancer at the beginning of "Firework".
  • Crossover:
    • Disney has much, much of it's song catalogue added to the series throughout the years.
    • With the Rabbids (another Ubisoft property) in "Here Comes the Hotstepper" as either DLC of the second game or as a standalone track for Summer Party, "Make the Party (Don't Stop)" in 4 and "Love Is All" in Just Dance 2015 (in which Globox also makes an appearance). 2018 took it further by having a level where the coach itself is a Rabbid, followed by another exclusive to the Chinese Unlimited servers to celebrate Chinese New Year.
    • And the Super Mario Bros theme (complete with the man himself) appears in the Japan version and as DLC for the Wii version of the third game. The same level returned in the Switch version of 2018, with updated graphics that resemble Super Mario 3D Land.
    • Just Dance 2015 features the Tetris theme as a playable track, and 2016 features an Angry Birds-themed routine.
    • Hatsune Miku appears in "Ievan Polkka" in 2016, "Popipo" in 2017 and "Love Ward" in 2018.
    • The trend continues in 2019, which has a level dedicated to Pac-Man.
    • 2020 features the routine "Baby Shark".
    • League of Legends:
      • "DRUM GO DUM" by K/DA appeared on Unlimited during the 2021 era which was later followed up by their two more famous songs, "POP/STARS" on 2022 and "MORE" on launch of 2023 Edition all featuring the members as the coaches with the backgrounds based on their respective music videos, and "MORE" has an alternate easier solo version called the "Seraphine Version" where, well, Seraphine is the coach.
      • Along with "MORE", "Playground" by Bea Miller from the soundtrack of Arcane appears on the launch songlist, featuring Jinx as the coach in the world of the series. Both Jinx and Seraphine are also among the selection of avatars used for dancer card customization alondside the JD characters.
    • 2023 Edition has "Top of the World" from Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile having Lyle the crocodile himself being the coach, one of the rare routines with an animated coach, as a bit of cross-promotion as the movie has a small easter egg of a Just Dance ad with Freyja, the coach of "Love Me Land".
    • Miraculous Ladybug and Cat Noir appear in Just Dance+ with their theme song as a playable track.
  • Curse Cut Short: Despite the E10+ rating of the series, this gets zigzagged like crazy. Oftentimes, like in "Wild Wild West", the lyrics will omit the offending word while the song itself does not.
  • Custom Uniform of Sexy: Female dancers are prone to this and serve as the main source of Fanservice. Midriff-baring clothing range from modest low-cut crop tops (P3 of "Junto a Ti" from 2016 and "Die Young" from 2015) to outright bras ("BOOMBAYAH" from 2022).
  • Cute Witch: Usually averted in the Halloween-themed levels (especially "Boss Witch"), but played straight in "Don't Let Me Down", which stars two teenagers dancing in and around a magical circle surrounded by candles. As they dance, they move objects around and summon heart-shaped clouds of smoke. The level ends with them conjuring a small energy sphere and joining hands, having successfully concluded their ritual.
  • Dance Party Ending: If You Wanna Party functions as one for the Enter the Danceverses playlist in 2023
  • Dimensional Traveler: The coach of Rock Your Body, aptly named The Traveler.
  • Do Well, But Not Perfect: Some of the Dance Quests in 4 require you to get a GOOD rating at certain parts of each song. It doesn't count if you get a PERFECT.
  • Downloadable Content: Starting in the second game, there used to be an online shop that offered extra songs or alternate routines at a price. Averted as of 2016 and beyond, which replaced it with the Unlimited subscription service.
  • Early-Bird Cameo:
    • The JDU-exclusive routine to "Sax" by Fleur East appeared in the music video for Bebe Rexha's "The Way I Are (Dance with Somebody)", nearly a year before it's release.
    • An accidental one, the coaches and backgrounds for the classic routine of "Run The World (Girls)" appear in promotional material for 2021 however neither of the song's routines appear in the game, instead later being on 2022, implying it was supposed to be on 2021, however it was taken out and delayed till the next game for no explained reason.
