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Feel free to also include the reason why you want to TRS it, a link to prior discussion, and/or a link to a wick check, just so it's all in order when we can finally take these things to TRS.

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See also Appearance Tropes Cleanup, TLP Crash Rescue Tallies, Color Tropes Cleanup, and Badass Clean-Up.

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    Misuse or ZCE issues 
  • 100% Adoration Rating: It's used to refer to anyone who’s greatly loved, but it specifically refers to beloved rulers.
  • Absentee Actor: It's for when a character (main or bit) whose presence would be either plot-relevant or at least plausible in the episode, and is completely absent for the episode for no apparent reason (or for a reason only readily apparent out-of-universe). It often used for when a character is absent even if there's a plausible reason as to why they wouldn't be present, such as if the episode followed one of the other main characters when they're on a trip.
  • Accidental Aesop: This audience reaction is about a good creator-unintended aesop that the audience interprets. However, like Hard Truth Aesop before its rename, it's frequently used for what is really Warp That Aesop (when people draw absurd conclusions to a work's themes), Alternate Aesop Interpretation (when the audience interprets another aesop from the one that's intended), or just "unintended Bad Aesop." Maybe do like Creator's Apathy (formerly They Just Didn't Care) and require Word of God to make it trivia?
  • Actually Pretty Funny: The trope is about the butt of an insulting joke finding said joke funny, but it's often misused to mean any instance of someone initially being reluctant to say that a joke is funny, regardless of the joke's subject. For example, the part where the joke in question must be at the target's expense is often ignored. Another form of misuse is in Video Review Shows, where a reviewer giving a negative review admits that they found a few jokes funny in a work they otherwise disliked.
    Expanding the definition to include misuse, or alternatively doing a Trope Transplant, would probably be the easiest route — characters claiming a joke isn't funny, then reluctantly admitting they found it funny and/or laughing at it, is still a trope, and doesn't appear to be one TV Tropes already has a page for. In addition, characters laughing at a joke they're the target of, possibly reluctantly, is a fairly narrow definition. Wick check here.
  • Adult Fear: Supposed to be anything that can happen in real life and scare levelheaded adults, like being unable to pay debts or losing your job, but is frequently misunderstood as "children in peril", often in ways that are completely unrealistic (like being kidnapped by demons). Unlike most tropes here, in this case it is almost certainly the image that is the culprit- tropers see the kid and the truck approaching them, with the caption "Every parent's worst nightmare", and assume that the trope means children in peril. Wick Check here.
  • Adorable Evil Minions: Lots of ZCEs that just say the minions are adorable without actually describing what they look like. A lot of examples also feel like gushing.
  • Airstrip One: A lot of the examples (probably because of the poor page image) are areas that just happen to have a nondescript name for whatever reason - e.g. parodies where all areas are named North City or the Forest Of Trees as a joke. The trope is supposed to be un-naming a region after conquering it, as with the Trope Namer (1984 having the UK referred to as Airstrip One after the rise of totalitarianism).
  • Album Single: Made as an index page in 2012, and only has a relatively brief list. Most of the content indexed aren't even singles (only four qualify and they're also covered by Music Videos), and as a trope on musician/album pages tends to often offer no context beyond what the singles are; whatever single the album has is better served in the description than as part of a trope.
  • Alluring Anglerfish: Supposed to be about anglerfish representation in media as Fiendish Fish who use their glowing lures to hunt their prey, but many pages apply it to anything that possesses a lure to lure its prey into false sense of security, no matter whenever they even remotely resemble anglerfishes or are even fish in question, and no matter whether the lure in question is a glowing anglerfish lure. (Wick check here.)
  • Always a Bigger Fish: This is about when the characters are cornered by something threatening, only to be saved when it is taken out by a bigger threat, but many examples are of animals eating each other without saving anyone in the process. That trope (if the animals are portrayed as monstrous) is Food Chain of Evil, and the misuse is probably not helped by the latter trope's misleading name (since monsters may just be portrayed as regular predators with no sense of morality). It is also misused for any situation in which a powerful character is rivaled by a more powerful one, even if nobody ends up being saved.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: It's supposed to be about things that are popular or well-liked domestically attracting widespread hatedom in another country, but despite having the word "hate" right there in the name, it's widely misused for things simply not catching on other countries, even if it is actually more of a country- or region-specific Cult Classic or Acclaimed Flop.
  • And I Must Scream: Supposed to refer to a never-ending, years-long if not eternal Fate Worse than Death, but is used to cover any situation where someone is trapped or paralysed and unable to prevent their doom, which will arrive rather shortly (by this trope's standards) in many cases.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Supposed to be about instances where a video game temporarily changes one or some of its rules to keep certain sections from being frustrating. However, it gets used for any feature that makes a game less frustrating or more convenient to play, including changes made to sequels (which may be covered by Sequel Difficulty Drop instead, depending on how many changes were made to said sequels). Expanding the trope to include quality of life features in general would probably be the easiest solution. There was an attempt at a TRS thread, but it was closed due to the clock expiring.
  • Autobots, Rock Out!: As a music trope, the page is rife with ZCEs that just say the song or band, but do nothing to explain how the song comes in or what the scene is even like.
  • The Backwards Я is ostensibly about borrowing letters from Cyrillic or other alphabets to make text look more foreign. A small amount of misuse now better covered by Randomly Reversed Letters remains, but several other examples refer to in-universe confusion between Cyrillic letters and Latin letters that resemble them, which should also be another trope.
  • Bad Boss: Frequently gets confused for Mean Boss, causing a lot of unintentional misuse. The former is for villains who abuse and kill their minions, while Mean Boss covers mean bosses in a standard work environment. A previous TRS thread proposed a rename to something along the lines of "Killer Boss", but it lacked a wick check and got closed.
  • Beneath the Earth: It's supposed to be about cities or societies underneath the earth. Predictably, it gets mistaken for just about anything living underneath the earth, such as big monsters (which is not helped by the image).
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Despite having three criteria that must be met in order to apply (appears out of nowhere, does not make sense in context, and has no impact on the story whatsoever), examples have a tendency to miss the "not making sense in context" part and use it to refer to events that aren't connected to the main story regardless of if they still make sense given the setting, characters, and/or narrative devices.
  • Black Sheep: The trope is about people who are different from other members of their family (i.e., the black sheep of the family), but it's often applied to works that differ from related works, which is covered by Oddball in the Series. Not helping matters is the fact that the similarly named Black Sheep Hit actually is about works. Simply renaming Black Sheep to "Black Sheep of the Family", the full name of the preexisting term, would clarify its meaning.
  • Bleached Underpants: Despite the on-page description for the trope being about a work aimed at general audiences stemming from an NSFW work, it's frequently used for when a creator of a work aimed at general audiences also created an NSFW one that has no relation to the non-NSFW one. As this ATT thread pointed out, the misuse could be spun into a separate trivia trope, provided it's not common to the point of being People Sit On Chairs.
  • Boring, but Practical: The trope is a mirror of Awesome, but Impractical i.e. about simple things that do their jobs at least as good as their awesome counterparts, like using a shotgun instead of a BFG; however the page describing the trope itself contains examples of things that are boring, but required (i.e. don't have an awesome counterpart), like RTS worker units. There is also an overlap with Mundane Solution, where a problem is solved by mundane means instead of something awesome and uncommon.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: This is supposed to be about when fictional characters address the audience, but many examples just refer to characters aware that they are in a work of fiction, without referencing the audience in any way. The source of confusion/misuse is likely from TVTropes using a narrower definition than the rest of the web.
  • The Bus Came Back: The description states that the character has to be "explicitly written out of a story"; a lot of examples, including on the page itself, just have characters that drop off from the series with no explanation and come back later, also usually with no explanation. There was an attempt at a TRS thread, but it was declined due to the wick check having insufficient wicks.
  • Buxom Is Better: Supposed to be "large breasts are portrayed as better than smaller ones", but is misused as "character has large breasts", which is People Sit On Chairs.
  • Cain and Abel: Attracts zero-context examples that just state who in a pair has what role, without explaining how.
  • The Cameo: Is currently defined as real people (i.e. celebrities) making a brief appearance in a work, but is frequently used for characters making a brief appearance in a work, suggesting the need for either broadening or a split.
  • Cargo Ship: Is supposed to be about fans who pretend that a character has romantic feelings for inanimate objects, but a lot of examples are about characters canonically developing feelings for an object In-Universe, which is a different concept (and may already be covered by Companion Cube).
  • The Cheerleader: The description explains this is specifically about negative depictions of cheerleaders. However, due to its vague name, it's used both on and off the page as just "character is a cheerleader." Either the name needs to be changed to be specifically about mean cheerleaders, or the definition needs to be expanded to include more cheerleader stereotypes.
  • Cheese-Eating Surrender Monkeys: A lot of examples on the page are either aversions or inversions, which seems like there should be a "French People Are Gung Ho" trope to contrast this.
  • Cheese Strategy: the trope uses a specific definition (i.e. that the strategy requires little skill to execute), but most fandoms have their own definition (which often boils down to "strategy people don't like"). The result is that the page has a lot of examples that are called cheese but don't meet the trope definition. Judging by the description, there might be too much overlap with Easy Level Trick for this to be a distinct trope.
  • Clueless Aesop: Suffers from misuse and subjectivity. Misuse because the trope's supposed to be when a work cannot possibly make its message work because of what the work itself is (for example, a kids' show that tries to give a Drugs Are Bad Aesop when its age rating forbids it from properly tackling that subject), but many examples are just works that fail to make their Aesop work for any reason, including just plain poor writing. It's subjective because most of the examples also explain the impact the "cluelessness" has on the work, which often involves passing judgment on its quality, and "this work couldn't possibly have made its message work" is often arguable (going by the example above, a kids' show that tries to deal with mature themes might fail, but some have successfully done so). Plus, similar to Broken Aesop (see the "Actually Subjective" folder), "This work failed to deliver its intended moral" might be subjective.
  • The Danza: Supposed to be for when the character is unambiguously named after the actor, but a lot of examples are just "actor and character shares a name" even if it could be a coincidence or a Casting Gag.
  • The Dead Have Names. Judging by its description, this is redundant to War Memorial. However, the examples suggest that this is about a character remembering everybody who died in a war, meaning that it's a character action and not a list of names. This would mean that the trope name and/or the description need to be changed.
    Image Pickin' previously removed the image for The Dead Have Names (link to thread) because it was a better fit for War Memorial, and the current image for the latter was picked in a thread for the former, with the image on the former being pulled instead of replaced.
  • Developers' Foresight: Previously renamed from The Dev Team Thinks of Everything because it was being used too broadly — it's about video game developers accounting for things players have to go out of their way to find, if they find them at all, but it was frequently misused to refer to Easter eggs and attention to detail. Despite the rename, the trope continues to suffer from roughly the same kind of misuse that caused it to get renamed.
  • Didn't See That Coming: The trope is supposed to be that a careful plan goes to pieces because of something wholly unexpected (basically, The Chessmaster who fails at Xanatos Speed Chess), but is misused for "a character was surprised by something" or for "a plot twist surprised the audience". The source of the misuse is likely the vague trope name, meaning that this trope might need a rename.
  • Discredited Meme is only supposed to allow In Universe and creator-acknowledged examples, but it still gets frequent out-of-universe and non-creator acknowledged use, particularly from people complaining about memes they don't like. The fact that it's classified as YMMV is probably a factor — creator-acknowledged information generally falls under Trivia and not YMMV. A similar situation happened with Creator's Apathy, which was moved from YMMV to Trivia when Word of God acknowledgement became a requirement. One option would be to split creator-acknowledged examples into a Trivia item with Creator's Apathy-style Word of God requirements (possibly also allowing Word of Saint Paul acknowledgements) and in-universe examples into a separate In-Universe Examples Only trope, and turning Discredited Meme into a disambiguation page between the two.
  • Discredited Trope: Despite its name, it often lists tropes that are still played straight, along with various other forms of misuse. It is a YMMV item, which makes it problematic as an index.
  • Disgust Tropes: Meant to be tropes about characters being disgusted, but it lists tropes that are about things viewers would find disgusting (but not necessarily characters), such as Nature Tinkling and The Pig-Pen.
  • Distaff Counterpart is currently defined as a character receiving a genderbent counterpart in a spinoff work. Many of these examples coexist with their source character in the same work, and the "spinoff" requirement may be unnecessarily narrow. Additionally, the merging of this trope with Spear Counterpart leaves the title misleading, as distaff specifically means female — using the redirect messes up alphabetization.
  • Don't Explain the Joke: Supposed to be In-Universe Examples Only, but is constantly used as a Pothole Magnet for tropers explaining a joke.
  • False Reassurance: The IP thread on the topic makes clear that people have different ideas of what the trope is about. The name is misleading, in that any old false reassurance is not necessarily an example. Per the description, the trope is "deceiving people by telling the truth in a way they won't believe," which is likely redundant with Sarcastic Confession.
  • Flanderization: Often confused for Temporarily Exaggerated Trait (when a character is only exaggerated for one scene/episode/chapter/etc) or Character Exaggeration (where a character is exaggerated in an adaptation or a fanfic).
  • Flat "What": Despite it being a dialogue trope, it's often used as a Pothole Magnet to describe the troper's own thoughts. It also has a tendency to be potholed to any instance of a character saying "What?" in response to something weird, even though it's supposed to be for someone saying "What." in a flat tone of voice as a statement of disbelief rather than a question of confusion.
  • Four Is Death: The trope is specifically for significant instances of Four being overtly associated with death or ghosts in Eastern media, but gets used for any instance of the number four being associated with various and likely coincidental negative things, or former examples of what is now known as Elite Four (and in fact that trope was originally launched to deal with a lot of this trope's former misuse, though that was not enough). Some instances of misuse here.
  • Four-Man Band: Attracts ZCEs, and uses a cumbersome table format for examples.
  • Freudian Trio: Most examples are ZCE that just list what character fits which type without saying how. Pages also have incredibly weird formatting, presumably to get around the "no third bullets" rule.
