Follow TV Tropes

This entry is trivia, which is cool and all, but not a trope. On a work, it goes on the Trivia tab.

Following

Milestone Celebration

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/119thUpdateCelebration_6277.png
This was meant to be the 100th update.
Valve Time happened.

"I will not celebrate meaningless milestones."
Bart's chalkboard gag, The Simpsons, "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song" (100th episode)
Advertisement:

Show pilots are a very tricky process. They are made, and even if they get a chance on the air, the vast majority of them fail within a few weeks. With other shows, they sometimes will build up a dedicated audience that will fail to keep the show alive long enough. Most of the time.

Most full television seasons are between 20 and 26 episodes long. There are various exceptions, animated shows can go from 13 episodes to well over 40 episodes. With such a vicious market, the ability to reach the 100 episode mark is a rare and coveted thing. So when a show does achieve that milestone, they plan something big to not only draw ratings, but to break out into the three digit episodes.

Part of the celebration is that pure money is offered with syndication rights, which a general rule of thumb is to have 100 episodes to air in certain time slots like Nick at Nite does. Because the show was already financed and produced, this will bring in the nostalgic viewers without much effort.

Advertisement:

This is not inherently just for television series, but any property that has had a consistent run will either celebrate the installment count or in the form of "10 Year Anniversary." This will often coincide with the Very Special Episode, but it could also be Tonight, Someone Dies or a Continuity Cavalcade with Internal Homage, especially when elements (or even the entire plot) of the series' first installment is directly recreated. It may avoid all of that and the installment is just given an additional polishing to make it one of the best episodes of the series.

But no matter what, remaining in the public view for years is an impressive event in any form of media.

Compare Meaningful Release Date.

Remember, Examples Are Not Recent.


Advertisement:

Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Fan Works 
  • Calvin and Hobbes: The Series has an in-universe example in "The Case of the Rogue Water Balloon", wherein G.R.O.S.S. celebrates its second anniversary and its 500th water balloon attack.
  • A significant chapter of Mega Man Reawakened was posted just before the fic's second anniversary.
  • The Bridge's second anniversary featured an animated Q&A video. Unfortunately, it was released a month late due to technical difficulties.
  • The PreDespair Kids "celebrated" reaching its 1000th page by truly taking after its source material with a true Wham Episode: Hiyoko is found murdered in the gym and an investigation takes place involving all the characters, both canon and original.
  • Sonic the Comic – Online!:
    • Issue 261 celebrated the 20th anniversary of the original Sonic the Comic by having an action packed issue featuring numerous cameos from older and oneshot characters.
    • One of the original Sonic the Comic writers, Nigel Kitching, wrote a special issue for Sonic the Comic Online in order to celebrate the 25th anniversary. It's set in an unmentioned amount of years in the future and has the Freedom Fighters on one last fight against Super Sonic, Dr. Robotnik, and Grimer.
  • Chapter 50 of The Parselmouth of Gryffindor is something of a Wham Episode: Harry and Snape see Lily again thanks to the Resurrection Stone, and it ends on the Cliffhanger of Mad-Eye Moody announcing that “Azkaban has fallen”.

    Literature 
  • The Mr. Men and Little Miss books celebrated their 35th (Mr. Men) and 25th (Little Miss) anniversaries with "Mr. Birthday" and "Little Miss Birthday".
  • The 1111th and the 2222nd volume of the long-running weekly German Sci-Fi series Perry Rhodan were both quite nice in-character and in-continuity parodies of the series, both written by Horst Hoffmann, who went on to announce his retiring from being a regular author.
  • Sweet Valley High celebrated its 100th book (well, actually its 97th through 100th) with its first Story Arc, a Genre Shift to horror. It worked surprisingly well, leading to more story arcs and more fantastical story elements in the future.
  • Return to Firetop Mountain celebrated both the 50th installment in the Fighting Fantasy series and the tenth anniversary of the publishing of the first book. It took the reader back to the same dungeon of the original The Warlock of Firetop Mountain to defeat a resurrected Zagor.
  • Pan Books commissioned And Another Thing... for the 30th anniversary of the publication of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
  • The tenth anniversary of Warrior Cats in 2013 marks the release date of the prequel series Warrior Cats: Dawn of the Clans.
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory's 50th anniversary in 2014 ("50 Whipple-Scrumptious Years") was marked with a variety of events and offerings. This milestone celebration specifically kicked off on January 31st, since that's the day Charlie finds his Golden Ticket in the novel.
    • Penguin Books added the novel to their adult-oriented Penguin Modern Classics line — a ploy that went awry due to its unique, controversial Contemptible Cover featuring a girl with Uncanny Valley makeup and dress.
    • The novel had several kid-friendlier anniversary editions published too, including deluxe reissues of both the Joseph Schindelman and Quentin Blake-illustrated editions — the latter in full-color for the first time.
    • The retrospective book Inside Charlie's Chocolate Factory was published.
    • There were contests in the U.S. and U.K., and the annual Puffin Virtually Live school webcast that marks Roald Dahl's birthday was centered on the book.
    • While the 2013 West End stage musical adaptation of the novel was not specifically launched to tie in to the anniversary, it was incorporated into several of the U.K.-based events, such as the aforementioned webcast and an Easter-season window display at the Piccadilly Circus Waterstone's bookstore that recreated its sets and characters in miniature via decorated chocolate biscuits. "Celebrate Fifty Years of Pure Imagination" was a tagline for the show for a while too.
  • James Bond novel Devil May Care was released on the hundreth anniversary of the birth of Ian Fleming, the creator of the character.
  • Life and Death, a Gender Flipped retelling of Twilight, was released in celebration of the 10th anniversary of Twilight.
  • The Further Adventures of Batman: The first anthology was written to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Batman multimedia franchise.

