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Dueling Dubs

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A peculiar phenomenon where a foreign product will get a localization in a region or language, and then get a different localization in the same language in the same region (or another where the same language is spoken). And another.

Why does this happen? Perhaps the first try was a hackjob or a comical rewrite or simply sounded bad, and there was demand for a significantly better localization. Perhaps some new company got the rights and can't use the previous group's resources due to some licensing hell. Perhaps the previous dub wasn't kept around to be reused again.

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A lot of times, different English dubs are made for different international audiences – sometimes to go along with an alternate-language dub in the same region; for instance, different English dubs for North America vs Europe or Asia. In these cases, there is an attempt to prevent even the knowledge that other dubs exist from being in the hands of the common audience. This doesn't always work.

For some reason, a lot of alternate dubs tend to not get released in a home video format, and thus fall into obscurity. If that isn't the case, then it may lead to odd scenarios where two of what is basically the same program are in direct competition.

This trope does not cover fan-made material, so no Abridged Series or fandubs here. A sub-trope of redubbing, in which a production receives a new dub.

Since a few dubbing companies actually make multi-language dubs for the sake of covering the languages available in that region, that'd probably cover a different trope and wouldn't apply here. This also doesn't cover different variations of the same dub (like when certain lines are redubbed for television broadcast for content reasons).

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NOTE: When possible, please note which people and companies did the duelling dubs, to prevent confusion and to clarify that the examples are examples.


Examples

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Examples - Multiple English dubs

    Asian Animation 
  • Micro Commando Diatron-5 was dubbed twice, first under its original title and again as Space Transformers.
  • YooHoo & Friends loves this trope:
    • The original series has two English dubs. One is an incredibly bizzare Gag Dub from the creator of Cow and Chicken starring Flavor Flav (yes, you read that correctly), while the other is a more faithful version that was available on Netflix and Amazon. The Feiss version was nearly completely lost for a while until all 52 segments were eventually found in English.
    • Two Arabic dubs of the series exist; one on Baraem, and the other on Besma that has a completely different theme song.
    • The history of the show in Latin America is a little confusing, but to sum it up: There was a Venezuelan Spanish dub of the Gag Dub that aired on Cartoon Network and Boomerang in 2012 (that also served as the worldwide premiere of that version), and then in 2015, a more faithful Mexican Spanish dub of the original was aired on Canal Once in Mexico. THEN in the same year as the Mexican dub, Boomerang decided to air "the second season" of the Gag Dub. The only problem? The Gag Dub didn't get a second season. The solution was that the Venezuelan dubbing studio would have the actors reprise their roles (except for Roodee's who was replaced) to dub the second season of the original show, despite the two versions being completely different.
  • (Turning) Mecard, a South Korean show, has two English versions. One was (literally) produced in Hong Kong as commissioned by the South Korean companies. The other was produced by Studiopolis for Mattel, the toyline's American distributor. In addition, many foreign language dubs outside of South Korea and Mainland China note  used the BTI Studios Hong Kong English dub as the basis for their scripts and some Western countries translated the Studiopolis dub too.note 
  • Happy Heroes has a few English dubs. The most well-known of these is the dub of the first two seasons from Lookus, though the other dubs are considered more accurate to the original Chinese version.
  • There are two English dubs of the Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf spinoff series Pleasant Goat Fun Class. The first dub was put on the Mandarin-learning app Miao Mi and the second dub was released on YouTube.
  • Simple Samosa has two dubs for each language it's dubbed in (Hindi, English, Tamil, and Telugu), with both sets of dubs having multiple differences that primarily have to do with changes in dialogue (for example, Jalebi mentions saving a fly in the first English version of "Jalebi's Birthday"; this is a Continuity Nod to the earlier episode "Makkhi Makkhi!". This reference is removed in the second dub). The first set of dubs, for unknown reasons, was eventually replaced in all televised airings with the second set of dubs, and the second set of dubs is the one available on Disney+ Hotstar.

    Eastern Animation 
  • Smeshariki was first brought to English-speaking audiences by 4Kids Entertainment under the title GoGoRiki in 2008. Later, a different dub (under the name Kikoriki, which eventually stuck for most foreign adaptations) was commisioned by Riki Group, the current producer of the show. The 4Kids dub is notable for being almost completely lost - Lost Media Wiki provides an extensive coverage. Neither 4Kids nor Riki dubs cover the entire series, though. Later, when the rights to the series were obtained by FUN Union, they began producing a new dub featuring some returning members of the 4Kids cast.
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    Films — Animation 
  • Some Dreamworks films have some of the guest stars voices re-recorded in different English-speaking countries with more local celebrities. For instance in Shrek 2, Joan Rivers (Red Carpet Announcer) and Larry King (Doris) were dubbed over by Kate Thornton and Jonathan Ross respectively for the UK version. In Shark Tale, Katie Current was voiced by Katie Couric for the US, Fiona Phillips for the UK, and Tracy Grimshaw for Australia.
  • Robots:
    • Loretta was played by Natasha Lyonne for the US, Cat Deeley for the UK, and Jackie O for Australia.
    • On an additional note, the UK version of Robots has Mr Gasket (Rachet's father) dubbed over by Terry Wogan, Eamonn Holmes re-dubbing the two roles of Stephen Tobolowsky (Bigmouth Executive & Forge) and Vernon Kay as the Trashcan Bot. Also, Aunt Fanny's name is shortened to Aunt '"Fan", as the word "fanny" is UK slang for the female genitals.
    • For the Australian version of Robots, the voices of the Watches ("Don't buy us; we're fakes!") in the train station, were dubbed by six children who had won a competition to appear in the movie. A voice coach trained them to speak with an American accent to blend in with the rest of the movie.
  • When Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree was released with The Blustery Day and Tigger Too as a compilation movie in 1977, Bruce Reitherman's dialogue as Christopher Robin was re-dubbed by Jon Walmsley, who originally did the same character in The Blustery Day. (This was done due to the character having American accent in the first featurette, as opposed to British, which caused complaints from pre-Disney fans. However, Reitherman's singing lines are left un-dubbed during "Little Black Rain Cloud" and "Mind Over Matter" and oddly, Timothy Turner's dialogue as the character in Tigger Too is also kept intact.)
  • The 2005 CGI film adaptation of The Magic Roundabout was re-dubbed and edited in North America as Doogal – which, not coincidentally, also stripped out a lot of the British humour of the original dub. The American version is roundly hated.
  • The 1997 Crayola adaptation of The Ugly Duckling has both a UK English and an American English dub. The only actors to appear in both versions are Hugh Laurie (as Tarquin the Cat) and Alison Steadman (as the Hen).
  • The Smurfs and the Magic Flute:
    • The film had a U.S. dub and a U.K. dub. The American dub was made in 1983 and was shown in theaters. The voice actors were a mix of voices that may be familiar to those who regularly watched Kung Fu Theater dubs as well as voice actors who would go on to achieve recognition in anime dubs and Western Animation (example: a pre Robotech Cam Clarke as the voice of Peewit). The 1979 U.K. dub had a completely different cast sporting thicker U.K accents, as well as electronically enhanced Smurf voices. The musical numbers were completely different in both versions. Today, only the U.K dub can be found, but it is believed that the American dub is still in someone's warehouse.
    • There have actually been two different versions of the U.S. dub. While they are nearly the same, both versions use different voice actors for Papa Smurf, and in the 2nd version, Johan (pronounced as "Yohan" in the 1st version) is called John. (An unofficial 2008 DVD release by Televista somehow has a mixture of both versions in has Johan being called "(Sir) John" up until the scene where he and Peewit first arrive at the Smurf village.)
  • One of the infamous animated Titanic rip-offs, The Legend Goes On has two different English dubs. The first dub was probably released in theaters, and the second was bundled free with some cheap DVD player bundles in the early days of DVD technology. Both versions contain the same voice cast, but the second dub contains completely different songs and several scenes were either re-arranged or cut (and the rapping dog has a different voice).
  • The German film, The Magic Voyage (known in Germany as: Die Abenteuer von Pico und Columbus, which translates to: The Adventure of Pico and Columbus) has actually gotten two English dubs produced. The first English dub was produced by Alias Film and it is rare and hard to find. It can be found on Malaysian VCD releases distributed by Berjaya HVN Sdn Bhd. Plus the original music heard in the original German version was kept. The second (and rather more infamous) English dub which had a more well known voice cast (including Dom De Luise, Corey Feldman, and Mickey Rooney), but with a new composed soundtrack was released for the home video market by Hemdale Home Video and still can be commonly found on VHS and DVD copies in North America and other western territories.
  • Asterix:
    • Asterix and the Big Fight has a British dub and an American dub. The American dub has a narrator explaining every single plot point as well as several character names, plot points and some terminology being changed (eg. druid to wizard) so American kids can understand it. The British dub has BRIAN BLESSED as General Caous and is sadly long out of print.
    • The Mansions of the Gods has a Canadian dub and a British dub. The British dub is exactly the same as the Canadian dub, only with a few voices replaced.
  • The 1979 animated adaptation of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe has an American dub and a British dub. The only actor to appear in both versions was Stephen Thorne (who voiced Aslan).
  • The two Animated Adaptations of the Swedish children's book series Peter/Pelle No-Tail/Svanslös from the '80s, Peter No-Tail (1981) and Peter No-Tail in America (1985) both have an American and British English dub. The American dub of the first movie has Dom De Luise, best known for his co-starring with Burt Reynolds and voicing comic relief characters in several Don Bluth films as Bull, and was coincidentally released by Vestron Video through their Children's Video Library label that they also released Don Bluth's first film, Banjo The Woodpile Cat through, while the British dub, released by Video Collection International, has Peter Woodthorpe (best known as Gollum in both Ralph Bakshi's and BBC's radio adaptations of Lord of the Rings) as the voice of Måns. The American dub of the second movie, which was released by Atlantic Releasing Corporation, has Cam Clarke as the titular cat himself. The second movie is a rather stange case, however, since both English dubs have American-sounding voices, including the British dub's voice for Peter/Pelle.

    Films — Live Action 
  • This has happened to at least a few Godzilla films. Ebirah, Horror of the Deep, Son of Godzilla, Destroy All Monsters, and Godzilla vs. Hedorah have uncut dubs produced for export (Ebirah through DAM were done by Tokyo's Frontier Enterprises, Hedorah's was done in Hong Kong), and their respective U.S. versions produced by Titan Productions. The export dubs were released on video in the UK during the '90s and later were released on DVD in the U.S., extinguishing the Titan versions from the market, although Media Blasters managed to include the Titan DAM dub as an audio option for their first troubled release in 2011.
    • The Return of Godzilla has two dubs. The original export dub (featuring many of the typically recognizable but unidentified Hong Kong dubbers of the time) was released subtitled on video in a few European countries and later made it to the UK in 1998. Of course, there's also the more well known American re-edit Godzilla 1985, dubbed in Los Angeles (Lara Cody, who lent her talent to a couple of Streamline Studio Ghibli dubs voices Naoko), which interestingly was released theatrically in the UK before the export dub. When Kraken Releasing brought the film to DVD and Blu-ray in 2016, the original export dub made its official debut in the US due to the Godzilla 1985 version being caught up in legal complications; ironically, now that version is unavailable on any format newer than VHS, and will likely never be officially released again.
    • Interestingly, Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II was actually dubbed in Hong Kong ''twice''.
    • Godzilla 2000 received an international dub in Hong Kong, which has never been officially released in full. TriStar completely re-dubbed the movie for its American release, in addition to making numerous small cuts for pacing reasons. However, a single line from the original dub was retained because sound editor Darren Pascal was fond of it.
  • The Mysterians had a unanimously poorly received new dub produced for the Media Blasters DVD release. The original 1959 English version has since been relegated to VHS and assorted fan synchronizations over the years.
  • The Big Boss has two English dubs. One is an extremely typical Ted Thomas filled HK dub with the original Mandarin soundtrack. The other is the U.S. dub, which almost entirely replaced this version internationally, featuring a new score by German composer Peter Thomas. Almost every major foreign version used this dub as a basis. The incomplete HK dub was only recently bootleg telecined and later slapped onto the Shout! Factory Blu-Ray as a bonus track. Interestingly, a good two minutes of this dub was heard on some earlier DVD releases of the U.S. dub for some unexplained reason.
  • Jackie Chan's Hong Kong films from his early and Golden Harvest days are among the absolute rulers of this phenomenon. They are usually divied up among the original dubs comissioned in Hong Kong or the UK for exportation abroad (sometimes shortened or rescored), the more often than not heavily altered theatrical and direct-to-video U.S. versions, and the dubs for home video consumption prepared in Hong Kong. The original Police Story is rather notorious for possessing a whopping four main dubs for a live action film:
    • The first was prepared at the time of the film's release, and featured the original Michael Lai score, but only saw official release on an obscure Dutch PAL VHS until 2018. In this dub, Jackie's Ka-kui character is given an English name, "Kevin". Has a classic '80s HK cast, with voice actors like Matthew Oram (Inspector Wong), Barry Haigh (Sergeant Mao), John Culkin (Kevin), and Simon Broad (Cheung, the lawyer).
      • The version of this dub that saw wide release was a shortened export version, featuring the same dubbing, but a new, fully synth score recorded by Kevin Bassinson, and also shaved off about 12 minutes from the original Hong Kong cut, giving it a more action-oriented pace with fewer comedy scenes.
    • When New Line Cinema acquired the rights to some of Chan's films in the late nineties, they had the export cut re-dubbed and re-scored with a recycled soundtrack by J. Peter Robinson, and Ping Wu (perhaps most well known as the Chinese takeout delivery man who sued Elaine from Seinfeld) dubbing Ka-kui/Kevin, now named "Jackie". This version only saw tape, laserdisc, and cable releases before being phased out in the early 2000s, when the uncut HK cut became the dominant version.
    • A third dub was commissioned around 2000, which saw distribution by Media Asia in PAL territories like the UK, and was featured on the initial HKL DVD in 2001. This has Jack Murphy (as Ka-kui, again named "Jackie" like the New Line dub), Andrea Kwan (Selina), and Rik Thomas (Inspector Wong) among the cast. Has different Anglicized names for most of the characters that are somewhat closer to their Cantonese names.
    • Finally, the fourth dub was recorded around when Fortune Star made their 5.1 mix of the film, which had a remixed soundtrack with new foley and the like. Has much of the same cast as the 2000 dub, but with a lot of better performances and better casting decisions.
  • Police Story 2 also packs four dubs under much of the same circumstances of its predecessor:
    • The original English export version was dubbed by General Screen Enterprises, Ltd. in the UK, and was shortened by 10 minutes from the Hong Kong theatrical version. This has Daniel Flynn providing the voice of Jackie, whose character is again named Kevin. It only saw release on VHS in the UK and Europe, before it was included as a bonus feature on Eureka's 2018 Blu-Ray.
    • New Line Cinema produced their own dub of the export version concurrently with the first film's, and likewise the cast is exactly the same. It also saw release on tape, laserdisc and cable.
    • The full-length Hong Kong theatrical cut was dubbed in 2000, again for Media Asia's PAL region releases. Has essentially the same cast as the 2000 dub of its predecessor, the only major difference being Rik Thomas assuming the role of John Ko.
    • The longer Japanese cut was finally dubbed concurrently with the first film's fourth dub, and shares the same cast. Its first releases was the Dragon Dynasty DVD in 2006.
  • Police Story 3: Super Cop had an uncut export dub recorded in the UK, again with Daniel Flynn providing Jackie's voice, who is once again named Kevin. This version was released on VHS there, while America got the abridged Dimension Films U.S. theatrical version, simplified to just Supercop, in 1996. Notable for having Chan and Michelle Yeoh loop their own lines for the new dubbing, which retains the Kevin Chan name for Jackie's character.
  • Drunken Master and its 1994 sequel both pack two dubs per film:
    • Drunken Master was originally shipped with a standard Hong Kong recorded dub. Wong Fei-Hung and Beggar So were anglicized as "Freddie Wong" and "Sam Seed", and voiced by voice actors Warren Rooke and Rik Thomas, respectively.
      • The second dub was recorded in the UK, and has Daniel Flynn dubbing Jackie Chan, whose character name is retained as Freddie Wong. Beggar So was renamed "So Hai". Has seemingly replaced the original dub and has appeared on most commercial releases, the original dub becoming somewhat rare and sought after by many fans of Chan's films.
    • Drunken Master II had an export dub recorded which retained the original music and effects from the Cantonese version, but cut the widely considered poor taste ending, where Wong Fei-Hung has become brain dead after guzzling industrial alcohol during the final battle. This dub has seen release on Warner Video Asia's DVD, which also has abridged Cantonese and Mandarin tracks that conform to the deletion of the ending.
      • The film was given a U.S. theatrical release by Dimension Films in 2000 as The Legend of Drunken Master, which replaced the original music and sound effects, and had Chan looping his own lines for the new dubbing. Part of the original ending is kept, but ends before Fei-Hung's state can be shown.
  • The Young Master was initially given a shortened English export version dubbed in Hong Kong, with some exclusive footage, a new music score by Ryudo Uzaki and Akira Inoue featuring the English theme song Kung Fu Fighting Man performed by Jackie Chan. A new, straight dub of the Hong Kong theatrical version was recorded for DVD in the UK, and yet another for the U.S.
  • Dragon Lord: Three dubs, all based on the general release Hong Kong version; A shortened English export version dubbed in Hong Kong, the also shortned U.S. Dimension Films version with a bad Jackie Chan soundalike, and the uncut dub of the theatrical cut for DVD in the UK. 88 Films' UK Blu-Ray release has the export and DVD dubs.
  • Project A: Two dubs. The uncut UK export dub by General Screen Enterprises, and the edited direct-to-video Dimension Films U.S. version.
    • Project A Part II packs three dubs: The original shortned UK export dub, the uncut dub of the Hong Kong theatrical cut for DVD in the UK, and the edited Dimension Films U.S. home video dub.
  • The original Lucky Stars trilogy:
    • Winners and Sinners packs two dubs: The original export dub (which removess a brief karaoke scene) was released on VHS in the UK and on DVD in the Nordic countries. The second dub was recorded for the UK Hong Kong Legends DVD.
    • My Lucky Stars: Three dubs. The shortened General Screen export dub released on VHS in the UK and U.S. and on DVD in the Nordic countries, the uncut dub of the HK theatrical cut used on the UK Hong Long Legends DVD, and another recorded for the U.S. Fox DVD. Twinkle, Twinkle Lucky Stars was surprisingly spared from this practice, possessing only its original export dub.
  • Wheels on Meals has two dubs: The original General Screen Enterprises UK export dub with a different, funkier music score by Keith Morrison (an alias of Japanese composer Toshiyuki Kimori), and a later Fortune Star redub for DVD. The UK Blu-Ray by Eureka Entertainment carries both.
  • Heart Of Dragon: The original HK export dub released on VHS in the UK and U.S. and DVD in the UK, and the Fortune Star re-dub featured only on the U.S. Fox DVD. The 88 Films Blu-Ray carries only the export dub.
  • Armour of God has three dubs: The original export dub done in Hong Kong, the Dimension Films version of the shorter export cut with a new music score and Jackie voicing himself, and the Media Asia/Fortune Star dub used on current home video releases of the uncut Hong Kong version.
    • Its sequel, Operation Condor, was surprisingly spared from the usual practice of having its original UK export dub replaced by a newer redub on later home video releases. On the other side of the Atlantic, Dimension Films released their own Americanized theatrical version in 1997 with new dubbing and Jackie ADRing his own lines.
  • Dragons Forever: The original UK General Screen dub of the shortned export version with some alternative scenes, and the dub of the Hong Kong theatrical cut for DVD. Both are on the 88 Films BD.
  • Miracles was dubbed twice: Once in the UK for its shortened export version, and once in Hong Kong for the DVD in the UK. The Blu-Ray by 88 Films only includes the shorter export version.
  • Island of Fire has two: The original HK export dub used in the UK, and the U.S. The Prisoner dub featuring a new score.
  • Twin Dragons: Two dubs. An uncut export version dubbed in Canada, and the shortened 1999 U.S. Dimension Films theatrical version where Jackie dubs himself.
  • City Hunter: Two dubs. The original Doug Stone Enterprises export dub, released in the UK on VHS and DVD, and the Fortune Star re-dub first featured on the U.S. Fox DVD. Both are on the Eureka BD relaese.
  • Crime Story is a strange case of two and a half dubs. The original Doug Stone Enterprises dub was released on video in the UK, and in the U.S. a modified version was released that changed Eddie's name to "Jackie" and also brought on somebody doing a bad Jackie Chan impression to revoice his lines. When the film was released on DVD in the UK, a new standalone dub was recorded in Hong Kong.
  • Thunderbolt: Two dubs. The original export dub recorded in Hong Kong (available on some Warner Bros. Asia DVDs like the Japanese two-disc set), and the New Line Cinema re-dub used in the U.S.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Ultraseven had two different dubs: The first was produced in the mid 1970s using local Honolulu actors when the series aired on Hawaii's KHON-TV (then a NBC affiliate, now a Fox affiliate), and the second was done by Cinar in 1985 for Turner Programming Services. Despite its rather amateurish voice acting, some fans believe that Hawaiian dub is the better of the two; however, only a handful of dubbed episodes survive. However, on the other side of the coin, some fans think that the Hawaiian dub wasn't all that good, and the Cinar dub was actually better.
  • Ultraman Tiga also has 2 dubs: an edited Gag Dub produced by 4Kids Entertainment that only lasted 25 episodes, and an uncut Asian-English dub that currently has only the first 2 episodes publically available.
  • Tots TV has two different English dubs: the original for the UK and another for the US. In the UK version, Tilly speaks in basic French, while the US version had her speak Spanish. The original UK dub tends to be the more well-known version, whereas the US version (which aired on PBS) is hard to find save for two rare VHS releases ("The Tots Find A Treasure Map" and "Lovely Bubble Surprise") and an episode uploaded to the website Understanding 9/11: A Television News Archive. note 
  • Yo Gabba Gabba! has a British dub where only the voices of the humans are changed (except during songs), and the voices of the costumed characters stay the same.

