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    Multiple English dubs 

Examples - Multiple English dubs

  • The first two seasons of Adventures from the Book of Virtues were re-dubbed into English in Singapore in the early 2000s because it was too expensive to keep paying royalties to the celebrity voices.
  • Arthur had two voice actors for the title character in the sixth season. It originally had Justin Bradley, but when Mark Rendall voiced him for season 7, he re-dubbed all the season 6 episodes. Word of God was that they did this because Justin Bradley's voice was too whiny for when Arthur was upset. The Mark Rendall version is the only one that airs in North America now, but the Justin Bradley version can be heard outside of North America and on older versions of the DVD and VHS releases.
    • The show also has a rare BBC-exclusive dub, where the main characters were redubbed by British actors.
  • The Backyardigans had a British dub on the United Kingdom's feed of Nick Jr. that also changed several terms ("football" instead of "soccer").
  • Barbapapa, a Japanese-Dutch series created by a French-American couple, has a total of five English dubs:
    • The first was made in the UK in 1974 which aired on BBC One.
    • A Gag Dub that was Edited for Syndication was then made in the US by Magno Sound and Video in 1977, and syndicated on some American TV networks.
    • A Canadian English dub aired shortly after which used the same songs as the ones from the UK dub, but re-dubbed the voices and aired on TVOntario and Knowledge Network. It was also released on DVDs in the UK.
    • An English dub was released years later in Japan on DVD and VHS alongside a Japanese and French audio track (and is perhaps the most cheaply produced of them all).
    • And another English dub was made in the US in 2006 by Centauro which was released on DVDs in South Korea to teach Korean kids English. Out of all of them, only this dub is complete, even going so far as to dub the 1999 Japanese spin-off series, Barbapapa Around the World, while all the rest only stopped at season one.
  • Bob the Builder is broadcast in America with a different voice cast for each era of the show, as opposed to the original British version which used the same cast throughout most of the show. The original British cast was eventually replaced beginning with the 2015 reboot series.
  • Caillou has a British dub that aired on Cartoonito. Further runs of the show in the UK have used the original Canadian voices.
  • Clifford the Big Red Dog received a British dub for BBC 2 in 2002.
  • Fireman Sam has two English dubs. One for the UK, and one for the US that was recorded in Canada by Ocean Productions. The Canadian dub is made in 2014 and and full episodes of this dub are very hard to find on the internet. Also, just about every special (except for the upcoming "The Rise of Norman-Man", which didn't have a redub yet) had a Canadian dub for US/Canadian release.
  • The French cartoon Insektors had an American dub and a British dub. The American dub was more faithful to the original.
  • A very strange example of this trope happened with Jay Jay the Jet Plane. The show has two different versions, both with the same cast: the standard version aired on TLC and PBS Kids, and a Direct to Video Religious Redub by Tommy Nelson that inserted references to Christianity in the story and altered lines about wishes and secrets. There is also a British version aired on Five that has localized live footage and localized narration.
  • Kaeloo, a French animated series, has two official English dubs, one produced by Tabb Productions, which aired in Australia on television, and one made by Miam! Animation, which is available online on Vimeo. The name of the place the characters live in is "Smileyland" in the Tabb dub and "Super Cute Land" in the Miam! Dubnote .
  • Little Einsteins has a British dub, which also changes some of the American terms used. For example, "Mission Completion!" is changed to "Mission Complete!" and candy canes are called "sweetie sticks". Like in the original, the main characters were voiced by kids.
  • Maggie and the Ferocious Beast also has a British dub. In the UK dub of "Roll Over Archie", Beast says "posts" instead of saying "pickets" in the original version.
  • The British version of the French cartoon The Magic Roundabout has received three different narrations: the original BBC dub by Eric Thompson, the second by Nigel Planer, and the third by Jimmy Hibbert. The second dub by Nigel Planer was made for Channel 4 in the early 1990s, to cover certain episodes which have not yet received an English translation (along with new re-tellings of episodes previously narrated by Thompson; a majority of which were released to VHS in 1993 and 1997). Reruns of the show on Cartoon Network and Boomerang randomly switched between the two re-dubs, although a majority of episodes during this run included Planer's narration.
    • The show also received an American dub, renamed "The Magic Carousel", which was featured in Pinwheel on Nickelodeon. It was a more faithful word-to-word adaptation of the original French dub. In this dub, the characters have their own voices (as opposed to the British version which featured a narrator voicing all of the characters) and retain their names from the British version, with the exception of Dylan and Mr. McHenry keeping their original French names (Flappy and Mr. Young, respectively) and Mr. Rusty having Mr. McHenry's name.
  • Monica's Gang has two English dubs. The first was done by The Kitchen Studios in the mid 2000's and only covered a handful of episodes. The second dub by BKS Dubbing Studios is a more refined dub, and has been going on the Monica Plus YouTube channel since 2019.
  • Mr. Men:
    • The 1983 "Little Miss" episodes from the original Mr. Men series, received a rare American dub by Warner Bros for VHS.
      • Although, prior to this, the original "Mr. Men" series actually has a US dub that was made by MCA/Universal, which was also direct-to-video!
    • Mr. Men and Little Miss had two English dubs. The first one was done in the UK for TV airings with a British voice cast of two or three voice actors. The second dub was made in Canada as an Importation Expansion and aired in North America on syndication (with the live-action segments) and Cartoon Network (with the animated episodes aired by themselves).
    • There are also slight hints that Mr. Men: The Christmas Letter also had a US dub, but no footage nor audio of this dub seems to surface to this day.
    • The Mr. Men Show has two dubs: one for the US that aired on Cartoon Network and Boomerang, and one for the UK that aired on Channel 5's Milkshake block.
  • Noddy:
    • All series from Noddy's Toyland Adventures onward (with the exception of the 2009 installment Noddy In Toyland) have both a British and North American dub.
    • The Noddy Shop, the show that broadcast the North American dub of Noddy's Toyland Adventures, has two versions: one with the Noddy segments with the North American dub which aired in the US and Canada and one with the original British Noddy segments, which aired elsewhere. The framing device segments remained untouched, save for the logo during the opening sequence being changed (the US prints have the Noddy logo, while overseas prints use the Noddy In Toyland logo.)
  • Olivia has a UK English dub and an American English dub. That, and they couldn't afford to keep paying the celebrity guest stars' royalties.
  • Oswald also has a British dub, which aired on Nick Jr. UK and Channel 5's Milkshake! block.
  • PAW Patrol had a British dub for Nick Jr. UK and Milkshake! airings, while Netflix uses the original voicesnote . Like in Little Einsteins and The Backyardigans, words are changed to fit British terminology, but sometimes, other words are changed, most commonly during the incidental musical numbers.
  • Peppa Pig had an American dub produced in Miami which was aired on Cartoon Network's short-lived preschool programming block "Tickle-U" back in 2005-06. When the show moved to Noggin note  2 years later) in the United States, it used the British dub. The American dub was never released on home video or aired on any other network, and currently only one episode out of 104 has been found in its entirety.
    • Similarly, the American dubs of two other British cartoons, Little Robots and Gordon the Garden Gnome, have not been seen anywhere in over ten years.
  • The 2013 Peter Rabbit series has two English dubs. The American dub can be heard on Nickelodeon or Nick Jr., while the British dub can be heard on CBeebies.