  • Friend to All Living Things: Often used as Animal Lover, which is a character who loves animals, but the trope is meant to be when animals love the character.
  • Gainax Ending: Despite being about endings that make no sense even within the context of the work, many examples are just odd Twist Endings that still make sense within the context of the work.
  • Gang of Critters: Attracts ZCE's. In addition, it has an anemic description.
  • Gender-Blender Name: An IP discussion points out that the trope was often used as someone having a name common to the opposite gender. In reality, the trope was supposed to be for gender-neutral names.
  • Gender Flip: Frequently used throughout the site used as "Rule 63 But Official", but part of the description notes the original character and their flipped adaptational counterpart need to be visually distinct in appearance if not entirely. Most examples list works that just flip the gender and change the name with changes to appearance minuscule beyond Tertiary Sexual Characteristics, and multiple examples list characters that are not the same character after a supposed flip, but rather Distaff and Spear Counterparts. Wick Check here. note 
  • Generic Doomsday Villain is for villains with no clear motivations or characterization and is only defined by the threat they pose. However, it often gets misused for one-dimensional or simplistic villains or used to complain about villains people found lame or boring, even if said villains have clear motivations or characterization.
  • Genre-Busting: The striking majority of examples are works made of several different but easily distinguishable genres, which would put them under Genre Mashup instead. There are also a few ZCEs littering the page, of the "extremely vague" type. Previous discussions here and here.
    The TRS thread for Neoclassical Punk Zydeco Rockabilly decided to migrate its examples to either Genre Mashup or Genre-Busting, but it clocked out during the cleanup phase.
  • Good People Have Good Sex: It is supposed to be about how good characters have good sex compared to the bad guys having bad sex, but often only talks about the good characters without comparing them to how the work portrays villains, or sometimes even skip the "good people" part and talk about characters who have good sex regardless of their morality. Wick check here.
  • The Great Politics Mess-Up: The image, the quote, and most of the description refer to the fall of the Cold War, with most tropers using the trope name as a euphemism for the Cold War. Originally, the Trope Breaker page referenced the trope as though it's the term TV Tropes uses for the end of the Cold War (the section has since been renamed to "Tropes affected by the end of the Cold War"). However, the trope is meant to represent any outdated political assumptions, not just regarding the end of the Cold War. Even in its broader state, it may possibly be The Same, but More to Dewey Defeats Truman. Discussion here.
  • He-Man Woman Hater: The title suggests this to be about an extremely macho male who hates women, as a counterpart to the Effeminate Misogynistic Guy, but many examples and even the description just reference misogyny in general, which may not be a trope at all.
  • Hollywood Nerd: This trope is when a nerd in media is superficially portrayed, such that we the audience are told and shown by how the other characters treat this character that they are a Nerd, but there isn't really anything about what the character engages in or their behavior that indicates they are a nerd. However, a lot of the examples on the page are either conflating this trope with Hollywood Homely or are not even about the in-universe treatment of the character, instead being some iteration of "this character has (what I the troper am characterizing as) a nerdy interest but they're also really attractive." Part of this may be on the description (which could afford to be more explicit on the whole in-universe aspect) but also there's just a lot of misuse.
  • Humor Dissonance: The item is intended for in-universe jokes that the characters find funny but the audience doesn't, but it's often used for writers deliberately setting up an unfunny joke that the characters (or certain characters) find funny, or when a character tells jokes that other characters find unfunny, both of which are objective. A good chunk of examples are on Recap pages, and even the YMMV wicks have several in-universe instances listed rather than audience reactions.
  • Iconic Logo: Many examples on the page are ZCE, partially because it's difficult to determine what makes a logo "iconic." Not only is it a subjective matter, but some icons may not be recognized worldwide.
  • I Knew It!: On this wiki, this Trivia item has a specific meaning: a fan theory or fan speculation being proven correct. However, the phrase has a broader meaning outside of this wiki. As a result, it gets misused for In-Universe examples where someone reacts to being correct about something under any circumstance or someone literally saying the phrase "I knew it" or any variation of it. I Knew It! has also been linked to whenever the words would come up, which is one reason No New Stock Phrases was implemented. A similar issue with "Too Soon" (which was frequently confused with Dude, Not Funny!, due to that phrase's usual meaning) caused it to be renamed to Distanced from Current Events.
    In addition, it should probably be YMMV instead of Trivia since it involves fan theories; Jossed was moved from Trivia to YMMV because it involves debunked fan theories, while I Knew It! is essentially the inverse of Jossed because it involves confirmed fan theories.
  • Impossibly Cool Clothes: As brought up in this Image Pickin' thread, many outfits listed are not actually impossible.
  • It's a Small World, After All: The description makes it clear that this is about works with space travel treating entire planets as equivalents to small towns, but the examples even just on the page are full of misuse for the commonly-known "people with preexisting connections meet up again by coincidence" meaning of the phrase.
  • It Was His Sled is supposed to be about Twist Endings becoming widely known to the public, but it gets used for any twist that's known to the public, not just endings.
  • Killed Off for Real is supposed to be limited to settings where resurrection is normal, and then it represents a death that does not come back for whatever reason. Of course, since the name Killed Off for Real means something else entirely, this trope gets mistaken for other death tropes, basically any situation where a character dies (which is Character Death, a No On-Page Examples trope). Being defined in the negative also makes examples difficult to explain or verify.
  • Lady Mondegreen: Supposed to be an Audience Reaction where a non-character phrase is misheard/read as a character (such as "laid him on the green" as "Lady Mondegreen" or "gladly the cross I'd bear" as "Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear"), but instead is used for misheard lines in general, and it also has a lot of in-universe examples. Note that the supertrope Mondegreen has been in-universe examples only instead of YMMV for a while.
  • Landslide Election: Persistent shoehorning on Real Life page. Needs a more hard minimum threshold for what counts as a “landslide”.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: The trope is for when a spoiler for a serial work appears front-and-cover in advertising or other official sources, but it's often confused for It Was His Sled or instances of sequels having story aspects that reveal a spoiler from the original work.
  • Lip Lock: The trope is about dialogue being changed in the dub to match the lip movement of the original version, but it's often used for cases where the characters' lips movements don't synchronize with their dialogue. It's also used for complaining.
  • Memetic Mutation: Oftentimes, this attracts popular quotes with no explanation as to how they're memes.
  • Me's a Crowd: The trope is about making clones in order to do tasks, but due to the vague name, several examples simply list instances of clones without specifying if they were made for a purpose. There may be confusion with Self-Duplication for this reason.
  • Mind Screw: Is supposed to be for works that are deliberately confusing due to extensive Rule of Symbolism and unexplained elements, but is used for any work that is confusing, or just confusing things in general. It is a Pothole Magnet.
  • Murderers Are Rapists: The page is medium-specific in a way that isn't a requirement, off-page wicks attract ZCE, and the name is very similar to our "All X are Y" tropes. Listed on Definition-Only Pages due to Fast Eddie removing examples around a decade ago.
  • Narm's intended meaning is "dramatic moment ruined by factors that prevent it from being taken seriously", but it frequently gets misapplied anywhere as "unintentional Funny Moment", regardless of whether the moment in question was dramatic or not.
  • Nintendo Hard is persistently shoehorned and lacks a clear cutoff; it sometimes attracts complaining as well. It is likely also YMMV due to involving difficulty.
  • No Straight Examples, Please: Features some questionable entries, such as pages that should go on Definition-Only Pages or No On-Page Examples instead, as well as at least one entry that says that no examples are forbidden. At least one mod previously suggested waiting for the Definition-Only Pages TRS thread to conclude before starting one for No Straight Examples, Please; the thread in question has since concluded.
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer: Trope is In-Universe Examples Only but is attracting the same type of misuse as a Pothole Magnet that got I Am Not Making This Up sent to the Permanent Red Link Club.
  • Not the Intended Use: Desperately needs a description re-haul, as the description is exclusively about videogames and tabletop games while the trope is widely used for... well, things that were not used in the intended way, in any media.
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping: The trope is for when actors make a slip when portraying a character with an accent foreign to their own, but a lot of examples are in-universe cases of a character doing this while faking an accent for different reasons (and there is an entire section for it on the trope page).
  • Panty Shot: A lot of the examples aren't clear that it's played for fanservice, and there might be lewdness issues. Notably, some list examples from kids.
  • Prickly Porcupine: While the description clarifies that porcupines (or any spiny mammal) are depicted in a stereotypical manner, it has examples of "porcupines in fiction." There's a notice added, but this trope could use a cleanup.
  • Pronoun Trouble: Despite the trope being clear-cut and objective, multiple examples talk about fans having trouble figuring out what pronouns to use for a character. If we don't already have a YMMV trope for this, it's good splitting fodder.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: This trope is supposed to be about a specific kind of spelling error in which the spelling of the word is correct, but the word itself is wrong. However, it’s frequently used to describe any sort of grammatical error, no matter if the typo is a correctly-spelled word or not.
  • The Scream: The trope is about how an exaggerated scream is used for (usually) comedic effect. However, most examples detail just about any situation in which a character yells, no matter how mundane it is. The trope is also incorrectly used to reference Edvard Munch's eponymous painting.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: Supposed to be a subjective trope about video gamers playing under restrictions that they create themselves, but a lot of examples are In-Universe cases of people doing voluntary challenges outside of video games, which is an objective trope.
  • Set Swords to "Stun": The description is very clearly about a video game mechanics trope, but the examples are about non-lethal lethal weapons in all media and contexts.
  • Seven Deadly Sins: Some examples assign sins to characters when the narrative does not intend said characters to represent the sins. This sometimes leads to shoehorning as tropers will try to fit all the sins to a group of characters, even if this means twisting what those sins actually represent. This may need to be limited by only including examples that acknowledge the sins in-universe, while "assigning sins to characters" could go elsewhere like a Just For Fun page.
  • Sliding Scale of Villain Threat: Non-standard page design that, in lieu of the standard Example folders, dumps character names under sub-bullets of the list entries. As a result, nearly every on-page example is a ZCE.
  • Strawman Has a Point: It's supposed to be "a Straw Character makes a better argument than the author intended", but most of the examples are more suited for Informed Wrongness because they don't really feature a true Straw Character (or even someone holding the Strawman Ball), and/or because they defend the character's actions/beliefs regardless of what arguments were actually made in the work. The video has both of these issues — Oscar and Lenny aren't straw characters, and they don't even try to make an argument.
  • Stock Parody Jokes: There should be some criteria for what constitutes a "parody joke," as many of these appear to be stock fandom jokes (which belongs in Memetic Mutation) or just straight-up complaints disguised as "jokes." Examples also tend to lack context, simply naming the joke without any other context as to how and why it's used in parodies, which makes cleanup quite difficult. On a less important note, there's also an issue with redundancy — any show with a bald character attracts cancer jokes, any show with anthro animals attracts furry jokes, etc. Discussion has come up frequently at the [[cleanup thread.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: Using text to explain how two songs are similar is a skill apparently not possessed by most tropers, leading to massive violation of Weblinks Are Not Examples. A lot of times it is also used for deliberately similar songs, which goes under Musical Pastiche.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: The definition is about works that are poorly received due to being excessively saccharine, which either distracts from the rest of the show or reveals that it has nothing actually going for it other than being cute. It's often used for anything that's cute, with many examples treating it as a positive or neutral thing despite being intended as a negative reaction (positive usage would probably fit better on Sweet Dreams Fuel). There are also lots of In-Universe examples about a Show Within a Show. Wick check here)
  • Teens Are Short: The trope is about works in which teenage characters are consistently depicted as being shorter than adults despite this not always being the case in real life. It's a visual shorthand to group characters by age. Instead, it's often misused to state that a teenager character is incidentally short, or to compare the shortest teenager to other characters who aren't short (the definition of 'short' mostly depends on the troper). (Wick Check here)
  • Title Confusion: About audiences confused over the meaning of the title, which also means that it should be reclassified as a YMMV item. Instead, it is misused for confusion as to what the title is.
  • Title, Please!: Seems to attract zero-context examples, and since all aversions are covered by Episode Title Card, it's questionable whether we need both tropes.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Still constantly misused by tropers failing to realize that the trope title is supposed to be literal, using it in places where other Stupidity Tropes such as The Ditz or Idiot Ball would be more accurate, rather than a character's stupidity putting them in mortal danger.
  • Unobtainium. It's right in the name: an important part of this trope is that we can't obtain this material. That's rarer than you'd think in fiction, and indeed it's getting misused for any material that's rare and valuable. Given that "unobtainable" materials end up being eventually "obtained" in most fiction, it's not clear that this is a sufficiently distinct trope from Applied Phlebotinum and its family.
  • Uncanny Valley: This specifically refers to an unsettling grey area between realism and stylization. However, it is often misused to refer to any animation that looks creepy or unsettling, even if it's not due to looking too realistic.
  • The Un-Favourite: Refers to children whose parents neglect them as a result of Parental Favoritism directed toward their sibling(s), but it's sometimes applied to characters who are ignored or neglected in other ways.
  • The Un-Reveal: Is supposed to be "The Reveal, Subverted" but instead is often used for examples where something is unknown yet no reveal is set up for the audience at all.
  • Unstoppable Force Meets Immovable Object: "A Stock Phrase for describing any conflict between particularly strong or particularly stubborn individuals". The article is explicitly about the phrase itself but it is frequently used to describe conflicts directly without anyone making the comparison in-universe.
  • Violation of Common Sense: This is a video game trope wherein the game gives you the option to do something plainly foolish, then rewards you for doing it. Many of the examples, even on the page, are just "this works in a way I personally think is nonsensical." Many other examples are just dumb things the game lets you do.
  • Walking Swimsuit Scene: Walking Shirtless Scene was brought to Trope Talk (link to thread) because it's often confused with Shirtless Scene, and it was pointed out that Walking Swimsuit Scene has roughly the same problem.