    Manga 
  • Oh My Goddess! has two known English translations. This is odd because one of those is the highly-regarded Dark Horse/Studio Proteus translation that ran from 1996 to 2015 (and received significant revisions when DH reprinted the first 20 volumes from 2005 to 2012); the other is a much more recent translation for the UK market.
  • Both Azumanga Daioh and the first 5 volumes of Yotsuba&! were originally released by ADV Manga, with AzuDai even made available in a slightly revised omnibus edition. Then ADV collapsed and went bankrupt (the anime side resurrected, but the manga line did not), and Yen Press picked up the licenses. When Yen reprinted both series, they opted to completely retranslate them to fit with their house style (near-literal accuracy, as opposed to ADV's tendency toward Woolseyism). Interestingly, Yen's Yotsuba reprints, as well as the next 5 new volumes, were handled by one of ADV's former translators (volumes 11 and onward were not because that translator passed away during the hiatus between volumes).
  • Fist of the North Star had two official translations that never got finished. The Viz version started as a monthly comic series in 1989, which was canceled due to low sales (lasting only eight issues), but was resumed years later in 1995 (due to the popularity of Streamline's dub of the movie), only to be canceled again in 1998. Viz would eventually lose the license to Gutsoon Entertainment, Coamix's short-lived English division, which published the Master Edition version of the series that lasted nine volumes from 2002 until Gutsoon's departure from the market in 2004. Whereas the Viz version featured flipped artwork and has a heavily localized translation with different names (most notably the martial art schools of Hokuto Shinken and Nanto Seiken became the "Sacred Martial Arts of the Great Bear" and "Southern Cross" respectively), the Gutsoon edition retained the right-to-left orientation and had a more literal translation, but features fully colorized artwork.
  • Love Hina has had four English translations. There was a short-lived "bilingual edition" from Kodansha meant for the Japanese market; there's Tokyopop's 2002-3 translation for North America; there's the Chuang Yi translation for Singapore (done at the same time as Tokyopop's); and now there's the Kodansha USA omnibus translation. For the record, Tokyopop's translation is fairly liberal, usually flows well, but has serious copy-editing issues (especially in Volumes 2-5 and 9). The Kodansha USA translation is, typical for them, much more accurate but rather dry as a result.
  • The Sailor Moon manga has three complete English translations. There's the original 1998 one from Tokyopop (then known as Mixx), which made use of DiC's localized character names (except Usagi, who was called "Bunny" instead of "Serena") and was a very liberal adaptation. When Kodansha USA rescued the series in 2011, their releases featured a new, far more literal translation using the original Japanese names/terms. It was frequently criticized for being too literal to the point of being awkward to read (essentially the opposite criticism of Tokyopop's version). They also translated Codename: Sailor V, which Tokyopop never touched. Kodansha reissued the series beginning in 2018 in special "Eternal" editions with a brand new faithful translation that read far more naturally.
  • Slam Dunk was originally translated in North America by the now-defunct Gutsoon Entertainment for their manga anthology Raijin Comics published from 2002 through 2004. This version of Slam Dunk lasted only five volumes before the publication folded. Viz Media later rescued the license and proceeded to translate the whole manga from 2008 through 2013. A comparison of both versions can be seen here.
  • The Tokyo Mew Mew manga has three English translations. Tokyopop's translation was the original, but it was ditched for a new one from Kodansha USA (like Yen Press, Kodansha has a house style that favors near-literal translations). There's also one from Singapore-based Chuang Yi for Southeast Asia.
  • Deadman Wonderland was originally published in English by Tokyopop, but they only released 5 volumes before their closure. The series was left in limbo until the anime found surprise success on Toonami, and the manga was rescued by Viz Media, who restarted the series with a new translation.
  • Fruits Basket was published by Tokyopop in the early 2000s, and was highly successful, becoming the #1 selling shojo manga of all time in the US. However their editions went out of print following their closure. Yen Press picked up the series in 2016 and began reissuing it in omnibus volumes with a new translation.
  • Kimagure Orange Road was originally released digital-only in 2013 by Hivelinx before transferring to Digital Manga's eManga service, featuring a heavily panned translation that was very literal in style and accused by fans of reading very dry on top of its sloppy presentation and numerous typos. In 2016, a successful Kickstarter campaign was raised for a physical release and a digital reissue featuring a newer, and far more professional, translation that was released in 2018-2019.
  • SPY × FAMILY originally received a digital translation by Manga Plus up through chapter 12 (including the first extra chapter), released simultaneously with the Japanese version. The series then got licensed by Viz Media, who took over the simulpub translations from chapter 13 and did their own translation of the previous chapters.
  • Urusei Yatsura was originally published in English by Viz Media (then called Viz Communications) beginning in 1989 under the title Lum * Urusei Yatsura, but was canceled after eight issues. Years later, it was resurrected in Viz's Animerica magazine under the title The Return of Lum * Urusei Yatsura, and 9 graphic novels were released, skipping some chapters, and covering roughly the first 11 volumes. However, Viz dropped the series again in 1998. 21 years later, Viz relicensed the series, and began releasing it in 2-in-1 omnibus volumes with a brand new translation. The first volume was published in February 2019.

     Theater 

    Video Games 
  • Not quite the same, but a lot of video games in British English for Europe and Australia have different localizations from the American English version for North America for reasons besides simple differences in spelling. The Advance Wars and Fire Emblem series have a few notable examples, despite the former being for handhelds (which are traditionally region-free).
    • While Fire Emblem is usually limited to a few name changes and bug fixes here and there, Advance Wars Days Of Ruin (Dark Conflict in British English) has a completely different script between the American and British versions.
    • A special example could be Professor Layton, in which Luke's voice actress is different in the American and the British versions (though the rest of the cast is unchanged).
    • Similarly, Kirby's Epic Yarn changed the voice of the narration, as well as some of the lines in the opening narration.
    • In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, both genders of Wii Fit Trainer have different voices between the American and British versions and most trophy descriptions are different, as is some text. (Like Event titles and the characters' titles on the Boxing Ring stage). Additionally, in the British version, the character Duck Hunt is known as "Duck Hunt Duo".
    • While both American and British versions left the Japanese voice track on, it's quite apparent that US-based Aksys Games' localization of Agarest Senki is far superior to UK-based Ghostlight's localization.
    • Most of the Ape Escape games have been released in the UK with a different English voice track than North America.
    • Inazuma Eleven on the Nintendo DS was released in Europe with a translation based on the Animax Asia anime dub, using a completely new cast of British VAs. Fast forward a few years, when Inazuma Eleven was re-released on the 3DS, it was given an entirely new dub featuring LA voice actors. Interestingly enough, other than changing "football" to "soccer", the script was almost entirely unedited from the EU release, which had the strange effect of mingling American accents with British colloquialisms and slang.
    • Splatoon has separate English localizations for North America and Europe. While the British version is mostly a direct translation from the Japanese version, the American version is more of a Woolseyism that takes greater liberties with some of the dialogue. In particular the American version turned the Big Bad DJ Octavio into much more of a Large Ham, gave Spyke a Cockney Funetik Aksent, and made Marie much more of an acerbic Deadpan Snarker.note 
    DJ Octavio (British English): Time...to...put an end...to you!
    DJ Octavio (American English): I'MA DUBSTOMP YOU INTO OBLIVION!
  • A lot of older Final Fantasy games got retranslated when they were remade for later systems. This is usually a good thing since the original localizations were often rife with "Blind Idiot" Translation problems (especially with spell and monster names), but for titles that became originally famous for their Woolseyisms, most notably the SNES version of Final Fantasy VI compared with its GBA re-release, some fans felt that the later more accurate translations lost some of the charm the the older versions had.
    • This can be further complicated by throwing the fan translations into the mix.
  • Other RPGs where later releases/remakes did a retranslation.
  • Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles includes a relocalized version of Castlevania: Symphony of the Night with a new dub which removes most of the over-the-top narm (or, for some, epic hilarity). Bizarrely enough, the PSN and XBLA versions of SOTN still use the classic PS dialogue, making this trope more apparent, rather than attempting to hide it as is usually so when a "replacement dub" happens.
  • Harvest Moon:
    • As of late, Natsume and Xseed have been fighting over the American translations of the Rune Factory series, with Natsume having translated Rune Factory 1 and 2, and Xseed translating Rune Factory Frontier. After Xseed got Rune Factory Frontier, however, Natsume got the Rune Factory series back and translated Rune Factory 3 and Rune Factory: Tides of Destiny. Then, Xseed managed to get Rune Factory 4
    • The translation fight between the two companies continues with the surprise announcement that Xseed will translate the next game in the Harvest Moon series, now renamed to Story of Seasons because Natsume still owns the rights to the Harvest Moon name. As Xseed is owned by Marvelous AQL, the developer of the Harvest Moon series, it's reasonable to assume that Xseed will translate the series from now on due to it being closer to Marvelous than Natsume is. Natsume isn't giving up, though, as it has been announced that Natsume is developing their own Harvest Moon game; many are assuming that, despite no longer translating Bokujou Monogatari (the name of the series in Japan) games, Natsume is trying to cash in on the series regardless by pretending they still own it by continuing the usage of the Harvest Moon name.
  • Metal Gear:
    • The original Metal Gear has three official English localizations. There's the British MSX2 version, which due to space constraint issues only kept 86 of the Japanese version's 155 radio messages and suffered from obvious Engrish. Most notably it refers to the player's cigarettes pack as "CIGAL" and constantly misspells the word "destroy" as "destoroy" due to the use of preset keywords to compose most of the text. The second and better known translation was the NES version, which was a reworked port which had a wider release. It kept all the radio messages, but still suffered from Engrish and the game itself had some drastic changes from the MSX2 original. A more faithful conversion of the MSX2 version was later included in Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence, with this new version having a completely revised translation. Despite the existence of the other translations, it is the NES version that gets quoted in Metal Gear Solid 2 during the crazed A.I. Colonel sequence and later on by Miller in Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes.
    • Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes for the GameCube was originally planned to retain the voice track from the original PlayStation version. However, the voices from the PlayStation version were not recorded in a soundproof studio, causing certain traffic noises in the background to become audible when the master files were processed on the GameCube's more advanced sound chip, resulting in the need for a new voice track. The differences between the two dubs include the lost of certain characters' accents (namely Mei-Ling, Dr. Naomi and Nastasha), the replacement of Greg Eagles with Rob Paulsen as the voice of the Cyborg Ninja (Eagles still voiced the DARPA Chief in the new version), updated playing instructions (due to the different button layout of the GameCube controller and the addition of updated mechanics from the sequel), and certain lines that were localized in the original script were replaced with more literal translations, resulting in some questionable changes that were considerably unnatural sounding.note 
  • The 2002 remake of the first Resident Evil completely replaced the voice acting from the original 1996 version out of necessity due to the addition of new plot events and changes to the tone and delivery of the existing ones. Specifically the original voice acting was done in an intentionally slow and stilted matter since the English versions of the game did not have subtitles and lead developer Shinji Mikami said that he did not want players to miss out on important clues during cutscenes. Additionally, the script for the 1996 version was written by the developers themselves, who were not exactly fluent in English, resulting in weird lines that has since become iconic to the series, most notably Jill Valentine's grandiose title of "Master of Unlocking", which have been referenced in later games in the series. Ed Smaron, who voiced Barry Burton in the remake, wanted to retain the narm aspect of the dialogue, but the developers of the new version insisted on a more serious tone for the script.
  • The PC Engine version of Ninja Ryukenden (aka Ninja Gaiden) has an English language setting with a translation that is completely different from the earlier NES version. Notably, Joe Hayabusa keeps his original name (he was renamed Ken Hayabusa in the NES version) and the Jaquio becomes the "Devildoer".
  • Konami's X-Men arcade game got a new voice track (with only two voice actors) for its Playstation Network re-release. However, this dub kept the laughable lines from the original dub ("The White Queen WELCOMES YOU TO DIE!!!") for tradition.
  • Diddy Kong Racing's voice track was redone for its Nintendo DS re-release in the mid-2000s from its original N64 release. This was pointed out in X-Play's review for the re-release with Morgan Webb saying "I miss the old Genie!"
  • The Silent Hill HD Collection featured new voice tracks for Silent Hill 2 and Silent Hill 3 due to Konami's refusal to pay royalties to the original actors. The scripts for both games remained the same (despite initial plans for rewrites), with only the performance changed. Ultimately, the released version of the HD Collection retained the original voices for 2 (giving players a choice between the old and new voices), as the cast for that game agreed to drop their royalties demand out of respect for the fanbase, but the original voices for 3 were still missing.