  • The first two seasons of Pingu were given two dubs each. The latter was done by HIT Entertainment in 2002, due to the original soundtracks having been greatly worn out. The re-dub features different music, re-recorded "penguin dialogue", and the "Pingu Dance" intro from seasons 3 and 4. The original versions of the episodes still air in the UK on CBeebies.
  • Thomas & Friends has two English dubs: one for the UK, and one for the US. In addition to having different narrators and, in later seasons, different voice actors, there are several small differences between the dubs due to different terminology, culture, and political correctness. Not only that, the first two seasons have a third English dub due to George Carlin replacing Ringo Starr as Mr. Conductor on Shining Time Station.
  • The Where's Wally/Waldo animated series has two English dubs, although this is justified due to the fact that the title character is known as "Wally" in the UK and "Waldo" in the US and Canada. Both dubs were produced simultaneously with the same voice actors; the only real difference between them was that every time the name "Waldo" was spoken, the actors had to rerecord their lines to accommodate the "Wally" dub.
  • Winx Club from Rainbow SpA rules this trope when it comes to non-anime English dubs:
    • A straight English dub produced by Cinélume in Montreal, Canada covers Seasons 1-4. It's featured on some international DVDs as the alternate English-language track, and most foreign language dubs were sourced from this one. It is also used by Cinedigm on their complete season 1-2 DVDs in the US.
    • The first two movies were also dubbed into English, but this time by Dubbing Brothers USA in Los Angeles, using voice actors mostly known for anime like Cindy Robinson, Christopher Corey Smith, Erin Fitzgerald, and Stephanie Sheh. These were only shown in some theaters in South-East Asia and were featured as an alternate language track on some foreign DVDs.
    • The heavily localized 4Kids dub, recorded in New York, covered Seasons 1-3. It was released to DVD by Funimation.
    • Nickelodeon's English voice cast recorded four one-hour specials summarizing Seasons 1-2, the entirety of Seasons 3-6, and the first movie. Seasons 5 and 6 were co-productions with Nick and Rainbow (both operated by Viacom), during which the animation was done to match Nickelodeon's English voices.
    • The seventh and eighth seasons were dubbed in English by DuArt Film & Video (the same studio currently handling Pokémon: The Series) and its successor, 3Beep. Despite being recorded in New York, the cast is completely different from the 4Kids dub, although the voice director is Lisa Ortiz, who voiced Musa and Icy in that version. Even here, most of the cast was replaced for unknown reasons between seasons 7 and 8.

    Other Languages/Regions 

Examples - Other Languages/Regions

  • Sonic Underground has been dubbed three times in Spain. The original dub from 1999, a 2010 redub for KidsCo and the 2016 redub for Netflix.
  • Peanuts might be the most-dubbed cartoon ever in Brazil, with six Portuguese versions.
    • There are also three Italian dubs.
    • There seems to exist two different Norwegian dubs of the Peanuts Musical Episode "Flashbeagle": One where all the songs reinterpreted and performed by the Norwegian actors, and one where the songs are left in English.
  • The classic TMNT 1987 cartoon was dubbed in Japanese -3- times by 3 different groups. This blog page has more info
    • Likewise, the series was dubbed in Slovak three times. The original was produced in-house by Slovenská televízia (STV) in the 1990's, while the second was made for DVD, and third for Dajto in 2013.
    • There were two Greek dubs: the VHS dub from Studio 87' and the ANT 1 dub from SPK Video Film Television.
  • Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! has two different Japanese dubs. The original was done in the early 1970s, and changed the names of all the characters, and created a new theme song using the original opening footage. The new dub is more faithful to the original American show (though it uses "Kuruppa" as Scooby's name in homage to the 70s dub), and was so successful, the Japanese dubbing studio that recorded it was called back to dub other Scooby-Doo media into Japanese using the same voice actors, such as the Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo show (with Naoki Tatsuto as Scrappy) and several of the DTV movies (Zombie Island, Witch's Ghost, Alien Invaders, Cyber Chase etc.).
    • It was also dubbed into Russian twice. The first was done for the STS Channel in 2011, and the second was made by Pythagor Studios around 2012-2013. The latter has the theme song left in English.
    • For the Swedish version, the 2nd season was dubbed twice: the first for TV3 in 1993, and later for DVD in 2005.
    • The show didn't get a Norwegian dub before 2015. However one episode was dubbed for the "Cartoon Crack-Ups" DVD back in 2001. Only the voices of Scooby and Velma appeared in both dubs.
  • Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo received three Polish dubs. The original was made for VHS releases, while the second was made for TV airings and the third for DVD releases. There's also a Voiceover Translation that exists as well.
    • It was also dubbed into Greek three times. The first dub was made by Studio 87' for VHS in the 1980s, the Audio Visual dub aired on MEGA from 1990-1992 and the third for Boomerang and DVD was done in the Sierra Recordings studio.
  • The Scooby-Doo Show had three Russian dubs, not counting a Voiceover Translation from 1997. The original dub was made in the mid-90s for NTV and Varus Video (VHS), the second was done in 2000, and the third was made during 2011-2012.
    • The show was also dubbed into Swedish twice: the original from Media Dubb and the newer from Sun Studio.
  • Adventures of the Gummi Bears had its first 52 episodes dubbed in Russia in 1992, but the masters for the original dub were lost (although TV rips of them were preserved by fans), and a new dub was commissioned in 2009. The second dub covered all episodes, made a different and more faithful translation of the opening song, but preserved the traditions of the original along with the same character names, and is generally considered just as good.
    • Greece got two dubs too. The first one by Studio Cross was done for ERT, and the second dub was for Disney Junior by Sierra Recordings. One of the Studio Cross dub's episodes ended up as an alternate audio track on a Russian DVD (the rest of the episodes were probably the Sierra dub).
    • There were also two Slovak dubs made: the original by STV from 1992, and the new one by Televízia Markíza from 2003.
    • The show also had two dubs in Japanese.
    • For Poland, it's a bit complicated, there is one TV dub with suplement re-dubs for some epsiodes (along with a really obscure lektor translation):
      • The 1st original TV dub was made by the studio Telewizyjne Studia Dźwięku in years 1991-1994 (which was basically Polish Television's studio)
      • In later years some episodes were re-dubbed (according to the production code they are: 30-33, 39, 48 and 64) by the studio Master Film with different voices for some characters (but with the same version of theme song from the 1st dub). One of the reasons of the redub creation is probably that master tapes of Polish dub of episodes 30-33, 39 and 48 have been mysteriously lost, while the first dub of episode 64 (which was rerun with its 1st dub durring its 2007-2008 run on TVP1) has "To be continuted" notice at the end translated with a VO saying "Dokończenie za tydzień" (Continuing next week), where that notice translated in such way could make sense when the show aired with only one episode a week (like it was originally during Sunday "Walt Disney przedstawia" block during Sunday "Wieczorynka" blocks).
      • A 3rd dub (which by looks is suplementar to 2nd dub) was done for two VHS releases in 1996 (and their later DVD reissues) from Imperial Entertainment (also made by Master Film), but with a different lyrical recording of the theme song.
  • Like above example this same happened to DuckTales (1987) in Poland. The first Polish dub was aired in 1991-1993. (but DuckTales (1987) were first shown in Poland in 1989 with voiceover) After decade the masters for original dub mysteriously lost, a new dub was made in 2004-2005, but it didn't premiere until 2007, when MiniMini shown began to show the 1980's DuckTales series. Henryk Łapiński voiced Duckworth in both dubs.
