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Have a page you want to take to the Trope Repair Shop, but there's too much backlog? Never fear—save those pages here!

Feel free to also include the reason why you want to TRS it, a link to prior discussion, and/or a link to a wick check, just so it's all in order when we can finally take these things to TRS.

Need help with the wick checking? Get assistance here.

See also Appearance Tropes Cleanup, TLP Crash Rescue Tallies, Color Tropes Cleanup, and Badass Clean-Up.

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Before adding an entry, consider:

  • If it would be more suited for a basic cleanup thread
  • If the trope has had previous discussions or repair/cleanup efforts
  • If it's possible the issue is small-scale or not as problematic as assumed

Trope Repair Shop is intended as a last resort if other discussion and cleanup venues fail, so it's not a good idea to add something to the page unless you're convinced there's a problem that can't be solved by any other means. If you'd like to see if an entry is viable, you can ask at the Tropes Needing TRS cleanup and discussion thread or the TRS All-Purpose Policy and Meta discussion thread.

Note: Anything with an asterisk at the end (*) is in need of a wick check or extra discussion before being taken to the TRS. Also, make sure you're sorting your trope into the correct folder.

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    Misuse or ZCE issues 
  • 1 Million B.C.: Supposed to be for a highly stereotypical depiction of prehistory which shows cavemen and dinosaurs existing together, but is sometimes used for depictions of the Stone Age that are more realistic yet still stereotypical (no dinosaurs but other inaccuracies are present), or for generally realistic works about prehistoric humans. *
  • 100% Adoration Rating: It's used to refer to anyone who’s greatly loved, but it specifically refers to beloved rulers. *
  • Accidental Aesop: This audience reaction is about a good creator-unintended aesop that the audience interprets. However, like Hard Truth Aesop before its rename, it's frequently used for what is really Warp That Aesop (when people draw absurd conclusions to a work's themes), Alternate Aesop Interpretation (when the audience interprets another aesop from the one that's intended), or just "unintended Bad Aesop." Maybe do like Creator's Apathy (formerly They Just Didn't Care) and require Word of God to make it trivia? *
  • Adorable Evil Minions: Lots of ZCEs that just say the minions are adorable without actually describing what they look like. A lot of examples also feel like gushing. *
  • Airstrip One: A lot of the examples (probably because of the poor page image) are areas that just happen to have a nondescript name for whatever reason - e.g. parodies where all areas are named North City or the Forest Of Trees as a joke. The trope is supposed to be un-naming a region after conquering it, as with the Trope Namer (1984 having the UK referred to as Airstrip One after the rise of totalitarianism). Usage check suggests misuse may be more on the page itself than on other pages that link to it, and that the specific misuse described here is not even particularly common compared to other types; cleanup may be all that's necessary.
  • Alluring Anglerfish: Supposed to be about anglerfish representation in media as Fiendish Fish who use their glowing lures to hunt their prey, but many pages apply it to anything that possesses a lure to lure its prey into false sense of security, no matter whenever they even remotely resemble anglerfishes or are even fish in question, and no matter whether the lure in question is a glowing anglerfish lure. (Wick check here.)
  • Alternate Universe Reed Richards Is Awesome: As the opposite of Reed Richards Is Useless, this trope is supposed to be about characters who used their powers/skills to make the world a better place by solving real problems compared to their regular counterpart. However, it's frequently misconstrued as being about an Alternate Self of a character who is simply stronger or better at things than their main universe counterpart, with no references as to how they could've used their powers to benefit society from a practical standpoint. *
  • Always a Bigger Fish: This is about when the characters are cornered by something threatening, only to be saved when it is taken out by a bigger threat, but many examples are of animals eating each other without saving anyone in the process. That trope (if the animals are portrayed as monstrous) is Food Chain of Evil, and the misuse is probably not helped by the latter trope's misleading name (since monsters may just be portrayed as regular predators with no sense of morality). It is also misused for any situation in which a powerful character is rivaled by a more powerful one, even if nobody ends up being saved. *
  • Americans Hate Tingle: It's supposed to be about things that are popular or well-liked domestically attracting widespread hatedom in another country, but despite having the word "hate" right there in the name, it's widely misused for things simply not catching on other countries, even if it is actually more of a country- or region-specific Cult Classic or Acclaimed Flop. *
  • And I Must Scream: Supposed to refer to a never-ending, years-long if not eternal Fate Worse than Death, but is used to cover any situation where someone is trapped or paralysed and unable to prevent their doom, which will arrive rather shortly (by this trope's standards) in many cases. *
  • Asian Store-Owner: The title doesn't make it clear that this is for a certain stereotype, and it receives some examples for Asian store owners who don't appear to fit the trope. *
  • Autobots, Rock Out!: As a music trope, the page is rife with ZCEs that just say the song or band, but do nothing to explain how the song comes in or what the scene is even like. *
  • The Backwards Я is ostensibly about borrowing letters from Cyrillic or other alphabets to make text look more foreign. A small amount of misuse now better covered by Randomly Reversed Letters remains, but several other examples refer to in-universe confusion between Cyrillic letters and Latin letters that resemble them, which should also be another trope. *
  • Beneath the Earth: It's supposed to be about cities or societies underneath the earth. Predictably, it gets mistaken for just about anything living underneath the earth, such as big monsters (which is not helped by the image). Has a wick check here.
  • Big Applesauce: Supposed to be "Everything important in America, if not the whole world, happens in New York City" but instead is misused as "New York City exists". *
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Despite having three criteria that must be met in order to apply (appears out of nowhere, does not make sense in context, and has no impact on the story whatsoever), examples have a tendency to miss the "not making sense in context" part and use it to refer to events that aren't connected to the main story regardless of if they still make sense given the setting, characters, and/or narrative devices. Has a wick check here.
  • Bleached Underpants: Despite the on-page description for the trope being about a work aimed at general audiences stemming from an NSFW work, it's frequently used for when a creator of a work aimed at general audiences also created an NSFW one that has no relation to the non-NSFW one. As this ATT thread pointed out, the misuse could be spun into a separate trivia trope, provided it's not common to the point of being People Sit on Chairs. *
  • Boom, Headshot!: Description is quite clearly "headshots deal extra damage in this game", but examples are both that and "person dies of being shot in the head in any context", so there seems to be some Missing Supertrope Syndrome going on here. *
  • Bottle Episode: The trope was brought up in ATT as a mixture of misused as "any episode that takes place in a single room", rather than an episode where little plot happens, and also as a possible speculation magnet. Has a wick check here.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: This is supposed to be about when fictional characters address the audience, but many examples just refer to characters aware that they are in a work of fiction, without referencing the audience in any way. The source of confusion/misuse is likely from TVTropes using a narrower definition than the rest of the web. *
  • Buxom Is Better: Supposed to be "large breasts are portrayed as better than smaller ones", but is misused as "character has large breasts", which is People Sit on Chairs. Wick check can be found here.
  • Cat Smile: Another ZCE-laden appearance trope. While the description does describe some character traits, most examples are just "character makes a :3 face". *
  • Catharsis Factor: It's supposed to be a YMMV trope about relieving stress through (typically violent) actions, but it's commonly misused as an Audience Reaction for the satisfaction of an unsympathetic character (usually a Jerkass, Hate Sink, or Complete Monster) receiving punishment for their transgressions. *
  • Cargo Ship: Is supposed to be about fans who pretend that a character has romantic feelings for inanimate objects, but a lot of examples are about characters canonically developing feelings for an object In-Universe, which is a different concept (and may already be covered by Companion Cube). *
  • Cheese Strategy: the trope uses a specific definition (i.e. that the strategy requires little skill to execute), but most fandoms have their own definition (which often boils down to "strategy people don't like"). The result is that the page has a lot of examples that are called cheese but don't meet the trope definition. Judging by the description, there might be too much overlap with Easy Level Trick for this to be a distinct trope. *
  • Clueless Aesop: Suffers from misuse and subjectivity. Misuse because the trope's supposed to be when a work cannot possibly make its message work because of what the work itself is (for example, a kids' show that tries to give a Drugs Are Bad Aesop when its age rating forbids it from properly tackling that subject), but many examples are just works that fail to make their Aesop work for any reason, including just plain poor writing. It's subjective because most of the examples also explain the impact the "cluelessness" has on the work, which often involves passing judgment on its quality, and "this work couldn't possibly have made its message work" is often arguable (going by the example above, a kids' show that tries to deal with mature themes might fail, but some have successfully done so). Plus, similar to Broken Aesop (see the "Actually Subjective" folder), "This work failed to deliver its intended moral" might be subjective. *
  • Clumsy Copyright Censorship: Specifically for copyright censorship that's poorly done, but is often used for any instance of something in a work being altered due to copyright issues. *
  • Cool Old Guy: Is RIFE with ZCE issues all over the site. It's a vague enough term that it's being applied to any older male character that shows up in a work with little else. *
  • Crapsaccharine World is supposed to be a subversion of a Sugar Bowl, wherein a world that seems to be one is revealed to be a Crapsack World underneath. It is instead frequently used for worlds with positive elements that are contrasted with serious problems and harsh reality, but is still portrayed in a positive light, not being outright rotten- for instance, a fantasy world that looks like cheery high fantasy, but also has war, death, and strife, yet not enough to make it a true Crapsack World. *
  • Creator Killer: Supposed to be for when a work is responsible for killing off a creator, but non-works are sometimes listed. An expansion might be needed—the misuse may still be tropeworthy. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Damage-Sponge Boss: Supposed to be about, as noted by My Timing Is Off, "a very basic boss fight that is little more than a war of attrition, with little strategy beyond "hit it until it dies"". It gets misused, however, for any boss with a lot of health. Check 50 wicks. *
  • The Danza: Supposed to be for when the character is unambiguously named after the actor, but a lot of examples are just "actor and character shares a name" even if it could be a coincidence or a Casting Gag. Wick check here.
  • The Dead Have Names. Judging by its description, this is redundant to War Memorial. However, the examples suggest that this is about a character remembering everybody who died in a war, meaning that it's a character action and not a list of names. This would mean that the trope name and/or the description need to be changed.
    Image Pickin' previously removed the image for The Dead Have Names (link to thread) because it was a better fit for War Memorial, and the current image for the latter was picked in a thread for the former, with the image on the former being pulled instead of replaced.*
  • Developer's Foresight: Previously renamed from The Dev Team Thinks of Everything because it was being used too broadly — it's about video game developers accounting for things players have to go out of their way to find, if they find them at all, but it was frequently misused to refer to Easter eggs and attention to detail. Despite the rename, the trope continues to suffer from roughly the same kind of misuse that caused it to get renamed. *
  • Didn't See That Coming: The trope is supposed to be that a careful plan goes to pieces because of something wholly unexpected (basically, The Chessmaster who fails at Xanatos Speed Chess), but is misused for "a character was surprised by something" or for "a plot twist surprised the audience". The source of the misuse is likely the vague trope name, meaning that this trope might need a rename. *
  • Discredited Meme is only supposed to allow In Universe and creator-acknowledged examples, but it still gets frequent out-of-universe and non-creator acknowledged use, particularly from people complaining about memes they don't like. The fact that it's classified as YMMV is probably a factor — creator-acknowledged information generally falls under Trivia and not YMMV. A similar situation happened with Creator's Apathy, which was moved from YMMV to Trivia when Word of God acknowledgment became a requirement. One option would be to split creator-acknowledged examples into a Trivia item with Creator's Apathy-style Word of God requirements (possibly also allowing Word of Saint Paul acknowledgments) and in-universe examples into a separate In-Universe Examples Only trope, and turning Discredited Meme into a disambiguation page between the two. *
  • Distaff Counterpart is currently defined as a character receiving a genderbent counterpart in a spinoff work. Many of these examples coexist with their source character in the same work, and the "spinoff" requirement may be unnecessarily narrow. Additionally, the merging of this trope with Spear Counterpart leaves the title misleading, as distaff specifically means female — using the redirect messes up alphabetization. Has a wick check here.
  • Epileptic Trees: This trope is supposed to be about fan theories that are so wild and insane that they couldn't possibly be true, despite what the fans hope for. However, it's most often used to discuss basic speculation and theory crafting that more often than not has evidence that supports it coming true in the future, which makes the trope feel utterly redundant to Wild Mass Guessing. *
  • Flanderization: Often confused for Temporarily Exaggerated Trait (when a character is only exaggerated for one scene/episode/chapter/etc) or Character Exaggeration (where a character is exaggerated in an adaptation or a fanfic). Has a wick check here.
  • Flat "What": Despite it being a dialogue trope, it's often used as a Pothole Magnet to describe the troper's own thoughts. It also has a tendency to be potholed to any instance of a character saying "What?" in response to something weird, even though it's supposed to be for someone saying "What." in a flat tone of voice as a statement of disbelief rather than a question of confusion. *
  • Fleeting Demographic Rule: This trope has many examples of works that don't have a fleeting demographic, such as animated shock comedies. *
  • Follow the Leader: Often used to describe a single work being very similar to a more successful work instead of multiple works being very similar to a more successful one. Also attracts complaining/bashing in the form of baseless claims that "Work B is just Work A but Recycled IN SPACE!/with the Serial Numbers Filed Off". *
  • Four Is Death: The trope is specifically for significant instances of Four being overtly associated with death or ghosts in Eastern media, but gets used for any instance of the number four being associated with various and likely coincidental negative things, or former examples of what is now known as Elite Four (and in fact that trope was originally launched to deal with a lot of this trope's former misuse, though that was not enough). Some instances of misuse here. *
  • Four-Man Band: Attracts ZCEs, and uses a cumbersome table format for examples. *
  • Freudian Trio: Most examples are ZCE that just list what character fits which type without saying how. Pages also have incredibly weird formatting, presumably to get around the "no third bullets" rule. *
  • Friend to All Living Things: Often used as Animal Lover, which is a character who loves animals, but the trope is meant to be when animals love the character. *
  • Gainax Ending: Despite being about endings that make no sense even within the context of the work, many examples are just odd Twist Endings that still make sense within the context of the work. *
  • Gender-Blender Name: An IP discussion points out that the trope was often used as someone having a name common to the opposite gender. In reality, the trope was supposed to be for gender-neutral names. *
  • Gender Flip: Frequently used throughout the site used as "Rule 63 But Official", but part of the description notes the original character and their flipped adaptational counterpart need to be visually distinct in appearance if not entirely. Most examples list works that just flip the gender and change the name with changes to appearance minuscule beyond Tertiary Sexual Characteristics, and multiple examples list characters that are not the same character after a supposed flip, but rather Distaff and Spear Counterparts. Wick Check here. note  *
