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  • As a Long Runner, Doctor Who and its Expanded Universe have a plethora of anniversary stories. Uniquely, since the show was largely off the air during the anniversary periods of 1993 to 2003, it was up to the expanded universe to pick up the slack during those years.
    • 10th anniversary (1973): "The Three Doctors", a Reunion Show that concludes the Doctor's exile on Earth since 1970. Interestingly, it didn't mark the actual date of the anniversary, being aired almost a year beforehand; instead, it marked the beginning of the show's tenth season.
    • Averted with "The Stones of Blood", which was the 100th story and aired on the show's 15th anniversary (1978). It was going to start with the Doctor and Romana celebrating his birthday with a cake, but the production team wisely vetoed it as too self-congratulatory. The staff did eat a cake during production of the serial, though.
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    • 20th anniversary (1983): "The Five Doctors", another Reunion Show. Unlike the other two canon TV anniversary reunion episodes, this one didn't mark a major status quo change for the Doctor (unless you count him getting a spiffy new TARDIS console).
    • 1985 saw the 100th Target novelisation, Robert Holmes' adaptation of his TV story "The Two Doctors", with an introduction by John Nathan-Turner, the TV series' producer at the time.
    • 25th anniversary (1988): "Remembrance of the Daleks", which had the Doctor revisiting the site of the first episode the next day (albeit hundreds of years later in his own timeline), and "Silver Nemesis", which was about a 25th anniversary, aired over the anniversary date, and had a cameo of Nicholas Courtney and some program staff.
    • 30th anniversary (1993):
      • TV: The non-canon "Dimensions in Time", which was a Children in Need Reunion Show skit that crossed over with EastEnders, and the documentary "More than 30 Years in the TARDIS".
      • The Doctor Who New Adventures marked the anniversary with a story arc running from October 1993 to February 1994 and featuring a number of old villains and monsters from the TV series appearing in the novels for the first time.
      • Doctor Who Magazine comics: "Time & Time Again", where the Seventh Doctor has to save his own timeline from the Black Guardian's rewriting by meeting his past selves.
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    • The fiftieth Doctor Who New Adventures novel is Happy Endings (1996) by Paul Cornell, in which a new cover design is introduced, Benny gets married, a whole host of characters from previous novels are invited, a lot of dangling plot threads get resolved, and every NA writer except onenote  contributes a paragraph to the reception.
    • Doctor Who Magazine marked its 250th issue (1997) with the comic "A Life of Matter and Death", bringing back many of its characters in a battle inside the TARDIS' mind.
    • 35th anniversary (1998):
      • Novels: The Past Doctor Adventures (sort of) novel The Infinity Doctors, which features an unspecified Doctor and is filled with continuity nods.
      • Doctor Who Magazine comics: "Happy Deathday", which pits the then-Eight Doctors against a Legion of Doom of their greatest enemies. The story turns out to be actually a video game the Doctor's companion Izzy has been playing on her spare time.
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    • Doctor Who Magazine celebrated its 20th anniversary (issue 283, 1999) with "TV Action!", a metafictional comic strip where the Eighth Doctor and Izzy chase Beep the Meep to October 12, 1979note  in a parallel universe where Doctor Who is just a TV show; there, they team up with none other than Tom Bakernote .
    • The 100th original BBC Doctor Who novel (counting the Eighth Doctor Adventures and Past Doctor Adventures together) is Mad Dogs and Englishmen (2002) by Paul Magrs, which announces the fact on its cover, along with having its logo in reflective gold foil.
    • 40th anniversary (2003):
      • TV: The revival of the series was announced in that period.
      • Big Finish Doctor Who: The main event was "Zagreus" (also the 50th Big Finish audio), a Wham Episode that concludes the Anti-Time Story Arc which began back at the Eighth Doctor's audio beginning, sets the stage for the Divergent Universe story arc and casts a number of previous Doctor and companion actors in completely new roles. There was also the thematic Villains Trilogy of "Omega", "Davros" and "Master", which explores just how Not So Different the Doctor is from his recurring enemies, and a web-animation of the unfinished Fourth Doctor story "Shada", substituting the Fourth Doctor for the Eighthnote . The "Doctor Who Unbound" series of What If? stories also began that year.
      • Doctor Who Magazine comics: "The Land of Happy Endings", which revisits the settings and characters of the TV Comic strips via All Just a Dream.
      • Novels: The Past Doctor Adventures novel Deadly Reunion, penned by Third Doctor era architects Barry Letts and Terrance Dicks. The first half of it tells the early years of the Brigadier before meeting the Doctor.
      • Other: The animated webcast Scream of the Shalka, which was intended to be the official revival of the series. The above announcement reduced it to an non-canon Alternate Universe tale.
    • 45th anniversary (2008): The show itself (which was revived by then) did nothing explicitly celebratory, but that didn't stop the Expanded Universe any.
      • Big Finish Doctor Who: "Forty-Five", a Seventh Doctor audio anthology where the number 45 is littered everywhere. There is an in-universe rationale in the last story for that.
      • IDW comics: "Doctor Who: The Forgotten", which featured an amnesiac Tenth Doctor flashing back to all of his previous incarnations in order to regain his memories.
    • Subtly done for the 200th story, "Planet of the Dead" (2009), which features a number 200 bus, which the Doctor refers to as "The mighty 200!"