    Web Video 

Examples - Other Languages/Regions

    Multiple Media 
  • Inevitable in Spanish, where both Spain and Latin America get different dubs. In the 21st century, only a couple Latin dubs have been broadcast in Spain, including Drawn Together and Coco.
  • In Latin America, some productions have multiple dubs because of different distributors. These dubs may be made in different countries (most often Mexico, but sometimes the USA, Venezuela, Argentina, Chile or Colombia). One wiki has a category describing the Dueling Dubs trope, as well as another category for redubs and slightly modified dubs.
  • In Brazilian Portuguese, some TV shows and movies have separate dubs made by different distributors. Most of these dubs are produced in different cities (usually São Paulo or Rio de Janeiro). Most older productions have at least two dubs because the original audio no longer exists in most cases, or because of alternate rights. Fans are known to ensure the original dubs still exist online if only for nostalgia.
  • European Portuguese dubs are only produced for children's movies and series. While most mature series/movies are dubbed in Brazil, they are only subtitled in Portugal.
  • Most films since 1994 have two French dubs: one for Canada, and another for Europe. However, most TV shows have a single French dub (usually made in France or Belgium). However, most recent Canadian shows have a single French dub done in Canada instead (Canadian broadcasters must air a certain amount of Canadian-made programming).
  • Whenever a movie (animated or live action) is released in Japan, each broadcaster produces its own dub of said movie. Some Japanese dubs may be released direct to video or theatrically. Older movies tend to have more existing dubs.
    • Similarly, in South Korea, the three main broadcasters (KBS, MBC, and SBS) own their respective dubs, which may not air on a competitor's channel.
  • Since Chinese is a language with many dialects, most productions have dubs made in Taiwan, China (Mandarin) and/or Hong Kong (Cantonese).
  • There exist alternate Islamic Arabic dubs of everything from Dino Babies and Toad Patrol to Cyborg Kuro-chan and Detective Conan. The difference? There's no music, the theme song's a nasheed (being sung a capella), and most of the time characters state religious things about Islam. Some shows have an Islamic dub but not a regular Arabic dub.
    • The aforementioned Islamic dub of Detective Conan (which renamed Conan to Kamal, meaning "Perfect") actually caused controversy among Arab otakus. Funningly enough, multiple sources say it was done by Venus Company, the same studio that did the more well-known secular dub aired on Spacetoon and other channels accross the Arab world.
  • It's common for films to have multiple Turkish dubs, mostly depending on the medium. TV broadcasts (depending on the channel), theatrical release, home entertainment, and streaming.
  • In Poland and Russia, it's very common for non-children's productions to have alternate voice-over dubs. Both countries have gradually begun to dub more mature works (and blockbuster films) with full casts.
  • Dozens of films have alternate Hindi dubs, mostly for theatrical release, home entertainment, streaming, and TV airings (mostly for different channels).
  • In the 2010's, Sony Pictures decided to redub a lot of their old material (ranging from Seinfeld to The Last Emperor) in Argentina for whatever reason (likely to avoid paying royalties to the original dub actors). Most of these redubs were done by either Caja de Ruidos or Palmera Record. The Argentine dub of Seinfeld has so far only aired on the Canal Sony pay TV channel (Amazon Prime Video keeps the original Mexican dub).
  • Some shows (such as Super Wings) have Swedish dubs in both Standard Swedish and Finland Swedish.

    Documentaries 
  • Docus may be redubbed for broadcasts when Channel Hop happens, or if they air edited versions. As an example, Walking with Dinosaurs and its sequels got many different dubs in Hungary, the record being held by Walking with Beasts: One dub for the VHS release, another one for the TV debut, and a third for the Discovery Channel cut. All completely different. Notably, each version changed the series title. The tie-in books were also published by different companies and based off different dubs, adding to the confusion.
    • Same thing with The Future Is Wild. The version that Animal Planet aired (along with all its recuts) got dubbed independently from its "more official" broadcast on a public service TV station (whose translations found their way into the book of the series).
  • OceanWorld 3D was originally dubbed in Italian by the comedic trio Aldo, Giovanni and Giacomo. The dub was poorly recieved, since it turned a serious documentary about the extinction risk of sealife into a comedic farce. The DVD/Blu-Ray edition redubbed it in a more serious way, albeit keeping the original one as an alternative audio track.
  • The Hungarian science channels Spektrum and OzoneNetwork often broadcast documentaries produced by The History Channel or Discovery Channel, which means many of these end up with two or three dubs. Various docus by The BBC also get freely distributed between Spektrum, Discovery/Animal Planet and public service channels, and these too tend to receive several different translations.
  • Eyewitness has two Norwegian dubs. One aired on the channel NRK, while the other one was made for home video release.

    Eastern Animation 
  • The Ukrainian Wikipedia lists no less than four Ukrainian dubs of Smeshariki, some of which even share voice actors. Airings of the show on 1+1 and Noviy Kanal had different dubs, and two other dubs were done by studios Z Ranku Do Nochi and Tak Treba Production.