  • Genre-Busting: The striking majority of examples are works made of several different but easily distinguishable genres, which would put them under Genre Mashup instead. There are also a few ZCEs littering the page, of the "extremely vague" type. Previous discussions here and here.
    The TRS thread for Neoclassical Punk Zydeco Rockabilly decided to migrate its examples to either Genre Mashup or Genre-Busting, but it clocked out during the cleanup phase.
  • Good Is Impotent: The definition used on the page is when a character is split into their "good" and "evil" halves, and the evil one is more effective than the good one. However, many examples describe good-aligned characters in general being ineffective. *
  • History's Crime Wave: The page describes it as whenever a work uses historical villains. However, its title, image, several of its examples, and this discussion suggest that the actual definition of the trope might be about historical villains teaming up. The said description is unclear on that aspect. *
  • Humans Are Good: The page is misused for everyone (or most people) being inherently somewhat good (including the old page image and laconic), which is People Sit on Chairs. The trope only applies for settings with multiple races, in which humans are the "good" race. Might need a better name, since similarly-named tropes (like Humans Are Bastards) do apply to everyone/most people in a work. *
  • Humor Dissonance: The item is intended for in-universe jokes that the characters find funny but the audience doesn't, but it's often used for writers deliberately setting up an unfunny joke that the characters (or certain characters) find funny, or when a character tells jokes that other characters find unfunny, both of which are objective. A good chunk of examples are on Recap pages, and even the YMMV wicks have several in-universe instances listed rather than audience reactions. *
  • Hunk: Supposed to be a man who is handsome and masculine, misused for any character tropers find attracting. The intended definition may even be too subjective to begin with. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: Gets constantly misused for Pay Evil unto Evil but actually means "villainous act inadvertently screwed over somebody who had it coming". *
  • Idiosyncratic Difficulty Levels: Supposed to be for games where most or all difficulty levels are labelled contrary to the default "easy, normal, hard". Many examples are just Harder Than Hard with default difficulty naming. *
  • If You Ever Do Anything to Hurt Her...: Description very clearly states that this is a method for one character (rival love interest/family member usually) to formally give up their "claim" on the titular "her". Examples both on- and off-page ignore this in favor of focusing on the "you hurt her, I hurt you" aspect. *
  • I Knew It!: On this wiki, this Trivia item has a specific meaning: a fan theory or fan speculation being proven correct. However, the phrase has a broader meaning outside of this wiki. As a result, it gets misused for In-Universe examples where someone reacts to being correct about something under any circumstance or someone literally saying the phrase "I knew it" or any variation of it. I Knew It! has also been linked to whenever the words would come up, which is one reason No New Stock Phrases was implemented. A similar issue with "Too Soon" (which was frequently confused with Dude, Not Funny!, due to that phrase's usual meaning) caused it to be renamed to Distanced from Current Events. In addition, it should probably be YMMV instead of Trivia since it involves fan theories; Jossed was moved from Trivia to YMMV because it involves debunked fan theories, while I Knew It! is essentially the inverse of Jossed because it involves confirmed fan theories. *
  • Impossibly Cool Clothes: As brought up in this Image Pickin' thread, many outfits listed are not actually impossibly cool. *
  • Instant-Win Condition: Examples cover two different concepts, based on either the trope's title, or the trope's definition. The title and image imply that the trope is about a rule, mechanic, card, etc. that allows a player to win without having to accomplish a game's normal win conditions. The definition instead describes a situation where once one player wins, the game ignores anything that could nullify that victory, no matter how little sense it makes. There are also a few examples that seem to be about victory conditions in general. *
  • It's a Small World, After All: The description makes it clear that this is about works with space travel treating entire planets as equivalents to small towns, but the examples even just on the page are full of misuse for the commonly-known "people with preexisting connections meet up again by coincidence" meaning of the phrase. *
  • Lady Mondegreen: Supposed to be an Audience Reaction where a non-character phrase is misheard/read as a character (such as "laid him on the green" as "Lady Mondegreen" or "gladly the cross I'd bear" as "Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear"), but instead is used for misheard lines in general, and it also has a lot of in-universe examples. *
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: The trope is for when a spoiler for a serial work appears front-and-cover in advertising or other official sources, but it's often confused for It Was His Sled or instances of sequels having story aspects that would spoil the original work for late arrivals, as in people who watch the sequel first. *
  • Lip Lock: The trope is about dialogue being changed in the dub to match the lip movement of the original version, but it's often used for cases where the characters' lips movements don't synchronize with their dialogue. It's also used for complaining. *
  • Lover and Beloved: Supposed to be about, within gay or ambiguously gay male couples, when "one partner is much older and acts as a mentor to another" per the description. However, it was brought up that many examples lack the "mentor" portion of the trope. Check 50 wicks. *
  • The Maiden Name Debate: Supposed to be about an engaged woman's uncertainty over changing her surname before getting married. Most examples listed are about women who were never shown having the debate and instead either kept their maiden name or have hyphenated surnames. In some cases, it's even listed for unmarried characters with hyphenated surnames. *
  • Mandela Effect: Noted as attracting nitpicking misuse, along with being poorly-defined. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Memetic Mutation: Oftentimes, this attracts popular quotes with no explanation as to how they're memes. *
  • Me's a Crowd: The trope is about making clones in order to do tasks, but due to the vague name, several examples simply list instances of clones without specifying if they were made for a purpose. There may be confusion with Self-Duplication for this reason. *
  • Mind Screw: Is supposed to be for works that are deliberately confusing due to extensive Rule of Symbolism and unexplained elements, but is used for any work that is confusing, or just confusing things in general. It is a Pothole Magnet. *
  • Murderers Are Rapists: The page is medium-specific in a way that isn't a requirement, off-page wicks attract ZCE, and the name is very similar to our "All X are Y" tropes. Listed on Definition-Only Pages due to Fast Eddie removing examples around a decade ago. *
  • Name-Meaning Change: The description says that this is when something's name is retroactively given a new meaning by its creators or other people in charge, but other examples are when it has a new meaning in an adaptation (which may fit better under Adaptational Context Change), and In-Universe instances of people deciding to change the meaning of a name. Also has a lot of overlap with Reimagining the Artifact. *
  • Nintendo Hard is persistently shoehorned and lacks a clear cutoff; it sometimes attracts complaining as well. It is likely also YMMV due to involving difficulty. *
  • Nobody Poops: Most examples listed on work pages are aversions to this trope, but the trope is supposed to be for lampshaded examples. *
  • No-Respect Guy: This trope is supposed to be about how The Chew Toys are considered Only Sane Men, but, due to the name, it gets misused as "any character who gets zero respect from others", which is the definition of Butt-Monkey, The Friend Nobody Likes, or Hated by All. *
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping: The trope is for when actors make a slip when portraying a character with an accent foreign to their own, but a lot of examples are in-universe cases of a character doing this while faking an accent for different reasons (and there is an entire section for it on the trope page). *
  • Out of Order: This is supposed to be about a work being presented in the wrong order in its initial debut (i.e. tv episodes airing in a different order than production order, or comic books being published not in the intended order), but is commonly misused to say that a work is presented on something like a home media release or on a streaming service in an order that is different from the original order. *
  • Overshadowed by Controversy: Often misused for non-controversies, along with off-mission usage. A Trope Talk thread suggested limiting this YMMV item to media and media creators only. Ongoing wick check of 50 wicks. *
  • Porn Stache: A lot of examples are just about the mustache without any indication of the stereotype it represents. *
  • Pronoun Trouble: Despite the trope being clear-cut and objective, multiple examples talk about fans having trouble figuring out what pronouns to use for a character. If we don't already have a YMMV trope for this, it's good splitting fodder. *
  • Retro Universe: Supposed to be about an Alternate Universe where retro, vintage or antiquated technology, styles and aesthetics are still used, but is often mistaken for Anachronism Stew and Ambiguous Time Period. *
  • Rich Idiot With No Day Job: This is supposed to be about characters who pretend to be a Millionaire Playboy or Upper-Class Twit as a front for their crimefighting careers or otherwise hidden usage of their wealth, but far too many examples tend to eschew the Secret Identity requirement in favor of describing lazy rich people in general, which is already covered by the previously mentioned tropes and Idle Rich. *
  • Rock Star Song: Attracts a lot of zero-context examples, both on and off-page, many of which just state the name of the song. Wick check here.
  • Romantic Vampire Boy: On-page examples are devoid of context. A wick check will be needed to determine how widespread the issue is. *
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: This trope is supposed to be about a specific kind of spelling error in which the spelling of the word is correct, but the word itself is wrong. However, it’s frequently used to describe any sort of grammatical error, no matter if the typo is a correctly-spelled word or not. *
  • Sapient Cetaceans: Intended to be for whales being as smart as humans, but is misused as "any anthropomorphic whale." Check 50 wicks. *
  • Scary Black Man: This trope is supposed to be about a portrayal of large black men as scary, but, as noted by this comment, it has been extremely problematically misused as any strong or tough black male character. If wick checked, 59 wicks need checking. *
  • The Scream: The trope is about how an exaggerated scream is used for (usually) comedic effect. However, most examples detail just about any situation in which a character yells, no matter how mundane it is. The trope is also incorrectly used to reference Edvard Munch's eponymous painting. *
  • Sensory Overload: The description and on-page examples state that it's supposed to be for when someone is intentionally overwhelmed with sensory input (usually involving Super Senses), but it's frequently used for the real-life psychological phenomenon of sensory overload. Might need a rename, and real-life sensory overload should also have a Useful Notes page. *
  • Set Swords to "Stun": The description very clearly refers to video game mechanics, but the examples are about non-lethal lethal weapons in all media and contexts. *
  • Skull for a Head: Most examples are just ZCEs amounting to "character has skull head" with no actual explanation. *
  • Staring Through the Sword: Loads of commented out ZCEs on the main page that just say "does this". Might not be tropeworthy either, since it relies on Rule of Cool. Wick check is here.
  • Sound-Effect Bleep: Originally intended for when an in-universe sound effect covers up dialogue so that the audience can't hear it, it has become frequently used to refer to regular censor bleeps. Even the trope definition has a bit of a split personality. *
  • Stock Parody Jokes: There should be some criteria for what constitutes a "parody joke," as many of these appear to be stock fandom jokes (which belongs in Memetic Mutation) or just straight-up complaints disguised as "jokes." Examples also tend to lack context, simply naming the joke without any other context as to how and why it's used in parodies, which makes cleanup quite difficult. On a less important note, there's also an issue with redundancy — any show with a bald character attracts cancer jokes, any show with anthro animals attracts furry jokes, etc. Discussion has come up frequently at the [[cleanup thread. *
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: Using text to explain how two songs are similar is a skill apparently not possessed by most tropers, leading to massive violation of Weblinks Are Not Examples. A lot of times it is also used for deliberately similar songs, which goes under Musical Pastiche. *
  • Tainted by the Preview: Supposed to be when a fanbase is turned off from an anticipated work because of a trailer, but is used for any work that doesn't impress from the offset, regardless of any fan backing or not. It's also misused for when the fandom doesn't like any information about an upcoming work. Might need to either be broadened or have its name changed, since the current one makes this reaction seem broader than it actually is. *
  • Teens Are Short: The trope is about works in which teenage characters are consistently depicted as being shorter than adults despite this not always being the case in real life. It's a visual shorthand to group characters by age. Instead, it's often misused to state that a teenager character is incidentally short, or to compare the shortest teenager to other characters who aren't short (the definition of 'short' mostly depends on the troper). (Wick Check here)
  • Timmy in a Well: Examples seem to follow a broader definition than one specific "Stock Plot" involving some child in trouble (which is mainly associated with the Heroic Pet genre), though a significant number do parody that. *
  • Title, Please!: Seems to attract zero-context examples, and since all aversions are covered by Episode Title Card, it's questionable whether we need both tropes. *
  • Troubled Production: Noted as attracting misuse for minor problems in a work's production or "toxic work culture" (which may be too common to list) as opposed to massive, disastrous productions. A cut or Trivia conversion was suggested. Check 62 wicks. *
  • Uncertain Audience: Supposed to be for works without a clear target audience, but it gets misused for "this work wasn't targeted at me." Ongoing wick check of 50 wicks. *
  • Unobtainium. It's right in the name: an important part of this trope is that we can't obtain this material. That's rarer than you'd think in fiction, and indeed it's getting misused for any material that's rare and valuable. Given that "unobtainable" materials end up being eventually "obtained" in most fiction, it's not clear that this is a sufficiently distinct trope from Applied Phlebotinum and its family. *
  • The Un-Favourite: Refers to children whose parents neglect them as a result of Parental Favoritism directed toward their sibling(s), but it's sometimes applied to characters who are ignored or neglected in other ways. *
  • The Un-Reveal: Is supposed to be "The Reveal, Subverted" but instead is often used for examples where something is unknown yet no reveal is set up for the audience at all. *
  • Unstoppable Force Meets Immovable Object: "A Stock Phrase for describing any conflict between particularly strong or particularly stubborn individuals". The article is explicitly about the phrase itself but it is frequently used to describe conflicts directly without anyone making the comparison in-universe. *
  • Violation of Common Sense: This is a video game trope wherein the game gives you the option to do something plainly foolish, then rewards you for doing it. Many of the examples, even on the page, are just "this works in a way I personally think is nonsensical." Many other examples are just dumb things the game lets you do. *
  • We All Live in America: Supposed to be when foreign countries are written more-or-less exactly like the author's, but it's often used for individual errors. Wick check here.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Is supposed to be specifically for minor characters or plot points that disappear without explanation, but it sees use for all types. *
  • Wild Magic: On This Very Wiki, "Wild Magic" refers to magic being "alive" (that is, magic that isn't easily controlled). However, in most other places, the term "Wild Magic" refers to magic that produces random effects (which we have under "Entropy and Chaos Magic"). Predictably, this leads to a lot of examples that use the more "common" definition than the one used on the site. *
  • Woolseyism: The definition deals with changes made to a translation done specifically for pragmatic reasons that end up well-received. Examples frequently treat it as if it was straight-up Superlative Dubbing. Occasionally, it's misused to complain about translations being worse than the original, despite the proper definition having to do with good translations. *
  • X Meets Y: Used as a Pothole Magnet, usually for Crossovers, despite already being a Just for Fun page about works combining the main elements of two other works. The main page is also loaded with ZCEs and Fan Myopia. *