    • For Bernice Summerfield's 20th birthday (2012), she had the charity special audio play Many Happy Returns, which brings back a number of characters and writers, and an audio adaptation of her debut Doctor Who New Adventures novel Love and War.
    • 50th anniversary (2013):
      • TV: "The Day of the Doctor" and its associated prequels "The Night of the Doctor" and "The Last Day", a Wham Episode Reunion Show that aired 50 years to the day of the show's premiere and laid down a new plot strand for the Doctor to follow in the next 50 years to come; "An Adventure in Space and Time", a docudrama about the creation of the show, and "The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot", a parody Reunion Show short feature. Also, nearly every episode of the season that preceded "The Day of the Doctor" featured a plot or characters related to the long history of the series, as did the episode that immediately followed a few weeks later, the 2013 Christmas special, "The Time of the Doctor", which resolved a 37-year-old plot thread, an 8-year-old plot thread, a 3-year-old plot thread, and introduced a new Doctor, to boot.
      • Big Finish Doctor Who: The Big Finish continuity was made a Canon Immigrant thanks to a line of dialogue in "The Night of the Doctor". For the celebratory audio plays, there was "The Light at the End", a classic series-style Reunion Show; "The Beginning", which tells the tale of the TARDIS's first flight; "Destiny of the Doctor", a series of Cross Through audiobooks involving the then-Eleven Doctors (and also the only time Big Finish has been able to outright use new series elements), and the thematic 1963 trilogy of "1963: Fanfare for the Common Men" (which is pretty much a Brick Joke to a background element in the first episode), "1963: The Space Race" and "1963: The Assassination Games".
      • Novels: A series of 11 ebook short stories for each of the then-Eleven Doctors published by Puffin Books. BBC Books also saw fit to reissue a number of Past Doctor Adventures novels.
      • Doctor Who Magazine comics: "Hunters of the Burning Stone", which saw the Eleventh Doctor reunited with the very first companions, Ian and Barbara, in a battle against an unexpected old foe, and "John Smith and the Common Men", published on the anniversary month of November 2013.
      • Doctor Who Magazine 467, which featured "John Smith and the Common Men", also came with a special mini-magazine showing what DWM might have looked like in 1964, marking the show's first anniversary, and collectible art cards of the First through Twelfth Doctors (leaving out War).
      • IDW comics: Doctor Who: Prisoners of Time, where an unexpected newer foe is disrupting the Doctor's timeline by removing his companions from his timestream. On a somber note, IDW's Doctor Who contract ran out that year.
      • Other: A Doctor Who game adorned Google's home page on November 22, 2013.
    • 10th anniversary of TV revival (2015):
      • Titan Comics published Doctor Who: Four Doctors, a five-part miniseries crossing over their Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Doctor titles and throwing in the War Doctor, an evil alternate universe Twelve as the Big Bad, and a cameo by Nine for good measure.
      • While the show itself didn't acknowledge this anniversary, Series 9 was heavy on return appearances by fan-favorite characters: a prologue short saw the return of Ohila from "The Night of the Doctor", and two stories followed on from "The Day of the Doctor"'s events — "The Zygon Invasion"/"The Zygon Inversion" is a direct sequel to its B-plot, and the three-part finale "Face the Raven"/"Heaven Sent"/"Hell Bent" had the Doctor returning to Gallifrey for the first time since the Time War/the revival's debut as one of several Wham Episode events.
    • Doctor Who Magazine marked its 500th issue in 2016 with the comic "The Stockbridge Showdown", pitting the Twelfth Doctor and most of the living DWM-original companions against one of the strip's major villains in a finale to a long-Aborted Arc, a bonus magazine covering DWM's history, a double-sided poster, the first of nine collectible art cards, and a sheet of stickers (calling back to DWM's first issue, back when it was Doctor Who Weekly, which came with transfers).
  • Game Shows are no stranger to this trope.
    • What's My Line?: To celebrate its 25th anniversary as a series in 1975, a special two-hour retrospective of the panel game, wherein four panelists sought to identify someone's occupation or other secret, aired on ABC Late Night. It was interesting in a number of respects when it aired in late May: 1. Virtually all of the footage (except for a clip introducing then-sitting President Gerald Ford) came from the original 1950-1967 CBS run; 2. The special was hosted by original host John Daly (who was not present at all during the syndicated run), although Arlene Francis and co-creator Mark Goodson were there; and 3. The syndicated version, which had been airing since 1968, was about to wrap up its successful seven-year run. Still, it was a nice way to celebrate television's then-longest running game show, which was a constant presence for most of the past quarter century.
    • Wheel of Fortune: The 3,000th and 4,000th episodes were special retrospective episodes, featuring some of the key highlights of the (syndicated) series. The 3,000th program aired in 1998, and the 4,000th sometime in 2003. A rare photograph, printed in Jefferson Graham's "The Game Show Book," showed Vanna and Pat at the puzzle board to promote the daytime series' 3,000th episode, aired sometime in the fall of 1986.
    • The Price Is Right:
      • With the ceremonial 5,000th episode (in the spring of 1998), Studio 33 (where the show taped) was renamed the Bob Barker Studio. The 6,000th and 7,000th episodes have all featured increased prize budgets and other pomp and circumstance.
      • The show celebrated its 25th, 30th, and 35th Anniversaries with a primetime special. The first (#0001S) used the half-hour format, with the other half filled with clips; the second (#0001LV) was taped in Las Vegas, using the regular format; the third (#023SP) also celebrated Bob Barker's 50 years in television, with a similar format as the 25th-Anniversary Special and a cameo by Adam Sandler.
