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From left to right: Suneo, Nobita, Doraemon, Shizuka, and Gian. Click here to see their 1979 anime designs 

"Hey there! My name is Doraemon! I'm a super-sized, gizmo-ized, gadget cat from the future! I get sent back in time to take care of this guy, Noby, but he's a mess! And that's where I come in! To save the day with an amazing invention from my fourth-dimensional secret gadget pocket! But things never turn out as planned! Get ready, 'cause here we go again!"
Doraemon explains the premise in the Doraemon: Gadget Cat from the Future opening
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Doraemon is one of the longest running anime series and the most successful work of Fujiko Fujio. The title character, Doraemon, is the quintessential example of the Robot Buddy: he is a robotic cat from the future sent back to help the socially inept Nobita Nobi through the use of futuristic technology (known as Dogu, Japanese for "tools", or gadget) produced from his Fourth Dimensional pocket. Typically, the devices are used to impress his love interest Shizuka Minamoto or humiliate the bullies Takeshi "Gian"note  Goda and Suneo Honekawa. Inevitably, there is some form of Phlebotinum Breakdown, and Nobita must sort through the root problem himself. The overused story arc is somewhat of an artefact of the series' origin during the 1970s, criticizing Japanese society's increasing over-reliance on superfluous technology.

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The characters also go on epic adventures in Doraemon's Long Tales and the films based off of them. All of these stories ended up being so many in number, and just so dang popular, that Shogakugan had to make a magazine to give the manga a permanent place to stay— which ended up becoming kodomomuke manga haven CoroCoro Comic, with Doraemon himself serving as Series Mascot to this day.

After a brief and unpopular animated series in 1973 by Nippon Television, Doraemon remained fairly exclusive in manga form until 1979 when a newly formed animation studio, Shin-Ei Animation (now owned by TV Asahi) produced an anime series of Doraemon. This series became incredibly popular and ended with 1,787 episodes on March 25, 2005. Celebrating the anniversary of the franchise, a new Doraemon series began airing on TV Asahi on April 15, 2005, with new voice actors and staff, and updated character designs.

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Even though it's not really popular in the west, Doraemon is a very influential series in the east. For example, in 2002, Doraemon was featured along with Aung San Suu Kyi and Hamid Karzai as one of the 22 heroes featured in a special edition of Time Magazine on Asian Heroes. In a truly surreal moment, Doraemon has been designated by the Real Life Prime Minister of Japan as the Ambassador between the cartoon world and Japan, with the ceremony including a to-scale model of Doraemon.

In 2014, it was announced that Disney XD would air an English dub, made by Bang Zoom! Entertainment, of Doraemon five days a week as part of a block for elementary-aged children. And thus, Doraemon made a premiere on American televisionnote  after three decades of trying so. Despite achieving cult status, the dub's ratings massively declined and were put on indefinite hiatus after two seasons. Nevertheless, the American premiere of the franchise was a big deal in both Japan and the US - so much so that the edited American episodes were actually dubbed back into Japanese "as is" and aired on Japan's Disney Channel.

As of 2019, an Indian English dub is airing on Disney Channel India.

For a list of Doraemon episodes, see its recap page here. For a list of movies and other adaptations, see its franchise page here.


Doraemon provides examples of:

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    A-D 
  • Abandoned Pet in a Box: There are a few episodes revolving around them.
    • In one episode, Doraemon helps Nobita secretly care for a box of puppies/kittens. After some failures to find adequate places for the pets, Doraemon and Nobita send them to the past where there is plenty of space, and no human or any other dangerous animal threatening them, so they can live on their own. To provide them a source of food, Doraemon also leaves a food-producing machine to the pets and makes a dog slightly smarter to operate the machine by evolving it using the gadget Evolution-Degeneration Beam. Later, Doraemon and Nobita return to 1000 years after the time they put the abandoned pets in, only to find that the dogs and cats have become humanoid, gained the ability to talk, and built a sophisticated civilization with high technology, all due to Doraemon leaving the Evolution-Degeneration Beam in the past and the pets using it to perform a fast evolution on themselves. However, those dogs and cats have decided to leave the Earth to another planet because they've predicted that the Earth will be facing a world-wide disaster.