    • Season 4 of 2021 Unlimited exclusives is themed around a character named The Traveler, the coach of "Rock Your Body" which also serves as the name for the season. The character has the ability to open portals to other worlds, and he appears in early-bird cameos in each of the trailers for each of the 3 previous seasons. Then he encounters a mysterious blue-skinned alien-like woman who is later revealed to be the coach for "Levitating". Both songs are revealed to be part of the season by being added to Unlimited for 2 weeks and 1 week respectively to get a taste of the upcoming game. The end of the trailer with them smiling at each other in a romantic way is also Foreshadowing for the routine of "Save Your Tears (Remix)", another track on 2022 that has the coaches from their routines dancing with each other in a combination or their backgrounds.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness: The original Just Dance, other than being a motion control-based dancing game, has virtually nothing in common with later games in the series, with a completely different point ranking system and aesthetic, "Shake Moves" as opposed to Gold Moves, and dancers that don't have the now commonplace gloves. Someone unfamiliar with the franchise could easily mistake the first game for a cheap knockoff instead of actually being part of the same series!
    • Similarly, the NTSC cover for the original game is the only game in the main series so to not feature any in-game dancers on the front cover.
  • Easier Than Easy: While Kids Mode's choreographies are deliberately simple so that young children can handle them, the grading system is so simplified and generous that any movement can rack up a few stars.
  • Elemental Motifs: "positions" has 4 female coaches with their own themed backgrounds who each represent the four basic classical elements of water, fire, earth, and air respectively. The coaches outfits have their own main color signifying their element combined with fashion to represent Ariana's past eras of her career. Strangely though, the pins representing Scorpio (a water sign) and Virgo (an earth sign) have been switched such that they are worn, erroneously, by P3, the coach representing earth and P1, the one representing water respectively.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: Just Dance's title describes the entirety of its gameplay.
  • Exergaming: Just Sweat, a mode introduced in the second game of the main series, tracks the calories burnt as the player dances. Recent games don't have an entire mode for this anymore as well as dedicated routines, as instead you can switch from regular to sweat mode in the song list and it will then track calories burned for the same routines. During gameplay, the star bar is replaced with the calorie tracker, making it difficult to track your score, especially as points are only displayed after the routine and not during.
  • Expansion Pack: Just Dance: Summer Party is basically a compilation of most of the DLC from 2.
  • Expy:
  • Fake Difficulty:
    • One of the main problems of the first game, and part of the reason why it was received so harshly, is how the motion detection is so terrible that even if you follow the moves pretty well, the game more often than not will register the move as OK or an X, making it difficult to get high scores consistently.
    • Some special effects can make it difficult to follow the dancer. Of note are the coaches from "Don't You Worry Child" and "Animals" (Extreme), who become black silhouettes during certain parts of their routines.
    • Thanks to a programming error, it's near impossible to score 5 stars in the "Candy" mashup in Just Dance 2014, as each counted move awards barely any points, even for Perfects.
    • In the Extreme version of "Sorry", the routine syncs its moves to the vocals and instruments arbitrarily, in a way that the challenge comes not from the choreography itself, but from remembering which part of the song each move has been synched to. The same could be said about the extreme version of "Without Me"
    • Another obvious instance of dance steps being performed off-beat is in "Lean On", where the punching move during the chorus is completely out of sync with the song.
    • In "Fight Club", several moves are out of sync with the song, with the one right at the start of the chorus being the most noticeable.
  • Fake Longevity: 2014 and 2015 have some mashups that can only be unlocked during a specific month.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: From 2 onwards, every dancer always wears a glove on their left hand, indicating that the players should hold the controllers with the right hand.
  • Fighting Game:
    • The stage for "Kung-Fu Fighting (Dave Ruffy/Mark Wallis Remix)" is done like this.
    • The Battle Mode in 4 and 2014 resembles one, complete with life bars and dots to count the number of rounds won.
  • Female Angel, Male Demon: 2023 Edition features two songs, "Magic" and "Disco Inferno", which have a female angel named Ann. G. Lina and a male devil named Luke Cypher as the dancers respectively. They would later get a routine together in Just Dance+: "About Damn Time."
  • Foreign Remake: 2015, 2017, and 2020 have Chinese versions with local songs included. Now also has a Chinese version known as Vitality School.
  • Funny Animal: Some routines will use anthropomorphic animals as dancers, such as "Land of 1000 Dances", "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)", and of course any routine using that panda dancer.
  • Fun Size: The miniature child versions of the Panda and Reindeer in 2020's "Freeze Please" and "Mini Yo School". Aren't they adorable?