    • DuckTales is very complicated in Finland: there exists the original TV dub from 1990, and the newer TV dub done in 2013, both under the title of Ankronikka. However, reportedly some episodes also received additional dubs for home video. Both TV dubs were made for Nelonen and reruns of both of the TV dubs air on Fox Finland.
    • The series was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice; once for VHS and again for TV.
    • It also received two Czech dubs.
    • Two Japanese dubs exist: the first done in 1988 and the second in 2004.
    • The pilot episode had two partial redubs in Italian: The first was done for the series's brief Channel Hop to Canale 5, and had Donald Duck's old voice actor Franco Latini replaced with his current voice actor Luca Eliani. The second was done for the release of the series on Disney+: as back then the pilot was dubbed only in the movie format and not as the individual episodes, all the extra scenes that were absent in the original dub were dubbed for the platform.
  • Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers has two Hungarian dubs: one from 1991-93 on TV-1 (though a few actors were replaced in season 2), and again in 2004 for RTL Klub. Éva Vándor (Chip) and Hugó Gruber (Monterrey Jack) voiced their characters throughout both dubs.
  • TaleSpin has two Hungarian dubs: one from 1993-97 on TV-1 and RTL Klub (much like Chip 'n Dale, a few actors were replaced in season 2), and again in 2003 for Story4. Five of the supporting voice actors kept their characters throughout.
    • The series has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for TV (Herbert Richers), and another for VHS (S&C). When the show was added to Disney+, a few episodes were redubbed by TV Group because Disney had lost the masters.
    • For European French, only the theme song was dubbed twice, this was done to match the different titles used for the dub (Super Baloo was used for French broadcasts, and Looping was used for broadcasts in Quebec, Belgium and Switzerland).
  • Care Bears was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese four times. The original and most fondly-remembered dub was made in 1986 for SBT, while the second dub was made for Rede Globo. The third dub was made by SC for home video releases and the fourth dub was made by Double Sound for Boomerang in 2004.
    • The Latin Spanish dub is even more complicated, with the original series being dubbed in Panama, Chile and Venezuela; while the movies were dubbed in Mexico.
  • In order to air on Jeem (Al Jazeera's children channel) Disney movies and series which were dubbed in Egyptian accent were re-dubbed into Modern Standard Arabic (fusha).
  • In Spain and Latin America, it is common to find a different Spanish dub for pretty much every show or movie that airs in both areas, but when He-Man and the Masters of the Universe (1983) aired on TVE in Spain, it did (if not accidentally) used the Latin American version, which was dubbed in Mexico, although it does have a Castillian Spanish dub for Home Media releases.
    • He-Man also received a DVD-exclusive Brazilian Portuguese dub.
  • The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was dubbed into Russian twice. The original was done in 1993 and was last shown in 2005. The newer was done in 2010 by Disney Character Voices International. Rumor has it the redub was due to legal issues with the original translations of the names.
    • The show had its first 11 episodes dubbed in Swedish by Media Dubb from 1988 to 1990. The rest of the episodes were later commissioned during 1991-1993 by KM Studios, which also re-dubbed those same 11 episodes.
    • For unknown reasons, the original theme song was redubbed in Poland for reruns. The episodes were, however, left intact.
    • In Greece, the show aired on Mega in the 90's. Later, several episodes were redubbed for DVD.
    • There are three Brazilian Portuguese dubs. One by Herbert Richers for TV and VHS, one by Doublesound for TV, and one by S&C for a rare VHS release. Gopher (Marco Antônio Costa), Piglet (Oberdan Júnior), and Eeyore (Luiz Brandão) had the same voices in the Herbert Richers and Doublesound dubs. S&C's dub uses the character translations from the movie The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, but with a different voice cast.
  • South Park:
    • Digging around other pages brings up some info about multiple dubs that aired in Mexico and other Latin American countries. The history behind the dub is very complicated, to say the least. Another wiki has attempted to chronicle the alternate dubs and changes in production. To sum it up:
      • The first two seasons have at least three dubs in existence: One for the Mexican channel Televisa, one aired on Locomotion, and a 2011 version aired on MTV. The first two of these dubs were produced simultaneously through 1998-1999.
      • The Mexican dub was produced at the Audiomaster 3000 studio, which was owned by Televisa. This dub is now considered lost to the point where the season 1 opening sequence cannot be found), other than the episodes that have circulated on internet uploads or that were rerun on MTV Latinoamerica. The Audiomaster dub of "Chickenpox" did inexplicably appear on Televisa's season 2 DVD release, while the Audiomaster dub of "Merry Christmas Charlie Manson" is available on a Christmas DVD. Most of the other episodes used the 2011 BVI dub track.
    • Dubbing for seasons 3-9 was passed through two different studios in Miami (Globecast and Kitchen Inc.) when it aired on Locomotion (and then MTV Latinoamerica after season 6), but they kept the voice cast and the director from BVI's version for the most part. Globecast handled seasons 3-5, while The Kitchen took over from the sixth season on.
    • The Kitchen's license expired after the ninth season, causing BVI Communications (the original studio behind the Locomotion seasons 1-2) to acquire it. BVI had first redubbed season 7 as MTV did not have the tapes for the dub, and later redubbed seasons 1, 2, and the season 4 episodes "Timmy 2000" and "Trapper Keeper" (later aired in place of the banned "200" and "201"). Although on the DVD releases, the original Kitchen dubbing of season 7 is the one that can be heard. BVI folded after the first half of season 15, causing Studio Center to temporarily pick up the license before it then shifted hands back to The Kitchen.
    • There are two different versions of "Rainforest Schmainforest": the original by Globecast, banned later on for the Costa Rica mockery, and a redub by Studio Center. There's also an unreleased, third version of the episode that was also dubbed by Studio Center but was considered too profane.
    • There is a French dub of the series that has been ongoing, as well as a short-lived Quebecois adaptation that only covered season 1 (initially only the first five episodes were aired, but the latter half of the season was later shown through reruns). A French dub of the film also exists, along with a more obscure Quebecois dub.
    • In Italy, the SEFIT-CDC Group (based in Rome) dubbed the first four seasons of the show although it underwent some censorship, particulary cutting episodes that had heavy references to pedophilia or mockery of Catholicism ("Cartman Joins NAMBLA", "Do The Handicapped Go To Hell?", and "Probably"). It also contained softened dialogue. After production of the dub was suspended and the show moved channels from Italia 1 to Comedy Central, a new adaptation by ODS was commissioned, starting at season 5 and moving on to cover the rest of the show. As the studio was based out of Turin and not Rome, the entire cast was replaced. ODS would also go back and redub the first four seasons for consistency, including the episodes that were originally cut or heavily censored.
    • The Polish dub originally covered Season 1. In 2011, seasons 11 onward started being dubbed, with only Ike having the same voice in every version.
  • Rugrats has two Italian dubs. One for the defunct Junior TV channel, which covered 52 episodes. The second dub, which aired on Italia 1 and Nickelodeon, covers the whole series.
  • There are two Polish dubs each (the second ones were done in late 2000s for Nickelodeon Poland) for Hey Arnold!, CatDog, Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.
    • CatDog also received two Czech dubs.