    • Another episode is about Doraemon helps a box of abandoned kittens feed themselves by setting program for them to catch mice at a set time at someone's house so that people will offer food to them as a reward afterwards.
  • Absence of Evidence: Sometimes there are impossible cases that cannot be solved normally due to the usage of gadgets.
    • Prime examples in the gold coin's robbery case which the culprit is Doraemon who used Time Machine and later, Suneo's kidnapping case.
    • A darker example appears in Gian's murder case in which Suneo creates a theory of Gian's voice being used to murder a music school's principal. According to him, it will be a perfect murder as killing with Gian's voice definitely wouldn't leave any evidence behind. In the end, it was used merely as a "Before" and "After" comparison for their newer ad, with Gian's singing serving as the "Before".
  • The Ace:
    • Dekisugi. Not only he is the smartest kid in the school, but he is also very athletic, has many other talents (like cooking and drawing), a Nice Guy, and a Chick Magnet. He's even called "Ace" in the Disney XD dub. In the Toyota commercial, he appears on TV as an Olympic athlete.
    • Shizuka is the second-best in this case: very smart too, a Dude Magnet and a very Nice Girl, very good at school, and a responsible daughter who is often implied to be good at cooking. But she lacks the numerous talents that Dekisugi has, sometimes struggles with The B Grade compared to Dekisugi's always perfect scores, and can't play the violin.
  • Ad-Break Double-Take: There are two in the American English episode "Experimental Dream Schemes". The first is during Noby's pirate dream when Big G appears as a pirate to attack Noby's pirate ship, and the second is when Doraemon warns Noby that he's broken the Dreamplayer and can't wake up from his dream because of it. Ironically, neither instance actually has a commercial break placed in-between them.
  • Adaptation Expansion: Many episodes from the anime that are adapted from the manga are extended to reach a conclusion or give good moral to the story. A notable one is "Mind Reading Helmet" which never reached conclusion in the original manga.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: In the 1979 anime series, Shizuka's hair color is brown rather than black. It was changed back to black in the 2005 anime series. Similarly, Gian's skin tone is the same as everyone else in the original manga while all the adaptations have him tanned.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness:
    • One of the 2005 anime's notable features. An example is that Nobita starts off as plain (when he compared himself to Dekisugi). In 2005? He's revealed to have quite nice eyes under that glass.
    • Shizuka starts off as kinda cute in the original series, but later becomes much prettier (even more so in the 2005 anime).
    • To make his Chick Magnet status more justified, Dekisugi is more handsome in the 2005 anime (he has a better haircut) compared to his character design in the 1979 anime where he was just as plain-looking as Nobita.
    • The remake episode of the Lying Mirror makes this more pronounced.
    • Noramyako, Doraemon's former girlfriend used to look like this in the original and in the remake, she now looks like this and also become Ascended Extra and Took a Level in Kindness too.
  • Animation Bump: Many late 1979 anime episodes saw a huge bump in animations after switching to digital animation in the early 2000s. The episode 490 of the 2005 anime ("The Old Man and the Elephant" in particular) also saw a nice increase in animation quality. Along with updated art direction that starts with this episode.
  • Aesop Amnesia: It takes a long time for any lessons to stick to Nobita (and of course, he often jumps to the wrong conclusion as well).
  • Ageless Birthday Episode: Sue's age is never given in "Worst Birthday Ever".
  • All Men Are Perverts: Anytime that Shizuka is shown in stripperiffic outfit, you can expect that the boys will be quite eager to see it. Yes, including Doraemon and Dekisugi.
  • Alternative Continuity: The 2005 anime's continuity may be truer to the original manga compared to the 1979 anime's continuity. For example, the circumstances of Doraemon's birth in the manga state that he was originally yellow, and until after an accident that involved a mouse eating his ears off (then Noramyako laughed at him because he was earless), he fell depressed enough that his tears made the yellow paint to fade into blue. This was retold in the 2005 anime-original intro and expanded in an entire episode; however, the 1995 movie-special changes some important details as such that Doraemon was originally blue, and that he was kicked off the assembly line and that it broke him.
  • Alternative Foreign Theme Song:
    • The English dub uses a different intro from the Japanese version in which Doraemon explains the premise of the show.
