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He's a motherfuckin' starboy.
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Abel Makkonen Tesfaye (born February 16, 1990) a.k.a. The Weeknd is a Canadian singer and record producer.

In 2010 he anonymously uploaded several songs to YouTube under the name "The Weeknd" which he then followed up with three nine-track mixtapes throughout 2011 - which brought him fame and a record deal. The following year, he released a compilation album of the three mixtapes (with three extra songs) Trilogy.

In 2013, he released his debut studio album Kiss Land.

Has his own record label "XO", which sometimes is partnered with Drake's label "OVO Sound", to be "OVOXO". XO is currently distributed by Republic Records.

An MTV journalist called him "The next Michael Jackson".

He received an Oscar nomination for the song "Earned It" on the Fifty Shades of Grey soundtrack.


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Discography:

Studio albums
  • Kiss Land (2013)
  • Beauty Behind the Madness (2015)
  • Starboy (2016)

Mixtapes

  • House of Balloons (2011)
  • Thursday (2011)
  • Echoes of Silence (2011)
  • My Dear Melancholy, (2018)

Compilation albums

  • Trilogy (his first three mixtapes packaged together) (2012)


Tropes:

  • Animal Motifs: A black panther symbolizes him in the "Mania" short film.
  • Arc Symbol: The cross icon in all his promo for Starboy symbolizes his new musical direction. He wears a cross necklace and wields a gigantic neon one to destroy his Big Fancy House.
  • Artistic License – Physics: The title Echoes of Silence, most likely meant to be symbolic. Though it sounds very cool, it is impossible to produce an echo without sound.
  • Audience Participation Song: "House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls."
  • Bank Robbery: The "False Alarm" video, in which he's a participant. The violent heist goes really wrong, culminating in the gang getting killed off one by one, the kidnapped and bloodied hostage escaping with the money, and shooting himself in the head.
  • Bilingual Bonus:
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    • "The Hills" ends with him singing a few lines in Amharic, his first language.
    • The chorus for "Montreal" is completely in Canadian French.
  • Bizarrchitecture: The strange structure in the video for "Secrets", with endless staircases, synchronized elevators, and long hallways.
  • Boastful Rap: "Starboy" is a deconstruction, as the lyrics point out all the luxuries and women that fame has brought him, but the lyrics also imply that Abel feels Lonely at the Top and indulges in his luxuries to distract from this. With the words "Look what you've done" in the refrain, it becomes clear that all those things were given to him when he doesn't know if he wants it all. Made more explicit in the video, where the "new" Weeknd kills off his "old" self and destroys the awards, fancy suits, and chandeliers that he owns.
  • Book-Ends:
    • The opening and closing tracks of Starboy both feature Daft Punk.
    • In addition, the video for "I Feel It Coming" ends with the same static sound that opens the title track.
  • Cool Car: He owns a decent amount of these, more notably a McLaren P1 and a Lamborghini Aventador SV Roadster (which are both namedropped in "Starboy", and also appear in the music video), and a tuned Mazda FC RX-7 - which appears in the music video for "Party Monster".
  • Concept Album: All of his albums and mixtapes thus far have been heavily conceptual, most notably his three mixtapes, which deal with a downward spiral into drug addiction and manipulative relationships.
  • Content Warnings: The music video for "False Alarm" opens with a parental advisory warning for graphic violence and that it's very much Not Safe for Work.
  • Cover Version: "D.D." from Echoes of Silence is a cover of his favorite song of all time, "Dirty Diana" by Michael Jackson.
  • Darker and Edgier: In comparison to most other R&B artists, in that his lyrics reference the bad side of drug use and gratuitous sex and evokes a dark and moody tone. His music videos also tend to take on similarly dark imagery, like "Pretty" and "The Hills". Starboy is this when compared to the Lighter and Softer Beauty Behind the Madness, with the "False Alarm" video being his darkest video yet.
  • Deliberately Monochrome: House of Balloons and Beauty Behind the Madness. My Dear Melancholy, is also this, but with black & red instead of black & white.
  • Destructive Romance: A lot of his songs touch on the darker side of romantic relationships and sexual encounters.