    Not Thriving 
  • Adminisphere: Created before 2010, but only has 27 wicks, only 9 of which link to work or character pages, and 212 inbounds as of 28th of July.
  • Backyard Wrestling: A "trope" created in 2009 with no work examples and its own example list and only 33 wicks.
  • Charlie Chaplin Shout-Out: Only has 32 wicks as of April 30, 2020, and may work better as a Referenced by... subpage (ReferencedBy.Charlie Chaplin) than a trope — "Shout-Out to Shakespeare" was moved to ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare and "Good Grief, Another Peanuts Shout-Out!" was moved to ReferencedBy.Peanuts.
  • Chic and Awe: Existed since 2009, 20 wicks excluding indices.
  • Common Hollywood Sex Traits: Only has 24 wicks, many of which are aversions. All the on-page examples are general, and the amount of detail in said examples may violate the Content Policy. It's unknown if this is trope-worthy or could at least be remade into an index or super-trope, as it has heavy overlap with Idealized Sex. Discussion.
  • Concept Art: Has zero examples and exists since 2010. However, it has 41 wicks. An Ask The Tropers discussion suggested that a TRS was needed to decide what to do with it.
  • Crow's Nest Cartography: Only has 18 wicks as of 11 August 2021. This is possibly due to the name not being indicative of the trope (which is meant to be about video-game maps being gradually revealed the higher you go), and would probably be thriving more under the more commonly used term "Ubisoft Towers".
  • Curtain Fic: The page has been here since 2009 but only has 27 wicks. Also, while "curtain fic" is certainly a known term within the fanfic community, it's likely examples have been left untroped because a casual reader has no clue the term existed. Might also benefit from being expanded to include chapters of a work instead of the entire work, and for the description to put more emphasis that the activity doesn't have to be shopping.
  • Dramatic Half-Hour and Dramatic Hour Long: Both have been around since 2008, but only have 23 and 31 wicks, respectively. The latter doesn't even have any on-page examples!
  • Far-Out Foreigner's Favorite Food: 18 non-index wicks for a trope that has existed since 2011. Looks like a supertrope to the much younger Aliens Love Human Food, but neither crosswicks the other.
  • Faux Interracial Relationship: Being a Dead Horse Trope, it currently has a very short description, has only 13 examples, and only 14 wicks. A previous TRS thread for this trope was started in 2018, but was closed without consensus.
  • Front 13, Back 9: Created in 2010, but currently only has 18 wicks. On top of that, the description also reads like it's a Useful Note instead.
  • Hex Sign: Reads like a Useful Note but is in Main/, and is technically a stub due to only having two listed "Tropes". Despite also being here since 2012, it only has six wicks.
  • Homogenous Multinational Ad Campaign: Only has 9 wicks since 2009. Part of the issue might be the fact that it's an advertising trope, making crosswicking more difficult since many campaigns and companies don't have pages here, but the idea of the trope (creating a product that is vague enough to appeal to all international markets) doesn't even need to be advertising-specific.
  • Hotlinked Image Switch: Had only six wicks prior to being added here (October 22, 2020), one of which is on Pages Needing Wicks and none of which are on work pages. On-page examples are primarily focused on real life examples with little to no focus on fiction.
  • Human-to-Werewolf Footprints: Been here since 2007, but only has 25 wicks.
  • I Can't See Myself: Been here since 2011, only eleven examples on-page and 16 wicks.
  • If You Call Before Midnight Tonight: Only 20 wicks since 2007, as discovered by this TLP Crash Rescue comment.
  • Improbable Taxonomy Skills: Page made in 2009, but only has 20 wicks (only 11 of which are on work pages).
  • Internet Mimic: 14 wicks since 2008 along with it being an audience reaction in Main/ with questionable tropeworthiness.
  • Live-Action Cartoon: Only 23 wicks since 2016, and it attracts zero-context examples even on the page.
  • Long Form Promo: Failing to thrive (created in late 2009, only 3 wicks), may be a Forgotten Trope due to most examples of it occurring before 1990. Making the definition more general would likely make it collide with Super Bowl Special; as written, it could probably be merged with Station Ident.
  • Long John Shout-Out: Has a low amount of wicks (11 before being added to this page on October 22, 2020), pointing toward it being redundant with ReferencedBy.Treasure Island.
  • Made of Shiny: Has only 4 examples (none are valid) and has 22 wicks (only 11 are work wicks). Practically wasn't worked on since it was made in 2010.
  • Miniatures Conversions: Listed as a Definition Only Page, but it has been pointed out that there may be In-Universe examples.
  • My Art, My Memory: Has been here since 2011, but only has fifteen wicks and a low on-page example count.
  • No Serious Business In Showbusiness: Some kind of YMMV that might be a specific version of Angst Aversion. Has 5 wicks and only 1 "straight" example on the page.
  • One Case at a Time: Only 5 wicks. As an Acceptable Breaks from Reality trope for detective fiction, it has no on-page straight examples and is barely wicked anywhere. Definitely trope worthy, but it hasn't caught on.
  • One I Prepared Earlier: Has only 27 wicks, is almost exclusively the domain of cooking shows, and is less a narrative convention than a necessity of the format. The entire concept could be adequately explained in one sentence on the Cooking Show page.
  • Only in America: Only 28 wicks since 2008 and no examples on the page. The "trope" seems to just be describing a real-life media slant.
  • Overly Long Airplane Banner Gag: Only 11 wicks since 2011; seems to be describing a highly specific type of gag that may be Too Rare to Trope on its own.
  • Perp and Weapon: Has existed since 2008, but only has 7 non-Administrivia wicks. Only three of the examples on the trope page have context, and two out of three of the wicks on work pages are zero-context.
  • Phrase Salad Lyrics: Doesn't have very many wicks, and a previous thread was in favor of merging it with Word Salad Lyrics due to the definition being "The Same, but Less" to Word Salad Lyrics (which is already covered by Downplayed Trope), but the thread clocked out due to inactivity. While the description claims that such songs are more common than songs with Word Salad Lyrics, in addition to claiming that they might be as common as songs with a clear meaning, the fact that the Phrase Salad Lyrics only has a two-digit wick count while the Word Salad Lyrics has a four-digit wick count casts doubt on that claim.
  • Plot Pants: Only 11 wicks since 2008, which could be because the description isn't super clear on what it's supposed to be about (which appears to be "characters briefly break from their Limited Wardrobe"). It might be a dupe of another trope, too...
  • Premature Aggravation: Has only had 13 wicks since 2008. Most of the examples on the page don't seem to fit the description of "person gets aggravated after imagining a slight".
  • Prodigal Family: 17 wicks for a 2008 trope. Can focus on name or unfocused description here.
  • Radiograph of Doom: 14 wicks and 10 on-page examples. Possibly hampered by the name.
  • Queens Puzzle: 13 wicks since 2008; but the examples indicate it's not tropeworthy.
  • Reveille: Only has 14 wicks since 2014. The name for the bugle call may be too obscure, especially when compared to the healthier Taps article.
  • Rule of Animation Conservation: 22 wicks, and no example section. Made 10 years ago, with only 7 edits. It's not about animating only specific things, like Conspicuously Light Patch has specific colored things, but instead is about the specific use of the medium of animation for works in general. Could do with a better name?
  • Sanderson's First Law: Despite being made in 2013, it only has 18 wicks and no on-page examples. The trope describes other "laws" (despite the title implying that it only covers one), seems to overlap with The Laws of Magic and Functional Magic, and reads more like a work page than an actual trope.
  • Sent Off to Work for Relatives: Was launched in 2011 but is still struggling to gather wicks even after crosswicking. It has only 15 now. Some have suggested it might be due to the name being too narrow. Discussed here.
  • Sequelphobic: Has only 21 wicks and only 4 that are actually used on YMMV work pages (all of which are ZCEs or would fit better with It's the Same, So It Sucks) despite being launched in 2008. Several examples feel similar to Contested Sequel.
  • Spoiler Hound: Someone intentionally spoiling a work is an Audience Reaction, not an objective trope (a clearer objective equivalent exists at Spiteful Spoiler), yet this isn't YMMV. In addition, it lacks examples and would probably work better as a Definition-Only Page due to how broad the concept is.
  • Such a Phony: Dates to 2007 yet has only 18 pages linking to it. Has a non-indicative Stock Phrase name (the trope is about someone trash-talking another person behind their back but praising them to their face, with the trope name being just one way of doing so that adds a layer of Hypocritical Humor).
  • Temporary Scrappy: 2008-era page with only 14 wicks. "This trope is based on the idea that a Scrappy is recognizable enough that creating a Scrappy on purpose, for purposes of parody, is a trope in itself."
  • Textplosion: Only 20 examples and 11 wicks despite existing since 2009. The name is pretty opaque, and the description is pretty complainy.
  • Thud and Blunder: Only 7 examples and 5 wicks. Named for a 1978 essay critiquing cliched fantasy writing, this seems to be defined as "Rated M for Manly Sword and Sorcery, but bad."
  • True Art Is Ancient: Examples removed years ago without wiki consensus.
  • True Art Is Boring: Examples removed years ago without wiki consensus.
  • Video Game Weapon Stats: Despite being made in 2011, the page only has 15 off-page wicks, and all of the subpages were moved into JFF because they weren't really tropes.
  • Villain Killer: This Trope Talk thread indicated that this trope may be suffering from misuse in the form of any character who kills a lot of enemies, even if that isn't necessarily a trait associated with the characters. 50 wicks need checking. *