    • The Italian dub has two entirely unique theme songs. The first theme song was made in the 80s, the second comes with the redub made in early 2000s, it's the one most people are familiar with and it stills airs on television these days (for both original series and remake).
  • Alphabetical Theme Naming: You can tell if any characters are related to the main gang or not with Nobi-, Shizu-, Sune-, Jai- , and Deki-.
  • American Kirby Is Hardcore: The American dub of the 2005 anime is like this. The dub emphasizes more on the episodes that are action-oriented and mostly lacks the episodes that focus on heartwarming relationships. Even the background music in the dub is much more upbeat and action-oriented compared to the calm and lighthearted background music in the Japanese version. Not surprisingly, the season 2 promo heavily emphasizes on the action aspect of the dub.
  • And You Thought It Was Real: One episode involves the cast getting ready to fight a bunch of Mole Men after one of them had a premonition that they were invading the surface. Turns out, it was just shooting for a movie.
  • Animated Adaptation: Three of them, in fact — one that is one of the longest-running shows in history, and an immediate reboot after it ended that will probably go on to match it. And a 1973 anime that we don't talk about. And 30+ movies.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: A lot of chapters involve Doraemon giving life to inanimate objects, usually with the intention of it just being temporary.
  • Animation Age Ghetto: In "Defender of Justice: Masked Me!", Noby is a fan of the superhero Masked Me, and Doraemon thinks that he's too old to watch kids' shows. invoked
  • Applied Phlebotinum: Doraemon's dimensional pocket full of "Dogu".
  • April Fools' Plot:
    • An April Fool's plot beginning when Nobita uses the excuse of April's Fools to avoid getting beaten up by Giant for tricking him. Giant then asks if he's sure it's April 1st, causing Nobita to doubt if it's actually April 2nd, so Giant gets the right to beat him up. When all said and done, Giant revealed that it's REALLY April 1st so he gets away for bluffing Nobita about the date.
    • Another episode started with Gian, Suneo and Shizuka playing April Fool's jokes on Nobita. One of the jokes include his house is on fire, so he has the right to be panic being the paranoid kid he is. Enraged by his friends fooling him, Nobita pleads to Doraemon for a device that makes its user able to make all April Fool's joke become reality. And since this is Nobita we're talking about, he's going to abuse it for his own good.
    • The plot point of the Retcon used by the manga (first story in Volume 7) and the second part of the two-parter anime special to bring Doraemon back. After getting tricked by Gian and Suneo that Doraemon has returned (and a couple more pranks) due to it being the said date, Nobita remembers that Doraemon has left behind a special box that would grant him one more gadget that should only be used in case of an emergency. The box grants him a potion that would make anything he says become a lie. He quickly uses it to unleash revenge on Gian and Suneo, but then on the way home, muses about the prank Gian and Suneo pulled on him and how Doraemon would never return. Naturally, Doraemon returns at the end of the chapter/anime.
    • Another peculiar case is the episode in the manga where Nobita gets from Doraemon a gadget that allows him to change the data as he wishes. Nobita obviously abuses it to change seasons in order to try to go to the pool with Shizuka or shifting between Christmas and New Year's Day to get gifts and money, and as a result the gadget stops working and Earth stops spinning and starts to move towards the Sun. Doraemon manages to solve everything by fixing the gadget and changing the data to April 1, retconning the apocalypse to his April Fool's joke on Nobita.
  • Arm Cannon: One of Doraemon's gadgets is an arm cannon that can shoot blasts of air to blow people away. He uses the arm cannon in "My Best Friend Doraemon" to blow Big G out of the way while he is under the control of Sneech, who is using the Buddy Beacon to make him his best friend.
  • Art Evolution:
    • Early in the manga and the 1973 series Doraemon's proportion varies, especially concerning his head and eyes. It took a while for him to look like the Doraemon that fans are more familiar with.
    • Initially the 1979 series barely looked any different from the 1973 one art style-wise, but around late 1981 the characters were redesigned to look chunkier as indicated by the image above. The 2005 series is closer to the later manga in style, but retains their height from the previous series.