    Films — Animation 
  • Disney just loves this trope overseas:
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs:
    • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was dubbed in Italian three times: once in 1938, again in 1972, and a third time in the early 1990's. The 1938 dub had rhyming dialogue, and is quite interesting to watch, even for non-Italian viewers. However, that style of dubbing went out of fashion and the more straightforwardly-dubbed 1972 version is the only one officially available today. The 90's dub was made for a bootleg VHS release.
    • The film has also been dubbed in Latin American Spanish three times: in 1938 (Los Angeles), 1964, and 2001 (both Mexico). Of the three, the 1964 one is considered the best and the classic (supposedly Walt Disney himself really liked this dub). The 2001 dub was made due to Lupita Pérez Arias (the singing voice of Snow White in the 1964 dub), having sued Disney for not paying the royalties on the use of her voice. After her death in 2005, the 1964 dub has occasionally aired on TV since 2010, with certain channels often switching between this and the 2001 dub. Interestingly, Francisco Colmenero appeared in both Mexican dubs: as Happy in the 1964 dub, and as the narrator in 2001. The dwarves' names weren't translated in the first two dubs.
      • Spain produced its own dub in 2001 because of the lawsuit.
    • It also received three German dubs; the original in 1938, one in 1966 and the current one in 1994. The second dub tries to be more "child-friendly", while the third dub actually caused controversy.
    • It also has three French dubs; the original from 1938, another from 1962, and the current from 2001. The reason why Snow White was fully redubbed in 2001 was because Lucie Dolène (who voiced Snow White in the 1962 French dub) sued Disney over the copyright of her voice and won, instead of her part being redubbed (like with the French dubs of The Jungle Book and Beauty and the Beast), Snow White was redubbed.
    • The film was also redubbed in Danish in 1980.
    • The film also had three Japanese dubs: the first from 1957, the second from 1980, and the third from 2007. Only the 1980 dub is considered official, since the others were made by independent studios. The 2007 dub was made for the public domain only and isn't released to home media.
    • It was also redubbed into Swedish in the early 1980's.
    • In the Netherlands, the film was originally dubbed into Dutch in 1938 and again in 1984. The 1984 version received a partial redub in 1992, with Snow White and the Dwarfs' voices left un-changed. There was also a soundtrack dubbing in 1973 for a storybook adaptation, resulting in a total of three and a half Dutch dubs.
    • There are also three Finnish dubs; one in 1962, one in 1982, and one in 1994. The 1962 dub only dubbed the speaking parts; the songs were used from the 1938 Swedish version.
    • It also received two Hungarian dubs; the first was done in 1962 and the second was done in 2001.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice: the first from 1938, and again in 1965. The 1938 dub is long lost (only recordings of the songs are known to exist), while the 1965 dub is the official version currently being used.
    • The film also had two Thai dubs. Both versions are nearly the same, though Snow White, the Prince, and Grumpy have different actors in the second dub.
    • There are two Polish dubs: one from 1938 and the other from 2009, which was probably made because the first dub was filled with outdated language. Plus, the quality of the original dub made some words hard to understand.
    • It also received two Norwegian dubs, one from 1983 and again in 1994. Unn Vibeke Hol voiced Snow White in both dubs.
    • It was also dubbed into Albanian twice: once in 2000 for TV (with the songs left in English) and again in 2005.
    • The film has two Putonghua dubs: the first (unofficial) for VHS and the second (official) for TV. While the VHS dub left the songs in English, the TV dub re-used the songs from the Mandarin Chinese dub.
  • Pinocchio:
    • There are four Japanese dubs: one in 1958, the second in 1983, the third in 1986, and the fourth in 2007. The second dub was revised in 1995, replacing Pinocchio's voice actor.
    • The film was also dubbed into German twice. The original was done in 1951 and the new one from 1973. While the original dub is currently lost, the latter one tries to be more "child-friendly". Georg Thomalla voiced Jiminy Cricket in both dubs.
    • It was also re-dubbed into Swedish in 1995.
    • There are also three French dubs; one in the 1940's with New York actors, one in 1946 and one in 1975. The 1975 version received partial revisions in 1995 (to revert the original French name of Jiminy "Grillon" ("Cricket" in French) to Jiminy Cricket as the original) and 2003 (re-dubbing a line from Lampwick). The 2009 Platinum Edition DVD, while mostly containing the 1975 dub, oddly uses "When You Wish Upon a Star" from the original 1946 dub and leaves the mentions of "Jiminy Grillon" intact, but keeps the 2003 redub of Lampwick's line.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice; the first was done in the 40s, and again in 1966.
    • It also recived two Hungarian dubs, the original from 1962 and the second (and current) from 1999.
    • It was dubbed into Danish three times, the first from 1950, the second from 1978. In 1995, the second dub was partially re-dubbed, replacing Pinocchio's voice.
    • It also had two Dutch dubs, the first from 1949 and the second from 1995.
    • The 1947 Italian version of the film was given a partial redub in 1963 to the song "When You Wish Upon a Star" due to the previous version being in low quality. Subsequent releases, since 1993, retain the original 1947 version.
  • Dumbo:
    • Dumbo received two Latin American Spanish dubs. The original dub was made in 1942 for Argentina, and the second dub was made for Mexico in 1969. Interestingly, the 1942 Argentinian dub has the Song of the Roustabouts left in English, though TV airings in Spain used this dub with the 1969 version of the song. Coincidentally, the 1969 Mexican dub recycled the brief Clown song from the 1942 version.
    • It was also dubbed into German twice; the original dub from 1952 was distributed by RKO, and the current dub from 1976 was directed by Heinrich Riethmüller.
    • The film was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times: once in 1941, again in 1973, and the third in 1998. After the third dub was commissioned, the 1973 dub has occasionally aired on the Disney Channel and was released a couple of times on DVD and Blu-Ray in certain European regions, until a European Portuguese dub was made for the film's 70th anniversary release in 2010.
    • It was also received two Hungarian dubs; the first in 1989 and the second in 1991. Curiously, both dubs used nearly the same voice actors, except for a few minor characters.
    • The film also has four Japanese dubs: the original theatrical dub from 1954, a television dub from 1979 (partially re-dubbed in 1981 for NHK), a 1983 theatrical re-release dub (which later aired on WOWOW during the 1990s), and a 1985 dub used for all home video releases of the film in Japan.
    • It also was dubbed into Swedish three times: first in 1946, again in 1972 by Doreen Denning, and the third time in 1996 by Monica Forsberg. Interestingly, the 1946 dubbing was made in the USA with Swedish-Americans. Also, the first DVD release with the 1996 re-dub incorrectly lists the 1946 voice credits at the end.
    • It was given two French dubs as well; once in 1947 and again in 1980. Canadian VHS releases used the original 1947 dub until 2001, while European VHS releases began using the redub beginning in 1991.
    • It was also dubbed into Czech three times: The first was done for its theatrical release in 1970, the second was made for TV Nova in 1994, and the current was done for home media in 2000.
  • Bambi:
    • Bambi was dubbed into Latin Spanish twice; like Dumbo, the first dub was made in Argentina (1943) and the second was done in Mexico (1969). Only the Mexican dub is currently available.
    • The film also got two German dubs; the original one from 1950 and again in 1973.
    • It also received two Finnish dubs; the first in 1969 and the current in 2005.
    • The movie was also dubbed into French three times: in 1945, 1978, and 1993. Gérard Hernandez voiced the owl in both redubs.
    • In Hungary, the film was given two dubs; once in 1961 and again in 1993.
    • It also had two Italian dubs; the first in 1948 and the second in 1968. Gianfranco Bellini participated in both dubs, as adult Bambi in the original and Flower in the second.
    • It was also dubbed into Japanese twice; once in 1957 and again in 1993.
    • In Poland, the movie was dubbed twice; the original in 1961 and the current in 1999 (this one wasn't released until 2005).
    • The movie had three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the first from 1943, the second from 1969 by Riosom, and the current from 1991 by the Delart studio. Since the first two dubs are lost, only Delart's dub is currently available. The 1969 and 1991 dubs were both directed and translated by Telmo de Avelar, while Aloysio de Oliveira translated the songs.
    • It was also re-dubbed into Swedish in 1986.
    • It also received two Hindi dubs; the first one was made produced by Main Frame Software Communications for Disney Channel India and the other for another channel and home video by Sound & Vision India.
    • There are also two Albanian dubs and two Dutch dubs.
  • Fun and Fancy Free:
    • There are three Japanese dubs. For the film version, the original dub was made around 1984/85 and released to VHS and laserdisc, while the third dub was made for the Disney Channel in the 1990s. The second dub was made in 1991 to the featurette versions ("Bongo" and "Mickey and the Beanstalk").
    • It was also dubbed into French two (and a half) times; once in 1950 and again in 1993 (for the featurette versions) and 1998 (for the film version). In the original French dub, the "Mickey and the Beanstalk" segment was censored for unknown reasons. About 10 minutes were removed and the end was even fully cut, therefore making the movie somewhat confusing.
    • The German version is a bit complex:
      • The "Mickey and the Beanstalk" segment was dubbed first in 1966, but heavily edited to remove the narration sequences. With the exceptions of Susanne Tremper as the Harp (who also re-dubbed Snow White in the same year) and Gernot Duda as Willie, the original dub for this cartoon is also rather weak. All of Donald's dialogue remains in English, a few scenes of the cartoon are shown without the accompanying narration, the second half of the song "My, What a Happy Day" is cut and part of the song "Eat Until I Die" is left un-dubbed without any voices.
      • The "Bongo" segment was then dubbed in the 1970s. While all the songs were left in English (with the exception of "I'm a Happy-Go-Lucky Fellow"), a 1990s TV special, "Jiminy Crickets Rezept für's Leben" (which translates to "Jiminy Cricket's Recipe for Life") has them dubbed.
      • The original 1966/1970s dubbing for both shorts can be found on a 1980s VHS cartoon compilation also featuring the original 1950s German dub of the short "Ben & Me".
      • The entire film version was later dubbed in 1992, with the narration for "Bongo" being kept intact from the original version (though the segment's songs are agan left in English, despite having been dubbed in the aforementioned TV special).
    • It also received two-and-a-half Italian dubs; starting with the original dub for the film in 1952, which was released to VHS twice in the 1980s and again in 1997. Then, there's the 1992 dub for the stand-alone version of "Mickey and the Beanstalk" with Ludwig Van Drake. Finally, there's the 2003 DVD dub, which is entirely the same as the 1952 dub, but for the "Beanstalk" segment, re-uses the voices from the 1992 dub of the stand-alone version. The only elements from the 1952 dub that are kept for this segment are a few scenes that have Edgar Bergen's narration overlapping, such as "My, What a Happy Day" (although the Harp's one speaking line and second song, "My Favorite Dream" are still used from the re-dub) and a few lines from Willie (notably his dialogue in the entire ending scene where he lifts Bergen's roof, searching for Mickey).
    • It also has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the first from 1949, the second by Herbert Richers from the 1980s, the third by S&C Produções Artísticas from 1993, and the fourth by Double Sound in 1999. Interestingly, all that remains of the 1949 dub are the songs (which appeared in Richers' version). The 1993 dub was made to the Ludwig Von Drake "Mickey and the Beanstalk" segment only.
    • The original Norwegian version from the 1950s was partially re-dubbed in 2004, replacing the voices of Mickey, Donald, Goofy, and Willie.
    • The film was also partially re-dubbed into Swedish for the 2004 DVD and VHS release, with Jiminy Cricket's frame story and the Bongo segment keeping the original dub from 1950 directed by Per-Axel Branner, whereas Mickey and the Beanstalk was given a new dub. The full original dub can be found on a rental VHS tape released in 1985.
  • Cinderella:
    • Cinderella had two Latin American Spanish dubs; the original was done in 1950, and the second in 1997. The redub was made due to a royalty dispute between Evangelina Elizondo and Disney because of the copyrights of her voice. That's also why Spain dubbed it that year.
    • The German dub received a partial redub in 1992. Originally the opening narrator was Erika Görner, the voice of Drizella, but in 1992 the narrator is a man. The main change they made was to explain that Cinderella is the English name of Aschenputtel (German for Cinderella) and thus she is called Cinderella in the film. Otherwise the film remains unchanged.
    • It also received two French dubs; once in 1950 and again in 1991.
    • It was also dubbed into Dutch twice.
    • The film also had two Swedish dubs, with the latter being done in 1967 (only 17 years after the original). Probably because the Swedish language had changed too much in this lapse of time. Interestingly, Sif Ruud voiced the Fairy Godmother in both dubbings (with her also doing the voice of the narrator in the current dub).
    • It was also dubbed into Japanese twice. The first was done in 1961 and again in 1992.
    • It also had two Finnish dubs; one in 1967 and the second in 1992. There was also a "Read and Listen" storybook cassette dubbing released in 1984.
    • The movie was also re-dubbed in Italian in 1967. The re-dub is considered a significant improvement over the original 1950 version. It is also the first Disney film to receive an Italian re-dub.
    • It received two Slovak dubs as well; once in 1970 and again in 2012. Interestingly, Oľga Šalagová, who voiced Anastasia in the first dub, returned as the voice of the Fairy Godmother for the second dub.
    • The original 1961 Polish version was also re-dubbed in 2012.
    • It was also dubbed into Czech twice: the original in 1970 and and the current in 2005. Hana Talpová voiced the Fairy Godmother in both dubs.
  • Alice in Wonderland:
    • 'Alice in Wonderland'' received two French dubs. The original was made in 1951 and the new one was made in 1974. For late-90s re-issues of the movie, a weird mix mistake appeared in the 1974 re-dub, in which it used the 1951 version of the song "Painting the Roses Red". This was corrected in later releases.
    • It was also re-dubbed into Swedish, Norwegian, and Danish in 1998.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice; once in 1951 for theatrical release/home video, and again in 1991 for the SBT channel. SBT's dub leaves all the songs in English.
    • The film was originally dubbed into Japanese in 1973 and aired on TBS (Tokyo Broadcasting System) in 1979 and 1981. The 2nd and more common dub was made in 1984, which later received two partial redubs (once in 1990 and again in 2005). The 1990 version only re-dubbed certain songs, while the 2005 version received a lot more translation corrections and changes in names, dialogue, and lyrics. Most of the characters in the 2005 edit have the same voice actors from the original 1984 version, except for the Dodo.
  • Peter Pan:
    • Peter Pan was dubbed into Hungarian twice. While the first was done sometime in the 1980s, the current was done in 1998.
    • It was also re-dubbed in Swedish and French twice; both languages were originally dubbed in 1953, and again in 1992.
      • Both French dubs have Jean-Henri Chambois as Captain Hook and Henri Labussière as the small pirate.
    • The film was also re-dubbed into Italian in 1986. The Italian Blu-Ray release of the movie includes both audio tracks, and so Peter Pan is the only Disney movie whose Italian dubs are both available at the same time.
    • It also has two Thai dubs: the first from the 1990s and the second from 2003.
    • The movie was also dubbed into Japanese four times: the first from 1963, the second from 1982/83 for TBS, the third from 1984 for VHS and laserdisc, and the current from 1992.
    • Like Alice in Wonderland, the film received a TV-exclusive dub into Brazilian Portuguese in the 1990s.
    • It was also dubbed into Norwegian twice.
    • It also had two Danish dubs, the first from 1953 and the second from 1998.
    • It was also dubbed into Finnish twice, the first from 1969, and the second from 1992.
  • Lady and the Tramp:
    • Lady and the Tramp was dubbed into Danish twice; once in 1956 and again in 1996.
    • There are also two Italian dubs. The first from 1955 and the redub from 1997. The 1997 version was widely criticized by fans and is considered to be the worst of Disney's Italian re-dubs. Because of this, fans wrote a petition to bring back the original 1955 dub, which has been retained since the 2006 DVD release.
    • It was also dubbed into German twice; the original one from 1956 and the new one from 1968. Harry Wüstenhagen voiced Tramp in both dubs.
    • It was also re-dubbed into Latin Spanish in 1997. The Latin dub was commissioned either because of a lawsuit from Peggy Lee (the English voice of Darling and the Siamese Cats), or from Roberto Espriu (the Latin voice of Tramp).
    • The film also received three French dubs: in 1955, 1989, and 1997. In Quebec, only the 1955 and 1997 dubs were released, while the 1955 dub was never released on VHS in France.
    • It was also dubbed into Japanese twice; the first in 1956 and the second in 1989.
    • It also had two Polish dubs; once in 1962 and again in 1995.
    • The movie was dubbed twice into Brazilian Portuguese. The original dub was produced in Los Angeles, and the second was made in Rio de Janeiro in 1997. Since then, the original dub occasionally airs on TV. In the first dub, Aloysio de Oliveira and Rosina Pagã voiced half of the characters.
    • It also received a Swedish redub in 1989, with Olof Thunberg reprising his role as Trusty.
    • It was also dubbed into Greek twice: 1975 and 1997.
    • It was dubbed into Czech twice, the first from 1974 and the second from 1997. The reason why the second dub was created was because the royalties for first dub were too high. Also, Inka Šecová who voiced Lady in the first dub, returned as the speaking voice of Peg for the second dub.
    • It also had two Finnish dubs, the first from 1966, and the second from 1984.
  • Sleeping Beauty:
    • To the disappointment of many viewers, the film was re-dubbed into Latin Spanish in 2001 from its original 1959 dub. The original dub was loved by many viewers. It's another dub that Walt Disney himself is said to have approved of before his death. The 2001 dub was commissioned for the same reason as Snow White: Lupita Pérez Arias (Aurora's singing voice) sued Disney over royalties for her work. The new dub is often considered a disappointment for simply not living up to the original, and for sounding lifeless and stale. Also, some of Maleficent's lines were revised because the language was apparently inappropriate for the audience.
    • It was also dubbed into Polish twice; the first was done in 1962 and the second in 1995.
    • French too. The 1981 dub is considered a significant improvement over the original 1959 version.
    • It was also dubbed into Japanese twice: 1960 and 1995.
    • It was also given two Swedish dubs, once in 1959 and again in 1980.
    • The film also had two Hungarian dubs; the first was done in 1966 and the second was done in 1995.
    • It also received two Dutch dubs, with the current being done in 1996.
    • There are also three Finnish dubs: two for storybook cassette adaptations in 1969 and 1987 and the third, from 1995, officially for the film itself.
  • 101 Dalmatians:
    • The film was given two Dutch dubs; one in 1982 and the other in 1995.
    • It was also dubbed into German twice; the original was done in 1961 and the newer was done in 1980.
    • It also received two Japanese dubs; once in 1962 and again in 1981.
    • The film was also dubbed into Polish twice; the first was done in 1966 and the newer was done in 1995. Aleksander Fogiel voiced Colonel in both of these dubs.
    • It also had two Hungarian dubs: in 1964 and 1995.
    • It was also re-dubbed into Swedish in 1995.
  • The Sword in the Stone:
    • The Sword in the Stone received two Finnish dubs; once in 1965 and again in 1993. Interestingly, Kauko Helovirta voiced Merlin in both dubs. Also, Archimedes is a female in the 1965 dub.
    • It was also dubbed into Japanese twice; the original was done in 1964 and the current was done in 1984 for VHS and (later) DVD.
    • The film also had two Polish dubs; the original from 1969 and the newer from sometime during the late 90s. Similar to the original Finnish version, Archimedes is a female in the 1969 dub.
    • For the Swedish version, an audio mistake appeared on subsequent home video releases of the film beginning in the 1990s. The original version (as well as the first VHS release from the 1980s) also dubbed the final chorus singing "Hail king Arthur, Long live the king!" at the end of the film, but later releases used an instrumental version instead.
  • The Jungle Book (1967):
    • There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs; the first was done in 1968, while the second was done for its 2014 Blu-Ray release using the same translation. Bagheera, Hathi, Kaa and Shere Khan's voice actors reprised their roles from the 2003 sequel in the redub. Also, all of the songs have been noticeably autotuned in the redub.
    • Before the film was dubbed into Dutch in 1979, there was a soundtrack dubbing in 1969, made for LP. This version was re-released for CD in 1992.
    • It was also dubbed into Finnish twice; the original one from 1968 (by Reino Bäckman) and the new one from 1993 (by Pekka Lehtosaari). Interestingly, the dubbing directors for both dubs also voiced Baloo, while the original 1968 version has Bagheera voiced by a woman.
    • The film was re-dubbed into Japanese in 1994, while extracts of the original 1968 dub can be found on the Sing-Along Song releases of "You Can Fly" and "The Bare Necessities".
    • It was also given two Czech dubs; the first in 1975 and the second in 1994. Jiří Jelínek voiced King Louie in both dubs.
    • The French version of "My Own Home" was re-recorded in 1997 with Claire Guyot (the voice of Ariel) replacing Lucie Dolène who had sued Disney France for the copyrights on her voice, and won. Guyot, who was unaware of this at first, later told that she would've have never agreed to do so knowingly. Subsequent releases, since 2007, retain the original 1968 version, though North American releases still use Guyot's version.
  • The Aristocats:
    • The Aristocats was dubbed into Dutch twice; once in 1980 and again in 2008. There's also an LP dub from 1971.
    • It also had two Finnish dubs; the first was done in 1971 and the second in 1994.
    • It received two Danish dubs as well: in 1971 and 1990. Otto Brandenburg voiced Scat Cat in both dubs.
    • It was also dubbed into Norwegian twice.
    • It also received two Persian dubs.
  • Robin Hood:
    • Robin Hood has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the original theatrical dub from 1975 and the 1984 redub made for a theatrical re-release and VHS. The 1975 dub was brought back for subsequent home video releases since 1999.
    • It also received three Persian dubs. One in 1976, a second in 1981, and the third made around 2010. George Petrossi voiced the title role in the latter two dubs.
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh:
    • This movie has an interesting case with this trope: in most countries, the first dubs cover the original featurette versions ("Honey Tree", "Blustery Day", and "Tigger Too"), with the second dub covering the compilation film version.
    • For example, the Swedish version had all three shorts dubbed first (1967, 1969, and 1977 respectively), and then (re-)dubbed together for The Many Adventures in 1992.
    • The same case goes for the Italian version: with the film version being dubbed in 1997. Interestingly, "Honey Tree" and "Blustery Day" were originally dubbed theatrically in 1967 and 1970 (and released on VHS in 1982 and 1983) respectively, while "Tigger Too" had a direct-to-VHS dub in 1986.
    • Likewise to the Danish version, with the Many Adventures film being dubbed in the 1990s. The original dubbing of the shorts were never released to VHS though, although the 1966 dub of "Honey Tree" was released on LP.
    • For the original Finnish dub of the shorts, "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree" is the only one to exist, having only two actors (Ritva Lehtelä and Reino Bäckman) providing the voices for all of the characters. (The full dub can be heard on the LP soundtrack.) No other information is known about "Blustery Day" or "Tigger Too", except that the former was dubbed in 1969. The "Many Adventures" compilation film was later dubbed by Pekka Lehtosaari in 1997, and used for all Finnish home video releases.
    • For the German version: the three shorts were originally dubbed in 1967, 1971, and 1975. Afterwards, the "Many Adventures" film version was later dubbed in 1994 for TV and later released to home video, beginning in 1997/98.
      • Curiously, the original German dubs of the featurettes made Rabbit and Roo females. (The redub corrects this, interestingly keeping the theme song from the original dubs, albeit with a few lines changed.) Also, Erich Kestin (who voiced Pooh in the 1967 version of "The Honey Tree") died before "The Blustery Day" was dubbed four years later. In order to maintain continuity, Walter Gross, who later voiced Pooh in Blustery Day and Tigger Too, re-dubbed said character for "The Honey Tree" in 1971. (The same 1971 edit also replaced the original voice for Christopher Robin for unknown reasons.) The original 1971-75 German dubs were last released on VHS in 1995, as part of the "Kinderbuch-Klassiker" series (the German equivalent of the "Storybook Classics" series in the USA) along with "A Day for Eeyore" (newly dubbed at the time).
    • Also the same case with the Brazilian Portuguese version. "Honey Tree" and "Blustery Day" were originally dubbed in 1969, with "Tigger Too" being dubbed in 1974. All three shorts were released together with the original dubs as a "first dub". The newer dub of the film was later made in 1997, with the transition scenes finally getting dubbed. Selma Lopes voiced Kanga in both dubs.