  • In Italy, there are two different dubs for all the three seasons of The Transformers and the movie. Seasons 1-2 were redubbed in 2008, with Diego Reggente and Giovanni Petrucci (Respectively Optimus Prime and Sparkplug Witwicky's first voice actors in the original dub) coming back on their characters while Germano Basile reprised his role as Bumblebee from the second dub of Transformers: The Movie. The second dub of Season 3 was originally going to be done along with the first two seasons, but because of many issues they had to scrap that. A new dub of that season was done in 2011 by a cast made by the hosts of Contactoons (a regionally syndicated cartoon program that aired the series in that period), members of a YouTube fan dubbing team, and a bunch of students from a Turinese voice acting schoolnote , resulting in an inferior job compared to the redub of the first two seasons. The same team also dubbed "The Rebirth", which was skipped back then to follow the Japanese continuity with The Headmasters.
  • The Fairly OddParents: Because Nickelodeon does not own the international rights to the show's earlier seasons, Nelvana produced its own dubs in most languages.
    • The Hungarian dub is also complicated. The original dub aired on a channel called KidsCo and was made by SDI Media. The second dubbing, complete with new voices (apart from Erika Náray as Wanda) and name translations, was commissioned by Nickelodeon, and created by Labor Studios. Later, the Disney Channel and SDI continued the series where KidsCo left it off. A number of voice actors changed during the Channel Hop. (Náray's Wanda sounds quite higher in Nick's version). Nick, meanwhile, held onto the Labor dub. Eventually the SDI dub emerged victorious from the duel, as Nick abandoned its own version after barely a season. This time, no recasting of voice actors took place — they just brought over the entire SDI gang.
      • However there are reportedly more shows that, when having aired on KidsCo, received fully new dubbings, confusing many kids in the process.
    • The Danish dub is a wierd case. Both the Disney Channel and Nickelodeon air it, the former airing only the first seasons, the latter airing the newer seasons... which means two dubs, of course! They only share a few voices, which include Cosmo, Wanda, Vicky and Timmy's parents. The opening also has the same lyrics between versions, they're only sung by different actors. But the most glaring difference between the two dubs is that, in the Disney Channel version, Timmy's voice is a teenage-like, low-pitch voice, while in the Nickelodeon dub has a very high-pitched voice. Very ironic and, needless to say, confusing. And to top it all off, both dubs are plagued with inconsistency.
    • A similar situation to the Danish dubs happened in Hebrew:
      • The first dub, which covers Episode 63 onwards and translated rather liberally, was made by Nickelodeon Israel in early 2012. Late Export for You is not in play here, though; these were aired with the original audio and Hebrew subtitles long before.
      • The first 63 episodes (which were briefly aired undubbed on Arutz HaYeladim until Nick set up shop in Israel) were dubbed later in 2012, more faithfully to the original – even compensating for the NTSC-to-PAL-switch-induced pitch rise – and with a completely different voice cast. This dub was originally aired (on all places) on Disney Channel Israel, but later moved to Zoom.
    • The Russian version was handled a lot like the Hungarian version. The show originally aired on KidsCo, instead of TNT like other Nickelodeon cartoons in Russia, and then on the official Nickelodeon channel. The former channel only aired the first four seasons, while the latter aired season five & onwards. Like in Hungary, a number of voice actors changed during the Channel Hop.
    • It was also dubbed in Czech three times. The first dub was made for Supermax (which is now lost), the second for Disney Channel, and a third by SDI Media for Nickelodeon.
    • Poland has two dubs, too. The first one was made by SDI Media and aired on Disney Channel and later Nickelodeon. The other, short-lived dub covering seasons 3-4 was made by Toya Sound Studios and aired on KidsCo (though it was rerun on Disney Channel a few years later).
    • There are also two Arabic dubs, one for Disney Channel and one by Venus Centre for Spacetoon.
  • Rolie Polie Olie was dubbed into Arabic twice. The first one (done in Syria by Venus Company) aired on SpaceToon, while the second one (done in Egypt by Video 2000) premiered on Disney Channel Middle East and later aired on KidsCo.
  • The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World were both dubbed into German twice; once for Super RTL and again for KidsCo.
  • Batman: The Animated Series, yet again, in Hungarian. The original dub was created back when the show initially aired during the 90s on HBO, and is considered a masterpiece by many. In reality, it had its problems, and only covered the first half of the series. This dub was thought to be lost until 2010, when several episodes were reran on television with it (the rest of the HBO episodes are still unavailable). The second dub, made sometimes during the 2000s for a DVD release and later television showings, received criticism for its sub-par casting choices and lazy translation work. This version originally also covered just half of the episodes, and only Alfred and the Scarecrow retained their original voices. Around 2010, certain episodes were broadcast for the first time on the TV station Viasat6 with a third dubbing variant, which recast all the voices. Finally in 2017, the rest of the series debuted on the channel RTL Spike — these episodes used most of the still available voices from the DVD dub and a much improved translation. Despite this, there still doesn't exist a single dub variant that covers all episodes. Some are still broadcast with the old HBO dub, and the bizarre Viasat6 episodes haven't been in circulation for a long time.
    • The show reiceived two Arabic dubs, the first one is distributed by Young Future Entertainment and dubbed by Venus Center for Spacetoon and the second one was dubbed by Image Production House for MBC 3 and Cartoon Network Arabic.
  • Family Guy was aired in Quebec as a European French dub. Fans didn't like it. After the show was Un-Cancelled (and had been running in English), they made a local Quebec French dub starting with season 8. Fans liked it even less.
  • The Flintstones has at least four dub variations in Hungary. The first is the classic... damn, full-on Cult Classic original one, famous for its rhyming dialog — but besides that, the SFX and music were also redone. Thought to be lost for years, until a TV station managed to dig it up recently. The other, still fairly well known dub was made using modern dubbing techniques, still used rhymes, but had a new voice cast. This is the one modern folks are most familiar with. Then, there exists a VHS-only dub, which is very obscure, and again mustered up new voices. Finally, the most recent one, which features yet another complete recast, and this version, for once, wasn't written in verse.
    • For the Swedish version, seasons 1-4 were originally made by Media Dubb. Media Dubb International later dubbed seasons 5-6 for TV3, while the entire series was re-dubbed by Sun Studios for Cartoon Network and Boomerang.
    • In Poland, the series was shown in TVP in 70s, dubbed (by "Studio Opracowań Filmów" in Warsaw). In late 80s, Hanna-Barbera Poland produced in TVP's dubbing studios a new dub for VHS release of some episodes. In 90s, the series was shown in TV again (also by TVP through "Hanna Barbera Hour" block) but this time with voice-over. In 1998 the then-newly launched Polish feed of Cartoon Network started showing a new, third dub which is the only official dub shown in TV since then.
    • There are six Italian dubs of the series. The first dub, from 1963, covered part of season 1. The second dub, from 1968-1975, covered parts of seasons 2 and 3. The third dub, from the late 1970's, covered seasons 5-6, and the un-dubbed episodes from seasons 1-3. The fourth dub, from the 1980's, covered season 4 and the last 8 episodes of season 3. The fifth dub, from the 1990's, re-dubbed a few episodes from seasons 1 and 4; Sergio di Stefano reprised his role as Barney from the second dub. The sixth dub covered a few episodes; this dub aired on Mediaset and was released on home video.
  • The Jetsons was dubbed into Swedish twice. The first was done by Media Dubb for TV3 and Cartoon Network, while the second was made by Sun Studio for Cartoon Network only. Sun Studio's dub renames the characters. (George to Haley, Jane to Stella, Judy to Ella, and Elroy to Olle.)