    Poor title 
  • Artificial Stupidity: Trope is supposed to be "AI is able to make choices and decisions but it does so badly", however many examples involve "AI" that is just following pre-determined orders, or things that they can't do because it was never programmed to be able to in the first place. Possible rename. *
  • Bad Boss: Frequently mistaken for Mean Boss, the mundane counterpart. Something like "Killer Boss" would better emphasize that it's about a supervillain who doesn't hesitate to kill or brutalize their minions. 107 wicks need checking. *
  • Better Than Canon: The trope refers to fan works handling as aspect of the story or characters better than the work it's derived from. However, possibly due to the name, it is sometimes misused for fans preferring aspects of non-canonical but still officially licensed works over what happens in canon. *
  • Born in an Elevator is broader than its title suggests — it covers any instance of a baby being born on the way to the hospital. There are just as many examples, if not more, that have the baby born in a vehicle. It only has 63 wicks, and this specific name may be preventing broader use. *
  • Break Up to Make Up: Has a confusing name unrelated to the trope's concept which is about a character finding their own self-worth after going through a break up. *
  • Caught in the Rain: The title doesn't hint in any way that it has to lead to kissing or sex. However, Romantic Rain is supposed to be the variant that leads to kissing or sex. Compare sister tropes Snowed-In (which doesn't lead to kissing or sex) and Snow Means Love (which does). *
  • Cipher Scything: Meant to be a trope about a "generic" or Featureless Protagonist being fleshed out or removed in an adaptation; it has less than 40 examples on-page, and 39 wicks (of which only 25 link to work or character pages). While "cipher" is an actual term for "blank slate" protagonists, the title doesn't clarify that that's what it's referring to in this context. A rename would help these issues, assuming tropes that like Canon Name or Cutting Off the Branches don't render this trope redundant.
  • City in a Bottle: Two threads have had difficulty picking images because this trope has a misleading name — it can be confused for literal cities in bottles. *
  • Confirmation Bias: Uses a pre-existing term about a fallacy for something more specific that occurs in fandom. Discussed here.
  • Destroy the Evidence: Did you think this trope was actually about destroying the evidence? Nope! This is (meant to be) specifically and only about evidence that is (1) about someone else, and (2) could be given to the authorities specifically. Needless to say the page has examples (and formerly an image) relating to destroying evidence in general. *
  • Double Aesop: It's been shown that the name can make one think of two morals being delivered instead of just one, but the trope is actually about two people learning the same aesop. *
  • Dropped Glasses: The trope is narrower than the name suggests, and examples are a mixture of dropped glasses being stepped on and dropped glasses causing problems. On Image Pickin', it was suggested by a mod that this be taken to TRS due to the trope's clarity issues. *
  • Einstein Sue: See here. "Character with no expertise knows the solution when experts don't" is a valid trope, but because of the "Sue" in its name, the name seems too negative, and not every character who has this happen to them is automatically a Mary Sue. *
  • Entertainingly Wrong: The title suggests something broader than the trope, which refers to characters drawing the wrong conclusion from correct but incomplete information. Its redirect, Wrong for the Right Reasons, is more explicit about this, and may actually be a better title. *
  • Eskimos Aren't Real: Though the trope is thriving fine, "Eskimo" is a controversial word, as discussed in the tropes with outdated/offensive names thread. Concerns were also brought up that referring to a specific disbelieved item might be misleading, since the trope is more general than that. *
  • Fiery Salamander applies to any reptile or amphibian with fire powers, not salamanders exclusively. But the trope name appears to imply otherwise, making the trope sound narrower than it actually is. *
  • Harmful to Minors: This trope is about children watching something that's bad for them, but due to the vague title, it's frequently used for bad things happening directly to children. *
  • The Hero's Birthday: Sounds like it's the same as Birthday Episode, and even had an image that was literally about the hero's birthday. The trope is when a story or work begins on (or close to) the hero's birthday, which isn't indicated by the title. Due to this, it's frequently misused for any hero's birthday. *
  • Hunter of His Own Kind: The description says that the hunter has to be the lone good member of an Always Chaotic Evil race, which is not indicated in the title. *
  • Hype Backlash: Refers to when a work is so heavily praised it can't possibly meet the fans' expectations. However, given that that hype can be prerelease publicity and anticipation, it is sometimes misused for when works are hyped up prior to release and fail to meet expectations when they come out. Hype Aversion, which is about when people avoid seeing the work for similar reasons, is also misused in this context. *
  • The Imp: The title is too broad for the concept it's meant to cover: a vice-ridden, non-threatening creature often tied to a more powerful character. Unsurprisingly, it attracts examples of all imp-like creatures.
  • "Join the Army," They Said: The trope is about military recruitment adverts, but the dialogue-based title makes it sound like Recruiters Always Lie. *
  • Lady in Red: The title merely means female characters in red, never mentioning that the character has to be "sexual" *
  • Lie Back and Think of England: This trope is supposed to be for women disliking and having to endure consensual sex, but gets misused (as was pointed out) for non-consensual examples. The name may be to blame for being vague. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Logic Bomb: This trope is for when a computer blows up because it cannot process certain information, but due to the vague title, it's used for any kind of paradox regardless of who interprets it or what happens as a result. *
  • Look on My Works, Ye Mighty, and Despair: Identified by the TRS thread for And Man Grew Proud as having an unclear title, poor image, and possible resultant misuse issues. The description has also been noted as being unclear. Might need an expansion and possibly a rename. 50 wicks need checking. *
  • Metallicar Syndrome: The 72 wicks—which is more than starving, but not many for a 12-year-old trope—suggests this suffers from a case of Trope-Namer Syndrome (a Fan Nickname from a particular forum for a character's car featured in Supernatural, which was big in 2010) *
  • Oddly Small Organization: the trope is an organization that we are informed is pretty large, but we are shown only a small team. It gets misused for any organization that is small. *
  • On One Condition: The trope describes plots where a dying person's inheritance is only granted to a character if they meet a certain condition. However, several wicks use it in the context of other conditional agreements, due to the title sounding more like a Stock Phrase. The broader idea of an agreement reliant on a certain condition may be tropeworthy, while this more specific idea about wills should get a more specific title. *
  • Paint It Black: Does not describe what the trope is, i.e. a magical Evil Makeover. In addition, the Trope Namer ("Paint It Black" by The Rolling Stones) has nothing to do with the trope, which even the description points out. *
  • Phlebotinum-Induced Stupidity: Far too restrictive a name for something that doesn't have to involve Phlebotinum at all; it only has 95 wicks. Could be renamed and expanded to include Status Infliction Attacks that reduce Intelligence. *
  • The Punishment: The page describes a very specific concept - a supernatural punishment that also gives the victim superpowers - but the name is as vague as can be. The description also weirdly describes the victim as "the Punishment", with capitalization. *
  • River of Insanity: The trope isn't actually about rivers but about any trip, and attracts misuse based on that. Its redirect Doomed Expedition covers the content better. *
  • Robosexual: Refers to robots having sex lives, but used to refer to humans attracted—romantically and/or sexually—to robots, which stems from offsite usage of the term. Relevant discussion, including a partial wick check.
  • School for Scheming: The trope name reads like it's literally about schools for scheming. It's actually about schools that are coverups schemes. In fact, the trope name reads so ambiguously that the description is required to point out that it's not about any Academies Of Evil. *
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: Extremely non-descriptive and unclear name. Trope is intended to be about a work's innovations becoming old hat and no longer impressive due to being copied, but gets misused for groundbreaking works in general, which go under Genre Turning Point. The unclear name may be contributing as it says nothing about the trope. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Self-Abuse: Nothing in the title indicates that it's a euphemism for masturbation as opposed to something like Self-Harm. It doesn't seem to be heavily misused, but it may be underused, with only 52 wicks since 2011. *
  • Shameless Fanservice Girl: While the Trope is intended to be about rejecting the nudity taboo (note that No Nudity Taboo is an index and not a trope), its title has led people to believe that it's about characters who embrace their sexuality, which is covered by several Fanservice Tropes. *
  • Sleep Cute is supposed to mean a shot of two characters innocently sleeping together in close proximity, more often than not indicating a Ship Tease. However, due to the misleading name (which in itself is a snowclone of Meet Cute), it sometimes gets misused as "character looks cute when sleeping", which is defined by a Beautiful Dreamer. *
  • Solid Gold Poop: Meant to be for waste materials being valuable to someone else, but some on-page examples took the name literally. *
  • Some Kind of Force Field: Title doesn't explain which aspect of a Force Field is involved, and is supposedly named after a stock phrase. *
  • Tan Lines: The description implies that this is some sort of characterization trope, but the title just indicates "tan lines exist" and tends to attract examples that aren't very clear on the trope's meaning. *
  • Tanuki: Supposed to be about a particular stereotype of the tanuki species in Japanese culture, but it's used for any representation of the real-life animal, whether or not it fits the stereotype. Renaming it to something like "Trickster Tanuki" would better emphasize the stereotype part. *
  • T-Word Euphemism: Doubly outdated title, referring to the deprecated practice of "Trope" as a title placeholder, and confusing when there are actual derogatory words that begin with "t". In addition, the preexisting term "minced oath" already covers this concept, among other euphemistic ways of replacing or referring to actual profanity. *
  • The Tonsillitis Episode: Despite its name, the trope also covers wisdom tooth removal under the justification that it's an Evolving Trope. These two concepts might be different enough to split off, or similar enough to be merged into a general "Short-Term Medical Procedure Episode" trope. *
  • To the Batnoun!: Misleading title leads it to be confused with Hyperaffixation; TRS thread stalled out. Also, it seems to just be a Stock Phrase; perhaps it could be labeled as a Stock Shout-Out but it's not clear if it's notable enough to be its own trope. *
  • Trojan Gauntlet: On Image Pickin', it was discovered that the page has a Creator Provincialism issue — the "Trojan" in the name refers to a brand of condom that's unknown outside the US, so the name ends up sounding like a reference to the Trojan Horse. The actual trope is "Embarrassing Condom Purchase." *
  • "Uh-Oh" Eyes: Supposed to be a subindex, but there's no indication of that in the title; as a result, many have treated it as a trope. *
  • Understatement: Supposed to only allow In-Universe examples, but due to the simple name, to say that it's attracting invalid wicks would be...well, an understatement. *
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Previously renamed from Designated Protagonist Syndrome because of complaining, but continues to attract complaining. In the new name's case, it's often used to complain about protagonists thought to be boring, when it's actually about protagonists who are intentionally less defined for the sake of making supporting characters stand out more. Its summary on the Audience Reactions index gave the wrong definition at one point, and the fact that it's indexed under Audience Reactions to begin with, rather than YMMV.Home Page, has also been questioned, since the character is objectively in the work, and the subjective part is whether the character does in fact help supporting characters stand out more. A previous TRS thread was made, with a wick check demonstrating misuse to mean boring protagonists. The thread clocked out without any changes being made, despite support in favor of cleaning up complaining, but there was support for renaming; Enabling Protagonist was one suggestion given as a replacement name.
  • Wild Goose Chase is supposed to be the highly specific trope that somebody discovers a tracker device (e.g. on his car) and attaches it to a random other car or object, thus making the signal useless in a funny way. Predictably, this gets misused for, well, what the phrase "Wild Goose Chase" normally means, or characters saying the phrase. The phrase should arguably be a redirect to Snipe Hunt, and this trope should be renamed. It appears to be not thriving either, which may be caused by the name not matching the content. *
  • You Bastard! refers to when the work calls out the audience for enjoying something. However, due to the vague title, it is sometimes misused for when a character calls another character a bastard, which fits more under You Monster!. *