    • Same goes for the Latin Spanish version, with the film being dubbed in 1998. An interesting difference between both versions is that in the original dubbing of "The Honey Tree" and "The Blustery Day", Flavio, the original Spanish voice for Pooh, gave the character a Mickey Mouse-like voice. For the original 1974 dub of "Tigger Too", Pooh, Roo, and the narrator were given new voice actors. One of the voice actors, Luis Bayardo, who voiced Pooh in "Tigger Too", later reprised his role as the same character in the 1998 dub of the film.
    • Originally, the first French dub covered the shorts in 1967, 1970, and 1978, respectively. Sometime between the theatrical French release of The Many Adventures... compilation version in 1977 and the Canadian VHS release of the film in 1996, additional dubbing was made to the framing sequences and epilogue. The film version later had a new dub made in France in 1997, with Roger Carel (Pooh, Piglet and Rabbit) and Henry Djanik (Owl; also voiced Eeyore in the new version) reprising their character roles from the original dub. The new dub was only released once on VHS and laserdisc, as all future home media releases contain the compilation edit of the original dub.
    • The Hungarian version dubbed the shorts first in 1988 and then the compilation movie in 1997. The newer dub features most of the same voice cast (Christopher Robin, Kanga, and Gopher's voice actors were replaced).
    • There are two Greek versions of the Many Adventures compilation film; the VHS dub was released in 1994, and the DVD dub was released in 2005, with the only changes being replacing Pooh and Piglet's voice actor.
      • In a similar vein, the DVD version of Pooh's Grand Adventure, despite otherwise being the same dub as the original, replaces Piglet's voice actor.
    • The three shorts (including "A Day for Eeyore") were originally dubbed into Dutch for TV (NCRV) in 1986. After The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was dubbed in 1991; "A Day for Eeyore" was re-dubbed in 1993, followed by re-dubs of the other three shorts in 1995, which ended up being the version used for The Many Adventures starting in 1997. (Oddly, because "A Day for Eeyore" was the first to be re-dubbed, "Honey Tree", "Tigger Too", and "Many Adventures" re-use the unique overture and main theme song from that short.)
    • The film was dubbed into Japanese six times: one for theatrical release, one by Pony/Bandai, three Buena Vista dubs, and one that aired on WOWOW (1992).
      • First dub, 1970: Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree was the first to be dubbed into Japanese. This version was later released on VHS (and laserdisc) in 1989 and again (this time, on VHS only) in 1995 and 2002. The Sing-Along Songs videos ("Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah" and "You Can Fly") also uses this dub for the selected songs included from the short.
      • 1984: The first dub made for The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was released on VHS and laserdisc in 1985 and 1987. The 1984 version of Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day received its own VHS release in 1988, with additional dubbing made to its original opening credits narration.
      • 1990: Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too receives a separate Japanese dubbing on VHS and laserdisc; later re-released to VHS in 1996.
      • 1993, TV dub for WOWOW: The second Japanese dub made for The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. This version includes the same voice actors from the 1990 dub of "Tigger Too", except for Pooh and the narrator. Interestingly, this dub also re-uses several songs from the 1984 version (such as the theme song and "Heffalumps and Woozles" for example), while other songs were either partially ("The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down" and "Hip-Hip Pooh-Ray") or entirely ("Little Black Rain Cloud" and "A Rather Blustery Day") re-dubbed.
      • 1997: The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was given a home video redub in 1997, which was used for all subsequent releases. This time, the voice actors here (except for Christopher Robin, Rabbit, and the narrator) reprised their roles from the 1993 dub.
    • There are also two Norwegian dubs. The original was made only for the "Tigger Too" featurette in 1974, while the second one was made for the compilation film in 1997.
  • Winnie the Pooh and a Day for Eeyore was dubbed into Japanese three times: in 1984, 1990, and 1997.
    • Segments from all the Winnie-the-Pooh movies were re-dubbed into multiple languages as part of The Mini Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.
  • The Fox and the Hound was re-dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese in 2014 for TNT.
  • The Black Cauldron:
    • The film was dubbed into French and Swedish twice; the originals were done in 1985 and the newer versions were made in 1998.
    • The French redub was made following a right of exploitation issue of the 1985 version while the Swedish redub was made inorder to dub the scenes that were censored in the original Swedish dub.
  • The Great Mouse Detective has two Arabic dubs: one in Egyptian Arabic from the mid 2000's, and one from 2014, made in MSA in Lebanon for airings on Jeem.
  • Oliver & Company received two Hungarian dubs; once in 1990 and again in 2009.
    • It was also dubbed into Swedish twice; the first in 1988 and the second in 1997.
  • The Little Mermaid (1989):
    • Several foreign dubs of The Little Mermaid, made during the film's original 1989-90 release, were either partially or entirely re-dubbed for the late-90s re-release. The most likely reason is that Disney USA wanted to replace Ariel voices that were too different from the original Jodi Benson. Other reasons claim that it was a specific request by Disney USA in Europe, which imposed the re-dub of the film, when it re-released in theaters to test their new DTS mixing device designed in their lab.
    • For example, it was re-dubbed in Finnish in 1998, no one knows why (except for the folks at Walt Disney Finland). The old dub was of good quality and fondly remembered by those who saw the movie on VHS in the early 90's. Some actors reprised their roles in the new dub, most notably Ursula's Finnish voice, but the majority of the main cast were played by different people.
    • The movie was also re-dubbed in Germany in 1998. Disney never exactly said why they did so, citing vague "it's now closer to the original", while the real reason most likely were outstanding payments to the original dub voice actors. This move pretty much killed the movie's reputation in Germany, as the new dub was seen as an atrocity, due to the voices, the changed dialogue, and especially the songs, which were borderline "Blind Idiot" Translation. Obviously someone had not considered that the changes from the original in the first dub were there for a good reason. Disney finally caved in when they created the Diamond Edition in 2013, making both dubs available to ensure that sales would not bomb as they did with the DVD.
    • In Denmark (which, coincidentally, is the country of the story's origin), Laus Høybye replaced Nikolaj Bohm as Flounder in 1999. The songs were partially re-dubbed as well.
    • It also received two European French dubs; the first in 1990 and the second in 1998. Ariel, Carlotta, and Ursula's French voice actresses reprised their roles in the 1998 dub, but the majority of the main cast were played by different people. Also, the redub retains the 1989 version of "Poor Unfortunate Souls". Like the German version, the 1998 re-dub was highly criticized by French fans and specialized press. Because of this, it only remained on the 1998 VHS and 2000 DVD, while the original 1990 dub has been retained since the 2006 DVD, after multiple petitions.
    • The 1989 Brazilian Portuguese version received a partial redub in 1997; here Kiara Sasso replaces Gabriela Ferreira as Ariel's singing voice (add that the lyrics to "Part of Your World" were changed, and there is quite a Broken Base regarding which is better), and André Filho as Sebastian re-recorded "Under the Sea". (The original 1989 recording of the song can still be heard on the 2006 soundtrack.) Also, the Diamond Edition accidentally omits Ursula's line "Keep singing!" as she takes Ariel's voice.
    • The 1991 Japanese version had its songs re-dubbed in 1997.
    • The movie also had two Greek dubs: the original from 1991 and the current from 1998.
    • Same goes for the Thai version, which had also its two dubs made in 1991 and 1998.
    • The film was also dubbed into Albanian twice (2006 and 2013).
  • Beauty and the Beast:
    • Beauty and the Beast was dubbed into Polish twice; once in 1992 and again in 2002. The Beast, Maurice, Lumière and Cogsworth have the same voices in both dubs. There is also a Voiceover Translation version which was made for the VHS.
    • It also received two Thai dubs: 1991 and 2002.
    • The French dub had Lucie Dolène's parts as Mrs Potts replaced by Lily Baron (speaking) and Christiane Legrand (singing), because Dolène won a lawsuit against Disney for the copyright on her voice in 'The Jungle Book''.
  • Aladdin:
    • Aladdin has been dubbed in Slovak twice. The first dub was produced by Studio 7 for airing on TV Markíza and the second was produced for TV JOJ.
    • The title character was re-recorded by Shin-ichiro Miki in 2004, because Aladdin's original voice actor (Kenji Haga) was arrested and convicted of fraud and extortion.
    • Not the whole movie itself, but in the Norwegian version of "Arabian Nights", the lines about getting one's ear cut were removed and redubbed just like the orginal American version. note 
  • Some people believe that there are two Italian dubs for The Lion King (1994). That's not exactly right: the truth was that Timon and Pumbaa's voice actors (Luigi Ferraro and Renato Montanari) were replaced by Tonino Accolla and Augusto Giardino after they actually recorded all their lines. Only the 2004 DVD release uses Ferraro and Montanari's dialogue, while Accolla and Giardino's voices are heard on all other releases.
    • When the movie was re-released in 2002, the song "The Circle of Life" was re-recorded in Egyptian Arabic and Polish. The rest of the dubbings for both languages remained the same.
    • There are two Tamil dubs: one was officially done in 1995 with the songs dubbed and the other was done later, but with no songs dubbed.
  • Pocahontas has two Serbian dubbings: one was done in 2009 for TV, but the songs weren't dubbed, and sometime in 2019, it will have the songs dubbed.
  • The Brave Little Toaster:
    • The film was dubbed in Czech twice. The first was made in 1992 for VHS. In this dub, Lampy is made a female, the non-human characters all had electronic-sounding voices and all the songs were blandly spoken, rather than sung. The 2004 DVD dub improves significantly over the original.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times; the first was done in 1988 by VTI in Rio de Janeiro. Both redubs were commissioned in São Paulo, with the second dub from 1996 by Gota Mágica, and the third dub from 2009 by Studio Gábia. In the 1996 dub, Lampy, the Hanging Lamp, the Stereo, and the Hearse are females. Ivo Roberto voiced Plugsy in both the 1996 and 2009 dubs.
    • The movie was also re-dubbed into Japanese in 2000.
    • There were also two Icelandic dubs; once for TV and again for home media.
    • It also had two Dutch dubs; once in 1995 for VHS and again in 2005 for DVD.
    • The film also received three Russian dubs. The first was a Voiceover Translation and made exclusively for VHS in the Soviet Union, while the second two (from the Russian dubbing companies EA and ORT) are fully dubbed. The 1st was done exclusively for TV in the late 90s, while the 2nd dub was done in 2000. Interestingly, both versions have the Toaster voiced by a male actor, instead of a woman, while the first dub made Lampy a female. The 2nd dub is the most common out of the three and is the only version to be preserved on home media. However, this is considered to be a slightly poor dub: while most of the movie's dubbing job is okay, the songs (with the exception of "City of Light", which remained entirely in English) vary between a mix of dubbing a few lines, using a Voiceover Translation, and leaving some parts in English. However, in the 1st dub (the rarest and hardest to find), the songs are fully dubbed and given accurate translations.
    • There are reports that there are two versions of the Croatian dub - the first version (often mistaken to be the Serbian dub) only dubs parts of Worthless while the second version dubs all the songs. Otherwise both versions are the same.
  • Toy Story has been dubbed in Serbian twice. Both dubs were made by Studio Loudworks.
  • The Incredibles has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for theatrical release and early home video releases, and another for television and later home video releases. A few voice actors were replaced, such as Mr. Incredible, Dash, Frozone and Syndrome. The second dub is now considered official, given most actors returned for the sequel.
  • The Nightmare Before Christmas has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Megassom (VHS), Double Sound (DVD and TV), and Delart (3D Blu-Ray and streaming). Much of Double Sound's cast (and the translator and announcer) returned for Delart's dub.
  • The Chipmunk Adventure:
    • The Chipmunk Adventure was dubbed into Italian twice. The first dub was released on home video. On June 30, 1997, the film aired on television on Rai Due, but with a different voice cast. The latter dub has the songs dubbed.
    • It was also dubbed three times in Latin Spanish: twice in Mexico (1989 and 1997), and again in Argentina. The latter two dubs have the songs dubbed, except "The Girls of Rock & Roll" and "Diamond Dolls" in the Argentinian dub.
  • Shark Tale has two Italian dubs. The most known one, which was released at cinemas and on DVD, is actually the second one, and it's filled with Celebrity Voice Actors as the characters. The first dub, with regular voice actors, was originally aired at the Venice Movie Festival in 2004. TV airings randomly switch between the two dubs.
  • The Man Called Flintstone:
    • The film received two Hungarian dubs; once in 1978 and again in 2006.
    • It also received three Czech dubs; the first in 1993, the second in 2002, and the third in 2008.
    • The The Flintstones TV movie I Yabba-Dabba Do! also has two Hungarian dubs, one made in 1994 for its VHS release by Zoom (this version was a straight translation with no rhyming) and a second made by Mafilm Audio for Boomerang in 2007, featuring the voices from the series' 2006 redub (with rhyming dialogue). The second dub even changed the title of the film to include more puns and rhymes.
  • A Boy Named Charlie Brown was re-dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese for Cartoon Network, while the original dub was preserved for DVD.
  • Snoopy, Come Home:
    • The movie was dubbed into European Spanish twice: the first dub from 1989 was made in Barcelona for TVE, and the second was made in Madrid for Antena 3 (1993).
    • It also has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the first by Mastersound for DVD, and the other for SBT.
    • The film was also dubbed into Hungarian twice; the original from 1988 (which aired on MTV 1) and the newer from 1991 (which aired on HBO). The songs are only dubbed in the first version.
    • There are also two Czech dubs; the original 1975 theatrical dub by Barrandov, and again in 1990 for airing on ČST.
  • The Smurfs and the Magic Flute:
    • The film received two Brazilian Portuguese dubs, with the latter being done for the 2011 DVD release. While the songs in both versions are left un-dubbed, the newer version only dubs "Peewit's Ballad". Also, the first dub re-names Johan and Peewit "João" and "Gui", whereas the second dub uses their names from the UK English dub (John and William).
    • The European Spanish version of the film was dubbed three times; once in 1979, again for a 1980 LP soundtrack and again for the 2010 DVD. The 1979 dubbing seems to be a more faithful translation to the original French dub, while the 2010 DVD re-dub seems to be closer to the 1979 UK English dub (the most commonly available version, compared to both this and the 1983 American English dub). Because of this, the first two songs, "Peewit's Ballad" and "Gentle Lady" (which are left untranslated in both dubs) are played in French in the 1979 dub, and English in the 2010 re-dub (which also leaves the Smurfs' working song untranslated).
    • It was also dubbed into Latin Spanish twice; the first time in the 1980s and again in 2011 by Candiani. Interestingly, both dubs use much of the same cast from The Smurfs series.
    • It was also dubbed into Italian twice; first in 1981, and again in 1983 by Grupo Trenta, with most of the series cast. TV airings of the film used to randomly switch between the two dubs, but later airings and DVD releases use only the original dub from 1981 (except for Peewit's final line, which is kept from the second dub, since the audio track of the original dub was damaged in that point). Interestingly, both dubs have the songs left either partially or entirely in French, as well as the original instrumental music for the Smurfs' party sequence replaced by another song ("La festa della luna") sung to the tune of "Yankee Doodle".
    • It was also dubbed into Hungarian twice: once in 1978 and again, ten years later, in 1988.
  • Barnyard has two Polish dubs. The first was made for Canal+ (with dubbed songs) and the second was made for Polsat. A few voice actors appeared in both dubs, but never as the same character.
  • Alvin and the Chipmunks Meet the Wolfman has received two Czech dubs. One for VHS release in 2001 and the other for airing on Minimax.
  • Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice, with the first dub having the songs left in English. Curiously, the DVD release of the movie includes both audio tracks.
  • Charlotte's Web:
    • The 1973 animated version of Charlotte's Web has three Japanese dubs: one for its theatrical release in 1973, the second from 1985 for VHS/laserdisc, and the third from 2006 for DVD.
    • It was also dubbed into German twice. Once in 1973 and again in 2004 for DVD. The re-dub, which has all the songs left in English, received highly negative reception from nostalgic fans.
    • The film also has two Brazilian dubs, with the latter being made for DVD.
  • FernGully: The Last Rainforest has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the original in 1993, and the second in 2014.
  • The Secret of NIMH:
    • The film was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice: in 1982 (by Herbert Richers) and 2000 in São Paulo.
    • It also received two Swedish dubs: the first from 1982, and a TV-exclusive dub in 1996. Only the original dub is available on home video releases.
    • The film was also re-dubbed into Hungarian during the 2000s.
    • It was also dubbed into Latin Spanish twice (1982 and 1997). Unlike the other examples, the Blu-Ray includes both dubs. Rocío Garcel appeared in both dubs (Martin in the original, and Mrs. Brisby in the redub).
  • An American Tail:
    • All four movies have been dubbed into Czech at least twice: once for DVD (2005), and once for Minimax (2011). The first two movies both have a third dub for VHS release.
    • An American Tail was dubbed into Polish twice; once for TV and again for DVD.
    • An American Tail: The Mystery of the Night Monster has two Hungarian dubs: one for VHS, and another that was broadcast on TV2
  • The Land Before Time:
    • The Land Before Time received has two Japanese dubs. The original one was released in theaters in 1989 and the second for home video in 1992. All home video releases contain the second dub. The direct to video sequels would later use more or less the same cast from the second dub.
    • It also received two Hungarian dubs. One released in theaters in 1989 and the second on DVD.
    • It was also dubbed into French twice: 1989 and 2002 for its re-release. Roger Carel (Petrie) and Jacques Frantz (Cera's father) reprised their roles.
    • The film also has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs. One was made in Rio de Janeiro, and the second was made in Sao Paulo.
  • All Dogs Go to Heaven:
    • The film was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice: the original by Álamo in 1990 and the newer by Dublavídeo for DVD in the 2000s.
    • It was also dubbed into Greek twice; there's the original from 1989/1990, and the DVD re-dub from 2002 which leaves all of the songs in English.
    • It also has three Latin Spanish dubs; two for Mexico (1989 and 1997) and one for Venezuela (1994). The first Mexican dub was made at the Grabaciones y Doblajes studio, with big-name voice actors (i.e. Arturo Mercado as Charlie, Francisco Colmenero as Carface, and Diana Santos as Anne-Marie); this dub is available on all DVD releases in both Latin America and Spain. The other two dubs have occasionally aired on TV, but are impossible to find anywhere else.
      • Ricardo Silva served as the musical director for both Mexican dubs. The only consistent cast members were Alfonso Obregon and Rocío Garcel, but never as the same character. Flo was voiced by Sylvia Garcel in the original dub, and by her sister Rocío in the Audiomaster version.
  • Anastasia:
    • Was dubbed into Czech twice; the original in 1997 for VHS, and again in 2006 for airing on ČT. Jan Schánilec voiced Vladimir in both dubs.
    • Poland had two dubs as well: one made for cinema in 1997 and the second one was made for TV and first aired on Easter 2002. The TV dub is considered lost and all that's left of it is "Once Upon a December" in this dubbed version.
  • South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut:
    • There are two competing Latin American dubs that were recorded around the same year (2000). The more prominently-known dub was produced by Sensaciones Sonicas and Warner Bros. and had toned-down language, as well as leaving the musical numbers in English. The other dub, produced for pay TV and USA Blu-Ray by Intersound SA and Paramount, dubbed the musical numbers and contained stronger language, although it has also been criticized for using too literal translations for the songs. Eduardo Garza (Stan), Liliana Barba (Kyle), José Antonio Macías (Cartman), and Carlos Águila (Mr. Garrison) voiced their characters in both dubs.
    • It also received two dubs in Hungary. The production of the first version was fueled by a dose of ignorance on the dubbing directors' part. As the show's dub was very popular, the movie became quite disliked for not keeping the series cast (except Stan, Cartman, and one apiece of Mr. Garrison, Jimbo, and Ned's recurring voices), though it wasn't half bad. This is why the second dub got produced, a full decade later, for using the then-current voices from the series. This counts as a Moment of Awesome for the channel that ordered the new dub, Filmmúzeum (now Film Mánia), as it was purely a gesture of kindness towards the fans. They even ran a series of ads mocking the older dub. Peter Bozso (Stan) and Gabor Csore (Cartman) voiced their characters in both dubs.
  • Transformers: The Movie:
    • In Germany, the original dub (re-titled Transformers: The Battle for Cybertron) was created in 1994 as a dubious TV Pilot Movie of sorts to the Generation 2 version of the show itself, despite story-wise taking place between the 2nd and 3rd seasons of the original version. The second dub, universally regarded as inferior due to its amateurish voice acting and mangled translation work, was made for a 2003 DVD release.
    • The first Hungarian dub was made for the VHS release by a company called Televideo sometime in the 90s, but calling it a dub might be generous: it was five actors talking over the movie, not really paying attention to when, which, and how many characters were speaking, and the translation in general was odd, if witty. The other dub was made by Masterfilm for a cheap bargain-bin DVD released by the Mirax company around the early 2000s. Also featuring voices that vary from scene to scene, this version is notorious for the added profanity and overall shoddy translations.
    • It also has two Italian and Brazilian dubs.
  • After the The Daltons cartoon (and the Go West film) made a huge success in Italy, in 2015 most of the old Lucky Luke movies were redubbed with the new voice cast from the aforemented film and series.
  • The Simpsons Movie was dubbed into Japanese twice. The original theatrical dub used Japanese celebrities to do the voices. It was so poorly received that the movie was re-dubbed for the home video release with the Japanese voice actors from the TV series.
  • Sausage Party has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one made by Delart (theatrical release/Netflix), and another made by Dublavideo.
  • Happily Never After has been dubbed three and a half times into Latin Spanish. The first dub was a collaboration between Argentina and Mexico; Ella and Rick's voice actors are replaced with Mexican actors in an alternate dub. Second was a dub made in Los Angeles, which is available on American DVD releases. A third dub was made in Tijuana, Mexico.
    • The sequel, Snow White: Another Bite @ the Apple, also has two Latin Spanish dubs. One in Mexico, and another in Argentina for Cartoon Network.
    • Both movies have two Brazilian Portuguese dubs.
  • Valiant has two Latin Spanish dubs: a Mexican dub (for theaters), and a Chilean dub (for Disney).
  • Rock Dog has four Latin Spanish dubs: three in Chile, and a fourth in Mexico. Interestingly, the Chilean voice cast is the same in all three versions except for main character Bodi.
    • The film has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one by Unidub for theatrical release, and another by BKS for Netflix.
  • Fritz the Cat has two Italian dubs, released almost simultaneously: the first one (which is currently lost) is completely faithful to the original version, while the second (the only one still available, which apparently was released in lower-rate cinemas only a few months after the first one) throws the original script out of the window and creates a completely different plot where Fritz (who is actually O'Malley under a fake name, according to this version) causes a riot because he thinks that prostitutes ask too much money for their prestations.
  • Asterix:
    • The Twelve Tasks of Asterix and Asterix Versus Caesar received two Polish dubs (the first ones in 1979 and 1987 respectively, the second ones somewhere in the late 90s). The newer dubs are now official and are shown in TV airings, while the old ones are either extinct (The Twelve Tasks) or only extracts of them can be found (Asterix Vs. Caesar). Other movies use the 90s cast.
    • In Brazil, all up to Asterix Conquers America have up to three, as some were released by different VHS companies with different dubs, and then five of them were released on DVD with a whole new dub.
  • The Prince of Egypt:
    • In Greece, one was officially done in 1998 with the songs dubbed, but in 2009, a Greek TV channel called "Antena" did their own dub with different voice actors and the songs were left undubbed. However, it didn't do well and was thus never broadcasted on TV again.
    • It was dubbed in Russian twice: one was done in 2001 by Ey-Bi Video (for TV, but the songs were not dubbed) and 2011 by Pythagor (songs were dubbed).
  • Frozen (2013) has two Japanese dubs: one with Olaf played by Pierre Taki and the other with Shunsuke Takeuchi voicing him. They're otherwise the same.
  • Animalympics has two Hungarian dubs, one made in 1998 for TV2 and one made for a DVD release by Fantasy Film in 2007.