    • There are two Polish dubs: the first was made by Polskie Nagrania, included on VHS and later aired on TVP2 in 1991 and the second one was made in 1998 for Cartoon Network. The series actually premiered in Poland much earlier (in the first half of 1960s), but it was a Voiceover Translation.
    • It was also dubbed into Hungarian three times. The original dub was made for TV-2 in 1990, the second dub was made for VHS in 1993-1994, and the current dub was made around 2003-2004 for Cartoon Network, Boomerang, and DVD.
  • When Finnish pay-tv channel MTV3 Juniori that focuses on quality children's programming started airing animated series from the 80's and 90's for nostalgic purposes, they had to redub them all, because they were not allowed to use the old dubs made by another channel. The new dubs were also used for later DVD-releases of some the shows. The new dubs were of great quality, but the intended nostalgic effect of airing those shows didn't work out because the familiar voices were replaced.
  • The Animated Adaptation of The Wind in the Willows from the '80s was dubbed twice in Finnish: a dub with one actor playing all the roles released only on video, and one with several actors and aired on TV.
  • The Powerpuff Girls has two Japanese dubs, but only one covered the whole series. The other is fairly obscure (being briefly broadcast on a smaller satellite station), and was called "Powerpuff Girls Underground". For the record, it only lasted 26 episodes. The other dub is far better known, and was even broadcast on TV Tokyo before finishing its run on Cartoon Network Japan. The cast for that dub was also used for the movie and the Christmas special.
  • The Legend of Korra has two Russian dubs made for two different channels, one of which was a Voiceover Translation. Both translations seem to have almost the same script. The 2x2 voiceover only covers the first season, while the other one covers all four. When 2x2 started airing books 2-4, they used the dub instead of voiceover. Strangely, Korra's VA is the same in both versions. Even more strangely, it's the same VA that voiced Aang in Avatar: The Last Airbender dub.
  • Several early-dubbed Latin Spanish episodes from the first two seasons of Bob the Builder ("Bob's Barnraising" and "Wendy's Busy Day" for example) were redone to keep up with the vocal continuity of a few characters. (For example, in the early-dubbed episodes, Muck and Roley's Spanish voices were originally deeper, while Lofty's voice was a tad bit higher.)
    • For the Russian version, only the theme song was dubbed twice; with the latter version being done for DVD releases and subsequent airings on JimJam.
  • Garfield and Friends has two Japanese dubs: one on WOWOW, and the other on Cartoon Network Japan.
    • It also has two dubs in Hungary, one made for MTVnote , and one for RTL Klub. Besides sharing Garfield's voice actor, they're fairly different — the more recent one for example didn't dub the theme song.
    • There were also two Polish dubs: one on Polsat and its related channels (which was basically a Voiceover Translation with dubbed theme songs), and the other (fully dubbed) on TVP1.
    • Brazil has at least three, one in the VHS releases, the best-known one that aired on TV, and a third for the DVD (that only got season one released).
  • The Smurfs has three different Greek dubs. The series was originally dubbed on ERT, but the masters for the original dub were lost and only 45 episodes are known to have been saved. The second dub was mainly used for VHS releases, while the more recent dub first aired on STAR and exists currently on DVD releases.
    • The show also had two German dubs. The original dub was made only for the first two seasons on ZDF from 1983-1984. This dub was widely forgotten (and currently extinct), after the more recent and well-known dub first aired on Tele 5 in 1988. Aside from sharing Gargamel's voice actor, the second dub also featured a new cast and kept Clumsy's English name intact. (The ZDF dub occasionally named him "Trotteli" from the comic books.)
    • The Polish version (known as Smerfy) is a bit complicated:
      • The series was originally dubbed from 1987 to 1999 on TVP. Seasons 1-3, 5, and (partially) 6-8 were done first, while seasons 4 and 9 (and the rest of season 7) were later done in the 90s.
      • In 2005, TVP re-broadcasted seasons 5, 6, 7, and 9 in 2005, but at the time, a majority of the original master tapes were either lost or damaged. So, from 2006 to 2009, seasons 1-4 were redubbed by TVP's personal studio with new voices for some characters (but with the same recording of the theme from the original dub), though some episodes kept their original dub intact. Several episodes that have not received a Polish version yet were later dubbed for the first time in 2010.
    • In Czechoslovakia/the Czech Republic, the show's first five seasons were originally dubbed on the channel ČST from 1988 to 1993. Seasons 6 through 8 were later dubbed from 1997 to 2000 for the channel TV Nova, and then the entire series (including season 9) was re-dubbed in 2010 for TV Barrandov.
    • It also had two Arabic dubs, both made in Lebanon. While the latter was made for the Arabic Cartoon Network (presumably because Turner Broadcasting could not get the rights to broadcast the original, as that dub's rights were held by Spacetoon), the original dub was restored for online and DVD releases.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese twice. The original was done for Rede Globo by Herbert Richers in 1982 and the newer was made for DVD at Dublavideo in 2011.
    • There were also two Turkish dubs as well; both were done for TRT, while the newer was preserved for Cartoon Network.
    • The show also had two dubs in Finland. The first dub was made for VHS releases. It was basically a Voiceover Translation over the Swedish dub with the songs (and the theme) remaining in Swedish as well. The second (fully dubbed) aired on MTV3 Juniorilla.
    • It also has two Serbian dubs (not counting the old RTB voice-over from the 1980s): one in 2009 for TV on B92 and the other in 2011 for DVD.
    • The series was dubbed into Croatian twice, first during its original run in the 80s by TVZ and then a second time later on in the late 90s/early 2000 by HRT. While the first dub is mostly absent from official releases on DVDs and VHS tapes as well as TV re-runs, several season 1 episodes with the original dub are featured on the DVDs and re-runs and the rest are no longer officially available.
    • The show has also received at least four Slovenian dubs. There's the original TV dub from 1987, a home video dub from the early 2000s, the 2011 DVD re-dub by SDI Media, and the 2014 TV re-dub by Studio Menart for POP TV. Most of the surviving voice actors from the 1987 dub reprised their roles in the 2014 POP TV re-dub.
  • The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 has two dubs in Finnish. The original was made in 1998 for VHS tapes released by Finnkino, and the redub was made in 2013 for DVD.
    • It was also dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times. The first dub by Herbert Richers does not use the original background music from episodes 15 to 26, being replaced by Isao Tomita compositions. A second dub was made by BKS for a VHS release. The third dub, made by Uniarthe for DVD in 2006, was negatively received, and Toad was renamed to "Todd".
    • It also has two Greek dubs.
    • There are two European Portuguese dubs as well: one on SIC, and the other on KidsCo.
    • It was also dubbed into Hungarian twice; once in 1993 and again in 2006.
    • It also had two French dubs; with the redub being made exclusively for KidsCo.
    • The show also received two dubs in Spain. The 1st dub is a more accurate translation of the English version, whereas the 2nd dub had many changes and mistakes (particularly regarding to character's names and episode titles).
      • It was also dubbed into Latin Spanish twice; the Los Angeles dubbing is more well-known than the short-lived dubbing from Mexico. The voices from the former dub returned for Super Mario World.
      • On another note, there's also a difference between the Latin American and the 2nd Spain dub title of the series: In Latin America, the duo is known as the Super "Mario" Brothers, with "Super" being an adjective to "Mario" which is their last name, whereas in Spain, they are the "Super Mario" Brothers, with "Super Mario" being sort of their last name.)