  • What an Idiot!: Suffers frequent complaining and misuse, where users interpret actions made in a bad state of mind, without all information, etc., to be idiocy; the worst of these "examples" is where the troper expects the character to go against their established personality in order to not go against their established personality.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Attracts ZCEs and weblink only examples like the plague. A lack of firm standards over what qualifies and how said examples should be described to make it clear that people think drugs are involved is probably not helping
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Is supposed to be specifically for minor characters or plot points that disappear without explanation, but it sees use for all types.
  • Why Fandom Can't Have Nice Things: This refers to when creators who frequently interact(ed) with fans sever ties with the fanbase after fans misbehave. However, as mentioned on its Square Peg, Round Trope entry, it's frequently misused in a way that's broader than the actual definition — it's often used to refer to any instance of creators taking things away from misbehaving fans, such as features in a video game. Expanding the definition to include misuse would probably lead to overlap with They Changed It, Now It Sucks! — for example, the entire TV Tropes subpage is misuse, and contains examples similar to what a They Changed It, Now It Sucks! subpage would have, with the main difference being that it doesn't focus on reactions to the changes, nor does it require there to be reactions to the changes. While the misuse is more in line with the definition of the supertrope, Why We Can't Have Nice Things, the fandom subtrope's definition is more strict than that.
    Square Peg, Round Trope page: "Why Fandom Can't Have Nice Things is a bit more specific than its title would imply; it's meant to be for instances in which creators interact closely with fans of a work, only to cut down on that interaction after having unpleasant encounters with fans (or haters), disappointing the nicer fans. It has often been used for cases in which the consequence of bad behavior is something other than less fan-creator dialogue, such as cancellation of a work, the retirement of a creator, or removal of a feature in a video game (some of which are listed as potential further consequences in the description)."
  • Widget Series: Supposed to be about works that come across as unusual because of cultural differences, but a lot of examples don't explain the latter part. May need a rename.
  • Wild Magic: On This Very Wiki, "Wild Magic" refers to magic being "alive" (that is, magic that isn't easily controlled). However, in most other places, the term "Wild Magic" refers to magic that produces random effects (which we have under "Entropy and Chaos Magic"). Predictably, this leads to a lot of examples that use the more "common" definition than the one used on the site.
  • Woolseyism: The definition deals with changes made to a translation done specifically for pragmatic reasons that end up well-received. Examples frequently treat it as if it was straight-up Superlative Dubbing. Occasionally, it's misused to complain about translations being worse than the original, despite the proper definition having to do with good translations.
  • X Meets Y: Used as a Pothole Magnet, usually for Crossovers, despite already being a Just For Fun page about works combining the main elements of two other works. The main page is also loaded with ZCEs and Fan Myopia.

    Not Thriving 
  • Adminisphere: Created before 2010, but only has 27 wicks, only 9 of which link to work or character pages, and 212 inbounds as of 28th of July.
  • Alan Fridge: Only 13 wicks since 2008, and only two of those are listed on a work's trope list.
  • Charlie Chaplin Shout-Out: Only has 32 wicks as of April 30, 2020, and may work better as a Referenced by... subpage (ReferencedBy.Charlie Chaplin) than a trope — "Shout-Out to Shakespeare" was previously moved to ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare and "Good Grief, Another Peanuts Shout-Out!" was moved to ReferencedBy.Peanuts.
  • Common Hollywood Sex Traits: Only has 24 wicks, many of which are aversions. All the on-page examples are general, and the amount of detail in said examples may violate the Content Policy. It's unknown if this is tropeworthy or could at least be remade into an index or supertrope, as it has heavy overlap with Idealized Sex. Discussion.
  • Common Newspaper Words: No on-page examples (barring general examples), and not thriving. May also count as a meaningless stock phrase.
  • Crow's Nest Cartography: Only has 18 wicks as of 11 August 2021. This is possibly due to the name not being indicative of the trope (which is meant to be about video-game maps being gradually revealed the higher you go), and would probably be thriving more under the more commonly used term "Ubisoft Towers".
  • Curtain Fic: The page has been here since 2009 but only has 27 wicks. Also, while "curtain fic" is certainly a known term within the fanfic community, it's likely examples have been left untroped because a casual reader had no clue the term existed. Might also benefit from being expanded to include chapters of a work instead of the entire work, and for the description to put more emphasis that the activity doesn't have to be shopping.
  • Dolly: Only 7 wicks since 2008. The only example on a work page is zero-context.
  • Dramatic Half-Hour and Dramatic Hour Long: Both have been around since 2008, but only have 23 and 31 wicks, respectively. The latter doesn't even have any on-page examples!
  • Faux Interracial Relationship: Being a Dead Horse Trope, it currently has a very short description, has only 13 examples, and only 14 wicks. A previous TRS thread for this trope was started in 2018, but was closed without consensus.
  • Feel Good: Only 6 wicks since 2007. Most of the examples on the page are zero-context/general.
  • Front 13, Back 9: Created in 2010, but currently only has 18 wicks. On top of that, the description also reads like it's a Useful Note instead.
  • Homogenous Multinational Ad Campaign: Only has 9 wicks since 2009. Part of the issue might be the fact that it's an advertising trope, making crosswicking more difficult since many campaigns and companies don't have pages here, but the idea of the trope (creating a product that is vague enough to appeal to all international markets) doesn't even need to be advertising-specific.
  • Hotlinked Image Switch: Had only six wicks prior to being added here (October 22, 2020), one of which is on Pages Needing Wicks and none of which are on work pages. On-page examples are primarily focused on real life examples with little to no focus on fiction.
  • Live-Action Cartoon: Only 23 wicks since 2016, and it attracts zero-context examples even on the page.
  • Long John Shout-Out: Has a low amount of wicks (11 before being added to this page on October 22, 2020), pointing toward it being redundant with ReferencedBy.Treasure Island.
  • Loud Last Name: Has 26 wicks since 2011 (6 of which are indexes). Description is barebones and virtually all the on-page examples are zero-context.
  • Made of Shiny: Has only 4 examples (none are valid) and has 22 wicks (only 11 are work wicks). Practically wasn't worked on since it was made in 2010.
  • Miniatures Conversions: Listed as a Definition Only Page, but it has been pointed out that there may be In-Universe examples.
  • No Serious Business In Showbusiness: Some kind of YMMV that might be a specific version of Angst Aversion. Has 5 wicks and only 1 "straight" example on the page.
  • One I Prepared Earlier: Has only 27 wicks, is almost exclusively the domain of cooking shows, and is less a narrative convention than a necessity of the format. The entire concept could be adequately explained in one sentence on the Cooking Show page.
  • Only in America: Only 28 wicks since 2008 and no examples on the page. The "trope" seems to just be describing a real-life media slant.
  • Overly Long Airplane Banner Gag: Only 11 wicks since 2011; seems to be describing a highly specific type of gag that may be Too Rare to Trope on its own.
  • Perp and Weapon: Has existed since 2008, but only has 7 non-Administrivia wicks. Only three of the examples on the trope page have context, and two out of three of the wicks on work pages are zero-context.
  • Phrase Salad Lyrics: Doesn't have very many wicks, and a previous thread was in favor of merging it with Word Salad Lyrics due to the definition being "The Same, but Less" to Word Salad Lyrics (which is already covered by Downplayed Trope), but the thread clocked out due to inactivity. While the description claims that such songs are more common than songs with Word Salad Lyrics, in addition to claiming that they might be as common as songs with a clear meaning, the fact that the Phrase Salad Lyrics only has a two-digit wick count while the Word Salad Lyrics has a four-digit wick count casts doubt on that claim.
  • Plot Pants: Only 11 wicks since 2008, which could be because the description isn't super clear on what it's supposed to be about (which appears to be "characters briefly break from their Limited Wardrobe"). It might be a dupe of another trope, too...
  • Plot Pivot Point: Has few examples both on the page itself and in wicks. It's also not clear what its purpose is, since "What if X happened instead of Y at plot point Z?" is too speculative to be an objective trope, and even as a YMMV concept it could potentially be too broad depending on how much is left up to speculation. Could maybe be reworked into "someone in-universe points out seemingly-minor event upon which the entire plot rests", provided there are even enough examples of that. The TRS thread that cut Plot Preassumption discovered that both were created by the same person at close to the same time, without YKTTW.
  • Premature Aggravation: Has only had 13 wicks since 2008. Most of the examples on the page don't seem to fit the description of "person gets aggravated after imagining a slight".
  • Rationalizing the Overkill: Launched in 2014, but only has 37 wicks and 17 examples on the page.
  • Reveille: Only has 14 wicks since 2014. The name for the bugle call may be too obscure, especially when compared to the healthier Taps article.
  • Rule of Animation Conservation: 22 wicks, and no example section. Made 10 years ago, with only 7 edits. It's not about animating only specific things, like Conspicuously Light Patch has specific colored things, but instead is about the specific use of the medium of animation for works in general. Could do with a better name?
  • Sanderson's First Law: Despite being made in 2013, it only has 18 wicks and no on-page examples. The trope describes other "laws" (despite the title implying that it only covers one), seems to overlap with The Laws of Magic and Functional Magic, and reads more like a work page than an actual trope.
  • Second Banana: Created in 2008, but only has 9 on-page examples, 19 wicks, and 25 edits. Examples for real people (such as acting credits) could probably be moved to And Starring, and sidekicks for fictional characters could probably be moved to Sidekick or a subtrope thereof.
  • Sent Off to Work for Relatives: Was launched in 2011 but is still struggling to gather wicks even after crosswicking. It has only 15 now. Some have suggested it might be due to the name being too narrow. Discussed here.
  • Sequelphobic: Has only 21 wicks and only 4 that are actually used on YMMV work pages (all of which are ZCEs or would fit better with It's the Same, So It Sucks) despite being launched in 2008. Several examples feel similar to Contested Sequel.
  • Series Fic: Normally seventy wicks would be fine, but only thirty of them are from fanfic pages; series fics are also very common, and many of them have pages here, so this not having more is very concerning.
  • Spoiler Hound: Someone intentionally spoiling a work is an Audience Reaction, not an objective trope (a clearer objective equivalent exists at Spiteful Spoiler), yet this isn't YMMV. In addition, it lacks examples and would probably work better as a Definition-Only Page due to how broad the concept is.
  • Starting From: Only four wicks not counting this page, consisting of two trope indexes and two "needs help" indexes. Yet another undercooked advertising trope, this one consisting of mostly general examples and having undertones of complaining about pricing.
  • Temporary Scrappy: 2008-era page with only 14 wicks. "This trope is based on the idea that a Scrappy is recognizable enough that creating a Scrappy on purpose, for purposes of parody, is a trope in itself."
  • Textplosion: Only 20 examples and 11 wicks despite existing since 2009. The name is pretty opaque, and the description is pretty complainy.
  • Thud and Blunder: Only 7 examples and 5 wicks. Named for a 1978 essay critiquing cliched fantasy writing, this seems to be defined as "Rated M for Manly Sword & Sorcery, but bad."
  • True Art Is Ancient: Examples removed years ago without wiki consensus.
  • True Art Is Boring: Examples removed years ago without wiki consensus.
  • Video Game Weapon Stats: Despite being made in 2011, the page only has 15 off-page wicks, and all of the subpages were moved into JFF because they weren't really tropes.
  • We Are the Experts: Has existed since 2007, but has only 4 wicks, and most of the examples on the page are zero-context.

    Poor title 
  • Artificial Stupidity: Trope is supposed to be "AI is able to make choices and decisions but it does so badly", however many examples involve "AI" that is just following pre-determined orders, or things that they can't do because it was never programmed to be able to in the first place. Possible rename.
  • Bastard Boyfriend and Bastard Girlfriend: Supposed to be examples where the abuse is played for sexiness, but is often used to refer to any abusive boyfriend and girlfriend.
  • Better Than Canon: The trope refers to fan works being seen as better. However, possibly due to the name, it is sometimes misused for officially licensed, but non-canonical works.
  • Born in an Elevator is broader than its title suggests — it covers any instance of a baby being born on the way to the hospital. There are just as many examples, if not more, that have the baby born in a vehicle. It only has 63 wicks, and this specific name may be preventing broader use.
  • Caught in the Rain: The title doesn't hint in any way that it has to lead to kissing or sex. However, Romantic Rain is supposed to be the variant that leads to kissing or sex. Compare sister tropes Snowed-In (which doesn't lead to kissing or sex) and Snow Means Love (which does).
  • City in a Bottle: Two threads have had difficulty picking images because this trope has a misleading name — it can be confused for literal cities in bottles.
  • Death by Sex: A horror trope where sex foreshadows death, but the title suggests death caused by sex, which is Out with a Bang.
  • Destroy the Evidence: Did you think this trope was actually about destroying the evidence? Nope! This is (meant to be) specifically and only about evidence that is (1) about someone else, and (2) could be given to the authorities specifically. Needless to say the page has examples (and an image) relating to destroying evidence in general.
  • Double Aesop: It's been shown that the name can make one think of two morals being delivered instead of just one, but the trope is actually about two people learning the same aesop.
  • Dropped Glasses: The trope is narrower than the name suggests, and examples are a mixture of dropped glasses being stepped on and dropped glasses causing problems. On Image Pickin', it was suggested by a mod that this be taken to TRS due to the trope's clarity issues.
  • Einstein Sue: See here. "Character with no expertise knows the solution when experts don't" is a valid trope, but because of the "Sue" in its name, the name seems too negative, and not every character who has this happen to them is automatically a Mary Sue.
  • Entertainingly Wrong: The title suggests something broader than the trope, which refers to characters drawing the wrong conclusion from correct but incomplete information. Its redirect, Wrong for the Right Reasons, is more explicit about this, and may actually be a better title.
  • Female Flatfoot and Snarky Guy: A "flatfoot" is generally either somebody that has trouble walking due to a medical condition, or somebody who is too surprised to react. A since-pulled image does match this definition, too. Usage of the word "flatfoot" to refer to police officers, as with the trope name, appears to be archaic and thus is probably unknown in modern day, resulting in a confusing trope name — the trope has nothing to do with either of the word's modern-day definitions.
  • Fiery Salamander applies to any reptile or amphibian with fire powers, not salamanders exclusively. But the trope name appears to imply otherwise, making the trope sound narrower than it actually is.