    Films — Live Action 
  • Like Disney, the Star Wars franchise is nearly as famous for doing this
    • The Hungarian dubs have a long history:
      • Original Trilogy, first dub — The Empire Strikes Back was the first to be dubbed, in 1982. A New Hope, previously only available with (some very bizarre) subtitles, received a made-for-TV dub in '84. Return of the Jedi was a step back, in that it was again shown only with subtitles. Fans had to Keep Circulating the Tapes 'till '93, the date that marked the first instance all three movies became available on VHS. ROTJ finally got dubbed at this point. All three dubs were, sadly, extremely inconsistent, and that of ROTJ was particularly So Bad, It's Good.
      • THX dubs, 1995 — the first attempt at creating a consistent dub for the entire trilogy. Most of the characters received their now-famous VAs here, but the dub was soon overshadowed by...
      • Special Edition, 1997 — the most widely available versions... mostly through piracy, until the 2011 Blu-ray came along, marking the first time this dub became obtainable through legal means (it was originally created solely for TV broadcasts). The voices were, more or less, consistent throughout, though Vader curiously retained his old THX voice actor for A New Hope, and due to a major sound-editing blunder, they somehow erased his iconic breathing noise from the entirety of Empire.
      • Special Edition dub 1.1? Though the Blu-ray reached back to the '97 dub, instead of opting for yet another complete revision, some extended scenes and added sounds of course had yet to be dubbed. As Vader's "new" voice actor had passed away in '05, they had to call in his THX voice for these, which was quite jarring. The breathing hasn't been reinstalled either.
      • Prequel Trilogy dubs. Can be considered separate from the OT dubs, as most recurring characters received new voices. Only Vader kept his '97 VA.note 
      • And you may also wanna count an ancient voice-over, with a single person talking over the original audio track.
    • For the Czech dubbing of the original trilogy, each film was dubbed three times:
      • A New Hope was dubbed for theatrical, VHS (Bonton Home Video), and Blu-Ray releases.
      • The Empire Strikes Back was dubbed twice for home video (Guild/Bonton Home Video) and again for the Blu-Ray release.
      • Return of the Jedi was first dubbed for VHS twice; the first in 1992 and the second in 1995. The third dub was made in 2011 for TV Nova airings and the Blu-Ray release.
    • The Japanese dub history for the original trilogy is a little complex:
      • A New Hope was dubbed into Japanese five times. The first was made for the original theatrical release, the second and third dubs were made for TV airings in 1983 and 1985 respectively, the fourth was made for VHS releases (Laserdiscs of the Trilogy were always subtitled), and the fifth dub was also made for TV airings in 2005. The Story of Star Wars, an abridged audio adaptation of the film that used audio clips from the movie, also had a Japanese dub, resulting in a total of six Japanese dubs. Goro Naya, who voiced Ben Kenobi in the audio adaptation, reprised his role for the fourth dub, while Yusuke Takita played him in the third and fifth dubs.
      • The Empire Strikes Back received four Japanese dubs. The first was made for its original theatrical release, while the second and third dubs were made for TV in 1986 and 1992, and the fourth dub was made for home media.
      • Return of the Jedi only had two Japanese dubs; the first in 1983 and the second for VHS versions. C-3PO's voice actor reprises his role in the second dub.
    • The original trilogy was re-dubbed in Brazilian Portuguese in the 1990s, then five of the movies (except A New Hope) were re-dubbed in 2015, just in time for the release of The Force Awakens. Peterson Adriano did not return as Anakin Skywalker in the prequels because he no longer works at the dubbing studio (Delart). Interestingly, Isaac Bardavid voiced Obi-Wan Kenobi in at least two versions of each of the original trilogy.
    • The Latin American Spanish dub deserves a mention:
      • The Original Trilogy was first dubbed in Los Angeles, California, the first two at ESM, under the direction of Salvador Najar, the voice of Luke, Return of the Jedi at Magnum, under the direction of Roberto Alexander, the second voice of Luke.
      • There were also alternate Mexican dubs produced for T.V. airing of A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back Almost nothing is known about these dubs, and they're believed to be lost.
      • The special editions were then dubbed at Mexico at Ultra Video (with casting done by Audiopost) under the direction of Carlos Pontón, along with partial redubs for later releases recorded at Prime Dubb under the direction of Javier Rivero. Arturo Mercado reprised his roles as Lando and Yoda from the original dub of Episode V.
      • The 2006 DVD release of the original cuts in the US has Castilian Spanish instead of Latin American Spanish.
  • For the 20th anniversary re-release of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial in 2002, several foreign-language versions were re-dubbed. Examples include Brazilian Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Latin Spanish, and Spanish European.
    • For the Italian and European Spanish versions, the re-dubs were only included on the 2002 DVD release, as the original dubs were made available on Blu-Ray at the request of fans.
    • Unlike the above example, the Japanese Blu-Ray release includes both dubs.
    • There are also three Czech dubs. The original theatrical dub from 1983; the second dub from 1992 for VHS; and the third and current dub from 2002, made available on all subsequent home video releases.
  • The history of Hungarian dubs is well documented. There are several major, distinct categories:
    • Communism retained a high quality product of Hungarian culture: Excellent dubs! Pannonia Film Studio (the production company of state owned television) employed the national stars and first rate actors of cinema and theater at the time, their dubs were of very high quality. To this day, Pannonia dubs are fan favorites, especially since the translators often employed successful Woolseyism of their own.
    • Counter-intuitively Capitalism brought a low quality product to Hungary: Not-so-good dubs! Since Pannonia Film Studio retained the rights of its dubs, commercial TV channels often opted to simply have films re-dubbed rather than pay the (often high) fee... with lesser-known actors, who often first saw their script during actual production. These "re-dubs" are infamous for their syndicated edits and "Blind Idiot" Translation.
  • According to this forum, From Dusk Till Dawn, Mad Money, Armour of God, Song of the South, Universal Soldier and King Kong (1976) have been dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese five times each.
  • The Exorcist was dubbed four times into Portuguese, with Newton da Matta voicing Father Karras in all four versions. Herbert Richers (older SBT airings, HBO, and Blu-Ray). Another dub by Herbert Richers (Globo). Wan Macher (Airplane, Paid TV). And another dub by Wan Macher with most of the same cast (Home Media, Blu-Ray, SBT, and TCM). Vera Miranda, Orlando Drummond and Dário de Castro also appeared in all four dubs.
  • Confidence has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs made by the following studios: Lipsync (DVD/cable), Audiocorp (unknown medium), Cinevideo (TV), and Wood Video (Telecine).
  • Liar Liar has been dubbed into Portuguese four times: Alamo (VHS, TBS and TNT). Herbert Richers (Globo/Universal Channel). Double Sound (most modern broadcasts and releases). And Drei Marc (Telecine). Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney and Anne Haney have the same voice actors in the latter three dubs. Hélio Ribeiro directed the Herbert Richers and Double Sound dubs.
  • She's All That has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Studio Gabia (DVD and TV), Dublamix (another TV dub), Bravo Estudios (Telecine), and Sigma (Netflix/Sony Channel).
  • Spawn has four dubs in Brazilian Portuguese made at the following studios: Clone (Home Media and Netflix), Marshmallow (TNT), Wan Macher (SBT/Blu-Ray), and a later Wan Macher dub (Paramount Channel/HBO). Maralise Tartarine and Paulo Wolf dubbed over Melinda Clarke and D.B. Sweeney respectively in both the Clone and Marshmallow dubs; while both of Wan Macher's casts have many of the same voice actors.
  • In Brazil, the first three Indiana Jones got a second dub for the Blu-Ray that has also aired on cable. This meant that instead of having Indy with the same voice actor in all four movies, the original trilogy now had him with the same voice as Han Solo in the Star Wars re-dub (and yet he was later in The Force Awakens, given the older Indy died the year before).
  • Margin Call was dubbed into Latin Spanish five times: twice in Mexico, once in Colombia, once in Venezuela, and once in Argentina.
  • American Psycho has four Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico City, one in Venezuela, one in Argentina, and one in Cuernavaca, Mexico.
  • Cloud Atlas has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Argentina.
  • Alpha Dog has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Argentina, and another in Chile. The Mexican dub has aired on several TV channels.
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind has three Mexican Spanish dubs: one for Universal's DVD release, another for TV airings and Netflix, and a third for another medium.
  • Monster has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Miami.
  • John Wick has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Chile, one in Argentina, and one in Mexico. The Mexican cast returned for the sequels.
  • Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, and two in Argentina. The cast of the second Mexican dub returned for the sequels.
  • Bram Stoker's Dracula has been dubbed in Japanese three times. One for the VHS release which was carried over to the initial DVD release. Then, TV Asahi broadcasted a different dub in 1995. In 2007, a 15th anniversary DVD edition was released that featured a third dub.
    • The film has two Korean dubs: one that aired on KBS, and another for MBC.
  • Spider-Man 3 has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the Nippon TV dub. Except for Hiroke Oka as Mary Jane Watson (who was replaced by Kie Kitano for the TV dub), both dubs have most of the same voice actors.
  • Dr. Dolittle 2 has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on DVD. The second dub was made for airing on TV Tokyo. The third dub was also made for airing on TV Asahi.
  • Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on VHS and later, DVD. In 1993, a second aired on Fuji TV. Then, in 2004, 10 years after the second dub had aired, a third premiered on TV Tokyo. Masane Tsukayama voiced the titular character in the first and third dubs.
    • The film also has two French dubs.
  • Dragonheart has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub released on home video, while the second dub aired on Nippon TV. Genzo Wakayama and Akio Otsuka voiced Sean Connery and Dennis Quaid's characters in both versions, respectively.
    • The film also has two Hindi dubs.
  • Zathura has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2008, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
  • XXx has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2009, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
  • Casualties of War has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS and DVD. In 1996, a second dub was aired on Fuji TV.
  • City Slickers has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS. The second dub was made for airing.
  • Single White Female has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on home video and the second dub was made for airing on television.
  • Absolute Power has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on VHS and Blu-Ray, while the second was made for airing. Taro Ishida dubbed over Gene Hackman in both dubs.
  • Trading Places has been dubbed in Japanese three times for airing. The first dub aired on Nippon TV. The second dub aired on Fuji TV and was carried over on the DVD release. The third dub aired on TV Asahi. Keiko Toda and Akira Kume remained consistent in voicing Jamie Lee Curtis and Ralph Bellamy's characters in the first two dubs, respectively.
  • Crocodile Dundee has been dubbed in Japanese for airing twice. The first dub was made for Fuji TV and the other was made for TV Asahi.
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the other made for television viewing.
  • The Sound of Music has been dubbed into Japanese six times. The first and second dubs were made for the TV Asahi and Fuji TV airings in 1976 and 1978 receptively. The third dub was made for the VHS release, while the fourth dub was made for the DVD release. The fifth dub aired on TV Tokyo in 2011, while the sixth dub was made for the DVD and Blu-ray re-release, which was released on May 2, 2015. Only Maria's first voice actor, Reiko Mutou, stayed consistent for the first three dubs.
    • The film has two Mexican dubs: one by Sonomex (which also dubbed the anime adaptation), and a later dub by Dubbing House in 2005. José Lavat voiced Captain von Trapp in both versions, as well as the anime.
  • Roman Holiday was dubbed into Japanese a whopping seven times. You can see a comparison video here.
  • Many of Marilyn Monroe's movies have been dubbed into Japanese more than once, but Mariko Mukai is usually her voice actress in any dub of her films, even when the rest of the cast changes.
  • True Lies has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the for MBC. Lee Jeong-gu voiced Arnold Schwarzenegger in both dubs.
    • The film has two Mexican Spanish dubs: one for Universal, and another for 20th Century Fox. Roberto Carrillo dubbed over Art Malik in both versions.
  • A Few Good Men has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
  • Vertical Limit has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for MBC and the other for SBS.
  • Stuart Little has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
  • Bad Boys has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
    • The film has two Mexican Spanish dubs: one for TV and DVD, and another for Blu-Ray.
    • In Brazilian Portuguese, there are two as well, one in the initial release, and another for Blu-Ray (which even brought in Will Smith and Martin Lawrence's voices from the sequel).
  • Paddington has two Korean dubs: one for theatrical release, and another for KBS.
    • The film in Latin Spanish has two dubs: one in Mexico, and another in Argentina.
    • Paddington 2 was released in Latin America with a Mexican dub. However, when the film was distributed in Argentina, Paddington's voice actor was replaced.
  • Godzilla Raids Again was redubbed in Germany in the early 2000s after the original version was presumed lost. Then in 2009, the elements for the German theatrical version were found, and the new dub has not been included on releases since.
    • If the Spanish and Mexican theatrical versions of the film still existed (Spain got the Japanese cut, Mexico got Gigantis), there would be three separate Spanish dubs (of course spread across two dialects).
  • Some of the Godzilla films from the VS series have been dubbed into Cantonese twice:
  • When Harry Met Sally... has two Korean dubs: one for MBC and the other for SBS.
    • The film has four Japanese dubs: one for home video, one for Nippon TV, a third for Japan Airlines, and a fourth for All Nippon Airlines.
    • The film has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one that aired on Globo in 1993, another for TV and streaming, and a third for Telecine.
    • It also has four Latin Spanish dubs: three in Mexico, and another in Venezuela.
  • The Mysterians interestingly also has two different French versions. Like the situation in the U.S., there is a theatrical version based on RKO's cut, and a later home video dub based on the Japanese version.
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark fell victim to this in Germany. When the original German dub was created in 1981, they for some reason screwed up and created a really bad Dolby Stereo mix and managed to lose the original German speech tapes. Due to the bad production of the mix, it proved impossible to separate the speech from it to create a new 5.1 mix (as done with Star Wars) and they were forced to create a new dub in 2008 when the movie went HD, where apart from the voice of Indiana Jones, all voices were new. The old dub is well-loved and the new one caused enormous bad blood, so bad indeed that Paramount decided right away when creating the Blu-Ray that both dubs should be available on it. Thankfully, the sequels had much higher production quality in the dubs and they were spared this fate as a remix was trivial (access to 6-channel magnetic sound made it easy).
    • The exact same thing happened in Italy too, except that the Italian redub changes Indiana's voice too... weird thing, since the original voice actor was still available (and reprised the character for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull too).
  • A Fistful of Dollars has two dubs in Germany: one that was made when the movie came to cinemas and is faithful to the original, and one made for TV that tries to be humorous. Thankfully, starting with the DVD, only the original dub is used; however, the other dub has its fans, and so both dubs are available on the Blu-ray.
  • Goodfellas was given five Hungarian dubs: The first dub from 1991 was released on home video and broadcast on HBO and TV3. The second dub was commissioned for Magyar Televizió and broadcast on that channel, TV 6, and Viasat 3. The third dub was made in the early 2000s for RTL Klub and brodcast on that channel and Duna Televizió. The fourth dub was made for the home video re-release in 2005. The fifth dub was broadcast on the MGM channel.
    • The film has two Mexican Spanish dubs; the first dub was made for TV, while the second (made in 2004) is available on Blu-Ray and Netflix.
    • The film has two Korean dubs: one for KBS, and another for SBS. Yang Ji-un voiced Robert De Niro in both versions.
  • Showgirls received three Portuguese dubs. Sigma (VHS and TV), Voice Brazil (Paid TV), and Centauro (Netflix).
    • The film was dubbed twice in Latin Spanish: once in Colombia, and again in Mexico.
  • A few Bud Spencer and Terence Hill movies got a new dub in Germany during the 70s due to their rising prominence as a comedic duo.
    • God Forgives I Dont got a second dub in a try to turn the serious film into a comedy (together with numerous cuts). It didn't work. Both versions are available on Blu-Ray.
    • The second Trinity movie got a new dub in 1980, also including cuts, to make it a comedy (although the movie already was funny on its own). Both versions are available on Blu-Ray as well.
    • Boot Hill also got two very different dubs.
    • Almost all Bud Spencer films have two dubs in Hungary as well, which resulted in him having two "main" voice actors — one who portrayed him 39 times and one who voiced him in 41 dubs. In contrast, Terence Hill was mostly voiced by the same actor even in later dubs of his and their films. Generally, the later dubs are more despised by fans.
  • Young Guns has had four Brazilian Portuguese dubs. Three were made in Rio de Janeiro: one for Rede Globo, a redub for Globo and TNT, and a third version for Cinemax. The fourth was done in Sao Paulo for VHS and Rede Record. Interestingly, Marcelo Garcia appeared in all three Rio dubs, but never as the same character.
    • The film has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venzuela from 2013, and one from Chile.
  • Labyrinth has been dubbed four times in Latin Spanish. Twice in Mexico, and twice in Argentina.
    • The film also has four Portuguese dubs. Once in Sao Paulo (VHS), and three in Rio (Globo, DVD, and Blu-Ray/Netflix).
  • Spider-Man was dubbed in Thai twice. The first dub by Sound Factory and the other by True 4 U.
  • Jumanji has been dubbed in Korean twice for broadcast. The first was made for KBS and the other for SBS.
    • It also has two Hindi dubs.
    • It was also dubbed in Latin American Spanish twice. The first dub was done in Mexico. The second dub, which was featured on the 2011 Blu-Ray release, was done in Argentina.
    • It also has four Japanese versions. The first dub was made for the 1996 VHS release which was also carried over to the first DVD release. The second dub was made for broadcast in 1998 on Fuji TV. In 2000, third dub was aired on TV Asahi. Finally, the dub fourth dub included on the DVD re-release and Blu-Ray release. In all four dubs, Masashi Ebara stayed consistent in voicing Alan Parrish.
    • It also has two Thai dubs. One dub made by Sound Factory in 1996 and the other by True 4 U in 2017.
    • It was also dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub came out in 1996. In 2011, a second dub was featured on the 2011 Blu-Ray release.
    • Shortly before the sequel hit theaters, a new Brazilian Portuguese dub was made for a streaming service and its pay TV arm.
  • Independence Day has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on home video. In 1999, a second dub aired on TV Asahi. The third dub was made as an in-flight movie. Kōichi Yamadera was consistent in voicing Will Smith's character between the first two dubs.
    • It also has two Korean dubs: One for MBC and the other for SBS.
  • Ghostbusters (1984) has three Hungarian dubs, the first made in 1989 and the third in 2009 (the age of the second, made-for-TV dub is harder to pinpoint). Ironically, all of them are utterly inconsistent with each other, as well as with the single dub of Ghostbusters II, despite certain recurring voice actors — the only consistent parts are Raymond Stantz having the same voice in the first and second dub and Louis Tully's voice from the first dub returning for the second movie.
    • Latin Spanish: Both movies have four dubs (three in Mexico (classic TV broadcasts, DVD and Blu-Ray, and a TV re-release), and one in Argentina). The first movie's Argentinian dub aired on FOX, while the second movie's dub was released on VHS in Argentina. TV airings have mostly switched between the three Mexican dubs.
    • Both movies have three Japanese dubs: one for home video, one for Fuji TV, and one for TV Tokyo
  • Ghost Rider has two Hindi dubs. The first dub was made for cinema and home video release in 2007 by Sound & Vision India. The second dub was made for airing on UTV Action in 2013 by Main Frame Software Communications.
    • The sequel, Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance, has three Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, and one in Argentina (distributed by Sony). One of the Mexican dubs (distributed by Zima) was released in theaters.
  • Gone with the Wind has six Japanese dubs! One by Warner Bros., one for a public domain DVD release, two dubs for Nippon TV (both with Tatsu Natsumura as Mammy), one for TV Tokyo, and a sixth as an in-flight movie.
    • The film has two Korean dubs: one for KBS, and another for SBS. Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh and Leslie Howard's voice actors are the same in both versions.
    • The film has two Latin Spanish dubs: one in New York City from the 1940's, and a Mexican dub from the 1980's.
  • 300 has two Hindi dubs. The first dub was for cinema and home video release in 2007 by Sound & Vision India. The second was made for airing on UTV Action in 2010 by Main Frame Software Communications.
  • The Defiant Ones has been dubbed in Czech three times. The first Czech dub was produced in-house for ČST in 1965. In 2006, a second dub was produced in-house for ČT. In 2009, a third dub produced by Studio Bär aired on MGM Channel.
    • It also received two Hungarian dubs.
  • The Villain has been dubbed in Czech two times. The first dub was released on VHS in 1994 and the other was made for airing on MGM Channel.
  • Thunderbolt and Lightfoot has been in dubbed in Czech three times. The first dub released on VHS in 1992. Then in 1996, a second dub was recorded. In 2011, a third dub was produced by Studio Bär for airing on MGM Channel.
  • Le Mans has been dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub was released on VHS in 2004. In 2009, a second dub was produced in-house for ČT.
  • The Great Race has been dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub was produced in the 90's and the other was produced in 2006. The voice actors for Professor Fate, Max, and Leslie Gallant III remained consistent between the two dubs.
  • Beverly Hills Cop has been dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. The first dub was produced for Slovak Television and the other by Lenox for TV Markíza.
    • All three movies have two Hungarian dubs apiece: the first for theaters, home video and TV; and a second for TV 2. György Dörner voiced Axel Foley in all six dubs, while several other original voice actors returned for TV 2's versions. As of 2015, TV 2 is now broadcasting the original dubs of the sequels.
    • The first film in the series has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs, while the sequels each have two. Except for the original dub of Beverly Hills Cop II, Mario Jorge Andrade was consistent in dubbing over Eddie Murphy.
    • The first two movies each have two Latin Spanish dubs.
  • Hannah Montana The Movie has been dubbed in Slovak twice. There's the theatrical dub produced by Creative Music House and the other dub produced for TV JOJ.
  • Disaster Movie has been dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. The first dub aired on TV Markíza on August 8, 2010. In 2015, a second dub premiered on TV JOJ.
  • To Sir, with Love has been dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. There's the 1973 dub that aired on Czechoslovak Television and the other dub produced by Štúdio Roko for TV Markíza.
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl has been dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. There's the 2008 dub that was produced by Studio 7 for TV Markíza and the other produced by Daniela for TV JOJ.
  • The Hurt Locker was dubbed in Czech twice. Both dubs were recorded in the 2009 and some of voice actors remained consistent between the two.
    • The film has two Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico (distributed by Videomax), one in Argentina (distributed by Summit Entertainment), and one in Venezuela. The Mexican dub has aired on most TV broadcasts.
  • Alvin and the Chipmunks was dubbed in Brazilian Portuguese twice. The first dub was recorded in 2007 in São Paulo and the other was recorded in 2012 in Rio de Janeiro.
  • Total Recall (1990) has been dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. The first dub aired in 2005 on TV JOJ and the other aired on TV Markíza in 2010. The voice actor for Quaid remained consistent between the two dubs.
    • The film has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs. One for TV, one for Rede Globo, and a third for DVD/Blu-Ray/TV.
  • It has been dubbed in European Spanish three times. One in 1992, another in 1994, and the third in 2002.
    • It also has been dubbed in Mexican Spanish twice.
    • It also been dubbed in European French twice. One in 1992 and the other in 2003. Jean-François Vlerick (Bill), Jacques Ciron (It), and Hervé Rey (teenage Richie) were the only Role Reprises, while Denis Boileau (adult Richie) returned as adult Stan.
    • The film has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub aired on NHK and the other aired on TV Tokyo.
  • Casino was dubbed into Hungarian three times. One in 1996 for its original release, one in 2002 for TV, and a third in 2005 for DVD. Juli Básti dubbed over Sharon Stone in all three versions.
  • Deep Impact has been documented to have three Hindi dubs. One from 1998 by Sound & Vision India for cinema release and carried over to some home video releases, another in 2009 by VR Films for home video releases and there was a third made in 2017, also by VR Films, but for television airing and it also had different staff and voice cast involved.
    • The film has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one made by Herbert Richers for Rede Globo, DVD and Netflix, and another that aired on Space.
  • The Karate Kid has been dubbed in Hindi twice. The first dub produced by Sound & Vision India in 2010, while the second dub was produced in-house by UTV Software Communications for airing on UTV Action in 2011.
  • Love Actually was dubbed in Slovak twice for airing. The first dub was produced in-house by Slovak Television and the other was produced by Atiz Studio for TV Markíza.
  • The Wizard of Oz was dubbed in Brazilian Portuguese three times.
    • It was also dubbed in Hungarian four times; One in 1960, another in 1976 (both made by Pannonia Film Studio with Iluz Vay as the Wicked Witch), a third in 1992 (for TV, DVD, and Blu-Ray), and a fourth in 2000 (for VHS and DVD).
    • It was also dubbed in Italian three times; One in 1949, another in 1980, and a third in 1985.
    • It was also dubbed in Japanese three times; One in 1974, another in 1987, and a third in 1980s or 1990s. The first dub was featured on home video. The other two dubs were made for airing on NHK and TBS.
  • The Terminator films, specifically the first three films were dubbed multiple times in Japanese:
    • The Terminator was dubbed four times: the TV Asahi dub by Tohokushinsha, the VHS dub by an uncredited company, the TV Tokyo dub co-produced with KSS, and the DVD dub by Angelworks. In the first two dubs, Arnold Schwarzenegger's voice was dubbed by Ryuzaburo Otomo, while in the latter two he was replaced by Tessho Genda. All four dubs are included as part of Fox Japan's Blu-ray release.
    • Terminator 2: Judgment Day was dubbed three times: the original home video dub (based on the theatrical cut) by AC Create, the Fuji TV dub (based on both, the theatrical and special edition) by Glovision, and the Extreme Edition DVD dub by Studio Echo. Masane Tsukayama dubbed Schwarzenneger in the first dub before he was replaced by Genda in the later dubs.
    • Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines has a theatrical dub, a home media dub, and a TV dub, with the first two dubs sharing most of the same cast except for John Connor. All three dubs feature Genda dubbing for Arnold.
    • The Terminator has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Croma (over-the-air TV), Dublavideo (for Flashstar's DVD release), and Alamo (for MGM's DVD release, plus most later broadcasts and streaming).
    • In Brazil, Terminator 2: Judgment Day has two dubs, one for TV (Herbert Richers) and a second dub for the DVD release and later broadcasts (Cinevideo). Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, and Peter Schrum had the same voice actors in both versions.
  • 20th Century Fox's Japanese division has a lineup of Blu-ray releases called the Fukikae no Teiō series ("Emperor of Dubbing") dedicated precisely at collecting the multiple Japanese dubs of popular Hollywood films, along with their scripts. The lineup thus far consists of the following films:
    • Commando, which was released twice as part of this series. The initial release features the theatrical version with two dubs (one with Yusaku Yara as the voice of Arnold and the other with Tessho Genda), while the later release is the Director's Cut with a new dub using most of the cast from the Genda version.
    • The original Die Hard trilogy, each with three dubs.
    • Predator, which also features two dubs starring Yara and Genda.
    • RoboCop (1987), which features the theatrical, VHS and DVD dubs.
    • Speed and its sequel, which features three dubs for the first movie and two dubs for the second.
    • The original Planet of the Apes (1968) with three dubs.
    • Alien, with a whopping number of five dubs: two TV dubs for Fuji TV and TV Asahi, a Laserdisc dub, a VHS dub, and a dub of the Director's Cut originally released on DVD.
    • The Terminator, with the aforementioned four dubs.
    • Home Alone, with three dubs: a home video dub and two TV dubs for TV Fuji and TV Asahi. Ai Orikasa dubbed Macaulay Culkin's voice for home video and TV Asahi dubs, while Akiko Yajima dubbed him for the Fuji TV dub.
    • Live Free or Die Hard received a new dub for its Fukikae no Teiō release in addition to the original dub used for its theatrical and prior home video releases. It reused the same voice cast except for the late Hidetoshi Nakamura, Bruce Willis' original dub actor, who was replaced by Ben Hiura.
    • Aliens has six dubs, half of which aired on TV Asahi. the TBS dub starring Hiroko Suzuku dubbing for Ellen Ripley, the 1989 TV Asahi dub starring Keiko Toda, the first home media dub starring Naoko Kouda, the 1993 TV Asahi starring Kazuko Yanaga, a second home media dub also starring Naoko Kouda, and the 2004 TV Asahi dub starring Kaori Yamagata.
  • Jurassic Park has been dubbed in Hindi twice. The first dub was produced by Sound & Vision India. In 2006, a second dub was produced by Treasure Tower International for STAR Gold.
    • The movie also has three Brazilian Portuguese dub: Alamo (home video, TV and Netflix), Herbert Richers (Rede Globo), and Delart (3D theatrical re-release/Blu-Ray). Delart's dub kept much of the Herbert Richers cast.
  • The Lord of the Rings trilogy has been dubbed in Hindi twice.
    • They also were dubbed in Thai twice.
    • They were also dubbed in Cantonese twice.
  • Child's Play has been dubbed in Hungarian three times. There's the theatrical dub released in 1990 by Duna Film. Then in 2005, a second dub was produced by Masterfilm for airing on TV 2. In 2011, a third dub produced by Zone Stúdió was produced for MGM Channel.
  • Mary Poppins was dubbed into Japanese twice: once for TV in 1986 and again in 1995.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times. The first two dubs were made in the early 1990's: one by SC Produções for VHS and the other by Herbert Richers for TV. The third dub was made by Double Sound in 2000 for DVD.
  • Flash Gordon (1980) has two Latin Spanish dubs: a Los Angeles dub by ESM International Dubbing and a Chilean dub by DINT Doblajes Internacionales.
  • Carrie (1976) has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs. One by Telecine for Rede Band, one by Herbert Richers for Rede Globo, one by Dublavideo for Rede Record and DVD, and another by Voice Brazil for Megapix and Netflix. In the Telecine and Herbert Richers dubs, Nelly Amaral voiced Miss Collins, while in Telecine and Voice Brazil's dubs, Mário Jorge Andrade dubbed over John Travolta.
    • Carrie and its 2002 remake both have two Hungarian dubs. Both '76 versions were made in the 1990s, with only Margaret White having the same voice. Both versions of the 2002 remake have a few voice actors in common, but never as the same character.
  • Twilight has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for theatrical release, one as an in-flight movie, and another for TV broadcasts.
  • The Muppet Movie was dubbed into Latin Spanish twice.
  • The Muppets Take Manhattan was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice; one by BKS and another by Megason.
  • Thomas and the Magic Railroad has two Latin Spanish dubs. The first dub was made for theatrical and DVD releases. The second dub was made in the mid 2000's for television airings. Liliana Barba voiced Lily's mother in both dubs.
  • Matilda has two Latin Spanish dubs: one for theatrical release, and another for TV airings.
  • Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times: the first dub made by Tecnisom for its theatrical release, the second by Herbert Richers for TV, and the third by Clone for VHS. The first dub is the current version being used on DVD and Blu-Ray.
    • There are also two Italian dubs: the original from 1971, and the newer from 1983. The first dub is now lost.
    • It was also dubbed into French twice. While the redub was released to DVD at least once in Europe, US releases (including the Blu-Ray) contain the original dubbing, which has most of the songs left in English (with the exception of "I Want It Now" which is mostly spoken, save for some lyrics in the middle).
    • It also received three Latin Spanish dubs. There's the original dub by CINSA, the second dub by SISSA, and the third dub by Sonomex. Most releases contain the first dub, while the second dub was released on Netflix. TV airings randomly switch between the two redubs.
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks received three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one in the early 1970's, a dub from the late 1970's-early 1980's at Herbert Richers for VHS, and a third in the 2000's at Double Sound for DVD/television. Selma Lopes dubbed over Angela Lansbury in all three versions.
    • It was also dubbed into French twice, the first in 1972 for the original-theatrical cut and the second in 2003 for the Extended cut, both dubs have been available on DVD (with the French 2003 dub being sold on the first French DVD release in France and the Blu-Ray release (abet with the running-time of the original-theatrical cut version), while the French 1972 dub was released on DVD in the Benelux countries, the second French DVD release in France and the second British DVD release in the United Kingdom). Philippe Dumat and Jacques Dynam appeared in both dubs as differnet characters.
  • Scream has three Latin Spanish dubs, as does Scream 2: two in Mexico, and one in Argentina. The second Mexican dub is the most circulated version.
    • The first movie also has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Cinevideo (unknown medium), Clone (DVD/Internet streaming/cable TV), and Marshmallow (VHS and TV)
    • Scream 2 has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Cinevideo (TV), Studio Gabia (DVD), Herbert Richers (in-flight movie/Internet streaming/cable), and Drei Marc (Telecine).
  • The Breakfast Club had three Brazilian Portuguese dubs, one upon release by Herbert Richers, another in the early 2000s by Trix Brasil for the DVD release (being originally not intent for broadcast, this one does not Bowdlerize and downright translates the profanity), and yet another by Audiocorp that is on Netflix. The last two can be found on cable, depending on the channel.
  • The first three Rambo films have three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one by Herbert Richers for Rede Globo, and one by Centauro (for Universal's DVD releases). The third dubs, for Flashstar's DVD releases, were made in different studios: Dublavideo for First Blood, Herbert Richers for First Blood: Part 2, and Álamo for Rambo 3.
    • First Blood has a fourth Brazilian Portuguese dub for the SBT channel, also by Herbert Richers (with a few of the same actors).
    • First Blood has five Japanese dubs: two for NTV, one for TV Asahi, one for Fuji TV, and one for TBS. The cast of the second NTV dub returned for the sequels, but Sylvester Stallone's voice actor from Asahi assumed the role in Rambo 3.
  • There's two Latin American Spanish dubs for Hellboy (2019): One dubbed in Mexico exclusively for that country, handled by Imagem Filmes, and another one done in Argentina, handled by Digi Cine.
  • Top Gun has two Latin Spanish dubs: the original made in Los Angeles in the 1980's by Intersound and a newer dub in Mexico made by SDI Media de Mexico. TV airings ping-pong between the two dubs.
    • The film has two Portuguese dubs: one by Telecine (TV), and another by Alamo (re-releases).
  • In 1997, all of Brazil's voice actors entered a strike. To counter this, Batman & Robin and The Lost World: Jurassic Park had dubs made in Los Angeles for the VHS and TV (most nostably, both protagonists had the voice of the late Ubirajara de Castro - aka Bira Castro - best known as the announcer for TNT and Fox). Both would later get dubs done in Rio de Janeiro. And while the new Jurassic Park dub is official, amusingly, on home video only the old Batman & Robin dub is available (which even arguably enhances the So Bad, It's Good quality for how the performances are so campy).
  • Parasite got a Brazilian dub for streaming. And given it was made by a non-traditional studio in Belo Horizonte, dubbing fans were expecting paid channel Telecine to commission another from a studio in Rio, and rejoiced when it was confirmed.
  • Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure has three Hungarian dubs: one made for HBO in the early '90s, one made for the now-defunct network TV3 in the late '90s, and one made for MGM in the late 2000s. The original is notable for its subpar translation that neutered a lot of jokes. The second dub is even stranger for giving the exact same voice actors to the two leads as before, but their roles got switched. While still far from perfect, this one had a better script but toned down the profanities. It even re-titled the film from Bill és Ted oltári kalandja (Bill and Ted's Awesome Adventure) to Bill és Ted zseniális kalandja (Bill and Ted's genius adventure). The third dub kept the 2nd title but recast all the voices. This version was made in a cost-effective Romanian dubbing studio as part of a larger incentive to produce cheap Hungarian dubs with cheap Hungarian voice talent for numerous classic films for potential TV broadcasts.
    • The sequel, Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey, has two Hungarian versions, one made sometime in the '90s and one made at the same time as the first installment's MGM dub. The MGM version kept the same voice cast as their dub of the first film. The first dub recast every character and is thus inconsistent with every other dub of either movie.