  • Game-Breaking Bug:
    • The Xbox Kinect has a tendency to detect objects like chairs and add them to the game as if they were extra players. In the worst cases, it will stop detecting the actual player movements to focus solely on the object!
    • Having too many players sometimes causes the Kinect to mash them together and treat them as a single dancer. This happens predominantly in choreographies where players swap places or interact with each other.
    • Although rarely, the Wii version of the games sometimes freeze or crash, requiring the console to be unplugged to solve the issue.
  • Gender Flip: Some levels employ coaches of alternating genders that take turns performing. Examples include "Gangnam Style", "Safe and Sound", "Song 2" and "Uptown Funk".
    • 2017's "Watch Me" features the "Love is All" frog coach as a female instead of male.
  • Gimmick Level: Most of the themed alternates fall into this, for example "Juice" alternate featuring.. well... Dancing Juice
  • Greatest Hits Album: Just Dance Greatest Hits (Best of in Europe) contains popular songs from the first 3 games.
  • Guilt-Based Gaming: Idle example. If you don't score any points during the routine, instead of the results, the game will give you the message, "Step in and just dance!"
  • Interchangeable Asian Cultures:
    • There used to be a section called K-Pop in the Just Dance search bar. However, some songs listed there, mainly the Just Dance original songs, were actually in Japanese. This is fixed in 2019, as the playlist is renamed "Songs from the Far East".
    • In 2017, one of the mashups had the theme of K-pop, which included coaches whose appearances were similar to K-pop singers... and also Hatsune Miku.
  • Instant Costume Change: Many levels in the game have the coaches switch costumes mid-song immediately, sometimes even multiple times in one song.
  • Intercourse with You: Many songs featured in the franchise fall under this, such as "Birthday" and "Bang Bang". It's also pretty obvious in one of the original songs from 3, "Baby Don't Stop Now". There are actually two versions of the song, the one used in the game and a slightly more explicit version that outright namedrops making love.
  • In the Style of: The Cover Version of "Fame" was recorded "in the style of Irene Cara".
  • Irony: The All Stars Mode for 2020 barely had a story at all with just the Panda going through worlds of past routines all just taken from Unlimited with scenes only added in between, but it got it's own mode selection put beside "Just Dance" and "Kids Mode". On 2023 Edition, there a few songsnote  shown to be part of a story with their routines having beginning and ending cutscenes actually part of them, showing a much more actual story-like story with an evil villain taking over the Danceverse and the heroes stopping her and reforming her son before sending the main girl named Sara back to real life. However, there's isn't any actual story mode in the game at all with these songs just being put into a playlist named "Enter The Danceverses" making it function sort of like a story mode, although the playing the routines by themselves still retain the intros and outros.
  • Kaleidoscope Hair: The Panda in "Water Me" in 2019 has a mohawk-shaped Tuft of Head Fur which cycles through the full color spectrum throughout the routine, along with his entire outfit.
  • Katanas Are Just Better: The alternate version of 4's "Tribal Dance" is subtitled as 'with a katana.'
  • Konami Code: Use it to unlock the Extreme Version of "Barbra Streisand" in 3 by inputting it on the title screen.
  • Large Ham: 2023 Edition's Alternate Routine of "Danger! High Voltage" is filled to the top with dramatic, over the top Choreography Performed by Ruben (Julien Durand) and Polo (Cormier Claude).
  • Later-Installment Weirdness: Just Dance 2022 and Just Dance 2023 Edition both have two features that are absent or downplayed in previous games:
    • Recent games after 2014 have been trying new things like animated coaches and movement of the camera. However 2022 and 2023 Edition kick it up a notch as almost every routine from the two games has the camera move and at different angles, zooming in to and out from the coaches and there are multiple routines with animated coaches as opposed to previous games that had just one.
    • Almost all of the coaches have visible makeup or visible facial features, which only occurred in some routines in the past, except for the first three games. Otherwise, faces of the coaches have been completely white, making it look like they don't have faces, aside from any errors and glitches made during editing.
  • Licensed Game: For artists as well as other properties.
  • Lighter and Softer: From 2015 and onwards, the franchise seems to be trying to appeal to a much younger and wider audience.
    • The tracklists originally encompassed a wide variety of music genres, but have since changed to be comprised mostly of pop songs. Most likely due to popular demand.
    • 2018 brought us "Kids Mode". The name should speak for itself.