    • Amusingly, one of the reasons they rebooted the anime series in 2005 was to give the character designs a quick makeover and to let some of the voice actors retire after 30 years of the same roles.
  • Artistic License – Biology:
    • Invoked in "Fossil Fools", which is about Noby and Doraemon making impossible fossils and pretending they really found them.
    • Sewashi plans at the start of the series about changing Nobita's life and "Transportation Logic" clearly is not possible. To elaborate; by changing the past and having Nobita marries Shizuka, Sewashi will cease to exist due to the fact that the Sewashi who is Jaiko's great-grandson and the one who is Shizuka's great-grandson is not the same person due to genetic differences. Unless of course, Nobita never married Jaiko in the first place.
  • Attack Reflector: In the episode "The Human Piggy Bank", when Nobita wants to get his money out of the Hypnotizing Bank, which hypnotizes anyone who comes near it, he uses a mirror to make it hypnotize itself.
  • Audible Gleam: In "Experimental Dream Schemes", at the beginning of Noby's "Chase the Sun" dream, when Sue, Big G, and Sneech find Noby, his mouth twinkles and has an audible gleam.
  • Audience Participation: Japanese viewers can use their TV remote to play Rock–Paper–Scissors with Doraemon (sometimes other characters) in the 2005 anime.
  • Bad Future: While not as extreme as some examples, if Nobita continues to live his life the way he does now, his life will fall apart so badly that he will end up a penniless laughing-stock, in so much debt that he will need to work for a century to pay it off, and married to Gian's sister.. It's also a bad future to Jaiko too, as, in the better future, she would have become a successful manga artist instead.
  • Badass Adorable: All of the Doraemons. But particularly Wangdora and Dora The Kid.
  • Bag of Holding: Doraemon owns one - Other robots similar to Doraemon also seem to have one as well.
  • Bait-and-Switch: In "Sequence Spray", Noby uses the Sequence Spray on a photo of Sue and Ace. The resulting scene shown in the picture makes it look like they're about to kiss, until Noby uses the Sequence Spray again to reveal that Ace just noticed a leaf in Sue's hair.
  • Balloon Belly: In the reboot's take on the classic "Memory Bread" story, Noby uses the Bread slices to copy the notes taken for homework. This backfires when he decides to have a snack in-between while studying with Shizuka, which makes him feel sick when he tries to eat another slice of Memory Bread. It doesn't help that Noby's mom made a special dinner with a lot of shrimp, which Noby eats anyway, and he ends up so stuffed that he's ready to explode.
  • Bamboo Technology:
    • A name-only example. The iconic take-copter literally means a "bamboo helicopter". However, it was named as such only because its namesake is from a Japanese toy under the same name. Which is a small bamboo stick with propeller blades and if you spin it in your hands, it will fly for a short while. This gadget, on the other hand, is not made from bamboo whatsoever. Completely averted in the English dub where this gadget's name is shortened to "Hopter".
    • Somehow implied in the episode where Nobita and Doraemon visit a planet which is basically a Bizarro World. Not only that Doraemon of that planet is a Gender Flipped version, the gadgets she pulls out look like they have been around for a really long time. This suggests Doraemon of this world may come from the past, instead of future.
  • Banana Peel: At the end of the episode "The Not So Lucky, Lucky Cards!", the person who winds up with the deck of cards, which now consists of only the joker card, ends up slipping on a banana peel and falling into a sewer.
  • Barbie Doll Anatomy: Averted quite a bit is in the original manga and 1979 anime from the late 80s where Nobita's penis and Shizuka's nipples are seen countless times. It is, however, important to note that the manga is completely lacking in Fanservice outside of Parental Bonus — all nudity is Played for Laughs. Played straight in the 2005's anime remake when the censorship is stricter.
  • Batman Can Breathe in Space: Doraemon has multiple gadgets that allows one to breathe in space without a suit.
  • Beach Episode: Several. Some which Suneo doesn't invite Nobita or Doraemon (but they find a way to join anyway.) Nobita and the Castle of the Undersea Devil itself is an undersea episode.
  • Behind a Stick: Nobita tries this quite often, but he fails.
  • Big Ball of Violence: In "The Action Planner", the Action Planner kicks up a big cloud of dust when he attacks Doraemon while trying to get him to stick to Noby's schedule.