    Machinima 

    Magazines 

    Music 
  • Many artists celebrate anniversaries of their best known albums by rereleasing them in remastered or upgraded versions. At times entire catalogues can get this treatment (such as John Lennon's one at 2010, when he would complete 70 years).
  • The Beatles released their Greatest Hits Album 1, with all their number ones, on the 30th anniversary of their break-up in 2000.
  • The Rolling Stones celebrated 40 years with Forty Licks, a Greatest Hits Album that as the title indicates had 40 tracks (4 of them new). 10 years later they did the same with the 50-track (two of them new, and one of the old ones being from Forty Licks) GRRR!, whose only disadvantage upon the predecessor was a Contemptible Cover.
  • Pearl Jam celebrated 20 years of debut album Ten with the documentary Pearl Jam Twenty and re-releases with extra disks.
  • Blur released a box set containing all of their albums for the 21st anniversary of their first one.
  • Michael Jackson examples:
    • He threw two all-star tribute concerts to himself at Madison Square Garden in September 2001 to mark the 30th anniversary of his first release as a solo artist, though these and remastered/mostly expanded reissue of his first four albums for Epic Records was more to promote his forthcoming Invincible than anything.
    • In 2007, Thriller 25 was a second expanded reissue of that particular album that added new versions of several tracks, pairing Jackson up with contemporary hitmakers.
    • In 2012, Bad 25 was a second expanded reissue of Bad that had a tie-in documentary helmed by Spike Lee.
    • A 25th anniversary reissue of Dangerous was announced for 2016, to feature new songs, demos and remixes.
  • David Bowie examples:
    • In 2002, the 35th anniversary of his debut album marked the release of Greatest Hits Album Best of Bowie - even if it only had songs starting with the second album, namely "Space Oddity".
    • He marked his 66th birthday in 2013 with the surprise announcement of his first studio album in ten years, The Next Day, via the relaunch of his official website and the release of its first single/video, "Where Are We Now?"
    • In 2014, the 3-disc Greatest Hits Album Nothing Has Changed marked 50 years of Bowie recordings, featuring the new single "Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)" to bookend his first single, 1964's "Liza Jane". This also made it the first Bowie-curated compilation to include pre-Space Oddity songs.
  • Anniversaries of Jean-Michel Jarre's Oxygène:
    • He celebrated the 20th anniversary by releasing the back-to-the-roots-but-still-kind-of-90s sequel album Oxygène 7-13 — about half a year late, but still. When asked back then which Oxygène is his favorite, he jokingly replied it's the third one he's going to release in another 20 years. After the new album came Jarre's first indoors tour, the Oxygène Arena Tour, during which neither of the two Oxygènes were played in full.
    • Jarre did release Oxygène 3 precisely 40 years after the release of Oxygène.
    • He also celebrated the 30th anniversary. First he largely re-recorded the original Oxygène at his studio. Then he took his three live co-keyboardists and his entire rig of about five dozen mostly vintage synths to the Belgian Alfacam Studios to re-record Oxygène yet again, this time not overdubbed but played live by these four musicians while being filmed and expanded by three Variations. The outcome was titled Oxygène – Live in Your Living Room. Next, he took this concept onto a live stage at Théâtre Marigny where he played ten concerts in a row. And then an actual tour followed with still the same concept. By then, Jarre was one and a half years late, and the last concerts of that tour were more than two years late, but the French consider being in time bad manners. All in all, Jarre celebrated the 30th anniversary of Oxygène by remaking the entire album 47 times over.
  • Some more Jean-Michel Jarre anniversary celebrations:
    • Rendez-vous Houston celebrated both the state of Texas' and the city of Houston's 150th anniversary and the 25th anniversary of NASA. Jarre even joked about returning another 150 years later.
    • The mini-gig Destination Trocadéro honored the Eiffel Tower's 100th birthday.
    • Paris La Défense, breaking Jarre's Rendez-vous Houston audience record, was exactly one year late for celebrating the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution and the 10th anniversary of Jarre's already record-breaking debut concert. That said, he had plans for a big Paris concert in 1989 in order to also celebrate the Eiffel Tower's birthday, but these had to be nixed. Instead, he played the small Destination Trocadéro and delayed the big show by one year.
    • At Jarre's Europe in Concert gig in Brussels, the fans celebrated his 45th birthday. A concert bootleg actually contains "Happy Birthday" sung by the audience.
    • Oxygen In Moscow, breaking Jarre's Paris La Défense audience record, was part of the city of Moscow's 850th anniversary celebrations.
  • GaMetal's fiftieth song was a medley of remade previous songs. The hundredth GaMetal song was also a medley, this time of gaming's most iconic tunes.
  • Garbage's 20th anniversary in 2015 had both a special edition of their debut and a tour where they performed said album on its entirety, including the B-sides.
  • Nightwish celebrated its 20th anniversary a little belatedly in 2018 with the release of Decades, a compilation of remastered favorite tracks from 2015's "The Greatest Show on Earth" all the way back to their original demo "Nightwish" in 1996.