      • During the first week of the 40th season, there was a 40th Anniversary Special, in which the audience consisted entirely of past contestants who were invited back to play again. One player, Paul Levine, who was the first player to play "Bonus Game" on the pilot episode, played that same game again, winning a restored 1972 Chevrolet Camaro, the same car he'd originally won in the pilot.
    • Jeopardy!:
      • The original version aired its 2,000th episode in early 1972. In place of Final Jeopardy! was a performance by Mel Brooks' 2000-Year-Old Man character. Various other special episodes and tournaments have cropped up during the course of the Trebek version.
      • For the Trebek version's 3,000th episode, the opening round featured the same categories used in Trebek's premiere (with new clues), Double Jeopardy! featured special categories worked around the milestone, and the Final Jeopardy! category was "Holidays", the same as the first episode.
      • For the Trebek version's 10th season, there was a Tenth Anniversary Tournament featuring players from each of the show's first 9 seasons, giving the season 9 slot to Tom Nosek, the then-newest Tournament of Champions winner). The tournament was won by season 6's Frank Spangenberg (after a major turnaround in the final games).
    • Let's Make a Deal celebrated being on air for 50 years in early 2013 by having Monty Hall himself and his assistant taking over for one of the deals.
  • Bob Hope: Various shows marked one of his landmark anniversaries or birthdays, starting with "A Quarter Century of Bob Hope on Television" in October 1975. Birthday celebrations for his 75th, 80th and 90th birthdays aired in 1978, 1983 and 1993, respectively. Many of these shows featured clips from previous specials, along with pre-taped well wishes from his friends, often the sitting president at the time and the casts of various TV shows.
  • All in the Family: The 100th and 200th episodes of the series were Clip Shows, but not in the traditional sense of wrapping a "recalling old times" storyline around past clips. Rather, these were special guest stars – Henry Fonda for the 100th show, in December 1974, and Norman Lear for the 200th show (from March 1979) – providing commentary, narrating clips and introducing interview excerpts from the main cast members. A 20th anniversary special also aired in 1991, featuring retrospectives from cast members and ordinary people who agreed to be interviewed for the special.
  • Happy Days: The series' first "milestone" show came just two years into its run, titled – inventively enough – "Second Anniversary Show," and was simply Fonzie and the family laughing about past adventures. Two more "anniversary milestone" shows – titled "Third Anniversary Show" (Howard and Marion celebrating their anniversary) and "Fourth Anniversary Show" (Lori Beth writing a paper about the Cunninghams, an "average middle-class American family") – aired in 1977 and 1978, respectively.
  • Little House on the Prairie: To celebrate its fifth anniversary as a series, NBC decided to celebrate one of its rare (at the time) series hits with a special three-hour movie, "The Little House Years." This was simply extended highlights from seven of the most popular episodes of the series framed around the Ingalls celebrating Thanksgiving dinner. Although shown independently of the series, and not usually shown in syndication order with the rest of the episodes, it is canon within the TV Little House universe. note 
  • The Tonight Show: To celebrate Johnny Carson's 10th anniversary of hosting the show, a prime-time special aired, including highlights from his first decade of the show and special guests. Clips were rather limited due to much of the archives being wiped (due to reuse of videotape), although kineoscopes and video of highlights from the 1960s through early 1970s (e.g., Ed Ames' tomahawk throw, a parody of Dragnet, Tiny Tim's wedding) were shown. After then, the specials began airing annually (e.g., "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 17th Anniversary Special" in 1979) until the last one aired in 1991. As the years progressed, more clips were aired since all shows produced after sometime in 1972 exist.
  • Star Trek:
    • The franchise celebrated 30 years with Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager doing special episodes that referred back to the original crew. Deep Space Nine did a revisioned look at the events of the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Trouble With Tribbles" via Time Travel, and Voyager also did a The Greatest Story Never Told with what Captain Sulu did during the majority of the events of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. The reason why Voyager had one featuring Sulu was that "The Trouble With Tribbles" was one of several Season 2 episodes to not feature Sulu (thanks to George Takei filming The Green Berets) and it just seemed strange to not include the character somehow in the 30th anniversary...
    • Star Trek: Voyager's 100th episode, "Timeless", featured the destruction of Voyager with only two survivors from a botched attempt to return home. Harry and Chakotay used Time Travel to Set Right What Once Went Wrong, which made them fugitives of Starfleet. Adding to the occasion was guest star LeVar Burton, who also directed the episode.
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation:
      • The series' 80th episode produced, "Legacy", surpassed TOS' total of 79note  had the Enterprise be forced to bypass a scheduled stop at Camus II, the planet where "Turnabout Intruder", the TOS finale, took place.
      • The series' 100th episode, Redemption, was the fourth-season Cliffhanger. It was a key episode in Worf's arc, marked the beginning of a Klingon civil war, and ended on The Reveal of Romulan Commander Sela, a dead ringer for the late Tasha Yarnote .
      • TNG's fifth season, 1991-92, coincided with Star Trek's 25th anniversary. For this season, the show's logo had rear shadows. The two-part episode "Unification", airing in November 1991 and featuring Leonard Nimoy as Spock, was created in conjunction with Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (and Spock even references the events of the film) as part of Star Trek's 25th anniversary. The episodes were also dedicated to Gene Roddenberry, who passed away during their production.