  • Big Fancy House: Suneo's house. He always brags about how large his house's yard is, so large that it has a pond.
    • Nobita's house in "Deluxified", thanks to the gadget Deluxifier, it's so fancy that it's actually a Big Fancy Castle.
  • Bigger Stick: Doraemon's not terribly powerful on his own, but his gadgets grant him various powers up to Reality Warper levels. His losses are often due to his opponent neutralizing his gadgets in some way. For example, in Nobita and the Birth of Japan as Doraemon fought the Big Bad:
    Doraemon: No way... How could the latest stun-spear of 22nd century be defeated?
    Gigazombie: This is the latest model from the 23rd century!
    Doraemon: Damn, I lost by a century... *faints*
  • Big Guy, Little Guy: Gian and Suneo. Though the leader role usually belongs to Gian, since Suneo is scared shitless of him.
  • Binocular Shot: In "Rub-a-Dub-Dub, See the World from a Tub!", Doraemon spots Sue in the Bathmobile while looking through binoculars, and a shot of her through the binoculars is shown.
  • Birthday Episode: Every major character has had episodes about their birthday.
  • Bizarro Universe: Happened in one episode when Doraemon and Nobita enter and explore a mirror planet and interact with their counterparts. This planet is literally mirrored of having mirrored writing and east is west. Other differences include reversed gender roles showing Nobita's mom as the breadwinner, all males dressed as females, and different teachings in school. Nobita and his counterpart decide to swap roles for a day.
  • Black Bead Eyes: Usually reserved for fat characters like Giant and Nobita's father. Averted in the 1979 anime. This returned in the 2005 anime where the art style is (slightly) closer to that of the manga.
  • Blush Sticker: The cloud creatures from the episode "My Own Golden Cloud" have permanent blush stickers.
  • Book Dumb: Nobita gets bad grades but can be pretty smart at times, just look at the creative ways he uses Doraemon's gadgets!
  • Bowdlerise:
    • This happened to any episodes or movies except those during the mid-1979 anime series.
    • The manga often shows how bad Nobita is after being maimed, usually by Gian. The anime often tones down this. Both often played for Amusing Injuries except for that Series Fauxnale.
    • The English dub that airs on Disney XD is this. One notable example of this is that in certain episodes, Nobita or the other characters end up naked due to Doraemons' inventions or another reason. Due to catching up with the times, the only nudity from the remake is from the back, showing their butts in Japan. In the Disney XD English version, however, their backsides are completely censored, despite the fact that it aired shows like Kick Buttowski and others that occasionally showed characters naked from the back and despite having cartoons on other networks showing characters naked from the back with little to no outrage from anyone about it.
  • Buried Alive: At one time Nobita misuses a gadget that lets him hide in anything to cause mischief. When it malfunctions, he is unable to get out, and start to worry about buildings crashing on him or being stranded forever (even with an image of his skeleton remains included). Cue his friends putting up a victorious arm fold on the spot he's hiding.
  • Broke Episode: One episode has Suneo's family gone completely broke on his birthday, as part of Suneo's birthday wish (after having his friends left his birthday party, thanks to Suneo being snooty), using What-If Phone Box. Even when he's poor, he's still a snob. Leading him to ask Doraemon to turn his life back to normal, due to his friends still despise him for being a snob.
  • Broken Aesop: The Woodcutter's Pond. The moral of the fable is that one should always be honest. A device that exploits this morality tale by allowing you to upgrade junk into good stuff by telling the truth...is about as far from honest as it gets.
  • Bruiser with a Soft Center: Gian, especially later movies where little touching moments can make him cry more than anybody else.
  • Bully and Wimp Pairing: Gian and Suneo could be considered this as they generally appear together.
  • Butt-Monkey:
    • Nobita. So much that one of his descendants has to send him his robot to help to deal with that. Not that it's getting any better.
    • Doraemon himself is a Butt-Monkey from times to times, especially around the time the series started.
  • The Cameo: In some anime episodes, there are characters from other Fujiko Fujio works as Perman and Esper Mami.
  • Cartoon Cheese: The show has conveniently held this kind of cheese. This trope is international. This is most likely due to American (especially Disney) influence in early anime.