    • The design of the Star Meter in 2019 has been likened to that of a Just Dance Kids game.
  • Louis Cypher: The dancer for "Disco Inferno" is named Luke Cypher. He's a much more open version of this trope, however, clearly presenting as a demon.
  • Lyrical Dissonance: Many songs feature routines that clashes their actual context:
    • "99 Luftballons" is about some red balloons accidentally causing a nuclear war. The routine has a happy couple dancing alongside red balloons.
    • The duet for "Let It Go" revolves around Elsa playfully using her powers to entertain Anna. However, the song is actually about Elsa's despair, as she faces ostracism from her people and decides to abandon her kingdom. When she finds solace in the fact that she no longer has to conceal her ability, Elsa fully embraces her isolation and declares that she is never going back to Anna and Arendelle.
    • The level for "Copacabana", a song about murder, has a group of anthropomorphic animals dancing in a Seussian background.
    • "Last Christmas" is a song about a painful breakup. The routine is about a couple playing in a snowy wonderland.
  • "Miss X" Pun: The woman in the song "Miss Understood" claims she's always had a hard life and people tend to look down on her (ie. she is misunderstood), but she keeps pushing on.
  • Mondegreen Gag: The Jamiroquai song "Automaton" has a "Tomato Version" routine as a nod to how the line "I'm automaton" can be misheard as "I'm a tomato".
  • Money for Nothing: Mojocoins in 2014 to 2017 are used to buy avatars and alternate routines. From 2018 to 2022, they are used to obtain cosmetic rewards and alternate levels (2018 and 2019 only) from the Gift Machine. You can keep collecting them even when they become useless after unlocking everything. Averted with Now, in which you have to pay 100 Mojocoins every time you play a song, and 2023 Edition where Mojo has been completely removed and stuff is only obtained from progression.
  • Multi-Platform: All but the original, 2, Summer Party, and the 3 Japanese games, which are exclusive to Nintendo consoles.
  • Non-Human Head:
    • In Just Dance 3, the dancer for "Video Killed the Radio Star" is a person with a television for a head, which alternates between showing footage of the older games and various cheerful expressions.
    • "Daddy Cool" in 2018 has a normal person wearing a panda mask. Notable in that it's the only Panda level that does not utilize the full costume.
    • "Bassa Sababa" in 2020 features a dancer wearing a unicorn head.
    • "Give That Wolf A Banana" in 2023 features two dancers wearing reindeer and panda masks.
  • No Plot? No Problem!: You just dance. Well, besides both the story modes introduced in 2017, 2020's All Star Mode and 2023 Edition's Enter the Danceverses which are more of Excuse Plots. This doesn't stop people from coming up with stories about various routines and their coaches, due to their unique and creative nature.
  • Nostalgia Level:
    • Being riddled with bits of dances from earlier games in the series, the Dance Mashups can easily fall into this trope.
    • "Uptown Funk" featured several dancers from previous games in the background.
    • The routine for "Don't Worry" in Just Dance Unlimited contains a lot of backgrounds from previous installments. The same concept is used in the Panda version of "Don't Stop Me Now" in 2017.
    • "Sugar" is one of the best examples yet. The level features dancers from almost every previous game, who take turns performing to the song. Quite a fitting celebration for what is the tenth game in the franchise.
    • The All Stars Mode in 2020 offers 10 routines from previous games to complete.
  • No Name Given:
    • Excluding crossover routines and coaches, almost every single coach does not have a name, although some of them have been given names or titles, either in concept arts, background details or posts from official social media accounts.
    • Downplayed with the fourth season banner for 2021 and major promotional materials for 2022, where it features the coaches for "Rock Your Body" and "Levitating", where they are both explicitly referred to as "The Traveler" and "Si'Ha Nova" respectively. While the latter is clearly a name, the former appears to be a title.
    • Downplayed in 2023 Edition and onwards, as every featured coach has a name, but only for routines that either originate from that game, or returning routines that never appeared in Unlimited or 2022 (save for a few exceptions such as "Toy").
  • Oddball in the Series: Some of the spinoffs can be this, especially if they focus on a certain niche, with a notable example of "The Smurfs Dance Party".
  • Oddly Named Sequel 2: Electric Boogaloo: From 2014 onwards, each game followed a pattern of being named after the year after its release date.