    • The teaser trailer for Star Trek: Picard was released on May 23, 2019, which was the 25th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation's Grand Finale, "All Good Things".
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer:
    • The 100th episode coincided with the fifth-season finale, in which Buffy dies (for the second time). "The Gift" additionally was the last Buffy episode to air on The WB network before the series moved to UPN in September 2001. Further, the episode began with a Previously On segment that contained clips from every single previous episode, all going by at very high speed.
    • The canon Season 8 comics that continued the story were coincidentally released on the 10th anniversary of the first season.
  • In Angel's 100th episode, "You're Welcome", Cordelia awoke from her mystical coma and reinvigorated Angel's fighter spirit. And it was revealed that she had died.
  • Power Rangers:
    • 10-year anniversary: "Forever Red" in Power Rangers Wild Force. 10 years of Red Rangers returned for a fight against The Remnant of the Machine Empire.
    • 500th episode - "Legacy of Power" in Power Rangers Dino Thunder, a big Clip Show showcasing most of the series. It also moved the story forward a bit, as the Dino Rangers finally found out that their teacher and mentor, Tommy Oliver, was a veteran Power Ranger (the very first Sixth Ranger, and Red Ranger to the following couple teams). The very next episode saw Tommy climb back in the saddle as the Black Dino Ranger.
    • 15-year anniversary: "Once A Ranger" in Power Rangers Operation Overdrive, a two-parter which had some of the more popular (non-Red) Rangers return for another fight.
    • In a bit of fortuitous timing, the final Disney season before Saban claimed the franchise back, Power Rangers RPM, ends with the 700th total episode.
    • Power Rangers Megaforce celebrates the show's 20th anniversary. It's running two years; the first year is a bit of a homage to the original Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers and the second is a franchise-wide Crisis Crossover. (The two-year thing is due to scheduling quirks on the part of both Disneynote  and Nickelodeonnote ; the adaptation of Sentai's milestone crossover season was going to miss the anniversary year, so it and the prior year was made one big storyline.)
    • 25-season anniversary: "Dimensions in Danger" in Power Rangers Ninja Steel, another big Reunion Show involving The Multiverse and Rangers from across the entire franchise.
  • On the other side of the Pacific, you have Super Sentai:
    • An odd case: Kousoku Sentai Turboranger was launched as the then-eleventh show (tenth anniversary) of Super Sentai. Its first episode was a special Clip Show that summarized the previous ten shows and featured 53 Sentai heroes in costume (which seems a modest number nowadays, when the first episode of Gokaiger had almost four times that amount). Interestingly, Toei decided to add two previous shows into the canon later on, making the Turboranger officially the thirteenth. The only reason they weren't included before was they lacked the Humongous Mecha.
    • 25th series: a team-up movie featuring the Hyakujuu Sentai Gaoranger teaming with five Super Sentai members from past series. The movie ends with every previous Red Ranger showing up, albeit in costume only.
    • 30th series: GoGo Sentai Boukenger with the after-show segment "The 30 Sentai Encyclopedia", short skits hosted by the Boukengers briefly reviewing every show and every first over the past 30 years, as well as shared themes between shows. There was also the Crossover Reunion Show, featuring the physical manifestation of the 30 Years of Sentai in AkaRed, who had the power of all the past Red Rangers combined, along with a Ranger from the previous four Sentai series, AND a villain from the one before those.
    • On a smaller note, the 15th reunion movie, Engine Sentai Go-onger vs. Gekiranger, saw a theatrical release instead of being Direct-to-Video for being number 15. This is acknowledged in the movie's ending when the heroes celebrate a birthday party, and calling it "a Super Sentai birthday". Afterwards, theatrical releases for reunion movies became the norm.
    • 35th series: Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger, the Sentai equivalent of Kamen Rider Decade, with the heroes channeling powers and mecha of previous Ranger teams. Previous Rangers themselves also make guest appearances. In a nod to the previous anniversary, AkaRed was the one who gave them their powers. They also had a crossover movie with one of Toei's other heroes, Space Sheriff Gavan, who himself was celebrating his 30th anniversary. And shortly after Gokaiger ended, Toei launched the Superhero Taisen series that crossed Sentai over with Kamen Rider, with Gokaigers vs. Decade as the plot of the first film (Toei denies that it's an intentional Milestone Celebration, but with the timing and characters involved it fits too well to not be one).
    • In 2015, Shuriken Sentai Ninninger celebrated 40 years since the debut of Super Sentai with Himitsu Sentai Goranger in 1975 by having the two Red Rangers of the past ninja series, Ninja Sentai Kakuranger and Ninpuu Sentai Hurricaneger, guest star in Episode 7; plus an additional cameo by Akaranger from Goranger. The episode was supposed to air on April 5, exactly 40 years to the day of the premiere of Goranger, but due to the show's entire schedule being delayed by one week because of preemption regarding the death of a Japanese journalist at the hands of ISIS, it became a belated birthday celebration on April 12; nevertheless, Episode 6, which aired on the anniversary date because of it, still acknowledged the milestone by beginning the On the Next preview with a photocollage of all 39 teams up to that point.
    • While Ninninger celebrated the 40th year of the franchise, Doubutsu Sentai Zyuohger was the 40th installment; and the franchise also hit 2,000 total episodes that season. The show celebrated both by bringing back the Gokaigers for episodes 1,999 and 2,000.