  • Death by Cameo: The "False Alarm" music video has Damion Poitier, who's well known as the heister "Chains" in the heisting / bank robbing game PAYDAY 2. He gets shot in the back, while escaping the bank, and collapses in the van.
  • Dissonant Serenity: The music video for the Eminem remix of "The Hills" features an eerily calm and disaffected Abel just walking by as comets rain down and Stuff Blowing Up all around him. The flames eventually consume him as he steps into his limo.
  • Double Entendre: His signature, "XO", can refer either to the "hugs and kisses" emoticon or ecstasy and oxycodone.
  • Downer Ending:
    • The final song in the Trilogy mixtape series, "Echoes of Silence", ends things on a very dark note (which is saying something given the rest of the mixtapes' content.) However, the Trilogy compilation itself ends with the bonus track "Here Comes The Sun", which is much less bleak.
    • The video for "False Alarm" ends with all the robbers dead, all the money lost, the hostage escaping with the remaining money that survived and the leader of the robbery (revealed to be The Weeknd) injured and bleeding who then shoots himself in the head.
  • Dream Team:
    • Enlisted Lana Del Rey and Ed Sheeran for songs on Beauty Behind The Madness. (He would return the favor for Lana and appears on the title track of her album Lust For Life.)
    • Eminem and Nicki Minaj contribute a verse to remixes of "The Hills".
    • "Starboy" and "I Feel It Coming" were produced by/feature Daft Punk. In the music video for "Starboy", they can be seen in a portrait hanging in the house as it's being trashed, and their likenesses appear in space in the video for "I Feel It Coming". They themselves make an appearance in the video's stinger.
    • My Dear Melancholy has production credits from Skrillex (on "Wasted Times") and Guy-Man (on "Hurt You").
  • Drugs Are Bad: About 95%, if not all of his lyrical content are about drug addiction and the really bad effects of taking so much.
  • Dual-Meaning Chorus: "I Feel It Coming" can either be read as being about the guy in the song feeling how great of a couple him and this girl are going to be once they start dating… or about how the guy can sense that he and/or his girlfriend is about to orgasm.
  • Epic Rocking: Quite a few of his earlier songs are over six minutes long, with his longest, "Gone", clocking in at over 8 minutes. This generally averted after Kiss Land.
  • The Faceless: When he started. It took a surprisingly long time for him to show his face in a video, and Kiss Land is the first album where we see his face.
  • Fading into the Next Song: Often. Specific examples would be "The Party And The After Party leading into "Coming Down". "Outside" leads to "XO/The Host", which leads to "Initiation".
  • First-Person Perspective: The "False Alarm" video is a violent Bank Robbery from his perspective.
  • Freestyle Version: He did a freestyle version in 2014, freestyling over Lorde's "Royals", Ty Dolla $ign's "Or Nah" and Beyoncé's "Drunk in Love" (although he significantly altered the beat for this one).
  • Hell-Bent for Leather: He's dressed from head to toe in leather in the music video "Starboy", as he kills off the version of himself from the Beauty Behind The Madness .
  • Important Haircut: The Starboy era is most characterized by him getting a lot of his hair cut off, representing the next stage in his music.
  • Intercourse with You: Given he's an R'n'B singer, this should be par for the course.
  • Lighter and Softer: He admits to invoking this for Beauty Behind The Madness in his desire to experiment with his musical direction. "Can't Feel My Face" is slightly more upbeat in melody, and drug references are toned down. Of course, the music video consists of him being set on fire. In addition, the narrators of later songs are considerably more sympathetic than the predatory narrators portrayed in earlier songs. "In the Night" is probably the most obvious. Of course, that song is about the horrific, traumatic aftereffects of rape, so it's not like he's making bubblegum pop...
    • "I Feel It Coming" is a departure from the much darker tone of Starboy, talking about a budding relationship in a positive light.
  • Love Is a Drug: Inverted with "Can't Feel My Face", where he compares his addiction to a relationship, complete with him addressing his drug(s) as "she".
  • Lyrical Dissonance: His songs all have dream-like productions about the dark side of hedonism. A notable example is his current biggest hit "Can't Feel My Face", a bouncy, funky, upbeat-sounding song with lyrics about drug addiction.
    • An interesting example is "Pretty," an ominous dirge with seemingly innocuous lyrics about forgiving one's unfaithful ex. The music video clarifies the song's intent.