    Should be In-Universe Examples Only 
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    Actually subjective 
  • Acclaimed Flop: It's about the critical reception of a work, which means it should be YMMV, not Trivia. Its inverse, Critic-Proof, is YMMV. *
  • Album Filler: Brought up in the gushing cleanup thread as a trope that reads like (and should probably be) YMMV, as the concept concerns a subjective topic (songs that are seen as having little purpose other than filler on albums). *
  • Anti-Climax: Claiming that the end of a story is anticlimatic is pretty subjective. What appears to be anticlimatic to one person may not be the case for someone else. *
  • Badass Adorable: What constitutes "adorable" has been brought up in at least one ATT as possibly being too subjective. Per the linked ATT: "it's practically become a vague catch-all term for literally anything and everything that a troper finds admirable/likable about a character." Despite this, the trope is not listed as YMMV, and due to the somewhat vague definition (which essentially amounts to "Badass + adorable") and resulting unclear usage may need more serious action as well. 85 wicks need checking. *
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: A line being attributed to a work when it was never actually said in it is something done by the audience, so it should be YMMV instead of Trivia. Its supertrope, "Common Knowledge", is already YMMV. *
  • Briefer Than They Think: This is based on the audience being surprised that something didn't last as long as they expected, so it belongs under YMMV.
  • Broken Aesop: "The work's intended moral is contradicted by what it shows" might be subjective. As of August 19, 2021, there are already 205 wicks on YMMV subpages. *
  • Brutal Bonus Level: Common sister trope of That One Level (which is for when non-bonus levels are difficult), where a bonus level is a significant Difficulty Spike. Some wicks are already on YMMV pages, and both That One Level and Difficulty Spike are already YMMV. *
  • Carried by the Host: Appears to be about how fans perceive a game show host, with a comparison made to Ensemble Dark Horse in the description. *
  • Colbert Bump and Newbie Boom: A sudden influx of new fans is more of an Audience Reaction than a Trivia item. A handful of wicks are indeed in the YMMV namespace. *
  • Cross-Cultural Kerfluffle: Relies on audience reaction from different countries - tellingly, the description compares the trope to Harsher in Hindsight and Values Dissonance, both of which are YMMV tropes. *
  • Dying for Symbolism: The trope is that the author wants to show heavy symbolism (generally a massive turn for the worse in the author's world) and does so by having an important character killed off. However, most of the examples are not based on Word of God; but on inferral or speculation of tropers who like the work. That makes it YMMV. *
  • Early Game Hell: In 2020, Difficulty Spike was made YMMV because difficulty spikes in video games affect different players in different ways. Early Game Hell operates on the same principle as Difficulty Spike in that it involves the game's difficulty changing as the game progresses, except instead of the game getting harder at a certain point, the game starts out hard due to the player character being weaker (such as having lower stats or lacking good equipment), and gets easier as the player character gets stronger. How the change in difficulty affects a given player will depend on their level of experience with the game, the series, or the game's genre as a whole. In addition, the name already sounds subjective in describing the early parts of the game as hellish. *
  • Fake Balance: Supposed to be for "when a game or an aspect of a game seems balanced on paper, but actual playing reveals major problems that were not anticipated by the designers." This is clearly subjective, and it's strongly related to Character Tiers and Game-Breaker, both of which are already YMMV. *
  • Fan Disillusionment: Fan reaction.
  • Fandom Life Cycle: Classified as Trivia, despite being about the status of fandoms and thus an Audience Reaction. *
  • Fan Community Nickname: Classified as trivia despite actually describing fan reactions. Often misused for derogatory nicknames, with Fan Nickname's Detractor Nickname redirect being cut because it was used to cover this form of misuse. *
  • Fashion Dissonance: This is essentially a fashion-specific version of Unintentional Period Piece, which is now YMMV. Also the "Dissonance" part of the name means there is percived clashing, which means it is an Audience Reaction. *
  • Four More Measures: "A song's lyrics start earlier than people expect them to" is definitely something the audience does, not the song. *
  • God Never Said That: Refers to statements that are falsely claimed to be Word of God by people who had nothing to do with the work's creation, yet it's classified as Trivia and not YMMV. Its supertrope, "Common Knowledge", is already YMMV. *
  • Both Iconic Item and Iconic Outfit specifically describe audiences associating a specific accessory or outfit with a character. They also have the standard ZCE problem most appearance tropes have. *
  • Iconic Sequel Character: Clearly an audience reaction (it's even on the YMMV index Unexpected Reactions to This Index) but isn't tagged as YMMV. *
  • Interrupting Meme: A subtrope of the YMMV Memetic Mutation, meaning it's about something that happens outside of the work itself, but it's classified as objective for some reason. Most of the examples are pretty badly written as well. *
  • Just Eat Gilligan: Noticing a method by which a work's conflict could be resolved much faster is something the audience does, not the work. It also has a tendency to cause a lot of debates on whether or not a suggested solution would in fact work or occur to the characters. Also, as chronicled here, the description seems to have mutated over time to the point of giving the impression it's about a specific character, suggesting the name may be misleading as well. *
  • Killer App: As stated in the description, this is software that is considered a must-own for its platform, thus making it a matter of opinion as to whether a given piece of software counts, but it's classifed as Trivia and not YMMV. *
  • Loudness War: How listeners are affected by the loudness war is subjective (in particular, how the music in question sounds to them, and how audiophiles avoid it), to the point that there's a subpage called The Worst Offenders that lacks objectivity in terms of how examples are presented. *
  • Magnum Opus Dissonance: The definition involves a clash of opinions between creator and audience, but is Trivia for some reason. Already on a couple YMMV-specific indices, indicating a misplaced page type. *
  • Memetic Hand Gesture: A rather shaky trope as is, but it's also a meme page that's for some reason objective. *
  • Metagame: A term for players adjusting their behavior in multiplayer video games in response to other players' behavior *
  • Modern Minstrelsy: Seems to focus more on audiences perceive a show as minstrelry, regardless of whether that's the intent. Also seems to be a complaining magnet. *
  • Moral Guardians: Classed as an in-universe trope, but most examples on work pages document audience reactions, which should be YMMV. *
  • Multiple Demographic Appeal: Makes a statement about how the audience enjoys the work, not something that happens in the work itself. *
  • Never Accepted in His Hometown: The concept (someone being popular pretty much everywhere except where they're from) is related to Germans Love David Hasselhoff and Americans Hate Tingle, in that it involves differing acceptance in different parts of the world, and has enough Real Life examples listed to have a subpage for them, but it's not classifed as YMMV. An alternative to making it YMMV would be making it IUEO and spinning out-of-universe examples off into a separate Audience Reaction, similarly to how out-of-universe examples of Dead Artists Are Better (which is listed as a related trope) were spun off into Posthumous Popularity Potential. *
  • The New Rock & Roll: It is neither marked as YMMV or IUEO, which results in both being listed; the on-page examples are written as Audience Reactions, but a lot of wicks have it as In-Universe. *
  • Obvious Beta: A game being unfinished isn't an intentional creative decision, and it's been discussed that what counts as "unplayable" is subjective. *
  • Obvious Crossover Method: Refers to something in the work that is generally exploited in fan works, which is an Audience Reaction. Indeed, several wicks are on YMMV pages. *
  • Player Tic: A thing a player does in response to the game is obviously not part of the work, but it's classified as objective and not an audience reaction. There are some examples of games recognizing and acknowledging common player tics, but that's its own trope entirely. *
  • Poe's Law: A work of satire that is mistaken for serious, or a serious work that is mistaken for satire. Audiences misunderstanding a work is subjective, since some people are bound to correctly tell is a work is satire or serious. Even the (poorly-enforced) demand for proof of people being confused by the work doesn't make it an objective trope, as Unfortunate Implications shows, and the mistaking is not something that happens in the work itself. Even "at least one major source has accidentally misunderstood the work's intentions" would be Trivia. *
  • Popcultural Osmosis is about audiences knowing about work A not because they've seen it, but because it was referenced in work B — definitely subjective. *
  • Power-Up Letdown: It's right there in the name — the powerup's weakness leaves the player feeling let down. That's a subjective opinion if there ever was one. *
  • Reality Is Unrealistic: Similarly to Aluminum Christmas Trees, this is about what audience members think is unrealistic but isn't, which is by definition subjective. *
  • Reference Overdosed: What's the requirement to be defined as "Overdosed"? How is this not subjective and just Shout-Out but a lot? *
  • Sequence Breaking: The description explicitly says this is something fans do to games, often going against what the developers intended, making this an Audience Reaction. *
  • Series Fauxnale: Defined as "an episode that feels like the end, and possibly was originally going to be the end.", which sounds a lot like a YMMV (or possibly a Trivia, but that would require a definition change, which would take a bit more work). Perhaps it could be split into two articles—a YMMV page for "feels like the end" and a Trivia page for "meant to be the end". *
  • Signature Line: Most remembered line seems subjective, similar Signature Scene And Signature Song are YMMV for this reason. *
  • Sleeper Hit: Whether a work is successful depends on audience reception, making this an Audience Reaction. And You Thought It Would Fail, which is listed as a subtrope, is already YMMV. *
  • Try Everything: "When you don't know what you're supposed to do so you just try literally every possible combination" is a thing the player does, not the game. It's also questionable whether this is a meaningful trope-related concept at all, as virtually every game will have at least one player so confused that they... well, "try everything" until they get the intended outcome. *
  • Yet Another Stupid Death: Seems to focus more on the actions of the player than the mechanics of the game, and how "stupid" a player's action is may be subjective. *

    Actually Trivia 
  • Adapted Out: Something from the source material being omitted from an adaptation is background information that can only be known after comparing the two.
  • Advertising by Association: One work is promoted based on its connection to another work. Decisions related to advertising do not appear directly in the work itself, so it should be Trivia.
  • All There in the Manual: This refers to information that is not in the work but is shared in supplementary material. If it's not in the work, it doesn't have any plot significance and fits better under Trivia.
  • Ascended Meme: A meme derived from a work later ends up in the work itself. The fact that it started out as just a meme isn't always acknowledged in the work itself.
  • Author Appeal: When a certain story aspect is prominent in a work because it's one of the author's personal interests. Just that the creator personally enjoys it does not mean that can be deduced from the story itself, and this tends to involve comparison to their other works that feature the same things. Also, not all examples make it explicit that the creator specifically likes the recurring element; if it appears for a different reason, it would just be a Creator Thumbprint. (Examples tend to be more obvious when the Author Appeal is a sexual fetish, however.)
  • Avoid the Dreaded G Rating: Content is added to avoid a G rating, because of a perception that the work may be seen as just for kids. This relies on the decisions of the creators and ratings boards, both of which happen behind the scenes, not in the work itself. Many examples don't have proof of being intentional, and come across as speculation. A lot of examples are also inversions, which could use its own trope.
  • Balance Buff: As pointed out, it describes "changes between versions of a product". A Trivia move might be possible, although more might be needed—the mod that pointed this trope out mentioned it might be too common. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Beauty Inversion: Relies on knowledge of what the actor looks like in real life in comparison to how their character looks in the work.
  • Canon Marches On: Should be classified as trivia, since "this Expanded Universe work is contradicted by a later primary-canon work" is not something that happens in the work. Its fanfic counterpart, Outdated by Canon, is already Trivia. Speaking of which, there doesn't appear to be a need for separate tropes that cover what is essentially the same phenomenon occurring in either official or fanmade works. A thread regarding the two stalled out for lack of activity. *
  • Casting Gag: Like Irony as She Is Cast and Actor-Shared Background, this trope relies on out-of-universe context to know why a specific casting choice is a "gag". That makes it trivia, because it isn't a direct storytelling trope, and similar tropes are classified as such. It's commonly mistaken for a trivia trope, as well; around 500 of its ~2,800 wicks are in the trivia namespace.
  • Censor Decoy: Like What Could Have Been except for removed objects of censorship.
  • Dated History: It's the same as Science Marches On or Technology Marches On but involving history and archaeology, so it should be considered trivia as well.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: Discusses tidbits about the origins of works before they received the dolled-up treatment. In addition, its supertrope What Could Have Been and opposite trope Divorced Installment are already trivia.
  • Double Vision: Explains the ways one actor can appear as two people onscreen at once, which is behind-the-scenes trivia, not a trope.
  • Fake Food: Props are used in place of edible food in advertising. This happens behind the scenes and isn't always obvious.
  • Feelies: About merch that comes packaged with games, which is external.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: Coding errors that either crash the game or cause other severe problems are not something that was intentionally put in the work, but rather background information on the work. Unlike Good Bad Bugs, players' opinions on these bugs' effects are not taken into account with examples, so it was determined to not be YMMV.
  • Genre Relaunch: A once-dead genre makes a comeback. Its inverse, Genre-Killer, is already Trivia.
  • Get Back in the Closet: Discusses how Moral Guardians and ratings boards treat same-sex relationships compared to opposite-sex ones, which is a meta concept.
  • I Just Write the Thing: This is about the author's writing process (i.e. that they feel like the story took its own direction without their input) and not exactly about the work itself.
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine: Although it describes scenes that take place within a work, it points out that the reason such scenes are notable has all to do with the behind-the-scenes meta aspect. Also the name is unclear as it sounds like an in-universe trope.
  • Lost in Translation: Something being lost in a translation of a work refers to the absence of something rather than anything that appears, which means it relies on comparison with the work's original language. It is also usually unintentional, which makes it not a trope.
  • Man of a Thousand Faces: An actor plays roles so dissimilar to each other that the actor isn't always recognizable, which is a meta concept whose examples always apply to more than one work. This already has an in-universe equivalent in Master of Disguise.
  • Man of a Thousand Voices: A voice actor voices different characters in very different ways, which is a meta concept whose examples can involve multiple works. The main page is also sorted by language instead of by medium, further showing that it's a meta concept and not an in-universe one. Acting for Two, which refers to an actor playing multiple characters in one work and can thus overlap with Man of a Thousand Voices, is already Trivia.
  • Market-Based Title: About titles being changed in international versions, which isn't something that appears in the story, and Completely Different Title (with which Market-Based Title often overlaps) is already listed as Trivia.
  • Merchandise-Driven: Relies on knowing external media tying into the work, and at least some knowledge of its creation behind-the-scenes. It's already wicked on 69 Trivia pages, and other tropes about merchandising like Kids' Meal Toy, Early Draft Tie-In, and The Merch are already Trivia.
  • Midseason Replacement: Refers to network programming decisions, not anything related to the content of the work.
  • Non-Actor Vehicle: Relies on knowledge of what the actor has done previously, and isn't related to what their role is in-story.
  • Now Which One Was That Voice?: About voice actors (and actors in general) not being credited for their roles within the show's credits, which is a meta concept.
  • Off-the-Shelf FX: Lists visual effects in works that were made using common household items. It's currently listed as a trope but, unless it's commented on or done with a Show Within a Show, all examples should be trivia instead.
  • One-Book Author: Closely related to One-Hit Wonder, which is already Trivia. The difference is that a One-Book Author only produced one work, while a One-Hit Wonder produced multiple works, but only has one that's widely known.
  • Protection from Editors: An author is exempt from editing and criticism. Related to Executive Meddling (which is when authors aren't exempt), which is Trivia. Currently classified as YMMV, but multiple tropers were in favor of moving it to Trivia before the Trivia thread was closed.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: One work's soundtrack is reused in at least one other work. Similarly to Prop Recycling, which is Trivia and involves props being reused, this is background information that requires comparisons between multiple works.
  • Real Soon Now: An unreleased work isn't given a clear-cut release date, which is a meta concept and not something from within the work. Vaporware, which is a related concept, is already Trivia.
  • Regional Bonus: A meta concept that involves comparing the differences between international releases of works and the original releases, which may not be noticeable to someone who's only familiar with their region's release. 23 out of 347 wicks are already on Trivia subpages, indicating that some tropers already think it's Trivia.
  • Revised Ending: A work's ending is changed before being released to the general public, which is a behind-the-scenes change.
  • Shown Their Work: A creator doing research for their work is background information, not something that appears directly in the work as opposed to merely affecting what's in it. Accidentally Correct Writing, which refers to when something is factually correct without actually being researched, is already Trivia. It also tends to be used as simply "shown their knowledge", as in creators simply depicting something accurately, without stating that they specifically researched it (as the creators may have known that thing already).
  • Side-Story Bonus Art: The description itself states that it is side art made unrelated to the main work. Staff-Created Fan Work, a similar trope, is already Trivia.
  • Sincerest Form of Flattery: A subtrope of Follow the Leader that features Word of God acknowledgment. Both Follow the Leader and Word of God are already Trivia.
  • Toyline-Exclusive Character: A character only appearing in a work's toyline, thus it requires meta knowledge of external merchandise. It's already on the Trivia page for Power Rangers: Dino Thunder, a work that is also its page image.
  • Universe Bible: A set of guidelines the creators use when making the work. Said guidelines are not normally publicly accessible and are only used behind the scenes.
  • Visible Boom Mic: Strangely classified under "camera tricks", this is not a trope but rather a production error. This makes it a subtrope of Blooper, which is already Trivia. If it occurs deliberately, it’s covered by Stylistic Suck.