  • As noted under Super Sentai, the 30th anniversary of the Metal Heroes franchise was celebrated with its first hero, Space Sheriff Gavan, returning in a Gokaiger movie. This was followed by a standalone film, Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie, that was intended to start a revival for the franchise by introducing a new Gavan, but it bombed.
  • Kamen Rider, in chronological order:
    • Kamen Rider ZX (1984), the tenth hero to bear the Rider monicker, is a low-key version. He was first advertised in a year-long promotion campaign across several mediums before finally debutting in a TV Special.
    • The deconstruction film Shin Kamen Rider: Prologue was made for the 20th anniversary of the franchise. it was released on 1992, one year off the actual anniversary of 1991.
    • Averted by Kamen Rider Agito (2001): the only thing marking the show as the 30th anniversary of the franchise is a disclaimer opening the first episode. Then again, the franchise was just fresh off a revival at the time; survival was a more pressing matter back then. However, Agito did introduce traditions that would stick for all the following years, including multiple Riders as the norm and the utter lack of ending credits.
    • Kamen Rider Kabuto (2006) had a few smaller things to celebrate the Kamen Rider franchise's 35th anniversary, including the return of blatantly insect-themed suits and after-show review segments for episode 23 to 27.
    • Kamen Rider Decade (2009), a year-long celebration of 10 years of the franchise's Heisei era in the form of a Crisis Crossover (a crisis which, oddly enough, eventually expands to celebrate the franchise's 38-year history by the end).
    • Kamen Rider OOO (2010-2011) and Kamen Rider Fourze (2011-2012) collectively celebrate the franchise's 40th anniversary.
      • The Let's Go Kamen Riders movie features OOO along with the original two Kamen Riders and Cash Cow Sub-Franchise Kamen Rider Den-O. The rest of the Riders make cameos as Big Damn Heroes during the final fight, too. The film also doubles as a celebration of the Toei Company's 60th year, which it marks with a special cameo scene where four of Shotaro Ishinomori's non-Kamen Rider toku heroes intercepting and quickly killing off a retreating General Shadow. Furthermore, episodes 27 and 28 of OOO happen to be the 999th and 1,000th episodes of the franchise as a whole, and feature the characters... filming a movie about Kamen Rider.
      • Fourze is named for "40", in-universe for the 40 Astro Switches he can use but obviously also for 40 years (in addition to continuing the previous years' Numerological Motif [Decade was 1, Double was 2, OOO was 3]). It also mentions Urban Legends about previous Riders, and uses Theme Naming that references classic Riders. Plus the traditional crossover-with-the-previous-Rider movie was expanded from just OOO and Fourze to include the first seven Riders and OOO's predecessor Kamen Rider Double. The Superhero Taisen crossovers with Super Sentai also launched their debut movie during Fourze's run. And on top of all that, a series of joint anniversary crossover shorts with the 20th anniversary of the Crayon Shin-chan anime.
    • As the 15th Heisei-era series, Kamen Rider Gaim (2013-2014) included several events uniting the fifteen Heisei Riders. First, Gaim made his debut appearance in post-script two-parter of the previous season, Kamen Rider Wizard, that featured the fifteen Riders together. Then the Wizard/Gaim movie had them sucked into an Alternate Universe where counterparts of the Heisei Riders fought for dominance. And after that, the annual Superhero Taisen crossover became Kamen Rider Taisen, pitting the fifteen Heisei Riders against the fifteen original Showa-era Riders (and Demoting Sentai to Extras). As for the show itself, the execs took the opportunity to shake up the formula that had been in place since the Decade anniversary ended; going as far as hiring Gen Urobuchi as lead writer and letting him go full "Urobutcher" on his scripts for the express purpose of breaking down the image of the franchise as people knew it.
    • 2016 celebrated the 45th Anniversary with Kamen Rider 1 the Movie (in place of the Superhero Taisen series), starring the original Kamen Rider and having him team up with the then-current show, Kamen Rider Ghost. Afterwards Hiroshi Fujioka stated he would be retiring from the role, also making it the final appearance of Takeshi Hongo.
    • The 2018-19 season, Kamen Rider Zi-O, is not only the 20th Heisei season, but the last Heisei season due to Emperor Akihito abdicating the throne and ending Japan's Heisei era. As a result, Zi-O is a Crisis Crossover similar to Decade involving all 20 Heisei shows as the era's Grand Finale. The series also followed in Gokaiger's footsteps by getting actors from all the other Heisei seasons for Cameos, managing to get 11 of the 19 main Riders to appear in personnote , some of them for the first time in years.
  • The Japanese Iron Chef had a 2000th plate special commemorating the number of dishes that had been served on the show. Chef Joel Robuchon was a special guest judge, and the Chairman Kaga chose his five favorite and three least favorite dishes to have been served on the show.
  • Stargate SG-1 had "Wormhole X-Treme" as its 100 episode, and another metahumor episode for the 200th episode. Part of the plot of "200" is that Mitchell is about to take his 200th trip through a stargate. This allows them to get away with saying things like "This is gonna be huge. The big 2-0-0!" within the episode itself.
  • Friends episode "The One Hundredth": Phoebe gives birth to the triplets.
  • Smallville featured the death of a main character in the 100th episode. In the 200th episode, Season 10's "Homecoming", Clark lets go of his guilt over his father's death, which was the aforementioned main character death that happened a hundred episodes earlier. And, at the very end of the episode, he and Lois share a dance, and, without either of them noticing, he begins to hover.