  • Most of the Looney Tunes shorts were dubbed multiple times in Italian. Curiously, the DVD sets keep older dubs of some shorts.
    • The shorts were originally dubbed into French during 1962 and then again around 1997.
    • It was also dubbed into Spanish multiple times.
    • The earliest Brazilian Portuguese dubs of the cartoons were done twice during the 1960s by Cinecastro and TV Cinesom respectively. (A comparison between the '60s dubbings of a Bugs Bunny cartoon can be seen here.) The newer dubs were made by Herbert Richers from the 80s to the 2000s. The later dubs are now the most common, with a consistent voice cast aside from some changes (Mario Monjardim dropped Bugs Bunny prior to Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Guilherme Briggs has been Marvin since Duck Dodgers).
  • Justice League has two Hungarian dubbings. The original aired on Cartoon Network, while the newer one (retitled "League of Superheroes") debuted on RTL Klub. Although the voices were recast, the new version features many returning voice actors from a number of previous DC dubs, including the show's very own original dub — for instance the new Superman has already been another Superman, as well as John Stewart in the original dub.
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series got dubbed twice in Germany. The first dub was made for ZDF, who made the series "kiddie-friendly" by removing several episodes and editing the remaining episodes to half-length. When Paramount heard negative talk of the dub from enraged fans in 1994 during the preparations for releasing the series on VHS, they got all the dub voice actors and responsible people that did the second half of TOS (that series got dubbed in two waves, the second one in the late 80's) and made a more faithful dub. This dub is also used on DVD.
    • The animated series was also redubbed into Brazilian Portuguese in 2016.
  • The first season of Space Goofs haves two Italian dubs: one from 1999 and one from 2004. The 2004 one was made for the DVD release and not only features a completely different cast from the first one, but it also uses a more faithful translation compared to the first one, detail made more clashing when season 2 was dubbed by the same cast as the first dub and in the same style.
  • Stōked has two Romanian dubs. One produced by Ager Film in Bucharest for Disney Character Voices International (a Disney subsidary) just for Disney Channel airings and the other one produced by BTI Studio in Oradea for Megamax. The latter dub covers both seasons.
    • It was also dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub was made by Studio Virtual for Disney Channel. The second dub was made for Megamax. The latter dub covered both seasons.
  • The first two seasons of Peppa Pig have received two Polish dubs. The first dub was produced by GMC Studio which is distributed on DVD by SDT Film and aired on Mini Mini+, while the second one was produced by TVP in their own dubbing studios Telewizja Polska Agencja Filmowa. However, starting from the third season the GMC Studio dub also airs on TVP's channels.
    • The Italian dub is usually recorded in Rome, but for some reason the second season was recorded in Turin. That season was redubbed by the usual cast in 2013.
    • The Latin American Spanish dub was originally done in Venezuela in 2006 for Boomerang. When Discovery Kids acquired the rights to Peppa, they redubbed the whole series in Mexico.
  • If this page is any indication, Inspector Gadget has received no less than four Greek dubs - one by EPT that was recorded in-house and first aired in 1985, one aired on ANT1 which was recorded at Studio Lysis for episodes 1-55 and Triton for the rest of the series, one for DVD releases by Dioharis that was also recorded at Triton, and one for KidsCo that was recorded at Sierra Post. The initial dub had two Alternative Foreign Theme Song's (with the main one performed by Panos Tsaparas), cut the Inspector Gadget title card from the intro, and overlayed credits on it. The song used more often was reused for the ANT1 dub, slightly shortened, and then looped to fit the unedited English intro. The result can be shown here. At least one of the other two dubs instead consistently uses the undubbed English opening. As for the closing credits, the EPT dub appears to repeat the opening credits, but with slightly different text, whereas the newer dub retained the English credits and ending, though it's handled differently in different cases. In the ANT1 dub, a voice can be heard giving dub credits. After the last sung "Inspector Gadget" and after the announcer finishes giving the dub credits, Dr. Claw says his "I'll get you next time Gadget. NEXT TIME!" (or equivalent line) in Greek. The same dub that consistently gives keeps the English opening leaves the closing completely undubbed as well. Tasos Kostis, who voiced Gadget in the EPT dub and came up with his Greek Dub Name Change ("Σαΐνης"; which means "genius" in Greek) and voice tone, reprised the role for the Greek dub of Gadget and the Gadgetinis. And to add to all of that, when EPT re-ran the show on the then-ET1, the ANT1 dub was used (likely because EPT no longer had the masters to their dub in their archives).
    • There are two Italian dubs too. The first one was based on the French dub, using the character names from that dub, having a translated version of the French remix of the classic theme song and even had Gadget speaking with a French accent. The second dub was based on the English version.
    • 6 episodes of the 2nd season note  got redubbed in Poland during their rerun (in TVN) and remained that way. The original dub (produced by "Studio Opracowań Filmów" in Warsaw for Eurocom note ) was released on VHS and shown on TVP, both in the same year. Various TVP channels had shown only the first 16 episodes of 2nd season while TVN had shown the whole series (and dubbed the whole 1st season and remaining episodes of season 2 plus those 6 episodes in studio "Master Film"). Currently DHX Media distributes the TVN dubs.
    • There are also two Arabic dubs. The original from the 1980s, made for Tele-Pictures Promoters International S.A., changed the names of the characters, had an Alternative Foreign Theme Song, and was rather cheaply made (as in they didn't use the official M&E track and instead used the original English audio track but overlaid it with Arabic pop music, muting it whenever the characters spoke in English to allow the Arabic voice actors to talk over it). In addition, some episodes had a woman give a preview of the episode to the viewers. The newer one, which is available on the Arabic version of the official Inspector Gadget YouTube channel, keeps the original English theme (but leaves it instrumental) and the original names (and uses the official M&E track).
    • Inspector Gadget (2015) has two Hungarian dubs, one for Boomerang, and another for M2 that was more faithful to the dub of the original series. Gábor Jóo voices Talon in both versions.
  • Babar has three Arabic dubs. One was done by Al-Markaz Al-Arabi Studios in Jordan in the 1980's for broadcast on various regional television stations, and another was done by Venus Company in Syria in the late 90's-early 2000's for Eastern Vision S.A. and Spacetoon, likely because the elements to the original dub were lost. The third one was done by Neo Productions in Egypt (probably for KidsCo). The first two dubs have different theme songs compared to the original version.
  • The Magic School Bus was dubbed twice in Arabic. The first was done by Venus Company for Tele-Pictures Promoters International S.A. and the second was done for Jeem.
    • When the series was added onto Netflix, it was re-dubbed into European Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Japanese, French, German, Italian and Polish. Patrizia Scianca (Ralphie) and Emanuela Pacotto (Janet) returned for the Italian Netflix dub, while most of the Brazilian cast returned for The Magic School Bus Rides Again.
  • Total Drama has three European Portuguese dubs. One was broadcast on the Panda Biggs channel, another for Cartoon Network, and another is shown on RTP 2 channel. The latter dub completely changes the name of the series and of many of the characters to names that are common in the country. The Cartoon Network dub keeps the original names of the characters and keeps the name of the series closer to its original English name. Sandra de Castro appeared in the Panda and SIC dubs, and Ana Vieira appeared in the Panda and Cartoon Network dubs as various female contestants.