    Classified as Trivia, but shouldn't be 
  • Dye Hard: Many on-page examples and off-page examples pertain to fictional characters known for dying their hair, not just creators. Additionally, the mere idea of someone dying their hair might not be tropeworthy, and could be split into more meaningful tropes to be more significant for both fictional and real-life examples. *
  • Real Song Theme Tune: A subtrope of Theme Tune that involves an existing song. Theme Tune is not trivia, and a Real Song Theme Tune appears directly in the work itself. *
  • Recycled: The Series: An initially standalone work spawns a full series derived from said standalone work. This is the inverse of The Movie, which is not trivia. *

    Redundant / Overlaps with another trope 

    People Sit on Chairs/Really a Useful Note 
  • Ancient Africa: Should be looked at to see if "(culture inspired by) an ancient African culture appears" is tropeworthy, as the page doesn't cite any narrative meaning. *
  • Anywhere but Their Lips: Seems to be defined as just "kisses somewhere other than the lips"; described and named in such a way that suggests there's supposed to be some kind of context for why they're actively avoiding the lips but doesn't explain what this context is. *
  • Back That Light Up: The page has more to do with game console technology than game mechanics or storytelling, so it would probably work better as a Useful Note. *
  • Basso Profundo: A list of characters and real people who are basses with no associated narrative meaning, unlike related tropes like Badass Baritone, Evil Sounds Deep, Contralto of Danger, etc. Description only describes what bass register is without discussing what it means in fiction. *
  • Bouncer: Currently just means "bouncers exist" and could be redefined to be about more stereotypical depictions of them. *
  • Country Matters: Seems unclear if it's just about the word "cunt" being used for impact, or about how it has different amounts of impact in different countries. If it's the latter, it could be a Useful Note. *
  • A Date with Rosie Palms: Masturbation in and of itself may not be a trope, and there are multiple subtropes anyway. *
  • Demoscene: Refers to a software development subculture instead of a trope, so Useful Notes would be a better fit for it. Such a move was previously suggested, but the thread clocked out with no action being taken. *
  • Dining in the Buff: Page doesn't cite any narrative significance for someone dining naked, and most of the examples are just "a character does this". *
  • Duct Tape for Everything: As currently defined, it seems to be about any use of duct tape. Should be restricted to "unusual" cases in order to be tropeworthy. *
  • DVD Commentary: As it stands, this is just "DVD commentaries exist", with most examples not even explaining what the creators discuss in said commentary. *
  • Ear Trumpet: Currently, it's just "ear trumpets exist". It's implied that this is a sort of gag but that may be redundant with I Can't Hear You. A lot of examples are specifically about hearing loss being used to characterize the elderly, which could be made a separate trope. *
  • Eenie, Meenie, Miny Moai: Only means "moai exist" without any specific narrative purpose. *
  • Every Year They Fizzle Out: The idea is based on something that happens in non-scripted sporting events, with very few fictional examples. No real explanation is given for the narrative purpose of the event. *
  • Flyover Country: Writeup appears to be intended for Useful Notes, including a lack of on-page examples. No elaboration on its tropeworthiness is given. *
  • Foul Fox: Has the standard issue of "attribute + another attribute = trope," but is particularly notable because it directly contradicts the actual trope Cunning Like a Fox, which explicitly states that foxes don't have an associated morality. *
  • Four Eyes, Zero Soul: The description implies that the trope is supposed to give off the impression that the "zero soul" is symbolized by the villain's eyes being hidden behind glasses. However, most examples are just "villain wears glasses" without any further significance. *
  • VideoGame.Game Genie and VideoGame.Game Shark: The namespace suggests that they're supposed to be work pages, but they lack examples and read like Useful Notes about the cheat devices in question, as well as the history of cheat devices as a whole in the former's case. They could probably be transplanted to a new page such as UsefulNotes.Video Game Cheat Devices without much issue. *
  • Giant Poofy Sleeves: Basically just "character wears poofy sleeves" based on description and examples. *
  • Giant Waist Ribbon: Basically just "character wears a big ribbon on the waist" based on description and examples. *
  • Gimmick Matches: Basically just lists the different match types in Professional Wrestling, although it does list some In-Universe examples. *
  • Healing Loop: The concept of "an enemy hits you after you heal, forcing you to heal again and getting you stuck in a damage-heal loop" might not be a trope. *
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine: Tends to be used solely to shoehorn any work that had one or more of its actors going on to bigger and more popular franchises, similar to how Role Association was when it was known as "Hey, It's That Guy!" and "Hey, It's That Voice!". *
  • Informed Judaism: A character is Jewish, but it has little to no relevance to the plot. This implies that the Jewish character should be made more obviously Jewish; it's not really made clear why, however, and there aren't any such tropes for other races/religions. *
  • It's Like I Always Say: Documents instances of a stock phrase. *
  • J'accuse!: Noted as being a list of uses of this as a stock phrase in fiction. Check all 38 wicks. *
  • Junior High: Not a trope, but rather a useful notes page (or perhaps something that should be merged/redirected/cut). The issue with the page is that it largely serves to explain how in many countries, "junior high" is the same thing as "high school"; and in fiction this applies as well, so high school tropes are the same as junior high tropes. *
  • Keigo, Kansai Regional Accent, and Tohoku Regional Accent: Information about the Japanese Language is Useful Notes material, Not a Trope. In the case of the accent pages, pages for other languages' dialects (such as the pages for American Accents and German Dialects) are already in the Useful Notes namespace. *
  • Like Is, Like, a Comma: The page looks like just a list of people who say "like" a lot, with no defined narrative purpose for doing so. May be redundant with Verbal Tic. *
  • Man in a Kilt: Just about men wearing kilts regardless of how this is referenced in-story. *
  • The Master: This is a list of characters named "the master." That is not a trope; it is a list of unrelated things that happen to have the same name. *
  • Megalodon: Trope is currently just "work has a megalodon in it" and should be made more narratively specific in the same way as King of the Dinosaurs (work has a T. rex) and Doofy Dodo (work has a dodo) were.
  • Multi-Ethnic Name: Looks like simply a list of people who have names of mixed ethnic backgrounds, which is a perfectly common thing in real life and most examples have no plot significance. *
  • Multigenerational Household: "Two or more adult generations share the same living unit" is actually a fairly normal family structure for many people around the world, and most examples have little context other than "children live with their parents and grandparents". *
  • Music at Sporting Events: The 10-or-so media examples are chairsy. The rest of the page is a very long and nattery real life section. Sponsor of the YKTTW mused that it could be launched as UN but apparently didn't (even if it did, it would be bad). *
  • Ouija Board: Ouija boards being used to contact ghosts and "Ouija boards used for horror/to cause mayhem" are obvious tropes, but as is, it's just "Ouija boards exist", and the description reads like a Useful Note. *
  • Public Domain: A lack of copyright isn't really a trope, but it's still useful information to have on TV Tropes since the wiki has plenty of pages for works whose copyright has expired, along with some of the images that were chosen by Image Pickin' not being copyrighted. Thus, it would probably be better suited to Useful Notes than Main. Note that, if the page is moved to Useful Notes, then it would need to be expanded and/or rewritten because it primarily focuses on American copyright law and doesn't sufficiently discuss Fair Use. *
  • Retro Gaming: Already reads like a Useful Notes page, plus the concept doesn't seem to be tropeworthy anyway. Lacks examples so a transplant would be quite easy. *
  • Sailor Fuku: Stock anime outfit filled with zero-context examples that basically boil it down to "person wears a sailor fuku", which isn't tropeworthy. *
  • Shrines and Temples: Basically just seems to be "Asian Shrines exist" based on description and examples. Probably could be split into multiple tropes: an Asian equivalent of Bloodstained Glass Windows for battles at a temple, and perhaps one for shrines having magical effects. *
  • Speedrun: The documentation of speedrunning any particular game is probably not within the scope of the wiki, let alone giving detailed entries on a YMMV page. It already reads like a Useful Note anyway and is probably worth keeping as such. *
  • Stock Kisses: An exampleless page that just lists different kinds of kisses. Similar to the cut Stock Underwear page. *
  • Straight Gay: A gay character is not given stereotypically gay traits. This may or may not be plot-relevant, depending on the work. A previous thread (which closed without consensus) had the suggestion that this should focus on instances where the trope is remarked on in-universe, particularly where the character's homosexuality is seen a surprise. *
  • The Thing That Goes "Doink": The description says that a shishi-odoshi's presence is supposed to indicate that the owner is wealthy and/or traditionally Japanese, but the on-page examples don't amount to much other than "shishi-odoshi exist". It could possibly work as a Useful Note as a reference for viewers of Japanese works, or it could be merged with the Japanese Architecture page, with the latter being what was done with Kotatsu. *
  • Teru-Teru Bōzu: Defined as essentially "any instance of a Teru Teru Bōzu in fiction", which isn't all that noteworthy (aside from them not often showing up in fiction). *
  • 12-Episode Anime: This Trope Talk thread (and an ATT it continued from) discovered that the page is written more like a Useful Notes page than a trope, and is possibly chairs as well due to the concept being far more common now than in the past. Several tropers in the thread have already expressed a desire to move it to Useful Notes or make it an index or Definition-Only. Attraction of ZCEs was also noted. If wick checked, 50 wicks need checking. *
  • Twofer Token Minority: Most commonly used as "character belongs to multiple minority groups" regardless of whether their identity is relevant in the story. Sometimes, the character won't even be the only member of either minority group, making the "token" part of the trope name meaningless. A TRS thread from 2018 closed without consensus. *
  • Two First Names: A previous TRS thread from May 2014 agreed that a character having two first names is Chairs on its own, and proposed replacing it with a Redneck Name Naming Conventions trope for stereotypical rural names like Billy Bob, but the thread was locked for inactivity at the beginning of 2016 after the proposed trope wasn't launched (the trope was eventually created under the title Hayseed Name). *
  • Virtual YouTuber: The page is in Main/, yet is formatted with a trope list and a list of some VTubers and groups. Would it fit better as a Useful Note instead?
  • The White House: Folks in this thread argued that it would be better placed as an Useful Notes page, but others argued that in its current state it's entirely about fictional depictions. *

    Murky description/other description issues 
  • Alternate History Wank: Complainy Wall of Text description about an Alternate History author who privileges a certain state by making them more powerful in that timeline. However, the examples are just "X is more powerful than Y in work Z." *
  • Anime Theme Song: Discussed in Is This An Example? thread because the trope description doesn't explain how to apply the trope properly. There is no clear definition of what Anime Theme Song is. It is also an example-less page and advises that examples should not even appear on work pages unless they're "noteworthy" or "career-launching"; however, there's no explanation of what counts as "noteworthy". So, the observations about the current content are: it needs to properly explain what "noteworthy" examples are (the original post); it needs a trope definition; it should be made a Useful Notes page; it appears to have no distinction from Theme Tune. Everyone agrees it needs trope repair. *
  • Canon Defilement: Its description reads like a list of "Thou Shalt Nots", as if going against a fandom's norms is automatically bad. Discussed here in the description improvement thread. *
  • Dark Messiah: The article uses words like "usually," "may (or may not)," and other similar words/phrases in the description, making exactly what one is ambiguous—or at the very least make this a flexible trope. The diversity in the listed examples adds further confusion on what a dark messiah actually is. Trope Talk thread here. Description cleanup Sandbox here. *
  • Glamour: Description should be something that discusses how this is about any spell called a "glamour" because they share similarities, but they're not all the same. Or get a rename and a changed description to fit an idea of Our Glamours Are Different. *
  • Happy Birthday to You!: It's unclear if it's supposed to be about birthday songs in general, or if it's specifically Writing Around Trademarks for the specific song "Happy Birthday to You" (prior to a lawsuit invalidating its copyright claim in 2015). *
  • Hope Springs Eternal: Unclear if it's about a stock message that things will eventually become better, or just about any reference to hope. *
  • I Am the Band: The description is trying to give multiple different definitions for what it means for a musician to "be" their band, ranging from "band member who is very controlling of the others" to "solo artist who can be mistaken for a band". Because of this, most of the on-page examples say nothing more than "Band is Artist". *
  • Metro-Specific Underworld: Just a list of stereotypes of gangs for specific areas, no explanation of the significance of the trope, and it has a non-standard page format. All of this makes it hard to figure out what the trope is even for. *
  • Most Fanfic Writers Are Fans: The description is trying to say why people write fanfiction, but doesn't describe a trope. It's been suggested that it could be moved to the Analysis subpage of Fanfic instead. *
  • Neutron Bomb: Cannot decide whether it is a Useful Notes page or a trope, and whether that trope is "Neutron bombs being portrayed inaccurately", "Neutron bombs appear in this work", or "WMDs that kill people but leave structures intact". A TRS thread was started, but clocked out due to inactivity and a lack of a wick check. *
  • Power Creep, Power Seep: As currently written, this is specific to crossovers. However, the concept it describes (preexisting character's power level is adjusted to match the new work) is more about adaptations in general and has little to do with crossovers specifically. This restriction can probably be removed. *
  • Pyramid Power is a mixture of "pyramids have a mystical power", "pyramids were built by aliens", "pyramids were built by slaves", and "this work contains a pyramid." The last of these is obviously PSOC, but the trope description is such a mess that it's not clear which of the first three is meant. *
  • Revealing Cover-Up: The lengthy Example as a Thesis describes a scenario of "hiding X by taking flashy action Y, which leads directly to the discovery of X", making it unclear whether the trope is "hiding X by taking flashy action Y" or "attempting to hide X leads directly to the discovery of X" — or if it was legitimately intended to cover the whole scenario, in which case it should probably be split because that is definitely two tropes, not one. *
  • Skepticism Failure: The description is very murky. It's confusingly worded, goes off on a tangent in the first couple paragraphs, and seems to be trying to express multiple distinct tropes: "the skeptic in a paranormal series will always be proven wrong" (per the laconic and title), "the skeptic remains skeptical despite massive evidence to the contrary" (per the page image), "skeptics are naive", and "true believers are more common than skeptics in fiction". *
  • Text Parser: The description is borderline incomprehensible due to its self demonstrating nature, has no examples, and You Can't Get Ye Flask could probably be merged into this trope so that it's less about complaining and more about the (relatively) advanced ability of the computer to understand colloquial English. *
  • Youth Is Wasted on the Dumb: Description is unclear, seems to be "teens pressuring each other into dangerous pranks and other acts", but the examples don't bear this out and the title is way too broad for that. Trope talk thread *