  • The X-Files had a fake 100th episode; they claimed it to be the 100th episode in the promos but if you do the math, the episode is the 99th episode to air. Scully's cancer was cured in this episode and it also concluded a few other subplots as well. The actual 100th episode to be aired was a flashback episode that showed how the Lone Gunmen formed in 1989 and met Mulder and Scully was not in that episode. Their 200th episode was some stupid The Brady Bunch episode.
  • Stephen Colbert did the 100th episode of The Colbert Report in a tuxedo, and had the same guest as on the first episode (the first ever repeat guest). The Daily Show ran segments celebrating their '10 F#@king Years' anniversary every now and then for six months.
    • The '10 F#@king Years' segments were made more hilarious by the collective cast acting as though they hadn't achieved something, but rather that they had just been through something terrible, and it wasn't over yet.
    • The Fifth Anniversary Show was supposed to be a big deal with lots of correspondents weighing in, but everyone had something else to do at the last moment and sent apology videos (Stephen Colbert's was a Video Will). Even the guest was on the other end of a satellite connection.
  • Law & Order: Special Victims Unit's 200th episode guest starred Robin Williams. Come on, you know that was meant to be special (so to speak).
  • The 100th Scrubs episode was an elaborate parody of The Wizard of Oz, directed by Zach Braff.
  • Referenced in Monk with the CSI parody episode. The actual hundredth episode of Monk features Monk's 100th case as a documentary. And then Monk ends up solving his 101st case inadvertently.
  • ER:
    • The 300th episode had the doctors betting on the number of patients they would have that night. The winner had a round 300.
    • Its 100th episode had them host a woman who was born 100 years ago that day.
  • CSI: Miami brushed with the Trope for their 100th, "Death Pool 100". The case just happens to involve counterfeit money, specifically $100 bills, but it's easy to miss. At the end of the episode, after most of the Montage Out, the core cast gathers on a beach casually talking about the case. The conversation ends by Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    Calliegh: Everyone thinks it's easy to make a hundred.
    Horatio: We know better.
  • Lost's 100th episode, "The Variable", which was actually #96, hinted at Tonight, Someone Dies in previews (someone did, fan favorite eccentric scientist Dan Faraday), tied in advertising for Star Trek (2009) as well as the show Flash Forward, and aired immediately following Barack Obama's 100th day address. As for the episode itself, it established the plan to alter the course of the series and prevent the crash of Oceanic 815. The occasion was also marked by a special Ace of Cakes with an awesome 100th episode cake.
  • The 100th episode of Frasier has the entire city of Seattle commemorating "Frasier Crane Day", to celebrate Frasier's 1,000th radio broadcast, and also has Niles and Frasier actually on-location and walking around Seattle.
  • Seinfeld had a clip show called The Highlights of 100.
  • In the 100th episode of Charmed, the constantly switching between good and evil character Cole Turner aka Belthazor was finally Killed Off for Real. In the 150th episode, the resident Mr. Exposition Leo became human. The Avatars have something to do with both events.
  • The 100th episode of That '70s Show was a musical, with Fez imagining the cast covering some of the '70s hit songs.
  • Ultra Series
    • In 1973, Tsuburaya Productions celebrated its 10th birthday with three new shows: Jumborg Ace, Fireman, and Ultraman Taro, an Affectionate Parody of their beloved franchise.
    • On their 30th birthday (1993), Tsuburaya created the film Ultraman Zearth, another Affectionate Parody of the franchise.
    • For Ultraman's 30th anniversary in 1996, Tsuburaya made Ultraman Tiga, marking the first full-fledged series after 15 years of short-lived foreign productions, movies, and the like. More specifically, the 49th episode "The Ultra Star" was the series' celebratory episode, featuring the protagonist travelling go to 1965 and meeting franchise creator Eiji Tsuburaya, as well as Tiga teaming up with the original Ultraman!
    • The franchise's 35th anniversary was the 2001 Ultraman Cosmos movie First Contact where Ultraman Cosmos battles against the original Ultraman's most famous enemy, Alien Baltan. It also serves as the prequel to the Ultraman Cosmos series.
    • In 2006, Ultraman Mebius and its tie-in movie Ultraman Mebius & The Ultra Brothers were made "Comemmorating 40 Years of Ultraman", revisiting the original Showa era universe (Ultraman to Ultraman 80) after 25 years of alternate universes and featuring returning actors, characters and monsters from there.
    • Ultraseven X, an adult-oriented Cyber Punk Spy Fiction, was released in late 2007 to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Ultraseven.
    • 2015 was the 10th anniversary of the unfortunately abrupt finale of the notoriously Darker and Edgier reboot attempt Ultraman Nexus, which saw a reunion of the cast and crew, a miniseries on the show's making, and an episode of then-incumbent series Ultraman X where Ultraman Nexus returned as a guest star and themes from the series were explored. The same year was also the 10th anniversary of Ultraman Max also celebrated by Ultraman X in its 8th episode where Max makes a guest appearance.
    • 2016 marked the 50th anniversary of Ultraman as well as the 20th anniversary of Ultraman Tiga. So, Tsuburaya celebrated with an Ultraman X movie featuring guest appearances from Ultraman and Tiga (as well as their respective iconic foes Antlar and Fire Golza) and the series Ultraman Orb, where the title hero is able to call upon the powers of previous Ultramen, most prominently Ultraman and Tiga. Ultraman Orb would go on to celebrate Ultraseven and Ultraman Dyna's respective 50th and 20th anniversaries in 2017 by having the respective heroes prominently (and respectively) guest star in a movie and a spinoff series.