  • Dexter's Laboratory had originally an Italian dub made in Rome for its first airing on pay TV, but it was redubbed in Milan for subsequent airings on regular channels, which also replaced the older dub on pay TV. The only episode of the Roman dub still available today is "Chicken Scratch", available as an extra on the The Powerpuff Girls Movie DVD.
  • Top Cat was dubbed twice in Polish. The first was for VHS releases by Polskie Nagrania, and was called Kot Tip Top (lit. Tippy Cat). Because the first dub was incomplete, a new dub called Kocia Ferajna (lit. Catfellas) was made for Cartoon Network's Poland feed.
  • In the Italian dub of Wakfu, Yugo's voice actor was replaced in Season 2, and for some reason they also redubbed Season 1 with the new Yugo voice. Curiously, this new dub of season 1 is used only for airings on Cartoon Network Italy, while airings on the free channel Boing and Netflix keep the original dub with Yugo's first voice.
    • Almost same thing happened with first 8 episodes of 2nd Season of the Polish dub of The Amazing World of Gumball, where they redubbed all of Gumball's lines (by the way in the 1st dub of those episodes, Miłosz Konkel's voice already cracked) in those episodes with his current actor (Jakub Zdrójkowski).
  • Magic Adventures of Mumfie has two German dubs. The first covers the Mumfie's Quest arc and the Mumfie's White Christmas special, while the second half covers the post-Mumfie's Quest episodes, and also had character name changes. For example, Mumfie, who was originally called Mamfie, changed his name to his English one, and Scarecrow changed his name from Vogelscheuche to Strohkopf (which means "blockhead" or "idiot" in Germany.)
  • The Superman-Batman Movie: World's Finest got two different Italian dubs, one for airings inside Superman: The Animated Series and one for the DVD release. The amusing fact is that, while the first dub was done for the cartoon and so uses the regular voice cast for Superman characters while giving new voices for the Batman cast, the DVD version was dubbed in Milan, and so used the regular cast from Batman: The Animated Seriesnote  with new voices for Superman characters.
  • In the early years of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, the promotional DVDs with demo dubs of "The Ticket Master" were distributed across the Europe and Latin America. (The Greek and Quebec French demo versions were hosted on the respect local editions of official MLP website.) The voice cast (and of course, dialogue translation) in those demo dubs are different from later-produced broadcast dubs. The Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian dubs in the discs distributed across Baltic region are perhaps the only versions in these languages with multiple voice performers: the versions broadcast on TV each have a single voice actress narrate over like TV news interpreters. But other than that...
    • In some of Central and Eastern European languages, there are dubs each produced for Minimax and various other channels (notably Serbian with Mini Ultra; the Mini Ultra dub also aired on the public TV channel RTS 2). Hungarian has the same episodes redubbed, all broadcast on Minimax. In Slovenian, there are two versions each produced for Minimax and free-to-air generalist Pop TV.
      • The Hungarian dub notably redubbed the episodes where Babs Seed and Derpy Hooves were accidentally voiced by men, as well as some of the ponies' singing voices in Season 2.
    • There are two Cantonese versions of the show: one is first released on DVDs and then broadcast on PCCW's Now Hong Kong and Viu TV; the other, uploaded by Hasbro Hong Kong's YouTube channel, has some of character and location names in English remain intact, and some songs sung in Cantonese (sometimes, the YouTube channel seems to upload some episodes from the formernote  dub, where all the names are translated in Chinese, and the singing part of the songs in English are kept).
    • Not counting the demo DVD, the Croatian dub first arrived on the scene in November 2014, airing on HRT 2. Three years later - in November 2017 - RTL Kockica began airing the show as well with an entirely new dub, providing the country with two dubs of contrasting qualities (the original, for example, came with strangely common audio mixing errorsnote  while the newer one does its best to avoid them).
  • SpongeBob SquarePants has two Norwegian dubs: the first one from 2000, the second one from 2006. The reason for the redub was due to complaints from some parents to NRK (Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) that SpongeBob's original voice was annoying. As a result, since the first movie retains the older voices, the Blu-Ray release of said film presents it in English with Norwegian subtitles, as not to confuse modern viewers (or likely because Paramount Norway couldn't redub the movie with the new voice actors due to them being busy with the current dub and other projects) note .
    • The series has two Turkish dubs: one for CNBC-e, and another for Nickelodeon. Oya Prosçiler voiced Sandy Cheeks in both dubs, while some of CNBC's voice actors returned for the first movie.
    • SpongeBob has a whopping 8 Persian dubs.
      • Several only covered a select few episodes. For example, Asia Resane Cinema Home Entertainment's dub only covers four episodes from season 9. Glory Entertainment's covers 22 episodes from 5 seasons. It was released between 2014 to 2017. Homa Media's covers only 2 and a half episodes.
      • IRIB TV 2's dub is one of only two dubs to be official. It covered 2 seasons and was released from 2011 to 2016. The other official dub is MBC Persia's, which started at season 9.
      • Parsian Studios' dub is the only complete dub, and has gained infamy on the internet for its poor censorship and the fact that it has been used for military propaganda. No, we're not kidding.
    • There have been two different Serbian dubs: the first was the B92 dub which was produced from 2003 to 2017 and covers the first 10 seasons, and the VSI dub which airs on the local Nickelodeon branch and covers seasons starting with the 11th. The old dub became famous in Serbia for it's many Woolseyisms, to the point SpongeBob was the most watched program on the channel quite a few times. Among general audiences. Naturally, when the second dub came along (which is a much more straightforward translation of the English script) the fans were not amused and there have been fairly regular outcries to bring back the old cast ever since. The movies are a weird case: the first one ran either in Croatian or with subtitles in theaters, the second one was dubbed by the B92 team and the third has two dubs: one for Netflix by the B92 team and the other for theaters by the VSI/Nickelodeon team.
  • The Transformers: Rescue Bots episode "Big Game" has two Hungarian dubs, for some reason. Originally part of Season 3 in the US, the episode (along with "Land before Prime") was rescheduled to air during Season 2 in Hungary to make up for two missing episodes. It then received a new dub when airing as part of Season 3.
  • In Russia, The Ren & Stimpy Show had two translations. There was a dub that aired on TNT and Nickelodeon in the mid-late 2000's, and a more recent Voiceover Translation on Paramount Comedy (the Russian equivalent of Comedy Central). The Russian channel 2x2 aired the Adult Party Cartoon version of Ren and Stimpy with a Voiceover Translation, including the banned episode "Man's Best Friend" and the unedited pilot "Big House Blues".
  • Muppet Babies has two Polish dubs: the first made in 1986 which covered only the first 26 episodes and the second made in late 90s that covered the whole series.
  • Hungary released six episodes of The Batman and its movie The Batman vs. Dracula on DVD in 2005. The channel RTL Spike produced a second, full dub of the show in 2017 with a new voice cast.
  • The Super Mario Bros Super Show! received two Norwegian dubs. The first one was made for VHS and dubbed only the animated segments, while the second dub was made for airing on Fox Kids and also included the live-action segments. The episode clips from The Legendof Zelda were left out in both dubs.
  • When Cartoon Network premiered in the Czech Republic in 2017, it could not acquire the rights to the dubs produced by České televizie (the country's national broadcaster). So CN produced its own versions of Adventure Time (keeping Jan Maxián as Finn), The Amazing World of Gumball (keeping Mojmír Maderic as Richard), and Regular Show.
  • VeggieTales was dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese three times. The original dub was made during 1996 by Audio News. The second dub was done by the same studio around 2004-2006, and the third dub was made during 2007-2008 by Herbert Richers.