  • Harmful to Minors: This trope is about children watching something that's bad for them, but due to the vague title, it's frequently used for bad things happening directly to children.
  • Henchmen Race for some reason requires the bad guy to have personally created this race. That's not indicative from the title, and probably attracts "wrong" examples.
  • Hype Backlash: Refers to when a work is so heavily praised it can't possibly meet the fans' expectations. However, given that that hype can be prerelease publicity and anticipation, it is sometimes misused for when works are hyped up prior to release and fail to meet expectations when they come out. Hype Aversion, which is about when people avoid seeing the work for similar reasons, is also misused in this context.
  • I Love Nuclear Power is not about loving nuclear power. It is about getting beneficial mutations and/or superpowers from nuclear material. All of its sister tropes are instead named "X Can Do Anything." A former page image depicted a scientist hugging a nuclear tower instead of the actual trope.
  • The Imp: The title is too broad for the concept it's meant to cover: a vice-ridden, non-threatening creature often tied to a more powerful character. Unsurprisingly, it attracts examples of all imp-like creatures.
  • "Join the Army," They Said: The trope is about military recruitment adverts, but the dialogue-based title makes it sound like Recruiters Always Lie.
  • Lady in Red: The title merely means female characters in red, never mentioning that the character has to be "sexual"
  • Logic Bomb: This trope is for when a computer blows up because it cannot process certain information, but due to the vague title, it's used for any kind of paradox regardless of who interprets it or what happens as a result.
  • Mailer Daemon: The title is a pun on a fairly obscure part of the Internet email protocolnote , and readers cannot be expected to know that. Additionally, the server programs that route email are usually called "mail transfer agents" (MTAs for short), or just "mail servers"; searching for "mailer daemon" in the software repositories for at least one Linux distribution (in this case, Manjaro Linux) provides no results, compared to how searching for just "daemon"note  produces a very long list of results.
  • Nosebleed: Name is too generalized for a trope referring to nosebleeds resulting from sexual arousal.
  • Oddly Small Organization: the trope is an organization that we are informed is pretty large, but we are shown only a small team. It gets misused for any organization that is small.
  • On One Condition: The trope describes plots where a dying person's inheritance is only granted to a character if they meet a certain condition. However, several wicks use it in the context of other conditional agreements, due to the title sounding more like a Stock Phrase. The broader idea of an agreement reliant on a certain condition may be tropeworthy, while this more specific idea about wills should get a more specific title.
  • Paint It Black: Does not describe what the trope is, i.e. a magical Evil Makeover. In addition, the Trope Namer ("Paint It Black" by The Rolling Stones) has nothing to do with the trope, which even the description points out.
  • Perverse Sexual Lust: Title is a reference to an obscure webcomic and is incredibly vague about it refers to. There are far more widely used terms for attraction to a fictional character. A previous thread resolved to turn it into an IUEO trope about in-universe characters lusting over fictional creations.
  • The Punishment: The page describes a very specific concept - a supernatural punishment that also gives the victim superpowers - but the name is as vague as can be. The description also weirdly describes the victim as "the Punishment", with capitalization.
  • River of Insanity: The trope isn't actually about rivers but about any trip, and attracts misuse based on that. Its redirect Doomed Expedition covers the content better.
  • Robosexual: Refers to robots having sex lives, but used to refer to humans attracted—romantically and/or sexually—to robots, which stems from offsite usage of the term. Relevant discussion, including a partial wick check.
  • School for Scheming: The trope name reads like it's literally about schools for scheming. It's actually about schools that are coverups schemes. In fact, the trope name reads so ambiguously that the description is required to point out that it's not about any Academies Of Evil.
  • The Scream: This trope is specifically about massively zoomed-out shots of screams. Of course, due to the trope's very ambiguous name, a good amount of the examples are "somebody screams in this work."
  • Self-Abuse: Nothing in the title indicates that it's a euphemism for masturbation as opposed to something like Self-Harm. It doesn't seem to be heavily misused, but it may be underused, with only 52 wicks since 2011.
  • Shameless Fanservice Girl: While the Trope is intended to be about rejecting the nudity taboo (note that No Nudity Taboo is an index and not a trope), its title has led people to believe that it's about characters who embrace their sexuality, which is covered by several Fanservice Tropes.
  • Sim Sim Salabim: This is a Hollywood Atlas trope which, aside from suffering from Trope Namer Syndrome (after Jonny Quest), has a name associated with a German schoolyard rhyme about Arabia. The trope itself is actually about stereotypical depictions of India. Compare how Spaghetti and Gondolas was renamed from "Olive Garden" for a more indicative, universal title that would attract wicks.
  • Sleep Cute is supposed to mean a shot of two characters innocently sleeping together in close proximity, more often than not indicating a Ship Tease. However, due to the misleading name (which in itself is a snowclone of Meet Cute), it sometimes gets misused as "character looks cute when sleeping", which is defined by a Beautiful Dreamer.
  • Some Kind of Force Field: Title doesn't explain which aspect of a Force Field is involved, and is supposedly named after a stock phrase.
  • Stock Shoujo Bullying Tactics: Despite its name, the trope is not actually specific to Japanese works — going by the on-page examples, its usage in anime and manga isn't even exclusive to Shoujo. Previous TRS thread clocked out without any action taken.
  • T-Word Euphemism: Doubly outdated title, referring to the deprecated practice of "Trope" as a title placeholder, and confusing when there are actual derogatory words that begin with "t". In addition, the preexisting term "minced oath" already covers this concept, among other euphemistic ways of replacing or referring to actual profanity.
  • The Tonsillitis Episode: Despite its name, the trope also covers wisdom tooth removal under the justification that it's an Evolving Trope. These two concepts might be different enough to split off, or similar enough to be merged into a general "Short-Term Medical Procedure Episode" trope.
  • To the Batnoun!: Misleading title leads it to be confused with Hyperaffixation; TRS thread stalled out. Also, it seems to just be a Stock Phrase; perhaps it could be labeled as a Stock Shout-Out but it's not clear if it's notable enough to be its own trope.
  • Trojan Gauntlet: On Image Pickin', it was discovered that the page has a Creator Provincialism issue — the "Trojan" in the name refers to a brand of condom that's unknown outside the US, so the name ends up sounding like a reference to the Trojan Horse. The actual trope is "Embarrassing Condom Purchase."
  • "Uh-Oh" Eyes: Supposed to be a subindex, but there's no indication of that in the title; as a result, many have treated it as a trope.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Previously renamed from Designated Protagonist Syndrome because of complaining, but continues to attract complaining. In the new name's case, it's often used to complain about protagonists thought to be boring, when it's actually about protagonists who are intentionally less defined for the sake of making supporting characters stand out more. Its summary on the Audience Reactions index gave the wrong definition at one point, and the fact that it's indexed under Audience Reactions to begin with, rather than YMMV.Home Page, has also been questioned, since the character is objectively in the work, and the subjective part is whether the character does in fact help supporting characters stand out more.
    A previous TRS thread was made, with a wick check demonstrating misuse to mean boring protagonists. The thread clocked out without any changes being made, despite support in favor of cleaning up complaining, but there was support for renaming; Enabling Protagonist was one suggestion given as a replacement name.
  • Wild Goose Chase is supposed to be the highly specific trope that somebody discovers a tracker device (e.g. on his car) and attaches it to a random other car or object, thus making the signal useless in a funny way. Predictably, this gets misused for, well, what the phrase "Wild Goose Chase" normally means, or characters saying the phrase. The phrase should arguably be a redirect to Snipe Hunt, and this trope should be renamed. It appears to be not thriving either, which may be caused by the name not matching the content.
  • You Bastard! refers to when the work calls out the audience for enjoying something. However, due to the vague title, it is sometimes misused for when a character calls another character a bastard, which fits more under You Monster!.

    Actually subjective/should be In-Universe Examples Only 
  • Acclaimed Flop: It's about the critical reception of a work, which means it should be YMMV, not Trivia. Its inverse, Critic-Proof, is YMMV.
  • Album Filler: Brought up in the gushing cleanup thread as a trope that reads like (and should probably be) YMMV, as the concept concerns a subjective topic (songs that are seen as having little purpose other than filler on albums).
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: The concept is based on the presence of things in fiction (such as the trope namer) that audiences think are fictional, but actually aren't. Audience assumptions are classified as YMMV, but Aluminum Christmas Trees isn't classified as YMMV, despite this factor, especially since the assumption that examples are fictional may not be the reason for their presence. In particular, the trope namer is thought to be fictional by modern viewers, not contemporary viewers. In addition, Eskimos Aren't Real already covers in-universe examples of characters thinking something real is actually fictional. Relevant Trope Talk discussion.
  • Anti-Climax: Claiming that the end of a story is anticlimatic is pretty subjective. What appears to be anticlimatic to one person may not be the case for someone else.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: A line being attributed to a work when it was never actually said in it is something done by the audience, so it should be YMMV instead of Trivia.
  • Broken Aesop: "The work's intended moral is contradicted by what it shows" might be subjective. As of August 19, 2021, there are already 205 wicks on YMMV subpages.
  • Brutal Bonus Level: Common sister trope of That One Level (which is for when non-bonus levels are difficult), where a bonus level is a significant Difficulty Spike. Some wicks are already on YMMV pages, and both That One Level and Difficulty Spike are already YMMV.
  • Carried by the Host: Appears to be about how fans perceive a game show host, with a comparison made to Ensemble Dark Horse in the description.
  • Dead Artists Are Better: Should probably be IUEO since it covers in-universe opinions about dead artists while Posthumous Popularity Potential is an Audience Reaction that covers real life instances of dead artists seeing a boost in popularity after their death.
  • Dying for Symbolism: The trope is that the author wants to show heavy symbolism (generally a massive turn for the worse in the author's world) and does so by having an important character killed off. However, most of the examples are not based on Word of God; but on inferral or speculation of tropers who like the work. That makes it YMMV.
  • Early Game Hell: In 2020, Difficulty Spike was made YMMV because difficulty spikes in video games affect different players in different ways. Early Game Hell operates on the same principle as Difficulty Spike in that it involves the game's difficulty changing as the game progresses, except instead of the game getting harder at a certain point, the game starts out hard due to the player character being weaker (such as having lower stats or lacking good equipment), and gets easier as the player character gets stronger. How the change in difficulty affects a given player will depend on their level of experience with the game, the series, or the game's genre as a whole. In addition, the name already sounds subjective in describing the early parts of the game as hellish.
  • Fandom Life Cycle: Classified as Trivia, despite being about the status of fandoms and thus actually an Audience Reaction.
  • Fan Hater: The trope is in contradictory categories — it's classified as YMMV despite being In-Universe Examples Only and No Real Life Examples, Please!. Since it was made IUEO due to complaining, and since it's related to Hatedom (which is Flame Bait; Fan Hater involves hatred of fans instead of the work), finishing the job of moving it out of YMMV would probably be better than removing its IUEO status.
  • Fan Nickname and Fan Community Nickname: Both are classified as trivia despite actually describing fan reactions. The former was moved from Main/ to Trivia/ on January 27, 2011, following a crowner but minimal discussion.
    In addition, both are often misused for derogatory nicknames, with Fan Nickname's Detractor Nickname redirect being cut because it was used to cover this form of misuse.
  • Fan Work Only Fans: Only 19 wicks and no on-page examples as of May 16, 2020, and describes fan reactions instead of an objective trope, despite not being classified as YMMV.
  • God Never Said That: Refers to statements that are falsely claimed to be Word of God by people who had nothing to do with the work's creation, yet it's classified as Trivia and not YMMV.
  • Interrupting Meme: A subtrope of the YMMV Memetic Mutation, meaning it's about something that happens outside of the work itself, but it's classified as objective for some reason. Most of the examples are pretty badly written as well.
  • Just Eat Gilligan: Noticing a method by which a work's conflict could be resolved much faster is something the audience does, not the work. Plus, it opens up all these debates on whether or not a suggested solution would in fact work, or occur to the characters, etc etc...
  • Loudness War: How listeners are affected by the loudness war is subjective (in particular, how the music in question sounds to them, and how audiophiles avoid it), to the point that there's a subpage called The Worst Offenders that lacks objectivity in terms of how examples are presented.
  • Magnum Opus Dissonance: The definition involves a clash of opinions between creator and audience, but is Trivia for some reason. Already on a couple YMMV-specific indices, indicating a misplaced page type.
  • Modern Minstrelsy: Seems to focus more on audiences perceive a show as minstrelry, regardless of whether that's the intent. Also seems to be a complaint magnet.
  • Moral Dissonance: "[T]he result of having a hero who has a double standard and the narrative fails to address or even comment on it. It can include any unintentional Double Standard on the hero's part that becomes obvious to the viewer during a walk to the fridge."
  • Multiple Demographic Appeal: Makes a statement about how the audience enjoys the work, not something that happens in the work itself.
  • Never Accepted in His Hometown: The concept (someone being popular pretty much everywhere except where they're from) is related to Germans Love David Hasselhoff and Americans Hate Tingle, in that it involves differing acceptance in different parts of the world, and has enough Real Life examples listed to have a subpage for them, but it's not classifed as YMMV. An alternative to making it YMMV would be making it IUEO and spinning out-of-universe examples off into a separate Audience Reaction, similarly to how out-of-universe examples of Dead Artists Are Better (which is listed as a related trope) were spun off into Posthumous Popularity Potential.
  • Newbie Boom: A sudden influx of new fans is more of an Audience Reaction than a Trivia item. A handful of wicks are indeed in the YMMV namespace.
  • Nobody Loves the Bassist: If bassists are lesser known among listeners, that's an Audience Reaction, not an objective trope. Despite this, it's neither YMMV nor IUEO. In addition, if a band lacks a bassist as an official member (such as bands that rely on session musicians), that's a separate phenomenon from bassists being unmemorable, and would probably be Trivia.