    Literature 
  • The Horrid Henry series has been translated into French by three different publishers (Hachette, Livre de Poche, and Gallimard). Gallimard's translation (Horrible Henri) was used for the live-action film, while the animated series uses a fourth translation (Lucas la Cata).
  • The Captain Underpants series has been translated twice into the following languages, each by a different publisher). In all four cases, the newer translation was used in the 2017 film:
    • European French (Le Petit Musc in 2000, Bayard in 2013). Most of the character names are changed in Bayard's edition.
    • German (Ueberreuter in 2000, Panini in 2012). Except for Mr. Krupp, all the character names are changed in Ueberreuter's version.
    • Norwegian (Cappelen Damm, then Schibsteds)
    • Swedish (Egmont, then Bonnier Carlsen). The Bonnier Carlsen translation changed most of the character names, except for Mr. Krupp and the kids.

    Live Action TV 
  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has two dubs each in Mexican Spanish and Portuguese because the rights are split between Disney and the Sony Channel. Both Mexican dubs have Carlos Hernández as Lance Hunter, while both Brazilian dubs have Ronaldo Júlio reprising his role from the movies as Agent Coulson.
  • The Big Bang Theory: Some episodes of Season 2 were dubbed twice in Italian. In the original dub Sheldon had a different voice actor in the episodes 2.15 and 2.19-23. When the old one came back for season 3 he also redubbed all of Sheldon's lines in Season 2. DVD release has the redub.
  • Chespirito had its 90's seasons dubbed in Brazilian Portuguese by the BKS and Parisi Video studios. These were then redubbed in 2001 by Gota Mágica.
    • El Chavo del ocho has been dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese many times (most memorably at the Maga studio). The only consistent voice was Martha Volpiani as Florinda.
  • The Day of the Doctor had three different Italian dubs in the span of a single year. During the various redubs, they fixed a lot of translation goofs here and there, as well as replacing Tom Baker's voice actor in the ending cameo with the original Fourth Doctor voice actor. The first dub was aired once on TV in the original worldwide airing, while the second dub is available in the The Day of the Doctor single DVD release and the third one is in the 50th Anniversary boxset.
  • In Latin America, Goosebumps (known as Escalofríos) has been enjoyed by Latin American fans, including Mexico where it was dubbed in Latin Spanish by Audiomaster 3000. It aired on television and released on home video. That's all they wanted, right? One consistent dub, yes? Well, you are wrong. In 2015, when Netflix got the rights to have the series in Latin Spanish dubbed format, they did not get the rights to use the audio. SDI Media México was contacted to redub the episodes with a new translation and new voice actors. Some fans didn't like this because the original dub was considered to be a childhood classic. And to top that off, this dub is only available in the United States towards Latin American Spanish speakers. The first season was also redubbed into French, German, Polish, Japanese, and Brazilian Portuguese.
  • Lost has received two Czech dubs. One for AXN and the other for TV Nova. Hurley and Walt Lloyd have the same voices in both dubs.
  • Rescue 911 has at least three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for SBT by Hebert Richers, one for AXN, and one for CBS Broadcast International by Delart which currently airs on TV VIVA.
  • Thunderbirds has two Italian dubs. The first one was made in 1974, covered only the first season and was heavily edited to make each episode 20 minutes long. The season got a new dub (this time with no cuts) in 1993. In 2003, this second dub was aired for the last time along with season 2 being finally dubbed. For some reason, later airings used the first dub, with subtitles on the scenes that were missing back then.
  • The X-Files has at least three Russian versions. The first one was made by REN-TV and included many mistakes such as mistaking a word for a name. Then there's the ORT version which, despite having minor flaws, is regarded as the best one from The '90s. And most recently, there is TV3 (the Russian one, not that TV3) dub which not only dubbed the show (both REN-TV and ORT were voiceovers), but also had credits in Russian and Russian captions for onscreen texts. None of these cover the entire series, though - even TV3, which includes the feature films and event seasons, only did seven seasons of the original series.
  • In 2019, the first two seasons of The Crown & The Flame were redubbed into Brazilian Portuguese, moving from Miami to Rio de Janeiro.
    • Netflix also changed the season 1 dub of The Umbrella Academy that had been made in Curitiba to one from Rio.
  • There are two Italian dubs of Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide, which are basically identical except for Cookie's voice. On Nickelodeon's broadcast he was voiced by Davide Garbolino. When the show premiered on Italia 1, he was re-dubbed by Monica Bonetto. The first dub has been used only for airing on the Italian Nickelodeon channels. In 2020 the Nickelodeon dub aired for the first time on free TV.