    Pro Wrestling 
  • The "Fifth Year Festival'' Ring of Honor held in its place of its usual anniversary show was a six day tour starting in NYC, New York and ending in Liverpool.
  • WWE Raw: Celebrated its milestone anniversaries — 10th (2003), 17th (2010), 20th (2013) and 25th (2018); as well as its 900th, 1,000th, 1,100th and 1,200th episodes. Usually, these shows involved special title matches and other special main events with unique stipulations and — more notably — the return of top superstars from the past.

    Puppet Shows 
  • Sesame Street:
    • The series had anniversary specials during years 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35. The 40th anniversary had to settle on-air with "40" (the highest number in the show's curriculum) sponsoring the season premiere. That season was also loaded with Continuity Nod Easter Eggs and cameos (both on-set and in photographs) of staff members and retired Muppet characters (including Kermit the Frog, who was retired from Sesame Street since the Disney buyout of the Muppets, and a generic Muppet specifically created for the Scrubs episode "My ABC's", which was an Imagine Spot-induced Fake Crossover with Sesame Street). Season 40 also premiered 40 years to the day that Sesame premiered on November 10, 1969.
    • In 1977, the 1000th episode was commemorated with a primetime special on PBS entitled Sesame Street At Night?note , hosted by Gene Shalit.
  • Barney & Friends had Old King Cole come over for a visit in episode 100. Barney is reunited with some alumni to celebrate ten years, and gets a memory book after twenty years.
  • Played straight with the 100th episode of Blue's Clues, where Joe and Blue did not search for clues, instead choosing to do a Clip Show where the entire cast reminisced about their past adventures. Steve Burns even made an unexpected guest appearance visiting from "college" to disprove the countless rumors going around at the time as to why he left the show.
  • The Muppets: A Celebration of 30 Years, marking 30 years since Jim Henson's first TV puppet show Sam and Friends, was an hour long special set at a testimonial dinner for Kermit (who had first appeared way back then), and a Massive Multiplayer Crossover in the style of the following year's A Muppet Family Christmas.

     Radio 
  • The 30th aniversary episode of I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue came from the Playhouse Theatre (where the first show was recorded) and included an introduction by the original producer, David Hatch, and the Mornington Crescent Championships, with commentary by Raymond Baxter.
  • The 100th episode of The Infinite Monkey Cage was an hour long special with the return of many former guests (they usually only have two). There was also a 40 minute video version on iPlayer, which included the return of the Robin, Brian and Eric Idle puppets from the 2014 video trailers.