  • Not Christian Rock: From the Laconic: "Music mistaken for being religious even though the artists themselves are not." While Laconics aren't always accurate, the trope's actual description (which references the YMMV items Faux Symbolism and Everyone Is Jesus in Purgatory when discussing lyrical content) does not contradict the Laconic. Since the audience is the one making the mistake, this is an Audience Reaction, not an objective trope, but it isn't classified as YMMV.
  • Obvious Crossover Method: Refers to something in the work that is generally exploited in fan works, which is an Audience Reaction. Indeed, several wicks are on YMMV pages.
  • Player Tic: A thing a player does in response to the game is obviously not part of the work, but it's classified as objective and not an audience reaction. There are some examples of games recognizing and acknowledging common player tics, but that's its own trope entirely.
  • Poe's Law: A work of satire that is mistaken for serious, or a serious work that is mistaken for satire. Audiences misunderstanding a work is subjective, since some people are bound to correctly tell is a work is satire or serious. Even the (poorly-enforced) demand for proof of people being confused by the work doesn't make it an objective trope, as Unfortunate Implications shows, and the mistaking is not something that happens in the work itself. Even "at least one major source has accidentally misunderstood the work's intentions" would be Trivia.
  • Popcultural Osmosis is about audiences knowing about work A not because they've seen it, but because it was referenced in work B — definitely subjective.
  • Power-Up Letdown: It's right there in the name — the powerup's weakness leaves the player feeling let down. That's a subjective opinion if there ever was one.
  • The Problem with Pen Island: Features a mixture of in-universe examples and examples that were noticed by fans, but either weren't pointed out in the work, or aren't stated to have been pointed out in the work. The trope is neither In-Universe Examples Only nor YMMV
    In addition, it was brought up in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread, but it failed to reach consensus there. Removing it from Wiki Tropes was proposed.
  • Reality Is Unrealistic: Similarly to Aluminum Christmas Trees, this is about what audience members think is unrealistic but isn't, which is by definition subjective.
  • Reference Overdosed: What's the requirement to be defined as "Overdosed"? How is this not subjective and just Shout-Out but a lot?
  • Refrain from Assuming: Classified as objective, despite being about listeners getting a song's title wrong because of a guess based on the lyrics — the title of the song may not even be in the lyrics (which is the case with "Baba O'Riley" by The Who, which listeners often mistakenly refer to as "Teenage Wasteland").
  • Rule 63: A mixture of in-universe examples of gender-flipped characters and ones created by the fans. There are already wicks on YMMV pages.
  • Sequence Breaking: The description explicitly says this is something fans do to games, often going against what the developers intended, making this an Audience Reaction.
  • Series Fauxnale: Defined as "an episode that feels like the end, and possibly was originally going to be the end.", which sounds a lot like a YMMV (or possibly a Trivia, but that would require a definition change, which would take a bit more work). Perhaps it could be split into two articles—a YMMV page for "feels like the end" and a Trivia page for "meant to be the end".
  • Ship Sinking: "X event confirms that relationship Y/Z won't happen" looks objective at first glance, except that such an event being an example as opposed to People Don't Date Everyone relies on the fandom shipping Y/Z in the first place, which is entirely subjective.
  • Signature Line: Most remembered line seems subjective, similar Signature Scene And Signature Song are YMMV for this reason.
  • The New Rock & Roll: The on-page examples are written as audience reactions, but it's not a YMMV trope.
  • Too Awesome to Use: "Powerful consumable item" is a trope. "I can't use the powerful consumable item because then I won't have it anymore, what if I need it later?" is an audience reaction. Too Awesome to Use doesn't seem to know which of those things it is.
  • Totally Radical: The description and examples focus a lot on how the audience perceives the work, but the trope is listed as objective and isn't IUEO either.
  • Vanity Project: All on-page examples are in-universe and the description says to add out-of-universe examples to YMMV tabs, but despite this, it's neither IUEO nor YMMV. A previous thread was made to resolve this issue, but it clocked out with no changes being made.
  • Yet Another Stupid Death: Seems to focus more on the actions of the player than the mechanics of the game, and how "stupid" a player's action is may be subjective.
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    Actually Trivia 
  • Abandonware: Refers to unsupported, out-of-print software whose copyright isn't strongly enforced (if at all), assuming the copyright holder still exists at all. This is background information on a work that shows up quite a while after release, and is closely related to Keep Circulating the Tapes, which is already Trivia.
  • Adapted Out: Something from the source material being omitted from an adaptation is background information that can only be known after comparing the two.
  • Ascended Meme: A meme derived from a work later ends up in the work itself. The fact that it started out as just a meme isn't always acknowledged in the work itself.
  • Author Appeal: When a certain story aspect is prominent in a work because it's one of the author's personal interests. Just that the creator personally enjoys it does not mean that can be deduced from the story itself, and this tends to involve comparison to their other works that feature the same things. Also, not all examples make it explicit that the creator specifically likes the recurring element; if it appears for a different reason, it would just be a Creator Thumbprint. (Examples tend to be more obvious when the Author Appeal is a sexual fetish, however.)
  • Avoid the Dreaded G Rating: Content is added to avoid a G rating, because of a perception that the work may be seen as just for kids. This relies on the decisions of the creators and ratings boards, both of which happen behind the scenes, not in the work itself. Many examples don't have proof of being intentional, and come across as speculation. A lot of examples are also inversions, which could use its own trope.
  • Casting Gag: Like Irony as She Is Cast and Actor-Shared Background, this trope relies on out-of-universe context to know why a specific casting choice is a "gag". That makes it trivia, because it isn't a direct storytelling trope, and similar tropes are classified as such. It's commonly mistaken for a trivia trope, as well; around 500 of its ~2,800 wicks are in the trivia namespace.
  • Censor Decoy: Like What Could Have Been except for removed objects of censorship.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: Discusses tidbits about the origins of works before they received the dolled-up treatment. In addition, its supertrope What Could Have Been and opposite trope Divorced Installment are already trivia.
  • Fake Food: Props are used in place of edible food in advertising. This happens behind the scenes and isn't always obvious.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: Coding errors that either crash the game or cause other severe problems are not something that was intentionally put in the work, but rather background information on the work. Unlike Good Bad Bugs, players' opinions on these bugs' effects are not taken into account with examples, so it was determined to not be YMMV.
  • Genre Relaunch: A once-dead genre makes a comeback. Its inverse, Genre-Killer, is already Trivia.
  • Get Back in the Closet: Discusses how Moral Guardians and ratings boards treat same-sex relationships compared to opposite-sex ones, which is a meta concept.
  • I Just Write the Thing: This is about the author's writing process (i.e. that they feel like the story took its own direction without their input) and not exactly about the work itself.
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine: Although it describes scenes that take place within a work, it points out that the reason such scenes are notable has all to do with the behind-the-scenes meta aspect. Also the name is unclear as it sounds like an in-universe trope.
  • Man of a Thousand Faces: An actor plays roles so dissimilar to each other that the actor isn't always recognizable, which is a meta concept whose examples always apply to more than one work. This already has an in-universe equivalent in Master of Disguise.
  • Man of a Thousand Voices: A voice actor voices different characters in very different ways, which is a meta concept whose examples can involve multiple works. The main page is also sorted by language instead of by medium, further showing that it's a meta concept and not an in-universe one. Talking to Himself, which refers to a voice actor playing multiple characters in one work and can thus overlap with Man of a Thousand Voices, is already Trivia.
  • Market-Based Title: About titles being changed in international versions, which isn't something that appears in the story, and Completely Different Title (with which Market-Based Title often overlaps) is already listed as Trivia.
  • Midseason Replacement: Refers to network programming decisions, not anything related to the content of the work.
  • Now Which One Was That Voice?: About voice actors (and actors in general) not being credited for their roles within the show's credits, which is a meta concept.
  • One-Book Author: Closely related to One-Hit Wonder, which is already Trivia. The difference is that a One-Book Author only produced one work, while a One-Hit Wonder produced multiple works, but only has one that's widely known.
  • Protection from Editors: An author is exempt from editing and criticism. Related to Executive Meddling (which is when authors aren't exempt), which is Trivia. Currently classified as YMMV, but multiple tropers were in favor of moving it to Trivia before the Trivia thread was closed.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: One work's soundtrack is reused in at least one other work. Similarly to Prop Recycling, which is Trivia and involves props being reused, this is background information that requires comparisons between multiple works.
  • Real Soon Now: An unreleased work isn't given a clear-cut release date, which is a meta concept and not something from within the work. Vaporware, which is a related concept, is already Trivia.
  • Regional Bonus: A meta concept that involves comparing the differences between international releases of works and the original releases, which may not be noticeable to someone who's only familiar with their region's release. 23 out of 347 wicks are already on Trivia subpages, indicating that some tropers already think it's Trivia.
  • Revised Ending: A work's ending is changed before being released to the general public, which is a behind-the-scenes change.
  • Shown Their Work: A creator doing research for their work is background information, not something that appears directly in the work as opposed to merely affecting what's in it. Accidentally Correct Writing, which refers to when something is factually correct without actually being researched, is already Trivia.
  • Sincerest Form of Flattery: A subtrope of Follow the Leader that features Word of God acknowledgment. Both Follow the Leader and Word of God are already Trivia.
  • Universe Bible: A set of guidelines the creators use when making the work. Said guidelines are not normally publicly accessible and are only used behind the scenes.
  • Visible Boom Mic: Strangely classified under "camera tricks", this is not a trope but rather a production error. This makes it a subtrope of Blooper, which is already Trivia. If it occurs deliberately, it’s covered by Stylistic Suck.

    Classified as Trivia, but shouldn't be 
  • Dye Hard: Many on-page examples and off-page examples pertain to fictional characters known for dying their hair, not just creators. Additionally, the mere idea of someone dying their hair might not be tropeworthy, and could be split into more meaningful tropes to be more significant for both fictional and real-life examples.
  • Real Song Theme Tune: A subtrope of Theme Tune that involves an existing song. Theme Tune is not trivia, and a Real Song Theme Tune appears directly in the work itself.
  • Recycled: The Series: An initially standalone work spawns a full series derived from said standalone work. This is the inverse of The Movie, which is not trivia.

    Redundant / Overlaps with another trope 

    People Sit on Chairs/Really a Useful Note 
  • In light of the TRS thread for Bi The Way determining that "character is LGBT" isn't sufficient to constitute a trope, other tropes that fall under that description need to be looked at as well. Asexuality probably needs to be looked at. Romantic Asexual might be fine as-is but could still use a check just to make sure people aren't using it as "asexual in a romantic relationship". Be aware that a Wick Check will need to be done to prove that the problem actually applies here as well, as previous threads were rejected for having only the similar definitions as their basis.
  • Ambiguously Brown: Supposed to be for brown-skinned characters whose specific racial backgrounds are not given, with little to no explanation for why that would be a trope. Previous thread from 2020 had no consensus.
  • Ancient Africa: Should be looked at to see if "(culture inspired by) an ancient African culture appears" is tropeworthy, as the page doesn't cite any narrative meaning.
  • Anywhere but Their Lips: Seems to be defined as just "kisses somewhere other than the lips"; described and named in such a way that suggests there's supposed to be some kind of context for why they're actively avoiding the lips but doesn't explain what this context is.
  • Back That Light Up: The page has more to do with game console technology than game mechanics or storytelling, so it would probably work better as a Useful Note.
  • Country Matters: Seems unclear if it's just about the word "cunt" being used for impact, or about how it has different amounts of impact in different countries. If it's the latter, it could be a Useful Note.
  • Demoscene: Refers to a software development subculture instead of a trope, so Useful Notes would be a better fit for it. Such a move was previously suggested, but the thread clocked out with no action being taken.
  • Dining in the Buff: Page doesn't cite any narrative significance for someone dining naked, and most of the examples are just "a character does this".
  • Duct Tape for Everything: As currently defined, it seems to be about any use of duct tape. Should be restricted to "unusual" cases in order to be tropeworthy.
  • Flyover Country: Writeup appears to be intended for Useful Notes, including a lack of on-page examples. No elaboration on its tropeworthiness is given.
  • VideoGame.Game Genie and VideoGame.Game Shark: The namespace suggests that they're supposed to be work pages, but they lack examples and read like Useful Notes about the cheat devices in question, as well as the history of cheat devices as a whole in the former's case. They could probably be transplanted to a new page such as UsefulNotes.Video Game Cheat Devices without much issue.
  • Gender-Neutral Narrator: Defined in the negative: "Narrator doesn't have a gender because it's not important." If it's not important, is it really a trope?
  • Gimmick Matches: Basically just lists the different match types in Professional Wrestling, although it does list some In-Universe examples.
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine: Tends to be used solely to shoehorn any work that had one or more of its actors going on to bigger and more popular franchises, similar to how Role Association was when it was known as "Hey, It's That Guy!" and "Hey, It's That Voice!".
  • Informed Judaism: A character is Jewish, but it has little to no relevance to the plot. This implies that the Jewish character should be made more obviously Jewish; it's not really made clear why, however, and there aren't any such tropes for other races/religions.
  • Junior High: Not a trope, but rather a useful notes page (or perhaps something that should be merged/redirected/cut). The issue with the page is that it largely serves to explain how in many countries, "junior high" is the same thing as "high school"; and in fiction this applies as well, so high school tropes are the same as junior high tropes.
  • Keigo, Kansai Regional Accent, and Tohoku Regional Accent: Information about the Japanese Language is Useful Notes material, Not a Trope. In the case of the accent pages, pages for other languages' dialects (such as the pages for American Accents and German Dialects) are already in the Useful Notes namespace.
  • The Master: This is a list of characters named "the master." That is not a trope; it is a list of unrelated things that happen to have the same name.
  • Multi-Ethnic Name: Looks like simply a list of people who have names of mixed ethnic backgrounds, which is a perfectly common thing in real life and most examples have no plot significance.
  • Name's the Same: This page is for when two characters in unrelated works coincidentally have the same name. A lot of the examples aren't even that; either they are about characters who share only part of a name, or they instead point out any time two works use a generic word to refer to something, even if the two uses aren't related. The description even says that the page is essentially "Shout-Out, but averted" - aversions of that trope aren't generally notable, as it's not omnipresent in any genre or medium.