  • Casting Gag:
    • Some of the voice actors who were in the 1973 anime returned to voice different characters in the 1979 anime version, such as Kameta Kimotsuki (Gian) as Suneo, Yoshiko Ohta (Nobita) as Sewashi, and Noriko Ohara (Tamako Nobi, Nobita's mom) as Nobita.
    • Tomokazu Seki voiced a younger version of Suneo in a late 90s TV Special inspired by "Memories of Grandma", before being officially cast as Suneo for the 2005 anime.
  • Casual Time Travel: Time travel is extremely commonplace in Doraemon's universe. Apparently everyone can afford a Time Machine in the future. As a result, many lunatics have the idea of using future tech to exploit and alter the past, which calls for the existence of Time Police.
  • Censor Steam: In a twist from the manga's Barbie Doll Anatomy subverting roots, recent episodes do this with Shizuka whenever she's taking a shower. This has not escaped the notice of the series' long time (40+ years) fans.
    • In the Disney XD English dub, this is used in the episode "Transformade" (dub title) to cover up naked Noby (Nobita) so all nudity from the back, which was in the Japanese version is all gone, both in his own form and when he accidentally transforms into naked Sue (Shizuka-chan).
  • Challenging the Bully: In one chapter, Doraemon has to go back to the 22nd century because his duty has been "fulfilled" (i.e making Nobita happy), but he's reluctant because he comes to care about Nobita too much. Nobita tries to prove that he doesn't need Doraemon anymore, one of the methods being challenging the local bully, Gian. While Nobita is badly beaten, he keeps coming after Gian, who ended up getting scared of him because he just won't back down. This at least convinces Doraemon to go back "home".
  • Chekhov's Time Travel: Doraemon himself comes from the 22nd century with a time machine to help Nobita in his school days. At least in some episodes/chapters, Doraemon and/or Nobita has to solve the problem of the day by going to the past or future with said time machine.
  • Chick Magnet: Doraemon who managed to capture many cats' hearts, Dekisugi, Nobita in the movie for Creme, Suneo during his (VERY) brief stint as a pop star (episode "The Rich Kid Mambo"), Miyoko and possibly Riruru. Doranichov and finally Wang Dora who tends to get beat up by Mimiko.
  • Child Prodigy: Nobita becomes one in the episode "The Life Do-Over Machine", where he uses the eponymous machine which allows him to do over his life while keeping the mind of his current self. As a result of this, he is able to write kanji and do multiplication at the age of four. This eventually backfires on him, though, as Doraemon points out that if he were to grow up like this he would actually be worse off than his normal self - since he's super smart, he starts to lose interest in actually doing his schoolwork, causing him to become much dumber than he had expected.
  • Chronic Pet Killer: An episode begins with some goldfish in Nobi's resident die again, causing Doraemon to solve a problem by using the special paint that can create multiple types of pet from rocks.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Early in the manga's run, there was a character named Gachakko, a female robot duck that pestered Doraemon and Nobita. The character stopped appearing due to the creators' dislike towards her, and consequently none of the manga featuring the character was reprinted. Gachakko also appeared in the 1973 anime, but not in the 1979 and 2005 anime.
  • Classical Antihero: Nobita is a total loser, a crybaby, and a lazy bum who prefers using tools to cheat than trying to improve himself, but he is naturally a kid with a gentle heart who can be brave and reliable when he needs to.
  • Closet Sublet: Doraemon sleeps in Nobita's closet.
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander: Nobita. He sincerely believes in outlandish things such as that the dinosaurs are still alive. Of course, he is right "every" time...somewhat.
  • Comic-Book Time: The series has outlived the creators, and yet poor Nobita is still in the fourth grade.note 
  • Consummate Liar: Lying is second nature to Suneo. He literally cannot go a day without lying about something, which bites him in the ass when he was given a device that makes all his lies true.
  • Continuity Nod: 40 years of chapters leads to quite a few of these.
  • Cool Car: Suneo's cousin has one and thanks to Doraemon's gadget, Inanimate Object-Hypnotizing Megaphone, it becomes a garbage truck.
  • Cool Gate: One of Doraemon's recurring gadgets is the "Anywhere Door", which when walked through brings you to any location you tell it, as long as you made sure you worded your request carefully.