    • The show was also dubbed two times into Spanish. The first dub was done in Chile by DINT Doblajes Internacionales, while the second dub was done from 2006-2008 by HCJB - Televozandes in Ecuador with two episodes dubbed at BVI Communications, Inc. in Miami. While both studios that did the second dub used the same lyrics for the theme song, the dialogue was retranslated when BVI dubbed the episodes.
  • The Little Lulu Show has two Mexican Spanish dubs: one that aired on HBO in the United States, and another for Cartoon Network Latin America. Eduardo Garza appeared in both dubs, but as different characters.
    • The show also has two Greek dubs.
  • Season 1 of The Real Ghostbusters got a second Italian dub when came on Netflix.
  • Goof Troop has two Polish dubs; one made in 1994 for TVP1 and the second made in 2006 due to Disney Channel launching in Poland.
  • In late 2018, Sabrina: The Animated Series got an Italian redub for the upload on Amazon Prime Video.
    • The show also received the second Polish dub on Amazon Prime Video.
    • There also exists two Russian dubs.
  • Mickey's Christmas Carol received two Norwegian dubs. The first one was made in the early 90s for the VHS release, while the second one was made in 2001 for the House of Mouse Christmas special where the short was featured in together with other shorts.
    • There are also two Italian dubs. The second one was done in the 90's when Disney chose a new voice cast for the classic characters and asked to redub everything with those voice actors. In a confusing way, later remasters use the newer dub but have dub credits for the original one.
  • There exist two Norwegian dubs for Dennis the Menace. The first one aired on the channel NRK and was latter released on VHS. The second one aired on Fox Kids and was latter released on DVD. When the TV channel TV 3 got the rights to air the show they used a mix of both the Fox Kids and NRK dubs, where they used the NRK dub on episodes Fox Kids had not dubbed into Norwegian. Norwegian actor Trond Brænne would appear in both dubs but as two diffrent characters. The first one as Henry, while the second one as Mr.Wilson.
  • Arthur had two Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one made in Rio de Janeiro (VTI/Herbert Richers) that aired on TV, and another made in Sao Paulo.
  • Clifford the Big Red Dog was re-dubbed into several languages (including Brazilian Portuguese, Italian and Polish) when it premiered on Prime Video. The Brazilian dub is an odd case, as the old dub was made by Vox Mundi in São Paulo and the new dub by Dubbing Company in Campinas, but since the talent pools of São Paulo and Campinas have a good overlap due to both cities being an hour apart from each other, it's safe to say both dubs used the same larger talent pool.
  • Rick and Morty has two Polish dubs: the first one made for Netflix (covering all the episodes) and the second one made for Comedy Central (covering first two series). Actors Anna Apostolakis and Przemysław Stippa appeared in both, with Stippa reprising roles of Mr. Meeseeks and Zeep.
  • Wolves, Witches and Giants got two Norwegian dubs. The first one was made for airing on the Channel TV 2, while the second one was made for the DVD release.
  • The classic series of Fireman Sam has two Norwegian dubs: one that was aired on television and one that was made for VHS tapes released by Viking Media.
    • There also seem to exist two Croatian dubs: one for an unknown channel that has an Alternative Foreign Theme Song and the more recent one for HRT.
    • Also for some reason, in addition to the well-known Polish dub for TVP, there exists a lesser-known voiceover translation.
  • Sylvanian Families has two Norwegian dubs, one made for the VHS release and the other one for airing on Fox Kids.
  • The first four seasons of Thomas & Friends has two Norwegian dubs. One for TV and one for VHS. Interestingly enough, Trine Lossius Borg who did the narrator voice in the first two seasons of the TV dub also voiced the narrator in all four seasons of the VHS dub.
  • Space Ghost Coast to Coast: When the show first aired, a Latin-Spanish dub was produced by Turner Broadcasting System in Los Angeles at Springwest Productions. In 1999, after six seasons were dubbed and Turner was purchased by TimeWarner (now called Warner Media), a new dub was commissioned by Warner Bros. at the Venezuelan company Etcetera Group, who had already established a relationship with Warner (with notable examples of their work for them being the 1990's Warner Bros. Saturday morning cartoons (including Animaniacs and Tiny Toon Adventures), the DCAU (which, at that point, consisted of Batman: The Animated Series and Superman: The Animated Series) and Beetlejuice). The LA dub is mostly forgotten about (though it has been seen on the TBS broadcast), while the Venezuela dub has been credited as cementing Warner's partnership with Etcetera, which still continues to this day.
  • Redwall has two Russian dubs: one by the SV-Kadr studio for TNT and one made by Ukraine's Pilot studio. The Pilot dub was made as part of a larger incentive by companies to produce quality Russian dubs of TV shows using cheap Russian-speaking Ukrainian talent (a notable other example being the early seasons of Pokémon: The Series, also dubbed into Russian by Pilot)
  • Street Sharks has two European Spanish dubs - one by Studio XXI in Galicia and one by Alta Frecuencia in Seville. The second dub has almost all the characters speaking with Southern Spanish accents, and the result was somewhat odd. There were a few changes in the script (notably, the main characters still adress themselves by their real names, and Dr. Piranoid's name is really Piranoid, from the start), and it's curious to hear how Piranoid is the only character in the show without a Southern Spanish accent.
  • Postman Pat: The 2004 series has at least three Polish dubs: one by TVP (which continued the tradition of Talking to Himself from previous series, as Jerzy Kramarczyk still voices all the characters in this dub), one by Start International Polska for CBeebies, and one by Master Film for MiniMini.
  • Make Way For Noddy has two European Portugese dubs. The first, Abram Alas para o Noddy, aired on RTP and Canal Panda in 2002, while the second, Aí Vem o Noddy, was made for JimJam in 2016.
  • Johnny Bravo has two Hungarian dubs. The first aired on the channel TV2 around the turn of the millennium and only covered the early episodes. This dub is considered lost, the sole fact still known about it is Johnny's dubbing actor (József Kerekes). A second dub was produced in 2007 to be aired on Cartoon Network, Boomerang and Viasat3. Despite being more recent, the 2nd dub featured plenty of oddities and inconsistencies, for example the crossover episode with Scooby-Doo used neither the voices, nor the established terminology from the otherwise relatively consistent Hungarian Scooby dubs.
  • The Adventures of Tintin (1991) has two Italian dubs: the first one was done in 1992 and aired on Rai Uno, while the second aired from 2011 onwards on Italia 1 and Boing and is now available on both Netflix and Prime Video.
    • There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs. The original dub by Herbert Richers, which aired on television for many years, is very well-remembered. When the series was added onto Netflix, it was re-dubbed in Miami.
  • Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines has two Brazilian Portuguese dubs. The first version was done in 1970 by TV Cinesom, with Domício Costa as Dastardly and Muttley, Henrique Ogalla as Zilly and Luiz Carlos de Moraes as Klunk. The second version was done in the mid-1990s by Herbert Richers, with Jorge Lucas as Dastardly, Luiz Carlos Persy as Muttley, Marcelo Torreão as Klunk and Henrique Ogalla reprising the role of Zilly. As of now, the 1990s dub is easily available for viewers, being the version featured on DVD and most of the TV reruns, while the original 1970 dub has become considerably rarer, appearing only in a few occasional cable TV reruns.
  • Billy the Cat was dubbed in Italian twice, in 1996 and in 2011.
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