    Counterpart Comparison's definition ("characters from unrelated works draw comparisons from fans") was relatively similar to that of Name's the Same ("characters from unrelated works have identical names, regardless their other traits"), but narrower in scope, and it was deemed redundant with and redirected to Surprisingly Similar Characters. Moving Name's the Same from Trivia to Just For Fun has been discussed on Ask The Tropers; such a move was done by the thread for One of Us.
  • Ouija Board: Ouija boards being used to contact ghosts and "Ouija boards used for horror/to cause mayhem" are obvious tropes, but as is, it's just "Ouija boards exist", and the description reads like a Useful Note.
  • Pay Phone: Phone Booth was cut in March 2021 for being Chairs, and Pay Phone is almost the same concept.
  • Public Domain: A lack of copyright isn't really a trope, but it's still useful information to have on TV Tropes, since the wiki has plenty of pages for works whose copyright has expired, plus some images chosen by Image Pickin' are not copyrighted. Thus, it would probably be better suited to Useful Notes than Main.
    The page would need to be expanded and/or rewritten if it's moved to Useful Notes, because it primarily focuses on American copyright law and doesn't sufficiently discuss Fair Use.
  • Retro Gaming: Already reads like a Useful Notes page, plus the concept doesn't seem to be tropeworthy anyway. Lacks examples so a transplant would be quite easy.
  • Sai Guy: Based on the laconic, it seems to think that using sais as weapons is trope-worthy; their use as primary weapons would probably already be covered by Weapon of Choice. To its credit, it points out how much Artistic License is used in sai-wielding, but presumably, there is a trope that covers artistic license as it applies to melée combat with any weapon, or even without a weapon.
  • Shrines and Temples: Basically just seems to be "Asian Shrines exist" based on description and examples. Probably could be split into multiple tropes: an Asian equivalent of Bloodstained Glass Windows for battles at a temple, and perhaps one for shrines having magical effects.
  • Speedrun: The documentation of speedrunning any particular game is probably not within the scope of the wiki, let alone giving detailed entries on a YMMV page. It already reads like a Useful Note anyway and is probably worth keeping as such.
  • Stock Kisses: An exampleless page that just lists different kinds of kisses. Similar to the cut Stock Underwear page.
  • Straight Gay: A gay character is not given stereotypically gay traits. This may or may not be plot-relevant, depending on the work. A previous thread (which closed without consensus) had the suggestion that this should focus on instances where the trope is remarked on in-universe, particularly where the character's homosexuality is seen a surprise.
  • Turtle Power: Defined as "Turtles are Awesome", which would be an outdated "Everything's Better with Turtles" in all but name, complete with a load of "This work contains a turtle" examples and a few examples that overlap with Turtle Island, Wise Old Turtle, or other subtropes. There are enough examples of "Turtles are powerful enough to be a powerful opponent or ally in battle", so perhaps the trope could be salvaged into "Badass Turtle".
  • Twofer Token Minority: Most commonly used as "character belongs to multiple minority groups" regardless of whether their identity is relevant in the story. Sometimes, the character won't even be the only member of either minority group, making the "token" part of the trope name meaningless. A TRS thread from 2018 closed without consensus.
  • Two First Names: A previous TRS thread from May 2014 agreed that a character having two first names is Chairs on its own, and proposed replacing it with a Redneck Name Naming Conventions trope for stereotypical rural names like Billy Bob, but the thread was locked for inactivity at the beginning of 2016 after the proposed trope wasn't launched (the trope was eventually created under the title Hayseed Name).
  • Virtual YouTuber: The page is in Main/, yet is formatted with a trope list and a list of some VTubers and groups. Would it fit better as a Useful Note instead?
  • The White House: Folks in this thread argued that it would be better placed as an Useful Notes page, but others argued that in its current state it's entirely about fictional depictions.

    Murky description/unclear definition/other description issues 
  • 1 Million B.C.: A Trope Talk thread noted that the trope is used for three distinct concepts: having cavemen and dinosaurs existing together, dinosaur habitat being portrayed as extremely hostile ("volcanoes on the horizon, geysers and tar pits at every turn, and earthquakes sending up cliffs below your feet"), and "more realistic but still pulpy" prehistory as in Ice Age. Prehistoria is also listed as a separate trope, but it's basically "1 Million B.C. but specific to video games", which isn't a meaningful distinction (as mentioned in the "Multiple tropes" section).
  • Acceptable Targets: The trope is supposed to be about the issue of which groups are okay to mock and which ones aren't. The trope is listed on YMMV pages, but most examples describe objective statements about the group being mocked in a work, not how the audience thinks the group is an acceptable target. If the creator thought the group is an acceptable target (which may not have been the specific intention) then that may be redundant with Take That! and Author Tract. It also seems like a Trope in Aggregate, since it relies on comparison with targets that are not acceptable, which are usually not specified by the examples either. A previous TRS thread resulted in no consensus.
  • An Axe to Grind: Discusses several related but distinct concepts about axes as weapons, in a very disorganized manner. Needs a description rewrite at the bare minimum. Some of the concepts here might deserve new tropes, but the sheer number of wicks to this page is an obstacle.
  • Anime Theme Song: Discussed in Is This An Example? thread because the trope description doesn't explain how to apply the trope properly. There is no clear definition of what Anime Theme Song is. It is also an example-less page and advises that examples should not even appear on work pages unless they're "noteworthy" or "career-launching"; however, there's no explanation of what counts as "noteworthy". So, the observations about the current content are: it needs to properly explain what "noteworthy" examples are (the original post); it needs a trope definition; it should be made a Useful Notes page; it appears to have no distinction from Theme Tune. Everyone agrees it needs trope repair.
  • Atlantis Is Boring: The description leads to three distinct concepts: characters have a hard time finding excitement underwater, writers have a hard time writing media that takes place underwater, and a work that takes place underwater is found boring by the audience and critics. While the last one is Complaining About Shows You Don't Like BUT UNDERWATER!, the second could be split into its own trivia ("Most Writers Are Landlubbers", perhaps?).
  • Bonus Level of Heaven: It is unclear how this is supposed to be distinct from Fluffy Cloud Heaven. Is it the same but restricted to video games? Is it a subtrope where you actually attack heaven, as opposed to just being there? Is it, as the image suggests, any level named heaven? Or maybe we should merge the two. It's worth noting that its title is a snowclone of "Bonus Level of Hell", an old title for Brutal Bonus Level, and that the description mentioning that this is specifically for Bonus Dungeons (despite many examples, including the page image, being about Heaven as a general Video Game Setting) is probably a holdover from that.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Description is quite clearly "headshots deal extra damage in this game", but examples are both that and "person dies of being shot in the head in any context", so there seems to be some Missing Supertrope Syndrome going on here.
  • Can Only Move the Eyes: The title sounds like it's about characters literally only being able to move their eyes, but the laconic says it's about characters being conscious while immobilised. The latter is also how And I Must Scream is commonly misused, so there's a lot of overlap.
  • Cut-and-Paste Translation: The title and laconic states the trope's meaning is supposed to be "slapping different parts of a work together in translation", while the description and examples make the trope look like example-allowed Macekre.
  • Dark Messiah: The article uses words like "usually," "may (or may not)," and other similar words/phrases in the description, making exactly what one is ambiguous—or at the very least make this a flexible trope. The diversity in the listed examples adds further confusion on what a dark messiah actually is. Trope Talk thread here. Description cleanup Sandbox here.
  • Development Hell: When this applies is clear for most types of works, but the same is not true for video game examples. It's been claimed that Vaporware is its counterpart for video games (and software in general), but it's also been argued that video games can go through Development Hell without being Vaporware.
  • Editing Works: Nonstandard design. The concept (applying edits to raw footage) is very broad, like "hand-eye coordination."
  • Fatal Method Acting: The given definition is, "A performer dies suddenly while on the job." There's some ambiguity as to whether the performer has to die as a result of their job, as the title implies, or if this extends to health mishaps not proven to be caused by their work, which includes many medical examples on the page. There's also some confusion as to whether the "creator" vs "performer" distinction is clear enough to separate it from Died During Production. Discussion.
  • Glamour: Description should be something that discusses how this is about any spell called a "glamour" because they share similarities, but they're not all the same. Or get a rename and a changed description to fit an idea of Our Glamours Are Different.
  • Good Bad Bugs: Lumps funny bugs with exploitable bugs under the umbrella of "good"; conflates the objective fact of the bugs' existence with the player base's subjective opinion of the bugs.e.g. 
  • Good Is Impotent: The definition used on the page is when a character is split into their "good" and "evil" halves, and the evil one is more effective than the good one. However, many examples describe good-aligned characters in general being ineffective.
  • Green Rocks: It is unclear what this trope actually is, compared to other tropes like the X Can Do Anything series, Unobtainium, and Applied Phlebotinum. The examples on the page are all over the place and contain things like inherent powers, plot devices, etc. It could use some cleaning up, and a title like "green rocks" (and a long-standing image of literal green rocks) probably doesn't help. Effectively, "a substance that can do anything the plot needs" is the exact same thing as Applied Phlebotinum.
  • Happy Birthday to You!: It's unclear if it's supposed to be about birthday songs in general, or if it's specifically Writing Around Trademarks for the specific song "Happy Birthday to You" (prior to a lawsuit invalidating its copyright claim in 2015).
  • Higher Self: The page describes a superego type concept, but combines both "moral" and "objective" judgements. Listed on Definition-Only Pages due to the lack of examples.
  • History's Crime Wave: The page describes it as whenever a work uses historical villains. However, its title, image, several of its examples, and this discussion suggest that the actual definition of the trope might be about historical villains teaming up. The said description is unclear on that aspect.
  • Hope Springs Eternal: Unclear if it's about a stock message that things will eventually become better, or just about any reference to hope.
  • Humiliation Conga: The description and laconic only refer to villains who get humiliated, while the trope is used for characters in general who are.
  • I Am the Band: The description is trying give multiple different definitions for what it means for a musician to "be" their band, ranging from "band member who is very controlling of the others" to "solo artist who can be mistaken for a band". Because of this, most of the on-page examples say nothing more than "Band is Artist".
  • If You Ever Do Anything to Hurt Her...: Description very clearly states that this is a method for one character (rival love interest/family member usually) to formally give up their "claim" on the titular "her". Examples both on- and off-page ignore this in favor of focusing on the "you hurt her, I hurt you" aspect.
  • I'm Alive: Stock Phrase with essentially no definition other than "person says 'I'm alive'".
  • Instant-Win Condition: Examples cover two different concepts, based on either the trope's title, or the trope's definition. The title and image imply that the trope is about a rule, mechanic, card, etc. that allows a player to win without having to accomplish a game's normal win conditions. The definition instead describes a situation where once one player wins, the game ignores anything that could nullify that victory, no matter how little sense it makes. There are also a few examples that seem to be about victory conditions in general.
  • Knife Nut: "Character uses a knife" could be redundant with Weapon of Choice at best and Chairs at worst, but at least one mod has claimed that the trope is about characters who fetishize knives, which would work as a characterization trope in addition to being sufficiently distinct from Weapon of Choice. Despite this, the description doesn't make it clear it's more specific than a character simply wielding a knife, and at least one Trope Talk thread was started to figure out the trope's definition.
  • Lead Bassist: Soft-split into four types, with at least two traits being distinct enough for a hard split - 1) The bassist is the lead singer, and 2) The bassist is the Face of the Band. While the former concept is objective, the latter is obviously YMMV (Face of the Band is already YMMV), so this is the exact same issue Stop Helping Me! had before Annoying Video-Game Helper was split off of it.
    The description and on-page examples have a problem with Type Labels Are Not Examples, and there's often overlap between the types — for example, Paul McCartney is listed under three types at the same time in both the description (to illustrate overlap between the types) and the example list (regarding his musical career).
  • Lead In describes two tropes in the same article: a small story that occurs before the main plot, and a popular television show placed before another program to entice viewers to watch the following program. These aren't internal subtropes - the concepts are too distinct to even be sister tropes (the latter definition is more of a Trivia item). The page is split with the first definition and examples, followed by the next definition and examples. On top of that, it only has 39 wicks.
  • Loony Fan: The description describes the character as an obsessive nut who follows the main characters around. Many examples don't include the latter part, and some don't even have the character act as a fan to the main characters. It's unclear if the description is misleading for being so narrow, or the trope name is misleading for describing an obsessive fan instead of a more specific breed of fan.
  • Mean Brit: Does this refer to any British character with a bad attitude, or specifically expies of mean British reality show judges like Simon Cowell and Piers Morgan? If it's the former, then it might be redundant with Evil Brit. Discussion here.
  • Metro-Specific Underworld: Just a list of stereotypes of gangs for specific areas, no explanation of the significance of the trope; has a non-standard page format. The only works that treat it as a trope are Peaky Blinders and Mafia III, who say "these are gangs in the work", with no mention of languages. It needs TRS just to figure out what it's for. Listed as a Definition-Only Page because the nonstandard listing precludes examples being crosswicked.
  • Mind Rape: The trope seems to have multiple definitions. The first paragraph describes it as a mental/psychic attack to one's mind that is likened to actual rape due to the violation and exploitation of vulnerabilities involved. Then it goes on to include any other forms of torture (including physical, verbal, and actual rape) that ends up breaking the victim's mind, (usually) causing them to go insane.
  • Most Fanfic Writers Are Fans: The description is trying to say why people write fanfiction, but never really describes a trope. It's been suggested that it could be moved to the Analysis subpage of Fanfic instead.
  • Mysterious Animal Senses: It only allows aversions and subversions, yet it's not listed on No Straight Examples, Please. All of the on-page examples are about animal senses being portrayed realistically, which could be redundant with Shown Their Work and Furry Reminder.
  • Name-Meaning Change: The description says that this is when something's name is retroactively given a new meaning by its creators or other people in charge, but other examples are when it has a new meaning in an adaptation (which may fit better under Adaptational Context Change), and In-Universe instances of people deciding to change the meaning of a name. Also has a lot of overlap with Reimagining the Artifact.