    Sports 
  • Major League Baseball celebrated the game's centennial in 1939, by having all sixteen teams wear a commemorative patch, one of the first such anniversary patches in sports. This was all based on the widespread lie that Abner Doubleday had invented the game in Cooperstown, NY in 1839. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum had been established in Cooperstown just three years earlier.
    • MLB would celebrate a more legitimate anniversary in 1969, marking the centennial anniversary of the first acknowledged all-professional baseball team, the Cincinnati Red Stockings (a separate franchise from the modern Reds). MLB celebrated with a new patch featuring a brand-new logo that would be adapted to represent MLB going forward. They also celebrated the 125th anniversary in 1994, but the season-ending players' strike caused that to end on a sour note.
    • The National League celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1976 by having its participants in the All-Star Game wear special NL pillbox-style hats. In addition, several NL teams wore their own pillbox hats as alternate caps during the season, although the Pittsburgh Pirates opted to go with the pillbox full-time for several seasons.
    • MLB celebrated the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking baseball's color barrier, by retiring his uniform number, 42, across all of baseball on April 15, 1997. Players wearing the number at the time were permitted to continue to wear it until the end of their careers. For the 60th anniversary in 2007 onward, MLB has held Jackie Robinson Day every year on April 15th, where every player takes the field wearing number 42 for the day (though the event does get pushed back on account of rain for some teams).
    • MLB celebrated the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig's farewell speech on July 4, 2014 by raising money for ALS research from sales of the patch worn by every team that day.
  • The National Football League celebrated its 50th season in 1969. Every NFL team wore a modified NFL logo patch that featured the number 50 in place of the football and stars on the blue upper portion of the shield. The American Football League also celebrated its tenth and final season with an anniversary patch of their own, as the two leagues would complete their merger in 1970.
    • The NFL went on to celebrate its 75th season in 1994; in addition to a league-wide anniversary patch, most teams wore throwback uniforms for at least one game. (Cleveland and Indianapolis opted not to wear throwbacks as their current uniforms were their most iconic, while Tampa Bay didn't have any older design to throw back to at the time).
    • The NFL celebrated the 50th anniversary of the AFL in 2009 (the 50th season of the eight founding AFL franchises), and those teams wore AFL-era throwbacks. This caused an interesting situation with the New York Jets and Tennessee Titans; the Jets threw back to their earliest seasons as the New York Titans, while the current Titans threw back to their days as the Houston Oilers. And they did play each other in their throwbacks.
    • The NFL celebrated the 50th Super Bowl with gold NFL logos and the 50-yard markers on every field being painted in gold. They also referred to Super Bowl 50 with Arabic numbers instead of Roman, as "L" (the Roman numeral for 50) is often used to represent losers, and wouldn't look good for a logo for the sport's biggest championship.
  • National Hockey League.
    • The League celebrated its 75th season in 1991-92 with both a league-wide patch and by having the Original Six teamsnote  wear throwback uniform designs for select games throughout the season. In addition, the league switched its home and road uniform colors after the All-Star Game, having teams wear their white uniforms on the road, reverting to white at home in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. The five surviving expansion teams from 1967note  also celebrated their 25th seasons. This was followed up with the celebration of the Stanley Cup Centennial in the 1992-93 season. Once again, every team had an anniversary patch, and a modified championship patch for the Stanley Cup Finals that celebrated the centennial as well.
    • In an unusual move, the NHL decided to celebrate the year 2000 by having every team wear a patch containing the year, with the letters NHL inside the zeros, for the entire 1999-2000 season.
    • The NHL celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2017 - from January 1st to December 31st, straddling two seasons - by having teams wear the centennial anniversary patch on their right sleeves. This included a pair of outdoor games specifically to celebrate the anniversary - the Centennial Classic on January 1st, and the NHL 100 Classic on December 16th.
  • The National Basketball Association celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1970-71 and its 35th anniversary in 1980-81, but celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1996-97, the league's 51st seasonnote . For the 50th, the NBA logo on the uniforms was gold, and several teams wore throwback uniforms for select games.
  • Historically, if teams celebrated anniversaries, they only focused on the major ones, such as 25th, 50th, 75th, or 100th. However, in modern times, it has become increasingly common for teams to celebrate their 10th, and even 5th, anniversaries with patches and the like.
    • The Montreal Canadiens held one of the more notable anniversary celebrations for their centennial. They began their celebration in the 2008-09 season and carried it into the start of the following season, up to their actual 100th anniversary on December 4th, 2009. Of note is that they had two logos for the anniversary - one that simply featured the number 100 and the years 1909 and 2009, and another that read "100 Seasons/Saisons". The only problem with that is that they wore the 100 Seasons patch only during the 2008-09 season - which, thanks to the 2004-05 season being cancelled in its entirety due to a labor dispute, was the Canadiens' 99th season of play. Though the case could be made that it was still their 100th season of business operations.
    • The 2004-05 lockout also screwed up several team anniversary celebrations. Some teams have continued to celebrate their original anniversaries after the lockout, while others have pushed them back a season. For example, the Ottawa Senators celebrated their 25th anniversary during the 2016-17 season, while the Tampa Bay Lightning celebrated their 25th during the 2017-18 season, even though both teams were founded the same year. Similarly, the Stars celebrated the 20th anniversary of their relocation to Dallas in 1993 during the 2012-13 season, while the Anaheim Ducks and Florida Panthers, both founded in 1993, celebrated their 20th anniversaries the following season. Making matters worse are the New York Rangers, who celebrated their 85th(!) anniversary during the 2010-11 season (what would've been their 85th season of play if not for the lockout), but then held their 90th anniversary six seasons later, during the 2016-17 season.
    • Possibly the most confusing slate of team anniversaries belongs to MLB's Houston Astros. Their first season was in 1962 as the Houston Colt .45s, but legal action from Colt's Manufacturing Company forced them to change their name in 1965. The Astros had celebrated their 25th season in 1986, their 35th season in 1996, their 40th season in 2001, and their 45th season in 2006. But then they decided to celebrate the 45th anniversary of becoming the Astros in 2010. This was followed by their 50th anniversary celebration in 2012 (their 51st season), and then the 50th anniversary of becoming the Astros in 2015.
  • In 2016, the South American confederation of Association Football (CONMEBOL) celebrated their 100 years of existence with the Copa América Centenario (Centennial America Cup), celebrated in the United States and played by all South Amerian national teams as well as the best teams from the Central American, North American and Caribbean side. It was won by Chile.