  • Old Save Bonus: For having save data from any predecessors of the current game you're playing (in 2014 or later), you get avatars based on one dancer each from the previous games in the main series.
  • Once an Episode:
    • Some artistsnote  will have at least one song featured in every game for a time, either in the main game or as Downloadable Content/added to Unlimited/+. The biggest example of this is the unofficial queen of Just Dance dubbed by some fans, Katy Perry who had a song in every game from the first up till 2017.note . Because of this she has the most songs featured in the main series and holds the record for the most songs from a single album featuredIf you're wondering . From then onward she would only have one song be featured in every other game. Disney is also another franchise this has been done for that's not just one artist, usually from the Disney Animated Canon.
    • Likewise from 2 onwards, there's a Halloween-themed song.
    • There's at least one song in each game that has someone playing an Air Guitar.
    • From 2014 on, a panda is guaranteed to appear either as a coach or as a background character in at least one song.
    • There is at least one choreography in every game that pays tribute to Bollywood, even if the song itself had nothing to do with India ("It's My Birthday","Fancy", "Cheap Thrills", among others).
  • 100% Completion: While it exists in every game after and including 3 in the form of getting all of the Unlockable Content, 2014 actually keeps track of how many stars you've earned out of the total amount available to give players a measurable sense of progress.
  • Original Character: Original songs, in this case. Amidst all the copyrighted tracks, you are bound to find at least 3 or 4 that were made specifically for each game. The most famous one is "All You Gotta Do", which essentially functions as the franchise's Title Theme Tune and has been featured in every trailer since.
  • Palette Swap: Used extensively in many non-Solo routines, where several levels have coaches with similar or identical clothing to match a specific theme.
  • Pastiche: The song "Let's Go to the Mall", from a joke on How I Met Your Mother, is a parody of 80s bubblegum pop, so the dance in this game is a pastiche of 80s dances.
  • Plot Threads: 7 Routines in 2023 Edition Are that; Small events that together build the "Enter the Danceverses" storyline.
  • The Points Mean Nothing: While some gamers really don't like this, others love these games for that reason. Somewhat averted in 3 and onwards, where the amount of points you earn (and thus how many stars you get) affects how much "Mojo" you earn, which in turn determines how fast you earn new Unlockable Content. Once you've unlocked it all, this trope kicks back into full gear. Averted mostly in 2023 Edition where Mojo has been removed and with the revamped progression system, everything concerning dancer cands is only unlocked from experience, making it a difficult and long process to reach the end and unlock everything.
  • Portal Door: Both The Traveler and his son Wanderlust can manifest these in a whim.
  • Precision F-Strike:
    • The preview for "Starships" in 2014 did not censor the profanities in the chorus. This was fixed on the final version.
    • The verse "I am so cool with my awesome big tits" in "Mi Mi Mi" went completely uncensored, as it was misinterpreted by the French developers. This wouldn't be so bad if it wasn't for the fact that this is one of the songs available in the game's Kids Mode.
    • Quite literally in "Happier than Ever", though downplayed. While most of the profanities in the song were censored, in the final minute of the song you can barely hear an uncensored "fuck you" under the music.
  • Product Placement:
    • The on-disc DLC "Safe and Sound" is subsidized by a promotion for the Fructis shampoo in Canada. Conveniently, much of the song's backdrop is plastered in similar colors to Fructis packaging, the routine has a lot of hair action going on, and the words "BOOST YOUR STYLE" show up in the background. It all but screams "shampoo commercial". The advertising would be removed from the routine in it's future appearances.
    • In 2014, 2015, Now, and 2016 there have been four songs tied to Coca Cola: "The World is Ours", "Movement is Happiness (Find Your Thing)", "The Choice is Yours", and "Taste the Feeling".
    • Unlimited received two choreographies to promote Barbie and the Emoji Movie.
    • The levels based on Tetris and Angry Birds advertise Tetris Ultimate and The Angry Birds Movie, respectively.
    • Chinese video sharing platform Bilibili is promoted on the Chinese localization of 2020 with "Rainbow Rhythem", a routine featuring their Moe Anthropomorphism mascots, Bili-tans 22 and 33.
  • Pumpkin Person:
    • One of these appears in 2's DLC "Professor Pumplestickle." It reappears for This is Halloween in 3.
    • There is one in 2017's "Ghost in the Keys."