  • Neutron Bomb: Cannot decide whether it is a Useful Notes page or a trope, and whether that trope is "Neutron bombs being portrayed inaccurately", "Neutron bombs appear in this work", or "WMDs that kill people but leave structures intact".
    A previous TRS thread clocked out due to inactivity; there were requests for a wick check to see how it's being used on other pages, but none was provided.
  • No Pronunciation Guide: Used for multiple different ideas at once: written works that don't indicate the pronunciation of something ambiguous; media where the audience does hear how something is pronounced yet the work pronounces it differently at different times (with no in-universe explanation); when a dub pronounces something differently from its source language; when the audience is unsure how to pronounce something (Viewer Name Confusion); and when an adaptation pronounces something differently from its source material (Adaptation Name Change).
  • Power Creep, Power Seep: As currently written, this is specific to crossovers. However, the concept it describes (preexisting character's power level is adjusted to match the new work) is more about adaptations in general and has little to do with crossovers specifically. This restriction can probably be removed.
  • Pyramid Power is a mixture of "pyramids have a mystical power", "pyramids were built by aliens", "pyramids were built by slaves", and "this work contains a pyramid." The last of these is obviously PSOC, but the trope description is such a mess that it's not clear which of the first three is meant.
  • Revealing Cover-Up: The lengthy Example as a Thesis describes a scenario of "hiding X by taking flashy action Y, which leads directly to the discovery of X", making it unclear whether the trope is "hiding X by taking flashy action Y" or "attempting to hide X leads directly to the discovery of X" — or if it was legitimately intended to cover the whole scenario, in which case it should probably be split because that is definitely two tropes, not one.
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: The "status effect" variant and the "circular firing squad" variant are different enough that they should be split, or at least made internal subtropes.
  • Skepticism Failure: The description is very murky. It's confusingly worded, goes off on a tangent in the first couple paragraphs, and seems to be trying to express multiple distinct tropes: "the skeptic in a paranormal series will always be proven wrong" (per the laconic and title), "the skeptic remains skeptical despite massive evidence to the contrary" (per the page image), "skeptics are naive", and "true believers are more common than skeptics in fiction".
  • Spell My Name with an "S": Used for a mixture of varying official spellings and differing fan spellings of names from works, particularly from works originally in a language that doesn't use the Latin alphabet (such as Japanese). Since it's an objective trope, it would ideally be used for official spellings only (i.e., official materials giving different spellings of the same name at different points). Fan spellings would probably be a better fit for a separate Audience Reaction. It also tends to be misused for any unusual spellings, even when applied to real-life individuals where there is only one correct spelling for a particular person.
    There was an attempt at a TRS thread to clean up fan spellings, but it was locked in a New Year's purge during the cleanup phase. Note that accidental fan spellings go under Viewer Name Confusion, which wasn't launched until after the previous Spell My Name with an "S" TRS thread was closed.
  • Superpower Lottery: Random power allocation, or just getting really good powers?
  • Text Parser: The description is borderline incomprehensible due to its self demonstrating nature, has no examples, and You Can't Get Ye Flask could probably be merged into this trope so that it's less about complaining and more about the (relatively) advanced ability of the computer to understand colloquial English.
  • Timmy in a Well: Examples seem to follow a broader definition than one specific "Stock Plot" involving some child in trouble (which is mainly associated with the Heroic Pet genre), though a significant number do parody that.
  • "Tokenism" tropes, such as The Smurfette Principle or Token Black Friend. There seems to be confusion about what being a "token" actually means, and it gets confused for when there's only one/two/etc minority characters in a work, regardless of why they're there or how the narrative treats them (for example, a lone female character in a work where the casting wasn't gender-based wouldn't count, as it's just incidental that the character happens to be a female / the only female. Meanwhile, if in that very same work one character was made gay specifically to be more progressive or representative, that character would be a Token gay character.) Would need an extensive wick check for at least a few of the tropes, if concerned over the whole batch.
  • Zombie Advocate. The page is a mixture of three distinct concepts: humans advocating for actual monsters (as the title and description suggest); humans advocating for any non-human (as the page image suggests); and non-humans advocating for their own race (e.g. a goblin campaigning for goblin rights).
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    Complaining or gushing 
  • 8.8: Only seems to exist to document complaining about review scores for games and is tertiary to work pages at best. The description mentions it's supposed to be Fan Speak but it still has over 350 wicks.
  • Alternate History Wank: Complainy Wall of Text description about an Alternate History author who privileges a certain state by making them more powerful in that timeline. However, the examples are just "X is more powerful than Y in work Z."
  • Camera Screw: The trope seems to consist entirely of complaining about camera systems one doesn't like. While the concept has been noted to be legitimate, many examples consist of complaining.
  • Camp Unsafe Isn't Safe Anymore: The description amounts to complaining about characters not properly assessing the danger they're in, and most wicks and entries are similarly complaining. A TRS thread suggested splitting it into two better defined tropes, but clocked for inaction.
  • Canon Defilement: Its description reads like a list of "Thou Shalt Nots", as if going against a fandom's norms is automatically bad. Discussed here in the description improvement thread.
  • Character Shilling: Attracts complaining and descriptions of audience reactions, despite being classified as an objective trope. Possibly because the term "shilling" used in the title has inherently negative connotations.
  • Classic Video Game "Screw You"s: The whole page is written as if an exercise in how sarcastic one can be.
  • Cliché Storm: Suspected of being a complaining magnet, as well as being redundant with Troperiffic.
  • Extreme Sport Excuse Plot: As noted in the complaining cleanup thread, the definition is overly negative, and it's possible the title could use a touchup as well.
  • Fanservice: Has no on-page examples, but attracts gushing in off-page wicks. See relevant discussion here.
  • George Lucas Altered Version: Attracts a lot of complaining, and many examples are redundant with Enhanced on DVD, Re-Cut, Bowdlerize, and Orwellian Retcon.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading is frequently used for complaining about loading times you can't stand. An Image Pickin' thread was started to change an image that wouldn't fuel this notion, but it would be better to give the trope an overhaul.
  • Moral Dissonance: Currently defined as a combination of Protagonist-Centered Morality with a touch of Hypocrite. Inherently negative and seems mostly used to shoehorn examples for Designated Hero (i.e. "Supposedly heroic characters are actually not heroic at all.") or argue about the moral justifiability of a hero's actions/decisions.
  • Polish the Turd: Blatantly subjective, potentially to the point of being Flame Bait, but classified as objective without being In-Universe Examples Only. Examples are mostly general examples that could potentially apply to several works but don't mention any, awkwardly mixed with work-specific and in-universe examples. There's also a folder for tropes; Writing Pitfall Index (previously Bad Writing Index) and Scrappy Index were brought to TRS in 2020 for complaining issues. There was a thread in 2017, but it clocked out without any changes being made; however, a decision to make it In-Universe Examples Only had to be overturned because there weren't enough in-universe examples for it to work.
  • Polygon Ceiling: Seems to be "Video Game 3D Leap but bad", which is redundant ("trope X done badly" is The Same, but More Specific, since Tropes Are Tools), complainy, and isn't tagged YMMV due to this 2011 TRS thread which rewrote the description and removed it from YMMV on the basis that it would be redundant to Jumping the Shark if it was subjective; Jumping the Shark itself has since been made In-Universe Examples Only. Duplicate tropes thread.
  • Porting Disaster: Used to complain about certain ports of a game, probably due to its title being too negative. The on-page examples seem to be worse than the wicks, suggesting that it should probably be No On-Page Examples as well. Moving to Darth is also an alternative due to the high inbound count (over 25,000).
  • Random Smoking Scene: Amounts to complaining (mostly by a single editor) about smoking scenes that do not affect the plot, but there are many other reasons for having smoking in a film.
  • Rational Fic: Gushy description that reads like a "So You Want To" page with a "Tropes Are Not Good" tacked on at the end. It has lists of "good" and "bad" tropes without explaining how they're used in the genre, doesn't explain what rationalism is, and the examples read like Fanfic Recs.
  • Silence Is Golden: Brought up in the TRS thread for Lull Destruction (now called Filling the Silence), and was seen as potentially gushy.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Attracts a lot of complaining and dubious examples, which includes examples of characters who weren't meant to be sympathetic (i.e. they were called out by the other characters, the other characters don't forgive their actions, etc.), characters with understandable motives or goals but were intentionally written to be morally questionable, and characters that one portion of the fandom found unsympathetic while others sympathized with them, meaning the reaction wasn't universal (better suited for Base-Breaking Character or Broken Base). It also attracts examples of straight-up character bashing that don't explain how the character was supposed to be seen as intentionally sympathetic. Criteria has been discussed in its cleanup thread.

    Multiple tropes 

    Tropes following deprecated practices (naming schemes, stock phrases, etc.) 

    Tropes brought to TLP Crash Rescue with no resolution there 
Link to Crash Rescue sandbox for reference

    Miscellaneous or multiple issues 
  • Multiple pages on Sorting Algorithm of Tropes: Several pages need wicks and lack examples. Considering that TLP Guidelines states "Sliding Scale" or "Sorting Algorithm" Drafts are now discouraged, many of these would likely be better off removed.
  • Acronym Trope Names: Listed under Wiki Tropes, but the Wiki Tropes thread failed to reach a consensus for it. Moving it to Administrivia, removing non-trope pages, and removing it from the Wiki Tropes index were proposed.
  • Antidisestablishmentarianism: Low wick count (but not low enough to be considered Not Thriving). An attempt at TRS is noting that the length of the name may be a bit much for people. This may need a Wick Check to determine how it's used.
  • Ascended Fanfic: The description implies that this is for any story that originated as fanfiction for something, but it has some examples that are "fanfiction gets incorporated into official source material" (compare the title of Ascended Fanon, which is where those examples are actually supposed to go). May need a rename. It should also be Trivia, since it refers to the production history rather than anything in-story.
  • Association Fallacy: The example section is a mess, with multiple sectioned example lists. Possible split?
  • Author Usurpation is about a work that overshadows the rest of the author's work, which is the exact same thing as One-Hit Wonder. It is not thriving, at only 21 wicks, likely due to its unclear title. It is also erroneously classified as an objective trope.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Brought up on the complaining cleanup thread, suspected of being far too common to have examples.
  • Auto-Tune: Should probably be split into two pages: A Useful Notes or possibly Trivia page covering the software's use for pitch correction (the software's intended use, which is behind-the-scenes technical information related to sound production and not a trope), and a trope covering its use for distorted vocals (which the software wasn't originally intended for, but caught on not long after it was released).
  • Baleful Polymorph is about a character being involuntarily transformed and said transformation negatively impacting them. An ATT brought up that it's being used as "character is involuntarily transformed", even if the change has a neutral or positive impact. Possible reasons for the misuse include Involuntary Transformation being a redirect to that page and people not knowing what "baleful" means. Wick check here.
  • Balloon Belly: A lot of examples are written by people who get off to it, so it might need a lewdness check.
  • Canon Marches On: "This Expanded Universe work is contradicted by a later primary-canon work" is not something that happens in the work. Its fanfic counterpart, Outdated by Canon, is already Trivia — also, the need for a distinction between essentially the same phenomenon happening in fanfic versus EU is not clear. A thread regarding the two stalled out for lack of activity.
  • Cipher Scything: Meant to be a trope about a "generic" or Featureless Protagonist being fleshed out or removed in an adaptation; it has less than 40 examples on-page, and 39 wicks (of which only 25 link to work or character pages). "Cipher" is an actual term for "blank slate" protagonists, but the title doesn't do well at stating that's what it means in this context. A rename might help, assuming tropes like Canon Name or Cutting Off the Branches (both of which the description link to) don't render this trope obsolete.
  • Creepypasta: As briefly discussed here, the page is very oddly used - it's simultaneously trying to be a genre page and a works page, complete with subpages. Some pages for subgenres list tropes associated with the genre, but troping individual, unrelated works, as Creepypasta is currently doing, seems out of line. The genre description could also use reassessment to make sure it lines up with how the word "creepypasta" is used outside the wiki these days.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: "Different games' control schemes result in negative transfer" is a clear enough definition, but there's no scope to it—as currently written, if playing Animal Crossing: New Leaf somehow caused someone to push the wrong buttons in Hatred, it'd be as valid of an example as if it caused someone to push the wrong buttons in Animal Crossing: Wild World. Relatedly, it probably should be YMMV.
  • The Database Hates Me: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. The page is about an outdated TV Tropes error message. Cutting, merging it into Forum Speak, merging with Data Vampires, and preserving it in some form were proposed.
  • Data Vampires: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. The page is about accidental deletions on websites. Turning into a non-wiki-specific trope, removing it from Wiki Tropes, merging it into the TV Tropes Glossary, and making it Administrivia were proposed.
  • Describe Topic Here: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's specfiic to TV Tropes due to being based on a message that used to be displayed on blank pages. Moving to Just For Fun and removing it from Wiki Tropes were proposed.
  • Dismissed Gender: A trope from the early days of the site which is why it has many issues. It's low on examples and wicks which contain speculations about audience reactions, a trivia entry, In-Universe entries, and a list of general tropes as examples (thus violating the Examples Are Not General rule) at once. All of this makes crosswicking a problem. Plus, the parts concerned with audience reactions are already covered by Pandering to the Base and Double Standard.
  • Dogfaces: This seems to be a trope largely based around specific Disney media properties, and lists tropes specific to those works as if the page is a work itself. It does seem to appear in some other works, but needs to be described in a way that's not Disney-specific.
  • Dr. Pedia and Mr. Trope: The page is supposed to be about differing editing philosophies between TV Tropes and Wikipedia, and is currently listed as a Wiki Trope. There was some discussion in the Outdated Pages thread about moving it to either Just For Fun or Administrivia instead of staying in Main/ (with the former being suggested due to the page's humorous tone), and it was pointed out that several tropers regularly edit both wikis productively, but the discussion stalled out without any action being taken.