  • How I Met Your Mother:
    • 99 episodes of almost zero amount of information about the mother, then comes along episode 100 with a huge information overflow. And Neil Patrick Harris shows off his singing with a musical tribute to suits. It played with Tonight, Someone Dies by "killing off" one of Barney's suit jackets. His tailor even likening using its buttons on another suit to "organ donation".
    • "The Slutty Pumpkin Returns", the Sequel Episode to "The Slutty Pumpkin", is an in-story example — even though the series began in 2005, Ted first met the girl known as Slutty Pumpkin in 2001. The episode itself takes place in 2011, during which Ted finally meets the girl who wore the Slutty Pumpkin costume again, after years of waiting for her in the same "hanging chad" costume at the same Halloween party (not unlike Linus waiting for the Great Pumpkin).
    • The 200th episode is A Day in the Limelight for the Mother herself as she tells her side of the story at various points in the series.
  • True Life so far has had a "Where Are They Now" episode for its 100th episode (2007) and its 200th episode (2011). In them, they revisited some of the most memorable people (the 100th episode included a girl with Tourette's Syndrome and a little person who was a Britney Spears impersonator, 200th episode included an alcoholic who ran over her boyfriend and a girl who had alopecia).
  • The tenth season premiere of Mystery Science Theater 3000 had TV's Frank returning to reap souls ("Second Banana Heaven was way too political") and Joel Hodgson returning to fix up the Satellite of Love.
  • The 100th episode of 30 Rock was a one-hour episode about the Show Within a Show's 100th episode, and was even titled "100th".
    • The episode also featured special guest appearances from Michael Keaton and Tom Hanks, the important plot point of Tracy deciding to leave movies to return to TV, the return of Dennis Duffy (a recurring character who was Liz's boyfriend in the first season) and a gas leak that caused the cast to reminisce about the past while in an altered state.
  • The entire 25th and final season of The Oprah Winfrey Show is a milestone celebration, with her bringing back her favorite or most shocking guests.
  • The 100th episode of Bones flashes back to how Booth and Brennan met and first worked together and has Booth confess his love for Brennan.
  • In Supernatural's 100th, Sam and Dean finally meet their half brother Adam and also rebuild their relationship.
  • Gilmore Girls 100th episode has Emily and Richard renewing their wedding vows.
  • The 100th episode of One Tree Hill has Karen return for Lucas's wedding where he is left at the altar, and Dan rescues Nathan and Haley's son Jamie after he is kidnapped.
  • The 100th episode of Desperate Housewives plays with the Tonight, Someone Dies card by killing off a previously unseen character who has been a part of the main character's lives for over a decade, the flashbacks in the episode show his involvement in their lives. Season one characters Martha Huber and Yao Lin also make a reappearance.
  • NCIS celebrated their 200th episode "Life Before His Eyes" with a lot of continuity nods to the previous eight seasons. Word of God says this episode was a "gift to the fans".
  • The 100th episode of Criminal Minds was actually called "100". The episode was told in Anachronic Order with the team being interviewed by Strauss because Hotch killed an infamous serial killer who murdered his ex-wife.
  • The Vampire Diaries reached their hundred episode in "500 Years of Solitude", an episode focused on fan-favorite Katherine that also features the guest appearance of characters who left the series long ago (Jenna, John, Alaric, Vicki, the Mikaelson siblings…)
  • Meanwhile in soap operas, Neighbours had celebrated both episode number milestones and anniversaries, usually by having some big event happen in the episode in question. Especially big milestones were the 1000th episode (Des and Jane's engagement party, which was crashed by Guy Pearce), the 2000th episode (Helen's birthday party) the 10th anniversary (unaddressed onscreen, but a special book and video were released), the 4000th episode (Flick rescuing Lou and Rosie from a fire), the 20th anniversary (an in-universe documentary featuring numerous former Ramsey Street residents, some of whom returned to the street), the 5000th episode (Paul being buried alive by his murderous son Robert), and the 25th anniversary (in late 2010). The 6000th episode (and the week leading up to it) created a mystery over an apparent murder attempt on Paul Robinson's life, which kept going for several months after. The 30th anniversary is to be marked in-universe by the Erinsborough Festival, again featuring returns from numerous residents (some of which haven't been in the street since 1990).
  • Home and Away has likewise celebrated milestones such as Episode 2000 (Angel's departure from Summer Bay), 3000 (Mitch's departure, as well as Alex and Dani's car crash), 4000 (Alf's birthday party, with numerous past characters returning, which also ended in a car crash) and the 20th anniversary (which saw Sally, a regular character since the first season, leave the bay).
  • The Big Bang Theory's 100th episode focused on the possibility of Leonard and Penny getting back together. They also had special behind the scenes video with the cast looked back at the series so far.
    • The 200th episode focused on Sheldon's birthday, and featured surprise appearances by Adam West, Stephen Hawking, Wil Wheaton and Sarah Gilbert as Leslie Winkle (for the first time since Season Three)
  • JAG celebrated its 100th episode "Boomerang (Part I)" by filming it on location in Australia, and the 200th episode was a What If?.