    Unclear Definition 
  • Acceptable Targets and subtropes: The trope is supposed to be about the issue of which groups are okay to mock and which ones aren't. The trope is listed on YMMV pages, but most examples describe objective statements about the group being mocked in a work, not how the audience thinks the group is an acceptable target. If the creator thought the group is an acceptable target (which may not have been the specific intention) then that may be redundant with Take That! and Author Tract. It also seems like a Trope in Aggregate, but this is not very-well defined, since it relies on comparison with targets that are not acceptable, which are usually not specified by the examples either. A previous TRS thread resulted in no consensus. Post on the Acceptable Targets discussion thread digging into page history *
  • Can Only Move the Eyes: The title sounds like it's about characters literally only being able to move their eyes, but the laconic says it's about characters being conscious while immobilised. The latter is also how And I Must Scream is commonly misused, so there's a lot of overlap. *
  • Care-Bear Stare: An attack powered by positivity, or anti-Mind Rape? While there's heavy overlap because an infusion of positivity is usually treated as mentally positive, the two are functionally different. *
  • Development Hell: When this applies is clear for most types of works, but the same is not true for video game examples. It's been claimed that Vaporware is its counterpart for video games (and software in general), but it's also been argued that video games can go through Development Hell without being Vaporware. *
  • Editing Works: Nonstandard design. The concept (applying edits to raw footage) is very broad, like "hand-eye coordination." *
  • Fatal Method Acting: The given definition is, "A performer dies suddenly while on the job." There's some ambiguity as to whether the performer has to die as a result of their job, as the title implies, or if this extends to health mishaps not proven to be caused by their work, which includes many medical examples on the page. There's also some confusion as to whether the "creator" vs "performer" distinction is clear enough to separate it from Died During Production. Discussion. *
  • Nature Is Not a Toy: Came up in Trope Talk over having an unclear definition that doesn't describe well what the trope actually is, resulting in usage that was noted as being all over the place. Check all 24 wicks. *
  • Popularity Polynomial: This comment identified the trope as having an unclear definition (and it is worth noting that the trope doesn't really have any criteria for what counts as popular or unpopular the way Condemned by History has), and the trope may also be People Sit on Chairs since media/trends going up and down in popularity is pretty common. If wick checked, 50 wicks need checking. *
  • Three Chords and the Truth: Examples don't seem to agree about whether the trope has to do with minimalistic songwriting or deliberately low-fidelity recording techniques. *

    Unecessary Soft Split 
  • Association Fallacy: The example section is a mess, with multiple sectioned example lists. Possible split?
  • Giant Flyer: Description is currently divided into five different sections, based on what role a giant flying creature has in the story. Should be looked at to see if these need to be merged or split into separate tropes.
  • Lead Bassist: Soft-split into four types, with at least two traits being distinct enough for a hard split - 1) The bassist is the lead singer, and 2) The bassist is the Face of the Band. While the former concept is objective, the latter is obviously YMMV (Face of the Band is already YMMV), so this is the exact same issue Stop Helping Me! had before Annoying Video Game Helper was split off of it. Additionally, the description and on-page examples have a problem with Type Labels Are Not Examples, and there's often overlap between the types — for example, Paul McCartney is listed under three types at the same time in both the description (to illustrate overlap between the types) and the example list (regarding his musical career).
  • Only Has Same-Sex Admirers: Split into male and female characters. Unclear what the value of this is.
  • Realistic Diction Is Unrealistic: Has two separate sections, one for realistic diction and another for notable examples of unrealistic diction. May be worth splitting into two tropes.
  • Youkai: This page has a list of folders for multiple different types of youkai creatures, which has grown large enough that most of these folders have their own images, quotes, descriptions, and media example lists. The page is currently so big and bloated, that it ought to be split up into a bunch of new articles for each youkai. *

    Combines Too Many Concepts 
  • Good Bad Bugs: Lumps funny bugs with exploitable bugs under the umbrella of "good"; conflates the objective fact of the bugs' existence with the player base's subjective opinion of the bugs.e.g.  *
  • Higher Self: The page describes a superego type concept, but combines both "moral" and "objective" judgements. Listed on Definition-Only Pages due to the lack of examples. *
  • Human Notepad: This trope is simply defined as "a character is covered in writing", but the description states that it covers two distinct concepts: helpful notes written on one's arm/hand, and plot-relevant tattoos. These concepts don't seem to have enough overlap (aside from "text on people") to justify them being under one trope, and neither of them requires a character to be covered in writing. *
  • Lead In describes two tropes in the same article: a small story that occurs before the main plot, and a popular television show placed before another program to entice viewers to watch the following program. These aren't internal subtropes - the concepts are too distinct to even be sister tropes (the latter definition is more of a Trivia item). The page is split with the first definition and examples, followed by the next definition and examples. On top of that, it only has 39 wicks. *
  • Mind Rape: The trope seems to have multiple definitions. The first paragraph describes it as a mental/psychic attack to one's mind that is likened to actual rape due to the violation and exploitation of vulnerabilities involved. Then it goes on to include any other forms of torture (including physical, verbal, and actual rape) that ends up breaking the victim's mind, (usually) causing them to go insane. *
  • Our Presidents Are Different: A trope clump of different "President+X" concepts which could be tropable in their own right, and some of which are already their own tropes. *
  • Same Language Dub seems to cover two distinct concepts: an actor’s voice being dubbed by another actor during post-production; and a localized dub for a different market in the same language. The latter is possibly redundant to Dueling Dubs, and both concepts are trivia. *
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: Used for both video gamers playing under restrictions that they create themselves, as well as characters In-Universe doing voluntary challenges outside of video games. Since one of these is an objective trope and the other isn't, a transplant to something like "Player-Imposed Challenge" would work. *
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: The "status effect" variant and the "circular firing squad" variant are different enough that they should be split, or at least made internal subtropes. *
  • Superpower Lottery: Random power allocation, or just getting really good powers? The latter would be Winning The Superpower Lottery (which is a redirect to the trope). *
  • Telepathy: Lumps together Mind Reading and mind-to-mind communication, which are two different concepts. Might need a split (the former is a redirect). *
  • Why We Can't Have Nice Things: The description and examples can't seem to decide whether the trope is "misbehavior that has collective negative consequences for a group" or "valuable object gets destroyed". *
  • Zombie Advocate. The page is a mixture of three distinct concepts: humans advocating for actual monsters (as the title and description suggest); humans advocating for any non-human (as the page image suggests); and non-humans advocating for their own race (e.g. a goblin campaigning for goblin rights). *

    Complaining or gushing 

    Products of problematic trope trends 
  • Fountain of Expies subtropes: Discussed at length in this thread. Most of the subtropes are The Same, but More Specific, and the general consensus is that many fail to distinguish between an archetype with one leading example (Adventurer Archaeologist, Tuxedo and Martini) and a parody/homage that's blatant about its inspiration (Notzilla, Alice Allusion). It's also difficult to determine what qualifies a character to be an expy — many examples will stretch to great lengths to call a character a clone, even if there's no obvious relation. The thread has also agreed that Expy itself needs stronger standards and cleanup, especially with its ill-defined relation to Captain Ersatz. Specific examples include:
  • Personal Appearance Tropes: Tropes dealing with appearance of characters often have problems with either tropeworthiness (often just being "character wears X" or "character has X"), or are tropeworthy but are misused in that manner. See Appearance Tropes Cleanup for some examples.
  • Video Game Settings: Some of these settings are listed as exclusive to video games, and are listed as separate tropes from the same settings in other works, but many don't demonstrate a separate interactive purpose that necessitates their own trope. For example, Prehistoria and Green Hill Zone look redundant with 1 Million B.C. and Ghibli Hills. The ambiguity is enough that many tropers have already added video-game examples under the non-video-game tropes and vice versa. It's also an index that has 96 wicks and is often confused for being a trope in and of itself.
  • "X Episode" tropes: A discussion in Trope Talk indicated that many tropes that have the "X Episode" naming scheme often suffer from tropeworthiness concerns, often simply being "episode in which X appears". Specifically:

    Multiple tropes 

    Misplaced JFF 
  • Evil Overlord List: Not a trope. Indexed under JFF, but is still in the mainspace along with its subpages. Needs to be either JFF or a work page.
  • Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon: This is a game and not a trope, so it would probably be better suited to Just for Fun instead of Main/. *
  • Super Weight appears to be intended for a Just for Fun game for listing perceived power levels of characters. It would be redundant to various other tropes covering the power levels, such as Made of Plasticine for level -1. *
  • Trope Grid: Is in the Main namespace, despite seeming like a Just for Fun page. *
  • You Have Been Warned: Seems more like a joke than a rule or policy, yet it's on Administrivia instead of Just for Fun. *

    Tropes following deprecated practices (naming schemes, stock phrases, etc.) 

    Tropes brought to TLP Crash Rescue with no resolution there 

These tropes come from the Crash Rescue sandbox:

    Miscellaneous or multiple issues 
  • Multiple pages on Sorting Algorithm of Tropes: Several pages need wicks and lack examples. Considering that TLP Guidelines states that "Sliding Scale" or "Sorting Algorithm" drafts are discouraged, many of these would likely be better off reworked into an actual trope or removed entirely.
  • Acrophobic Bird is both redundant and has a poor name. It is supposed to be when a character who can fly never avoids danger by flying up, only flying away from it. This is The Same, but More Specific to 1-Dimensional Thinking. Additionally, the name itself is attracting misuse, as its either taken literally (characters who can fly but have a fear of heights) or used interchangeably with Ironic Fear (which already covers the literal meaning anyway). *
  • Antidisestablishmentarianism: Has a fairly low wick count, but not low enough to be considered Not Thriving. An attempt at TRS pointed out that the length of the name may be what's causing the lack of wicks. This may also need a Wick Check to determine if it's used properly. *
  • Apocalypse How: Despite the class number system being depreciated long ago in favor of a scope and severity system, the example subpages weren't altered, resulting in the class numbers still being used on- and off-page (often resulting in the exclusion of actual example context).
  • Ascended Fanfic: The description implies that this is for any story that originated as fanfiction for something, but it contains examples that are actually "fanfiction gets incorporated into official source material", which falls under Ascended Fanon. Depending on the severity of misuse, it may need a rename. Additionally, since this trope refers to the production history of a work rather than anything in-story, it should be under Trivia. *
  • Author Usurpation: Defined as being when a work overshadows the rest of the author's work, which is the exact same thing as One-Hit Wonder. It also has only 21 wicks (likely due to its unclear title) and is erroneously classified as an objective trope.
  • Auto-Tune: Should be split into a Useful Notes (or Trivia) page covering the software's use for pitch correction (the software's intended use, which is behind-the-scenes technical information related to sound production and not a trope), and a trope covering its use for distorted vocals (which the software wasn't originally intended for, but caught on not long after it was released). *
  • Bottomless Bladder: Seems to be redundant with Nobody Poops and also has a title that could easily be confused with Bladder of Steel.
  • Characterization Tags: It's in Main/, yet reads more like an Administrivia page on how not to do things. Also appears to be a decent Pothole Magnet due to many of its wicks simply being potholes to any character tags. *
  • Character Roster Global Warming: The short (and vague) description seems to define the trope as a game series' number of Mighty Glaciers staying the same while the rest of the roster grows, but many examples either don't match the definition or are blatant shoehorning. The concept itself also seems too arbitrary to be tropeworthy, and the low example and wick count don't help its case. In fact, it appears that the page exists solely for the global warming pun (because global warming melts glaciers, get it?).
  • "Common Knowledge": Discussion on an attempted cleanup indicated that this trope requires notability for its entries (a violation of There Is no Such Thing as Notability) and thus may not be tropeworthy (to quote Tonwen's linked comment, ""Common Knowledge", by definition, requires notability to keep it from just being a list of every single possible misconception ever",) attracts misuse for niche and obscure "common knowledge" as a result, and is redundant with Fandom-Enraging Misconception. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Crapsack World: This ATT discovered that the description has been watered down over the years in a way that has led to the trope becoming overly vague and inviting complaining about works that don't actually have a setting in a horrible world, making this both a description and complaining issue. 108 wicks need checking. *
  • Creepypasta: As briefly discussed here, the page is very oddly used - it's simultaneously trying to be a genre page and a works page, complete with subpages. Some pages for subgenres list tropes associated with the genre, but troping individual, unrelated works (as creepypasta is currently doing) seems out of line. The genre description could also use reassessment to make sure it lines up with how the word "creepypasta" is used outside the wiki these days. *
  • Crossover Alternate Universe: A confusing description with examples that overlaps with both Fusion Fic and Intercontinuity Crossover (oddly enough, it isn't linked to either), in addition to both a low wick count and low on-page example count. *
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: "Different games' control schemes result in negative transfer" is a clear enough definition, but there's no scope to it—as currently written, Animal Crossing: New Leaf somehow causing someone to push the wrong buttons in Hatred would be as valid of an example as if it caused someone to push the wrong buttons in Animal Crossing: Wild World. Relatedly, it probably should be YMMV. *
  • Did You Think I Can't Feel?: An old Stock Phrase trope where a lot of examples don't actually use the phrase. Having an extremely convoluted Example as a Thesis as the description doesn't clarify matters.
  • Dismissed Gender: A trope from the early days of the site, which is likely why it has many issues. It's low on examples and wicks which contain speculations about audience reactions, a trivia entry, In-Universe entries, and a list of general tropes as examples (thus violating the Examples Are Not General rule) at once. All of this makes crosswicking a problem. Plus, the parts concerned with audience reactions are already covered by Pandering to the Base and Double Standard. *
  • Dogfaces: This seems to be a trope largely based around specific Disney media properties, and lists tropes specific to those works as if the page is a work itself. It does seem to appear in some other works, but needs to be described in a way that's not Disney-specific. *
  • Easy Logistics: This seems to have been intended to represent one of the Acceptable Breaks from Reality commonly found in videogames. However, way too many of the examples listed are aversions, especially in the non-videogame sections. Most of these should probably be split out as one or more new tropes. *
  • Elemental Powers: This is often used in conjunction with subbulleting tropes, which is not allowed. *
  • Entrance: Extremely overbroad term with an unhelpful description and only 4 wicks, which is tiny even for a Definition-Only Page. ATT query.
  • Evil Is Not Pacifist: An aversion-only trope; might be better under a trope where villains are pacifists so that straight examples can be listed.
  • Flies Equals Evil: Despite its name, it covers flies signifying death in addition to flies signifying evil. These concepts are distinct enough to be separate tropes, especially since flies can signify deaths that were caused by something that isn't evil, like the terrain of a location. Additionally, this trope frequently gets misused as "evil flies" instead of "flies signify evil", so it might need a cleanup. *
  • Furries Are Easier to Draw: Listed in Main/, but it reads more like meta-commentary on why animal characters are easier to draw than human characters, which would make it either a Useful Note or Trivia (if acknowledged by the creator). *
  • Game Mod: Has a tendency to be wicked on Video Game pages or Trivia subpages with a list of fan mods even though derivative works should not be mentioned on the parent pages (plus it's not a Trivia trope). Needs a cleanup and possibly a move to Useful Notes.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Actually a redirect to Sliding Scale of Gameplay and Story Integration, but it's frequently used as though it's a distinct trope — most wicks are for the redirect and not sliding scale's main page. It's been pointed out that it was a separate trope at one point; revisiting this idea may be worth looking into. *
  • Gay Panic: Redundant with Hide Your Lesbians which is a main trope. Entries are a mix of unconfirmed speculation, discussions of the fandom believing this to be the case (aka YMMV), and shipping-related complaining. It also gets misused for characters panicking about being seen as gay, likely due to the offsite usage of the term refers to a legal defense about violently responding to perceived gay advances. A wick check should further evaluate how far the misuse goes. *
  • Godwin's Law: This has over 900 wicks, but it doesn't have a single example on-page. Yet it's not listed as "definition only." So what is it, precisely, and why is it here?
  • Human Popsicle: Though a trope about time-travel through cryogenics, the title is broad enough to imply it's about any form of full-body freezing. Additionally, the Human Popsicle Wick Check found that there's also a good amount of examples that may or may not count, depending on the exact requirements of the trope.
  • The Jerk Index: This page is currently written as a Self-Demonstrating Article, which has resulted in many (rather cringey) trope descriptions styled with exaggerated examples of over-the-top jerkass behavior (and lots of unnecessary profanity). Some editors also seem to think that this page is interchangeable with the Villains index (which does have some overlap, but isn't quite the same thing), and some of the tropes listed might have been shoehorned in.
  • Jerks Are Worse Than Villains: The trope is supposed to be, as Square Peg, Round Trope puts it, "an Audience Reaction phenomenon where audiences tend to react more negatively to general Jerkass characters doing minor stuff to annoy the hero than to actual villains who commit heinous crimes." However, despite the exclusion of Hate Sink or In-Universe examples, it is misused for both. Notably, the misuse already started appearing on the very first day of the trope's existence. It is also often used for complaining, making this both a misuse and complaining issue. The description has also been noted as being excessively long. 50 wicks need checking. *
  • Later-Installment Weirdness: A Trope Talk thread noted that the concept is inherently flawed—being possibly too subjective and in some works may not be applicable due to series-wide changes. Valid portions of the definition have also been noted as being already covered by tropes like Denser and Wackier, Cerebus Syndrome, Breaking Old Trends, Jumping the Shark, and Flanderization. 50 wicks need checking.
  • The Laws of Magic: Barely any on page examples and only 4 wicks for a trope from 2012.
  • Level Breaker: No evidence that this term even exists. It's a Definition-Only Page, supposedly due to complaining, but there is no evidence for even making it a Definition-Only Page in the first place. *
  • LGBT Fanbase: On the page itself, examples seem to be spilt between "work has a queer following due to (accidental or otherwise) LGBT representation", and one-handed troping about hot characters, in addition to your standard ZCEs aplenty that plauge older tropes on this site. According to this ATT, there are also problems with Trope Decay where it is used for any work that has an LGBT fanbase, even if they are vastly outnumbered by the rest of the fanbase. *
  • UsefulNotes.Misplaced Nationalism: Description goes on and on about how mentioning any nation on the internet will always start a flame war that can never be stopped. It's also in the Useful Notes namespace for some reason, despite reading like a "web trope" from back when the wiki's standards were lower. *
  • Money-Making Shot: The term used in the film industry is "intended Signature Scene, which is heavily put into trailers and posters", but the description describes it as an audience reaction rather than an advertising decision. Could use a rewrite to fit the more widely-known definition. *
  • Mummers: As-is, this is a genre/format, but it's almost impossible to find real life examples and it would be impossible to make pages for those works, so it is currently listed on Definition-Only Pages. However, the definition could be isolated to In-Universe, like School Play, where examples and works can be verified. *
  • New York Is Only Manhattan: Brought up in Trope Talk as being mostly aversions, and possibly not common enough to stand on its own as a trope. There are only 54 wicks, so all can probably be checked. *
  • No Dead Body Poops: Currently defined as an aversion-only trope where dead bodies do poop; it should probably be redefined in the positive instead.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: Despite Sugar Wiki stating that tropes on that wiki there don't go under YMMV, this note seems to be ignored for this trope and is pretty much put under every YMMV page for works in any other medium that have a tie-in game, or the YMMV page for the tie-in game itself whenever its opposite trope isn't true. *
  • Not Good with People: The trope has 2 aspects: characters who can't or don't want to get along with humans but can get along well with non-humans. However, it's often used for any character who's introverted or has poor social skills regardless of their relationship with nature. The two variations has also caused many type-labels only ZCE examples. It needs a wick check to show how common is the misuse. *
  • Object Shows: Requesting a trope's list as it wasn't added for the TLP but this is necessary since, across all works associated with the mainpage, there are many shared tropes that need heavy elaboration on in order to understand the shows.
  • Off-Model: In addition to the overly-long trope description, the definition seems to be overly broad and also complaint-bait. The wick check here shows a heavily split usage.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot is an index, but is treated like a trope, most likely being confused for Serendipity Writes the Plot. There may also be misuse issues for works that don't have plots. *
  • Relationship Voice Actor: Inherited the problems of Hey Its That Voice and Hey Its That Guy, which were cut for being treated more like games for editors than actual trivia. Also tends to have poorly written examples that reek of Fan Myopia and contain excessive use of sinkholing, and some entries make it feel redundant to Role Association. *
  • Reviewer Stock Phrases: Contains a lot of general examples, some of which can verge into either praise or panning. Also of note: there used to be a viewer counterpart (Viewer Stock Phrases), but that was cut a while back. *
  • The Roast: Contains a trope list for specific roasts, as if it's a work page and a trope page. Common tropes should be folded into the description, while the specific roasts and roast series should be given their own work pages. *
  • Sampling: Due to a requirement on the page that states, "Examples should be either non-straight, due to the widespread use of it, or particularly notable." The latter clause violates a long-standing rule on the wiki, and leads to confusion over which samples count as "notable." *
  • Satire/Parody/Pastiche: Despite being listed as a trope in Main, the page is actually written as a guide as to the differences between the three. A Definition-Only conversion was suggested. Check 50 wicks. *
  • Self-Insert Fic: It's been discussed in the ZCE thread that this trope is hard to contextualize without diving into troping the author themself (Auto Erotic or otherwise), and seems to be conflating a few related concepts. Perhaps turning it into a genre index would help alleviate this. *
  • Self-Plagiarism: A creator's work is heavily derived from at least one of their previous works, which is a meta concept that involves multiple works, so it should be Trivia. Also, despite the word "plagiarism", a lot of examples are just when the work reuses anything from one of the creator's previous works, however small it may be. *
  • Sensory Abuse: Lends itself a bit to complaining, but is also written very oddly, with a list of forms this trope can take, whereas a majority of the examples in the Sensory Abuse Wick Check focus on sound — possibly due to the old title, "Ear Rape". It's questionable if many of the examples are intentional, and we might be able to split the in-universe examples off.
  • Shout-Out to Shakespeare: No longer a trope — it's a redirect to a Referenced by... subpage for William Shakespeare (ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare). Despite this, it still has several wicks, and since the target page is in the ReferencedBy/ namespace, doing Wick Namespace Migration from Main.Shout Out To Shakespeare to ReferencedBy.Shout Out To Shakespeare (with wicks pointing to ReferencedBy.William Shakespeare instead) would keep inbounds while preventing it from being used as a trope. Compare the Main.How Do I Used Tense redirect to UsefulNotes.Tenses being moved to UsefulNotes.How Do I Used Tense. *
  • Single-Issue Wonk: It seems viable as an In-Universe Examples Only trope similar to Berserk Button, so it should allow on-page examples (but no real life examples). The description is a bit too Internet-centric, likely due to starting life as troping Real Life users instead of characters and its frequent usage in the forums to report users with a narrow-minded editing agenda. *
  • STD Immunity: The page is a mixture of subversions, aversions and straight examples. Aversions may be better under a different trope. *
  • The Stations of the Canon: Only allows general examples, which is the opposite of site policy. *
  • Super Weight appears to be intended for a Just for Fun game for listing perceived power levels of characters. It would be redundant to various other tropes covering the power levels, such as Made of Plasticine for level -1. *
  • There Are No Therapists: Defined in the negative, like the now-cut Nobody Over 50 Is Gay. While it isn't indexed under No Straight Examples, Please!, it's listed as a trope in aggregate like Nobody Over 50 Is Gay, and it has a lot of aversions (which Nobody Over 50 Is Gay was solely for). Aversions may be redundant with The Shrink, which is for when therapists do appear. *
  • Toothy Issue: Written more like an index page. It has no on-page examples, but does have 82 wicks. As an index, it'd be redundant with Teeth Tropes. *
  • Toy Ship: Trope is Fan Speak when it really shouldn't be, considering "fans ship kids together because it's cute" isn't at all a non-tropable thing. In addition, the TRS thread that made the trope fan speak was originally a TRS thread for splitting the in- and out-of universe uses between Toy Ship and Puppy Love, with the descision to make the former fan speak coming out of left field near the end of the thread, where it barely got any discussion. Because of this, it's still treated as a trope by the rest of the wiki, and over 500 of its 723 wicks are from YMMV pages. *
  • Vampire Detective Series: Low wick count, but not enough to count as "not thriving"; this also seems to be too narrowly specific and could be expanded into a general "Supernatural Detective" trope. *
  • The Wiki Rule: Fandom wikis have become so commonplace in the internet age that their existence is not very notable outside of rare exceptions where multiple wikis for a single franchise co-exist. Examples also tend to just consist of offsite links; any person who is actively looking for a wiki will probably just do a Google search instead of check a work's Trivia tab, bringing the usefulness of the entries into question. Moderator discussion already purged the on-page examples, but TRS would be required for a full Definition-Only conversion or worse. Check 69 wicks. *
  • Worldbuilding: This Trope Talk thread discovered that this trope may be an Omnipresent Trope that doesn't need examples, as it is far too common in works. 50 wicks need checking. *

    Tropes determined to not need TRS 
These tropes have had potential issues brought up before, but discussion has indicated that they don't need help. If you think a new issue has come up with any of these tropes, make sure to do the footwork to confirm this before adding it again.
  • Nosebleed: Despite the seemingly-overbroad name, wick checks show it is reliably used correctly, to refer specifically to nosebleeds resulting from sexual arousal.

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