  • Easy Logistics: This seems to have been intended to represent one of the Acceptable Breaks from Reality commonly found in videogames. However, way too many of the examples listed are aversions, especially in the non-videogame sections. Most of these should probably be split out as one or more new tropes.
  • Edit Stomp: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. The page is about different editors submitting edits close to each other, with one overwriting the other, so it applies to TV Tropes more so than other wikis because it's related to the edit lock system. Merging it with Forum Speak, moving it to Administrivia, and cutting while moving the relevant information to Administrivia.Edit War were proposed.
  • Entrance: Extremely overbroad term with an unhelpful description and only 4 wicks, which is tiny even for a Definition-Only Page. ATT query.
  • Entry Pimp: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's mostly specific to TV Tropes. Merging it into the TV Tropes Glossary, moving it to Administrivia, and adding it to Troper Types were proposed.
  • Eskimos Aren't Real: Though the trope is thriving fine, "Eskimo" is a controversial word, as discussed in the tropes with outdated/offensive names thread. Concerns were also brought up that referring to a specific disbelieved item might be misleading, since the trope is more general than that.
  • Euphemism Treadmill: A redirect to Political Correctness Gone Mad that should probably redirect to Have a Gay Old Time instead, since the latter page actually discusses the euphemism treadmill in the description. A since-closed TRS thread discussed changing the redirect's target, but clocked out due to a lack of consensus; crowners were not working when the thread was open, so gauging consensus was difficult at the time. The discussion may be worth revisiting since the previous thread's technical issues were resolved.
  • Evil Over Lord List: Not a trope. Indexed under JFF, but is still in the mainspace along with its subpages. Needs to be either JFF or a work page.
  • Fancruft: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Refers to adding minor details about works to wikis. Merging it into Forum Speak, merging it with Word Cruft, and merging with the TV Tropes Glossary were proposed in addition to keeping it as a trope that applies to other wikis.
  • Flies Equals Evil: Despite its name, it covers flies signifying death in addition to flies signifying evil. These concepts are distinct enough to be separate tropes, especially since flies can signify deaths that were caused by something that isn't evil, like the terrain of a location. Additionally, this trope frequently gets misused as "evil flies" instead of "flies signify evil", so it might need a cleanup.
  • Game Mod: Has a tendency to be wicked on Video Game pages or Trivia subpages with a list of fan mods even though derivative works should not be mentioned on the parent pages (plus it's not a Trivia trope). Needs a cleanup and possibly a move to Useful Notes.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Actually a redirect to Sliding Scale of Gameplay and Story Integration, but it's frequently used as though it's a distinct trope — most wicks are for the redirect and not sliding scale's main page. It's been pointed out that it was a separate trope at one point; revisiting this idea may be worth looking into.
  • Hedge Trimmer: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but onsite it's used to describe tropers who trim overly wordy text. Merging with the TV Tropes Glossary and merging with Troper Types were proposed.
  • Home Pages: The page redirects to the main home page with no way to edit it, as all pages in the main namespace starting with "Home Page" do, either due to a glitch or an intentional design choice. The outdated pages thread had no idea what to do (moving it to Administrivia.Home Pages or List Of Home Pages was one idea), but it's likely that TRS may help with reaching a decision and potentially revamping this page's layout to be more accurate. Content is currently saved at Sandbox.Home Pages.
  • Hot Linked: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Hotlinking applies to other websites more so than TV tropes. Merging with Forum Speak, merging with the TV Tropes Glossary, and merging with Hotlinked Image Switch were proposed.
  • Hypothetical Casting: Mix of trivia (creator opinions) and audience reactions.
  • It Makes Sense in Context and Makes Just as Much Sense in Context: Both describe fanspeak terms instead of tropes, and are major Pothole Magnets, not unlike the infamous I Am Not Making This Up.
  • The Jerk Index: This page is currently written as a Self-Demonstrating Article, which has resulted in many (rather cringey) trope descriptions styled with exaggerated examples of over-the-top jerkass behavior (and lots of unnecessary profanity). Some editors also seem to think that this page is interchangeable with the Villains index (which does have some overlap, but isn't quite the same thing), and some of the tropes listed might have been shoehorned in.
  • Level Breaker: No evidence that this term even exists. It's a Definition-Only Pages, supposedly due to complaining, but there is no evidence for even making it a Definition-Only Page in the first place.
  • LGBT Fanbase: On the page itself, examples seem to be spilt between "work has a queer following due to (accidental or otherwise) LGBT representation", and one-handed troping about hot characters, in addition to your standard ZCEs aplenty that plauge older tropes on this site.
  • Linear Edit: Currently on Definition-Only Pages due to the lack of examples and wicks, this is something that cannot be seen within the work itself, making it a either a bit of industry terminology, or a Trivia-trope where production information is needed.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: A Trope Talk discussion raised concerns about the description being unclear as to the purpose of the trope and the name misleading people into believing it's about any large cast of characters, even if they're irrelevant to the plot/gameplay. One troper remarked in the discussion that it seemed like each troper had a different idea of what the trope is.
  • Long Form Promo: Failing to thrive (created in late 2009, only 3 wicks), may be a Forgotten Trope due to most examples of it occurring before 1990. Making the definition more general would likely make it collide with Super Bowl Special; as written, it could probably be merged with Station Ident.
  • Long Titles vs. Short Titles: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it mainly applies to TV Tropes. Removing from Wiki Tropes, merging with the TV Tropes Glossary, cutting, moving to Administrivia, and redirecting to Clear, Concise, Witty were proposed.
  • Magical Native American: The basic stereotype of Native Americans having magical powers that bring them in touch with nature is used for other indigenous people as well, and some examples are already about them. The trope could be expanded and renamed to something like "Magical Native" to account for this.
  • UsefulNotes.Misplaced Nationalism: Description goes on and on about how mentioning any nation on the internet will always start a flame war that can never be stopped. It's also in the Useful Notes namespace for some reason, despite reading like a "web trope" from back when the wiki's standards were lower.
  • Misty May: There were multiple posts in the Outdated Pages thread in favor of moving it to Just For Fun, since it's more of a game than a regular Audience Reaction, but since the thread was created for refining pages for site policies (which may include moving pages for Main to Administrivia), moving pages to Just For Fun is outside the thread's scope.
    Since Misty May is about gauging instances of Gainaxing, the page is essentially a game intended for works featuring Gainaxing; "Holy Shit!" Quotient was moved to Just For Fun by TRS because it's a game for gauging the amount of Shocking Moments in a work.
  • Mohs Scale of Rock and Metal Hardness: The Mohs Scale pages have issues with zero-context examples, and may not work as tropes at all. Moving them to JFF or Darth has been suggested in a clean-up thread.
  • Multi-Part Picture: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's an Administrivia page and thus applies more to TV Tropes (particularly Image Pickin'). Removing from Wiki Tropes, removing it from article indexes other than Wiki Tropes (such as Photography and Illustration), adding to the Administrivia index, and crosswicking with How to Pick a Good Image were proposed.
  • Mummers: As-is, this is a genre/format, but it's almost impossible to find real life examples and it would be impossible to make pages for those works, so it is currently listed on Definition-Only Pages. However, the definition could be isolated to In-Universe, like School Play, where examples and works can be verified.
  • Not Good with People: The trope has 2 aspects: characters who can't or don't want to get along with humans but can get along well with non-humans. However, it's often used for any character who's introverted or has poor social skills regardless of their relationship with nature. The two variations has also caused many type-labels only ZCE examples. It needs a wick check to show how common is the misuse.
  • Object Shows: Requesting a trope's list as it wasn't added for the TLP but this is necessary since, across all works associated with the mainpage, there are many shared tropes that need heavy elaboration on in order to understand the shows.
  • Old Shame: This trope is supposed to be about works whose creator tries to make the audience forget about. Not only is this extremely similar to Creator Backlash, it often gets misused (as pointed out here) for anything that a creator is ashamed of, rather than works the creator actively wants the audience to forget, making this both a Duplicate Trope issue and a Misused issue.
  • Paradox Expanded Universe Fan Factions: This looks less like a trope and more like a misplaced character page/work page.
  • Pop Culture Urban Legends and Urban Legend of Zelda: Both are classified as Trivia instead of Audience Reactions, despite rumors about works being spread by the audience. Both also already have a decent amount of wicks on YMMV subpages. Discussion about making the latter YMMV came up in its 2017 TRS thread (the former hadn't been launched at the time), but discussion petered out.
    The latter's description and quote (as of May 16, 2021) also don't clearly indicate that it's about fake hidden content in interactive media (which is what separates it from Pop Culture Urban Legends) and not every video game rumor, despite a previous TRS thread defining it as such.
  • Power Law Blogs: This article demonstrates an awareness of clique behavior and a bit of Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, focusing on how the blogs with the lowest count have the highest popularity. It's an anemic and ancient page.
  • Relationship Voice Actor: Inherited the problems of Hey Its That Voice and Hey Its That Guy, which were cut for being treated more like games for editors than actual trivia. Also tends to have terribly written examples that reek of Fan Myopia and contain excessive use of sinkholing.
  • Reviewer Stock Phrases: Contains a lot of general examples, some of which can verge into either praise or panning. Also of note: there used to be a viewer counterpart (Viewer Stock Phrases), but that was cut a while back.
  • Righting Great Wrongs: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's currently an Administrivia page and not a Main/ page. Removing from Wiki Tropes was the main proposal.
  • The Roast: Contains a trope list for specific roasts, as if it's a work page and a trope page. Common tropes should be folded into the description, while the specific roasts and roast series should be given their own work pages.
  • Same Language Dub seems to cover two distinct concepts: an actor’s voice being dubbed by another actor during post-production; and a localized dub for a different market in the same language. The latter is possibly redundant to Dueling Dubs, and both concepts are trivia.
  • Sampling: Due to a requirement on the page that states, "Examples should be either non-straight, due to the widespread use of it, or particularly notable." The latter clause violates a long-standing rule on the wiki, and leads to confusion over which samples count as "notable."
  • Self-Insert Fic: It's been discussed in the ZCE thread that this trope is hard to contextualize without diving into troping the author themself (Auto Erotic or otherwise), and seems to be conflating a few related concepts. Perhaps turning it into a genre index would help alleviate this.
  • Self-Plagiarism: A creator's work is heavily derived from at least one of their previous works, which is a meta concept that involves multiple works, so it should be Trivia. Also, despite the word "plagiarism", a lot of examples are just when the work reuses anything from one of the creator's previous works, however small it may be.
  • Shout-Out to Shakespeare: No longer a trope — it's a redirect to a Referenced by... subpage for William Shakespeare (ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare). Despite this, it still has several wicks, and since the target page is in the ReferencedBy/ namespace, doing Wick Namespace Migration from Main.Shout Out To Shakespeare to ReferencedBy.Shout Out To Shakespeare (with wicks pointing to ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare instead) would keep inbounds while preventing it from being used as a trope. Compare the Main.How Do I Used Tense redirect to UsefulNotes.Tenses being moved to UsefulNotes.How Do I Used Tense.
  • Single-Issue Wonk: It seems viable as an In-Universe Examples Only trope similar to Berserk Button, so it should allow on-page examples (but no real life examples). The description is a bit too Internet-centric, likely due to starting life as troping Real Life users instead of characters and its frequent usage in the forums to report users with a narrow-minded editing agenda.
  • Sinkhole: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's an Administrivia page and not a Main/ page. Removing it from Wiki Tropes was the main proposal.
  • Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon: This is a game and not a trope, so it would probably be better suited to Just For Fun instead of Main/.
  • STD Immunity: The page is a mixture of subversions, aversions and straight examples. Aversions may be better under a different trope.
  • Super Weight appears to be intended for a Just For Fun game for listing perceived power levels of characters. It would be redundant to various other tropes covering the power levels, such as Made of Plasticine for level -1.
  • There Are No Therapists: Defined in the negative, like the now-cut Nobody Over 50 Is Gay. While it isn't indexed under No Straight Examples, Please, it's listed as a trope in aggregate like Nobody Over 50 Is Gay, and it has a lot of aversions (which Nobody Over 50 Is Gay was solely for). Aversions may be redundant with The Shrink, which is for when therapists do appear.
  • Thread Mode: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's an Administrivia page and not a Main/ page. Removing it from Wiki Tropes and adding it to the Administrivia index were proposed.
  • Trope Grid: Is in the Main namespace, despite seeming like a Just for Fun page.
  • TV Tropes Wiki Hates Me: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's specific to TV Tropes. Cutting, merging it with the TV Tropes Glossary, and merging with Data Vampires and/or The Database Hates Me were proposed.
  • Vampire Detective Series: Low wick count, but not enough to count as "not thriving"; this also seems to be too narrowly specific and could be expanded into a general "Supernatural Detective" trope.
  • We Are Not Alone Index: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's specific to TV Tropes and it's also an index and not a trope. Removing it from Wiki Tropes was proposed.
  • Wick: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Classified as a wiki trope, but it's an Administrivia page that refers to a term coined on TV Tropes for TV Tropes. Removing it from Wiki Tropes was proposed.
  • The Wiki Rule: Fandom wikis have become so commonplace in the internet age that their existence is not very notable outside of rare exceptions where multiple wikis for a single franchise co-exist (e.g. Bulbapedia and Serebii for Pokémon). Examples also tend to just consist of offsite links; any person who is actively looking for a wiki will probably just do a Google search instead of check a work's Trivia tab, bringing the usefulness of the entries into question.
  • Wikipedia Syntaxer and Wikipedia Updater: Classified as Wiki Tropes, but they're specific to TV Tropes and refer to the application of Wikipedia-style editing to TV Tropes, which may be better suited to Just For Fun, possibly merged with each other and possibly also Dr. Pedia and Mr. Trope. They were brought up in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread, but discussion stalled.
  • Wiki Vandal: Failed to reach consensus in the Wiki Tropes TRS thread. Merging it with the TV Tropes Glossary, merging it with Troper Types, and moving it to Administrivia were proposed.
  • You Have Been Warned: Seems more like a joke than a rule or policy, yet it's on Administrivia instead of Just For Fun.


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