  • Put on a Bus / The Bus Came Back: There are some artists that have long breaks in between their songs being featured. As of 2023 Edition, both Kylie Minogue & The Beach Boys both hold the record for the longest absence between appearances in the main series at 13 games, with the first game having "Can't Get You Out Of My Head" and "I Get Around", and 2023 Edition having "Magic" and "Wouldn't It Be Nice"note .
  • Rank Inflation: The ranking system from 2 onward for each song went from one to five stars (One at every 2000-point interval) up to 2016. 2017 introduced the "Superstar" ranking at 11,000 points, and 2018 introduced the 12,000-point "Megastar" ranking.
  • Recurring Character:
    • The Panda who was introduced in 2014's "C'mon" and "Timber" has since reappeared as a dancer in every game since 2016note . He has also been used as a Living Prop in many other routines.
    • Other dancers like "Rasputin" and "Built for This" are also frequently reused, but are more of Call Backs.
    • The black cat in "Magic Halloween" in 2018's Kids Mode has reappeared in every game's Kids Mode since.
  • Recurring Element: Just about every game so far has had at least one Halloween-themed level, with characters dressed up as monsters and a spooky background.
  • Retraux:
    • The routines for "Kung Fu Fighting" and "Move Your Feet" have a distinct 8-bit feeling. The former is reminiscent of a fighting game, while the latter features little Atari-style critters alongside the player.
    • "In the Hall of the Pixel King" and "Fire" have aesthetics based on arcade games. The "16-Bit Version" of "Danger! High Voltage" goes further with this and the routine is fully animated in collaboration with designer Ivan Dixon with everything (even the no-so-smoothly-moving coach which can make the dance hard to follow) being pixelized and the setting being fighting enemies and a boss at the end.
  • Rewards Pass: Believe it or not, they were introduced to the series in 2023 Edition, though it's a rare instance of a pass system with all rewards available for free (albeit with a Just Dance+ subscription granting the player double experience).
  • Rotoscoping: In this case, the dancers are manually painted white before the routines are filmed, and after filming, they're digitally edited, with the outfits being recolored.
  • Rule of Three: Several artists have had three of their songs in one game:
    • Fatboy Slim had "Body Movin’ (Fatboy Slim Remix)", "Rockafeller Skank", and "Sympathy For The Devil (Fatboy Slim Remix)" in 2
    • The Hit Crew had "Here Comes the Hotstepper", "Holiday", and "Toxic"note  in 2
    • Katy Perry had "California Gurls", "E.T.", and "Teenage Dream" in 3 special editions
    • Nicki Minaj was featured in "Kissing Strangers", "Side To Side", and "Swish Swish" in 2018
    • When including original DLC's and Unlimited exclusives, the following artists also have three of their songs in one game:
      • Katy Perry also had "I Kissed a Girl", "Roar", and "Waking Up in Vegas" in 2014
      • Pitbull had "Can’t Get Enough", "Feel This Moment", and "Timber" in 2014
      • Ariana Grande had "Bang Bang", "Break Free", and "Problem" in 2015
      • Sia had "Cheap Thrills", "The Greatest", and "Titanium" in 2017
      • J Balvin was featured in "Con Altura", "I Like It", and "X" in 2020
  • Scoring Points: Employed as a way to incentivize competitive multiplayer and to unlock more content in later games. Not that most people care.
  • Self-Duplication: The Traveler from "Rock Your Body" is shown to be able to make clones of himself and send them through portals.
  • Sentai: 3's "Spectronizer" by the appropriately-named Sentai Express is a Homage to the Sentai genre.
  • Serial Escalation:
    • The dance routines in the games got progressively more difficult and involved as time went on, to the point where someone skilled in the later games can go back to the first game and do just about every dance routine in that game without even breaking a sweat.
    • An Inverted Trope, but there is the "Part of Me" choreography: When it was first released in Just Dance 4, it was given a 4 out of 3 difficulty rating (read: very hard). Then when it was re-released in 2014, this got toned down to just Hard, then Medium in Just Dance Wii U, before finally receiving an in-game rating of Easy by the Unlimited service in 2019.
  • Series Mascot: The Panda, thanks to him being a Recurring Character often used in all sorts of Just Dance media.
  • Serious Business: It is marketed as a silly party game, but Just Dance has grown in popularity to actually become an ESport, with yearly tournaments where players all around the world compete for the title of World Champion.