    Tabletop Games 

    Theater 
  • Cirque du Soleil milestone celebrations:
    • Alegría launched in 1994 as the company's 10th anniversary show; the year also saw the retrospective documentary A Baroque Odyssey.
    • The 20th anniversary of the company was marked with, among other things, the retrospective book 20 Years Under the Sun and the Midnight Sun concert in Montreal. The latter doubled as a 25th anniversary marker for the city's international jazz festival, which the concert was held at.
    • The 25th anniversary ("The Dream Continues") included a stilt-walking event centered on Las Vegas, a two-disc Greatest Hits Album featuring songs from almost every show produced up to that point, and a book on the company's costumes over the years.
    • The 30th anniversary was marked with the two-plus week run of a choral concert of Cirque music performed in Montreal's Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church and the photo book Backstage Cirque du Soleil.
    • Individual shows often mark their 1st, 5th, 10th, etc. anniversaries with a curtain call celebration during the performances that fall on the date in question, and perhaps a small gift for audience members that night (a 15th anniversary pin at "O", for instance). In Las Vegas, ads that year will include a special logo noting the milestone. Celebrations have also been held to mark a show reaching 100, 500, 1000, 1500, etc. performances.
    • There was also a special celebration for a single performer in 2012. Longtime circus performer and Mystère principal clown Brian Dewhurst's 80th birthday fell on a performance night, so a giant surprise party (yes, Surprise Party) was arranged for him, which played out over and after the two performances.
  • The 20th anniversary of the London production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera was marked with the BBC documentary special Behind the Mask. The 25th anniversary was marked with a mega-staging of the entire show at Royal Albert Hall (140 cast members as opposed to the usual 40, etc.), followed by a "grand finale" featuring appearances by most of the original London cast and a performance by Sarah Brightman (the original Christine); this was filmed and released on video.
  • The tenth anniversary of Les Misérables was celebrated with a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, and the 25th with a staging in the O2 arena, with The Reveal that they are making a movie musical adaptation.
  • Miss Saigon received a West End revival in 2014 to mark its 25th anniversary, and even got a new song for the occasion ("Maybe"). There was also a gala performance featuring both original and revival cast members, and tickets were dialed back to 1989 prices for that particular show.
  • The Wiz had its 40th anniversary honored in 2015 with a live performance on NBC, the digital release of a long-shelved movie tie-in soundtrack titled Diana Ross Sings Songs From The Wiz, and the announcement of a Broadway revival for the following year.

    Theme Parks 
  • The Disney Theme Parks have interesting anniversary promotions for whenever a park reaches the 10th, 25th, etc. anniversary of its opening day, usually debuting new rides/additions to the parks, new/updated shows and parades, and usually a large gimmick. Examples:
    • For its 25th year, Disney World's Cinderella Castle was transformed into a gigantic pink cake.
    • Mickey Mouse's 60th birthday was acknowledged at Florida's Magic Kingdom with a whole themed "land", Mickey's Birthdayland, in 1988. The park kept it and tweaked its theme over the years — first it became Mickey's Starland, then Mickey's Toontown Fair — until it was torn down in The New '10s to make way for the Fantasyland expansion.
  • SeaWorld celebrated the 50th anniversary of its brand in 2014 across all three parks, by doing things such as bringing in new street entertainment.
  • Almost always averted with the Universal Studios parks. There were plans to do a park-wide celebration of Islands of Adventure's 10th anniversary in 2009, but it was cut due to there being virtually no budget for it, as at the time most of it was going into the construction of The Wizarding World of Harry Potter. There was no 20th Anniversary celebration of Universal Studios Florida either, presumably for the same reason. In 2015, this was finally played straight when Universal Orlando honored their 25th anniversary, though even then the milestone nods were mostly limited to some special theming around the park and a new temporary logo.
  • Done several times with Universal's Halloween Horror Nights, first for their "Sweet 16" in 2006, then for their 20th anniversary in 2010, and once more for their 25th anniversary in 2015.