  • Saturday Night Live parodied this with their 100th Digital Short which was a music video called "We're Gonna Suck Our Own Dicks", a big musical Call-Back to all the other Digital Shorts. The show itself has had some big celebrations of its own, though:
    • The 15th anniversary was marked with a prime time retrospective that featured clips and interviews.
    • The 25th anniversary season warranted a live prime time special prior to the season premiere, featuring a variety of cast members, guest hosts, and musical guests on stage and in the audience. After that, they didn't do another special of this magnitude until...
    • The 40th anniversary special in February 2015, a prime time live show that ran three and a half hours...plus a one hour Roll Out the Red Carpet arrival special beforehand! Highlights included such skits as a gigantic "Celebrity Jeopardy" round that had far more than three contestants, a medley of the most popular musical characters (Operaman, The Blues Brothers, etc.), Eddie Murphy returning to the franchise after decades of avoiding it, etc. As a bonus, in the weeks leading up to the event VH-1 Classic turned over its entire schedule to rerunning favorite episodes from every season, moving backwards to the 1975 series premiere, which aired right before the aforementioned red carpet special began on NBC.
    • Parodied again in a season 41 episode hosted by Melissa McCarthy. She boasted in her monologue that the episode marked her fifth time hosting SNL, and led cast members in a celebratory musical number. Then Kenan Thompson (dressed as the number 5) interrupted by informing McCarthy that her appearance in the 40th Anniversary Special doesn't count as a complete hosting gig, bringing her tally down to 4 1/16. When she hosted again in season 42, Steve Martin interrupted her closing comments, to congratulate her for officially hosting five times, as the cast presented her with a special jacket.
  • Retro Game Master
    • As lampshaded in the Parappa The Rapper episode, a PS1 game is played for special occasions.
    • November 4, 2013 marked the tenth anniversary of the show, at which point it was officially classified a Long Runner. The show celebrated this milestone throughout the whole year.
  • The Late Show with David Letterman
    • There is often has a celebratory episode on their anniversary date (August 31) or the episode broadcast nearest the date if it falls on a weekend. The celebrants often include Bill Murray, who was Dave's guest on the first episodes of both the Late Show and Late Night.
    • Barely a year into The Late Show Dave announced they had broadcast 1,000 episodes with a huge 1000 chroma key. Then he said he misread and they'd actually done 100 episodes, with a much smaller and more subdued 100.
  • The November 11, 2013 broadcast of Panorama marked exactly 60 years of the show, and so it ended with a special credits montage.
  • On New Tricks, the 100th episode saw off the last original cast member, Dennis Waterman. (Particularly impressive because of British Brevity, and because the premise of the series was to assemble ex-cops who were already beyond pension age to begin with.)
  • The 8th season premiere of Ru Pauls Drag Race was the 100th episode of the show and also featured the 100th contestant overall. The show celebrated these milestones by having a main challenge that called back several design challenges from the entire run of the show.
  • The 100th episode of Person of Interest ended with the deaths of Root and Elias (for real this time), and Finch vowing to destroy Samaritan once and for all, consequences be damned.
  • The Arrowverse:
    • Arrow:
      • The 100th episode "Invasion!", is part of a four-part crossover with The Flash (2014), Legends of Tomorrow, and Supergirl (2015). It also features call backs to nearly the entire series, the return of several characters, and a battle royale with Oliver and his friends vs illusory versions of several past villains.
      • The 150th episode "Emerald Archer" features an In-Universe documentary about the vigilantes (and narrated by Kelsey Grammer no less), which includes cameos from several characters long since departed from the show.
    • The Flash (2014): The 100th episode "What's Past is Prologue" features many Call Backs to previous episodes, through the narrative of Barry and Nora having to run back to several points in the past in order to retrieve various components needed to make a weapon they believe will help defeat current Big Bad Cicada.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000 had its 200th episode land in the Netflix's third episode The Time Travelers. It was mentioned at the tail end of the episode by Kinga Forrester, who lampshades that celebrating "false anniversaries" is important.
  • The first half of Fuller House's third season premiered on September 22, 2017 - exactly 30 years to the day its parent series Full House premiered in 1987.
  • The Mickey Mouse Club: A special episode of the 1990's revival featured a reunion of Mouseketeers from the original 1950's show, commemorating both the revival's 100th episode and the original show's 35th anniversary.
  • The 100th episode of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver had a title card remarking on this, and a main segment on net neutrality that served as a sequel to one in the inaugural season 3 years prior.
  • Brooklyn Nine-Nine treated the 99th episode like it was its 100th, and as such featured a more ambitious plot that involved Captain Holt being interviewed for a commissioner promotion that he'd wanted for the entire series, and the presinct going on a road-trip across the US in an attempt to get to the interview in time. It also featured a major reveal - namely, that Rosa Diaz is a bisexual.
  • The 100th episode of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is the Season 5 episode "The Real Deal", wherein the Special Edition Title contains every special logo used over the run of the series, a Reality Bleed conjures illusions of various past antagonists, and most importantly, FitzSimmons finally get married.
  • Hell's Kitchen marked its 100th dinner service with a special black tie event, and the four previous winners were invited to sit at the chef's tables.
  • For Jimmy Kimmel Live!'s 10th anniversary show in 2013, Matt Damon, Jimmy Kimmel's Sitcom Arch-Nemesis, staged a Hostile Show Takeover, renaming the show Jimmy Kimmel Sucks!. Jimmy was tied up, gagged, and relegated to the background, while Matt interviewed various people who all proclaimed their hatred for Jimmy.

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