    • "House of Balloons" sounds pretty cheerful if you take the chorus at face value ("this is a happy house"). The verses, meanwhile, seem to depict an addict being taunted by his or her own addiction.
    • A form of subversion occurs in "Starboy". The lyrics are, on the surface, a Boastful Rap mostly just about how awesome being rich is ("Made your whole year in a week", "Pockets overweight, gettin' hefty", "I'm a motherfuckin' Starboy", etc.), but the music is sombre, almost tragic. However, some of the lines subtly imply undertones of hollowness ("We don't pray for love, we just pray for cars"), regret ("Look what you've done"), and possible references to trademark drug addiction (specifically painkillers in "I kill any pain"), meaning it to a certain extent fits as a Deconstruction of that lifestyle.
  • The Mentor: Drake was perceived to be this for a while, before The Weeknd started his own label as opposed to signing with Drake's. Some interpreted some Drake lyrics to be dissing him, although Drizzy is featured on one of his first singles on his own label ("Live For").
  • Murder Ballad: "Pretty."
  • Non-Appearing Title: "Party Monster". Most people assume it's called "Don't Even Know Her Name".
  • Not Safe for Work: The majority of his music videos features some nudity and a lot of violence. "Pretty" and "Twenty-Eight" are under Youtube's age barrier, and "False Alarm" has a Content Warning for very graphic violence.
  • Obligatory Bondage Song: "Can't Feel My Face" has been interpreted as this.
  • Refrain from Assuming:
    • "The Hills" is not called "Half Past Five", "Feel Me" or "The Real Me".
    • "Party Monster" you might mistake for "Don't Even Know Her Name" or "A Girl Who Gon Really Understand".
  • Rhyming with Itself: From "The Morning":
    I warn them like discretion
    Why these niggas testing?
    Always fucking testing
    Why these niggas testing?
  • Running Gag: Guess how often he mentions his age in his songs? This even extends to his collaboration with Drake, "Crew Love", where the hook was written when he was 20.
  • Sampling: Often of very weird songs for an R'n'B singer - a lot of his samples come from punk and indie rock songs.
    • An example being "House of Balloons/Glass Table Girls", which samples "Happy House" by Siouxie and the Banshees.
    • "Belong to the World" notably samples "Machinegun", although Portishead refused his permission to do so, and he equally refused to give them any writing credits, insisting it was "not a sample".
    • "Secrets" heavily samples "Pale Shelter" by Tears for Fears, almost to the point where he's singing new lyrics over the original beat (Although the hooks and riffs have been moved around slightly and created through a synthesizer).
  • Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll: His music touches upon the bad version, often sounding like a drug-induced and paranoid haze.
  • Shout-Out:
    • "Heaven or Las Vegas" is named for a Cocteau Twins album.
    • The "False Alarm" music video has a blink and you'll miss it cameo from, rather appropriately, Damion Poitier, who portrays Chains in the heisting / bank robbing game PAYDAY 2.
    • "Montreal" interpolates lines from Laisse tomber les filles.
    • "The Birds Pt. 1" is usually accompanied live by clips from the Hitchcock film.
    • "Kiss Land" was originally released in rough form as "John Carpenter", probably due to the heavy use of synthesisers that were a big part of Carpenter's films.
    • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Legends of the Fall in "Starboy".
  • The Sociopath: He can come off as this in some of his songs, more so in his Trilogy album.
  • That Man Is Dead: The music video for "Starboy" features him returning to his Darker and Edgier roots by opening with him killing off his dreadlocked Beauty Behind The Madness persona and then violently trashing his Big Fancy House afterwards.
  • Three Chords and the Truth: The entirety of "Can't Feel My Face" is based on three chords.
  • Title-Only Chorus: "False Alarm".
  • Trash the Set: In the "Starboy" video, after killing off his Beauty Behind The Madness persona, Abel goes full out destroying everything inside the house, including his awards.
  • Unbroken First-Person Perspective: The "False Alarm" music video is shot like something out of PAYDAY: The Heist or PAYDAY 2, using the POV of a bank robber. In the end we do see that person's face when he looks into a mirror as he lays dying.
  • Wolverine Publicity: Starting to get this, after being quite publicity-shy (see above) previously.
  • Your Cheating Heart: "Pretty"'s music video has him gunning down his ex-partner and her lover with a rifle.

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