  • Show, Don't Tell: Played exaggeratedly enough in Just Dance 2023 Edition with the coaches and the Enter The Danceverses storyline, as almost every single detail and information regarding of the coaches (e.g., familial connection between the coaches, Night Swan's motif) as well as the setting are all relegated to side content, promotional posts, direct answers from the staff and even second-hand accounts from community members. Most of them are absent in the gameplay itself, and even some of the present details are very ambiguous or subtle to uninformed players.
  • Shirtless Scene: Several male characters throughout the series appear shirtless. Sometimes it's to fit the level's theme, like Aladdin of 2014's "Prince Ali" or the male background dancers in 2015's "Dark Horse", but more often than not it's for Rule of Cool, like in 2019's "Bang Bang Bang".
  • Signs of Disrepair:
    • In the "Never Gonna Give You Up" stage, a neon sign reading "SOUNDS" gets damaged and displays "SO____S" instead.
    • For the title card of "abc (nicer)" the original title of "abcdefu" is present but only the first three letters and the "(nicer)" part underneath light up to display the clean version's title as that's the version used in-game.
  • Sitcom Homage Episode: 2014's "Blame It on the Boogie" is presented as a stereotypical 90s sitcom, featuring a title sequence introducing the coaches, who are a family of two children and their parents (Expies of Bill Huxtable and Peggy Bundy), a Laugh Track and a Standardized Sitcom Housing living room as the background.
  • Special Guest:
    • Some of the VIPMADE versions starting in 2015 of the songs will feature famous celebrities as the coaches, like Anthony & Ian from Smosh hilariously dancing to "Black Widow".
    • Eventually there would be routines (that aren't VIPMADEs) where the coach is actually the artist of the song, they appear exactly how they are without the regular performer things like the skin being made white, and the dances are based on the official choreography, including:
      • Todrick Hall with both versions of "Nails, Hair, Hips, Heels"note 
      • Camila Cabello for the alternate version of "Don't Go Yet"
      • Ava Max for "Million Dollar Baby"note 
      • K3 for "Vleugels"note 
    • "Anything I Do" has three members, Gigi, Vinii and Keiona from the House of Revlon be the coaches.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: The song "Chiwawa". It was just an original track in Just Dance 2016, but later it became one of the very few songs to get an alternate routine through the Unlimited service. Then it returned in the main tracklist of the Switch version of 2017, in 2018 as one of the routines in Kids Mode, and in 2020 as the representative song for 2016 in All Stars Mode.
  • "Staying Alive" Dance Pose: The dancer in "I Will Survive" in 2014 does a version of the pose.
  • Stealth Pun: It's a bit ironic that the dancer in "I Will Survive" is a zombie. Then the moon in the background turns into a disco ball and you realize that it's just the way the developers found to say that "disco is dead".
  • Stock Scream: At the end of 4's "Never Gonna Give You Up", the superhero dancer attempts to fly off, only to fall flat on his face and subsequently let out a Wilhelm Scream.
  • The Cape: There are few dancers which have one, such as the dancer of "Never Gonna Give You Up" from 4.
  • The Stoic: The dancer for "All The Stars" has a serious and solemn expression throughout the entire routine, in stark contrast to most of the coaches smiling in their routines.
  • Subverted Rhyme Every Occasion: Pretty much thanks to curse words being censored (it is rated E10+, after all).
  • Super-Deformed: The Chinese version of Now, AKA Vitality School, features animesque, chibi avatars.
  • Supermodel Strut: The coach of "Break My Heart" does an elegant, confident strut during most of the song, swaying her legs and hips to the beat while using her torso and arms to perform the dance moves.
  • Star-Spangled Spandex: In 2014's "Don't You Worry Child", at certain points, the dancer's outlines and textures are stars. At the chorus, the dancer becomes a silhouette-shaped night sky.
  • Tarot Motifs: Used in the promotional material, prominently the trailer, for 2022's Season 1: Astral to go with the astrology theme of the season.
  • Temporary Online Content:
    • "Brand New Start" in Just Dance 4. All other promotional songs were made available through Just Dance Now and Just Dance Unlimited, however this one is unlikely to ever be featured in either, due to legal issues between Ubisoft and the singer.