    Toys 
  • Transformers has had quite a few of these:
    • The UK version of the Marvel The Transformers comic, due to a quirk of publishing, ended up with over four times as many issues as the US comic. Issues 100 (1987), 200 (1989), and 300 (1990) all featured wraparound covers and double-length stories.
      • Issue 50 of the US comic featured Starscream wiping out a large chunk of the cast before biting the dust himself. This was done to pare down the Loads and Loads of Characters, though many of them (including Starscream himself) would be brought back (most, but not all, being due to new toys, of course).
      • Issue 75 saw the big battle against Unicron. Unsurprisingly, there were many more casualties.
    • 20th Anniversary (2004):
      • Toys: A huge transformable figure of Optimus Prime, complete with his trademark gun, laser axe, a miniature Megatron in gun mode, and of course, the Matrix of Leadership.
      • Transformers Energon had the episode "Distribution" being the 500th episode of Transformers to be shown on Japanese TV. It was a weird, pointless episode that spoofed Professional Wrestling.
    • Beast Wars 10th Anniversary (2006): a rerelease of several figures along with two new figures of Optimus Primal and Megatron. All the toys had pieces which could be used to build Trans-Mutate.
    • Transformers Energon was supposed to be the huge 20th anniversary series. Results, though, were....mixed, to be polite. Animation errors, inconsistent naming, character de-evolution, an extreme focus on selling toys, fluctuating art and animation, bad editing and awful dubbing were all common for Energon. The only remaining awesome factor of Energon from its Japanese counterpart (Super Link) was the music...and not even the toyline was safe, because that also carried over the flaws of the Armada toyline.
    • 25th Anniversary (2009):
      • Toys: The original Optimus Prime toy was rereleased with the inclusion of a DVD of the first three episodes of the original series and a copy of the first issue of the Marvel comic book. Also, new toys were produced based on characters from throughout the franchise, from G1 to Transformers Armada.
      • The airing of Transformers Animated (2007-2009) coincided with this period. It celebrated by paying homage to every single Transformers incarnation previously made, even the obscure ones that were barely even released in Japan and not at all outside. Granted, many of those nods and references were All There in the Manual, but that said, the manuals (that is, the Allspark Almanac, volumes 1 and 2) are extensive and full of Mythology Gags.
    • 30th Anniversary (2014): Both Hasbro and TakaraTomy are featuring 30th Anniversary lines (Hasbro dubbing theirs "Thrilling 30", which began with releases in fall 2013).
      • Transformers: Age of Extinction was released, marking the beginning of an expected second film trilogy.
      • Transformers: Robots in Disguise, the sequel series to Transformers Prime, was announced, though it wouldn't debut until 2015 (the name was previously used for the English dub of Car Robots in 2001, not to mention one of IDW's ongoing comic books).
      • The IDW series's mega-event Dark Cybertron and the follow-up in the ongoing series, Dawn of the Autobots, which includes the Windblade miniseries. Windblade herself was the culmination of a fan poll for the creation of a new character.
      • Toys: the Generations toyline features characters from non-G1 continuities (such as Rattrap, Waspinator, Tankor, Armada Starscream, and Fall of Cybertron Skywarp) who are represented in the IDW continuity (with their Hasbro figures including reprints of Dark Cybertron chapters). Hasbro debuted Masterpiece Soundwave to open the Thrilling 30 toyline, along with Acid Storm (an MP-11 Starscream redeco), and is reissuing MP-10 Optimus Prime (in a special "Year of the Horse" deco) and Grimlock, and debuting Prowl. Takara issued MP Soundblaster with Ratbat, and will be issuing MP versions of Wheeljack, Bumblebee (with Spike in his exosuit), Ultra Magnus, and Star Saber.
  • Nendoroids are adorable, pseudo-bubblehead figurines primarily aimed at otaku. With that in mind, the 100th release in the line is a character who falls outside of that demographic: Mickey Mouse, who is quite jarring when put next to franchises such as Touhou note  or Vocaloid.
  • BIONICLE got a line of six small sets called the Stars, a collection of remakes of characters from across the series' decade of existence. They also happened to be the last sets before the line got the can. They tend to be perceived as a rather weak way to both celebrate a milestone and end the line.
  • Barbie:
    • The original doll's 50th anniversary brought the My Favorite Barbie line of toys. Each set contains a reproduction of a famous Barbie doll, an extra outfit from the same era, and a retro pamphlet of other Barbie clothes and accessories sold at the time.
    • Barbie: Life in the Dreamhouse celebrated the 50th anniversary of Barbie's old friend Midge by adding her as a new major character.
  • LEGO will celebrate the 10th anniversary of its infamous "Modular Buildings" line with the 12th entry to the series, "Assembly Square", a behemoth of a model with subtle references to the previous modulars.
  • My Little Pony celebrated the 20th anniversary of the franchise by rereleasing reproductions of the original 6 ponies.