    Puppet Shows 
  • Barney & Friends has received two German dubs: the first one was made by FFS Film- & Fernseh-Synchron GmbH in Munich for Polygram, and the newer one by Deutsche Synchron Film GmbH in Berlin for HIT Entertainment. Interestingly, both aired on Super RTL (with the latter dub airing on the channel's Toggolino block). The translation of the Polygram dub seems to be more faithful to the original English version.
    • There are also two Japanese dubs: one for Kids Station and for Playhouse Disney Japan.
  • Dinosaurs has two Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico and one in Venezuela.
  • Fraggle Rock was re-dubbed into Polish sometime during the 90s. The original 1988 dub is now extinct.
    • It was also dubbed into Hebrew twice. The first dub was made to the first 15 episodes in 2012, while the second dub was made for the entire series in 2017.
  • LazyTown has received three dubs in Latin Spanish. The first dub was made in Chile for Discovery Kids, covering the first two seasons. A second dub was made in Venezuela for the American channel V-Me, which later aired on Boomerang. The third dub was made in Miami for Boomerang, covering all four seasons.
    • There are also two three Brazilian Portuguese dubs. One for Discovery Kids in São Paulo, one for Netflix in Rio de Janeiro, and a third for Boomerang and Cartoon Network in Miami.
    • There also exist two Dutch dubs: the first was made in Dutch-speaking Belgium for Playhouse Disney covering the first two seasons and the second in the Netherlands covering all four seasons.
  • The Muppet Show was dubbed into Hungarian twice. The original was done by MTV around 1980-1983, while the new version was made by Film Mánia (formerly known as Filmmúzeum at the time) during 2003-2004.
    • It was also dubbed into Latin Spanish three times. The original dub was made during the show's original run (1976-1981) by CINSA and is currently extinct. The second dub was made for the two VHS volumes of "It's the Muppets" in 1993, and the third dub was made in Argentina during 1999-2001 by Palmera Record.
  • Speaking of Muppets, Sesame Street also has multiple dubs in certain languages, often as a result of package programs (like Play With Me Sesame or Open Sesame) airing after local versions have ended or other package programs. A few examples:
    • Poland has two (there was a local version with dubbed American segments in 1996 and one with only dubbed American segments in 2006)
    • Denmark has three (A dubbed version of Open Sesame in 1992, a dubbed Elmo's World in the late '90s/early aughts, and a packaged block in 2009)
    • Sweden also has three (a local production with dubbed American bits in 1981, Open Sesame in 1996 - which retained the original Swedish voices of Grover and Cookie Monster, and more recent dubs of several American spin-offs, which have the second dub's Ernie and Bert).
    • Spain had a package dub in the late '70s, three iterations of the local production, and a few dubs of the American spin-offs.
    • Bizarrely enough, on the (now-cancelled) Russian production, despite only having one local production with dubs of American bits (taken from Open Sesame), dubs of later segments (like Play with Me Sesame and Global Grover) re-cast the majority of the American Muppets with completely different voices (save for Bert and Elmo), even with the Open Sesame bits still being included in episodes.
    • Italy had an early version of Open Sesame in the '70s and package dubs in the aughts.
    • Portugal had an early Open Sesame in the '70s, a local production in the late '80s and early '90s, and two dubs of Play with Me Sesame.

    Video Games 
  • F-Zero in Spanish is a weird case. The series went on hiatus a couple years before Nintendo's first Latin American Spanish translation, Super Mario Galaxy. However, as the series made cameos in more games with separate Castilian and Latin American versions, anything that wasn't a person's name (titles not withstanding) would generally go translated in the Latin American version but use Gratuitous English in the Castilian version. The Latin American version has Capitán Falcon, Gran Azul, Halcón azul, but the Castilian version has Captain Falcon, Big Blue, and Blue Falcon.

 
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Vegeta vs. Copy-Vegeta

Taken to its literal conclusion in Dragon Ball Super's English dub, where Copy-Vegeta is played by Brian Drummond, who plays Vegeta in the Saban/Ocean Group dub, and fights the regular Chris Sabat Vegeta.

How well does it match the trope?

4.54 (13 votes)

Example of:

Main / DuelingDubs

Media sources:

Main / DuelingDubs

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