    • With the discontinuation of online services on the Nintendo Wii on January 31, 2019, DLC on Just Dance 2 to 2015 can no longer be purchased on that console, and avatars that were tied to the World Dance floor cannot be unlocked. DLC on Just Dance 4 to 2015 also became unavailable on the Wii U on March 27, 2023 following the discontinuation of the Nintendo eShop for said console.
    • Seasons in 2023 Edition have their own dedicated seasonal progression separate from the main game's progression that awards new stuff for profile customization that generally relate to the season's theme, however they're only there for the duration of the season, so players who want to get certain or even all the seasonal rewards must get through the levels needed before the season ends and the next one starts.
    • Starting with June 30, 2023, it will no longer be possible to access to Just Dance Unlimited on Just Dance 2016, 2017 and 2018. In the case of the Wii U, It's no longer possible to purchase a Just Dance Unlimited subscription for Just Dance 2019 due to the Nintendo eShop for that console shutting down on March 27, 2023
    • All DLCs for Just Dance 4, 2014 and 2015 were removed from the PlayStation Store for both PS3 and PS4 at an unknown date, rendering them unavailable for those consoles.
  • That One Player: There are players who can score the highest rank on every routine, reach an online level near or above 100 in a few weeks, top the results of a World Dancer Floor round and hold the Dancer of the Week title for a long time. They are 100% sure to make it to at least Phase 2 of the Just Dance World Cup.
  • That Russian Squat Dance: "Rasputin" features this, as does "Y.M.C.A.", which reuses its dancer. It also pops up briefly during "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" in 4.
  • Title Drop: Lady Gaga's eponymous song is (finally) featured in the soundtrack of 2014.
  • Title Theme Tune: There have been multiple made over the years serving as the theme songs for series, all featuring the series' title.
  • Tron Lines: Some of the more Electronic-heavy songs' stages look like this.
  • Uniqueness Decay: In older games, a Gold Move was a one of a kind dance move that was worth more points than usual. Come Just Dance 2015, Gold Moves were relegated to simply occur at the start of the song's chorus, which often results in them being performed several times throughout the rest of the song just as a regular move. However, 2019 and later games took measures to avert this, employing unique and memorable Gold Moves in its levels.
  • Unlockable Content:
    • In 3 and onwards, collecting enough "Mojo" Points (gained by earning stars and completing special conditions in certain songs) unlocks alternate choreographies and Dance Mashups for certain songs, as well as new icons for the player's Dance Card.
    • Earning enough Mojo points to level up in 4 allows players to spin the "Wheel of Gifts" where the order of unlocks is at random, so it all basically comes down to luck, while 2014 replaces the Mojo with coins, which allows players to unlock the content in the order that they would want instead of it being in a fixed order.
    • In 2018 and onward, Mojo coins are instead spent on a gift machine, where players can randomly unlock concept art, alternate routines, titles and avatars.
  • Witch with a Capital "B": “Boss Witch” from 2022, which is a parody of “Boss Bitch” by Doja Cat.
  • Wholesome Crossdresser:
    • The coach from "Drop the Mambo" was originally supposed to be played by a woman, but the male choreographer's enthusiasm was such that the developers decided to just cast him in drag instead. She was brought back for "Sugar", again portrayed by a male.
    • The Chinese man from "The Way I Are" is played by a woman. Unlike "Drop the Mambo", there is really no explanation on why she was cast for this role.
    • The coach for "Boy You Can Keep it" is an intentional example.
    • The routine for "Sissy That Walk" has Drag Queen Lolita Banana as the coach.
  • Wolverine Publicity:
    • One Direction had songs in "Just Dance" 4 to 2016, and the band's name was featured on the cover of all four. Notably for 2015, their name did not appear on the preliminary version of the cover but ultimately ended up on the final box art.
    • Katy Perry's name has appeared on the box of every game her music's been in.
    • Averted for both in 2017 as neither appear in the game (though former One Direction member Zayn gets a song in). Katy's returned several times up to 2022, while One Direction's presence has largely been sustained by solo songs from its former members ("Familiar", "Adore You", "As It Was").
    • Nowadays, with the growing presence of K-Pop in the game, this position seems to have been taken by groups like BTS and Blackpink.
  • Zodiac Motifs: The promotion of the "Astral" season of Just Dance 2022 involved assigning coaches certain zodiacs or even One of the four zodiac groups.

♫ Baby, all you gotta do, all you gotta do is, all you gotta do is Just Dance! ♪

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