    Web Animation 
  • Homestar Runner:
    • Strong Bad tried (and failed) to answer 50 emails in a row for his 50th Strong Bad Email, presented his 100th email (a flashback of how he met Homestar) in widescreeeeen!, and traveled to meet alternate universe versions of himself for #150. For #200, there was a big build-up only for the resulting email to be addressed to Homestar rather than Strong Bad- it's then revealed that Homestar has had his own email show all along, which Strong Bad tries to ruin.
    • Homestar Runner started as a children's book made by the creators in 1996, "The Homestar Runner Enters the Strongest Man in the World Contest". Ten years later, they did a cartoon remake of the children's book, with the characters retaining their current, more over-the-top personalities:
      Homestar Runner: Everybody loves the me! I'm a terrific athlete!
    • Also parodied in Issue 10 of Teen Girl Squad. Keep in mind that in Teen Girl Squad, everyone dies Once an Episode:
      Cheerleader: It's our tenth issue-versary! Let's do a Clip Show!
      So-And-So: Let's have a wedding!
      The Ugly One: Let's have a baby!
      What's Her Face: Let's kill someone off!
      Narrator Strong Bad: Okay! (everyone dies suddenly in bizarre ways)
    • For the 20th anniversary of The Homestar Runner Enters the Strongest Man in the World Contest, the Brothers Chaps did a Homestar cartoon based on the unfinished second Homestar book, The Homestar Runner Goes for the Gold, with the Framing Device of Strong Bad and Homestar finding the book in a box of "Old HSR Crap" and making fun of their own Early Installment Weirdness.
  • This practice was thoroughly mocked by Zero Punctuation. His 100th episode opened with him celebrating the event, complete with party hats and noisemakers. So, to commemorate the event, he reviews a very special game; Call of Juarez: Bound in Blood. Which... is exactly the game he had scheduled anyway.
    It's just a number. 101 is also a number. And so is 99, and at least that one looks like someone getting bumfucked.
    • Later in the review, a sentence is abruptly interrupted by another noisemaker bursting out the side of Yahtzee's head, apropos of nothing. He just apologizes for the interruption and goes on, with what appears to be a bloodied ear.
    • Then, two episodes later, he actually does review a game he really likes: Silent Hill 2.
      And what better game to celebrate my 102nd episode?! *noisemaker*
  • How It Should Have Ended has a parody of Titanic (1997), the second highest-grossing movie of all time, as the 100th video.note 
  • The 100th episode of Welcome to Night Vale brought back every single person who had ever voiced a character.
  • Death Battle: Each milestone has a massive bump in budget, animation quality, and score.
    • The 25th episode was "Son Goku vs. Superman".
    • The 50th episode was "Son Goku vs. Superman 2".
    • The 75th episode was "Power Rangers vs Voltron".
    • The 100th episode was a remake of "Mario vs. Sonic the Hedgehog". In addition, this episode introduces animated segments with the show's hosts Wiz and Boomstick.

    Web Comics 
  • In the hundredth Twisted Toyfare Theatre strip, "Tonight, one of these characters will die!" Quoth Mego Spidey: "Hope it's me."
    • Note that the characters themselves have a huge party to commemorate the event - but Reed Richards secretly confides in Spider-Man that this isn't actually the 100th strip, technically speaking, due to some miscellaneous strips featured in Toyfare's sister magazines like Wizard and Inquest Gamer. As such, at the very end Spider-Man goes back in time to three issues ago and gives the huge cake from the party to the stars of the real 100th strip, the motley bunch of Stormtroopers.
  • 8-Bit Theater never does anything special for its milestones, even for its 1000th. Although the titles do sometimes reference the number, such as "Episode 255: Maximum 8-bit Hexadecimal Value is FF. Coincidence?", "Episode 404: Comic Not Found", "Episode 666: Is Just Another Comic, Calm Down", "Episode 911: It's A Conspiracy", "Episode 912: For Real Emergencies", "Episode 913: The Last Of The 9XX Jokes", and "Episode 1000: I can't believe someone was asshole enough to make 1,000 sprite comics" followed by "Episode 1001: I can't believe someone was asshole enough to make more than 1,000 sprite comics".
  • The Order of the Stick was intended to have the group meeting Xykon on the hundredth strip, but the writer messed up the timing, and had one character complaining about it ("And I was expecting something impressive for the hundredth episode.") Every other hundredth was something special, though. The two hundredth was the very long battle with Miko, the 300th revealed Xykon's massed army, the four hundredth was a kiss between two major characters, the five hundredth was the start of Roy watching the rest of the Order, and the six hundreth is when the POV switched back to Roy, though they repeat the same "I thought there'd be something special..." joke from the 100th episode, and then hang a lampshade on it. However, the 700th and 800th comics had nothing particularly special about them, and it wasn't even lampshaded. Milestones returned with the next few hundred-counts. Strip #900 showed a scene of another world beyond the rift sealed by Girard's (now destroyed) Gate. In Strip #1000, vampire Durkon declared himself to be the representative of the death goddess Hel and tipped the divine vote toward destroying the world before the Snarl escaped.
  • 1/0, in addition to ending with comic #1000, dedicated comic #251 to its "1000th panel" celebration.
  • MegaTokyo used its comic #1000 to show Kimiko having a critical part of the nature of the world around her revealed to her, and revealed Miho's Little Miss Badass status in strip #1024 (#1 KB). And comic 1337 is triple length, showing an Image Spot of Largo ammasing an army of Ph33rb0ts.
  • Captain SNES: The Game Masta managed to work its 200th story comic celebration into the plot. The 500th was slightly clumsier.
  • Narbonic had this very silly one-year anniversary celebration.
  • Questionable Content:
  • VG Cats had a flash animation for the 100th comic, and actually skipped the 200th comic with a note reading "TBA 2009". Which now reads "TBA - Never".
  • Adventurers! had hundreds of comics numbered 999 so that the final chapter would be number 1000.
  • Awkward Zombie has its 100th comic, in which Master Hand kills the recently returned Roy in one hit.
  • Sluggy Freelance includes a piece of simple animation every year on its anniversary (usually making someone dance to the song "X Years of Nifty Darn Comics"). The tenth anniversary featured this plus a bonus comic that referenced the "spam Satan" joke from the very first strip.
  • Darths & Droids celebrates every 50th strip by adding another level to the string of "What our webcomic is in this universe, since the thing we're parodying doesn't exist" strips following the 50th strip. While the actual 1,000th strip has nothing worth celebrating (it's the beginning of Luke's adventure on Dagobah), the accompanying alternate universe is based on George Lucas's other famous franchise, Indiana Jones.
  • The KAMics is usually sarcastic about it's milestones, comic #500 is a good example of this.
  • Every hundredth Yet Another Fantasy Gamer Comic strip is in color.
  • The 200th comic of Brawl in the Family had a musical accompaniment, dedicated to all the Mooks that died at the hands of gamers everywhere.
  • XKCD skipped comic number 404, so that a 404 'File not found' error appears if someone tries to access it. And for the 1000th comic, a binary joke: only 24 comics till a nice round number!note 
  • In honor of Platypus Comix's 10th anniversary, accessing the site during the week of February 7, 2011 brought up a page which resembled the homepage used in 2001. Through the Wayback Machine, the page even included links to old comics and articles, as well as a dated homepage for Platypus Comix's parent site, Toon Zone. Clicking, "Click here to restore status quo" brought up the usual website, decked out with a vertically-oriented banner, which featured characters from both ongoing and discontinued comics partying together. And during the 10th anniversary of Toon Zone, Peter Paltridge released an Electric Wonderland comic in which the main characters find themselves in Toon Zone's domain while pursuing a thief.
  • The Adventures of Dr. McNinja: "Happy first anniversary, Dr. McNinja!" It's a Wham Strip.
  • El Goonish Shive:
    • The webcomic used to celebrate each year of the comic with a filler comic featuring the whole main cast. It stopped doing this after the 6th anniversary but acknowledged the 9th with this filler which has links to previous milestone celebration comics.
    • For the 10th anniversary, it celebrated with a filler comic that mimics the setup and dialog of the very first comic but is in color, features transformations, references the anniversary and has a different ending.
  • Sonic the Comic – Online! celebrated the 250th issue of the series with a mega-packed issue. The issue is the largest so-far in the series, the online fancomics or the original Sonic the Comic; it also featured more artists in one issue then any other issue. It feature various cameos from characters that haven't appeared in a long time.
  • Arthur, King of Time and Space:
  • Played straight in Square Root of Minus Garfield in 1000th Root of Minus Garfield and parodied in Party Like It's #999 (the comic immediately afterwards).
  • Mountain Time celebrated its 500th episode with an extended-length comic, followed by 25 more comics which, seemingly in defiance of the series' norm, were pretty much straight-up Continuity Porn.
  • Keezees celebrates every 100th episode; episode 100 revealed the main character's surname; episode 200 took the form of an MP3 (warning: it's loud) which, when downloaded, recorded onto an audio cassette and played back on a ZX Spectrum, revealed episode 200 onscreen; and episode 300 was Keezees first colour episode; the author also ran a contest at that time where one lucky reader was immortalised in Keezees trading card form.
  • Played for Laughs on the 1000th page L's Empire when one of the characters tries to celebrate, only to be informed that it was technically only page 956 due to filler, title pages, and holiday specials. The actual 1000th page involved trolling the audience.

    Web Original 


Top