  • Cool Ship: The Time Patrol's ships, which not only could travel through different timelines, it could also phase through solid matter if need be.
  • Compound Interest Time Travel Gambit: Nobita has Doraemon do this in an attempt to get a better allowance; though he does earn a buttload of interest, the bills are in future currency, so it only nets him a modest increase when it gets exchanged for present-day bills.
  • Cowardly Lion: Despite being generally considered a coward among his friends, Nobita is shown to be quite brave in dangerous situations, mostly in the movies. The Dirty Coward role is given to Suneo instead. Fridge Brilliance when you realize that his star sign is Leo.
  • Cranial Eruption: In "Action Quiz", both times Big G hits Noby, the latter gets a noticeable bump on his head.
  • Creator Cameo: There are some appearances of Fujiko F. Fujio.
  • Crossover:
    • Has had several over the years. They are mostly crossovers with other Fujiko Fujio works, but there are some crossovers with other series, such as Super Mario Bros.
    • Tamagotchi has the toy Doraemontchi and the functionally-equivalent Doramitchi.
  • Cultural Translation: The English dub of the 2005 series replaced most of the Japanese cultural icons and items with objects that were familiar to American young viewers. For example, yen notes were replaced with dollar bills, chopsticks with forks, and Japanese text with English text, and Doraemon's Trademark Favorite Food, dorayaki, were referred to as "yummy buns."note  These edits, though they were condemned by many purists, were somewhat justifiable, since many American elementary school children were unlikely to be familiar with some of the Japanese cultural items (such as a dorayaki). The setting was changed to America as well. It should be noted that these Americanizations were insisted upon by TV Asahi, who wanted to increase the franchise's chances of success in America.
    • The Korean and Vietnamese versions are this as well.
    • The Latino Spanish dub of the anime calls dorayaki "galletas" (the Spanish word for "cookies").
    • In an early Thai release of Doraemon, Dorayaki is referred to as "Fried Flour". This gets reverted back to Dorayaki in the later release.note 
    • Several (probably bootleg) Chinese translations go as far as localizing Nobita's home country as Taiwan (without changing any of the aerial shots that clearly show them living in Japan).
    • The only thing done in the Tagalized dub of the 70's series is dorayaki being referred to as hopia (There are some hopia that resemble dorayaki), and at one episode, the Tokyo Tower being referred as the broadcast tower of GMA-7! (To be fair, it was a shout out to the said channel airing the 70's series in the Philippines, and never mentioned again afterwards.)
  • Custom Uniform of Sexy: Whenever the main cast play dresses up in a Sentai fashion, Shizuka will end up wearing a different outfit - often more revealing one.
  • Cut-and-Paste Translation: The English dub for Doraemon for the U.S. broadcast contains some elements of this. While most of the edits were more or less justifiable, some of the edits are rather erroneous due to strict U.S. broadcasting standards. A first-aid kit is replaced with a pizza,note  Nobita's stream of tears being removed, some instances of sweet snacks being replaced with fruits, note  and a doll replaced with a book, causing a rush to judgment among American otaku. It's worth noting that unlike the now-defunct 4Kids Entertainment, these edits are being done by the Japanese side of things, and the edits don't have a major impact on the story, so rest assured, they're trying their best to translate their baby to an American audience.
    • The animation edits however are done in South Korea in order to keep costs down; The animation edits are done by Studio Mir (yes, that Studio Mir). Mir also did the edits for the Korean dub of Doraemon as well.
    • Despite this, the English dub doesn't change certain Japanese names like Matsushiba, certain objects native to Japan or even censor guns.
    • The introductory episode for the English dub was cut from a later episode in which Noby was having a flashback to when he first met Doraemon. But, again, this is justified since most American audiences aren't familiar with the premise of the show and the episode explains how Noby and Doraemon met.
    • Surprisingly enough, season 2 kept in all of Shizuka's bath scenes and even aired an episode centred around it. Shizuka is given a bathing suit to compensate though. Shizuka's reactions to Noby and Doraemon seeing her in the bathtub were accordingly rewritten from her calling them both perverts to her attacking them because she's offended at their suggestion that she needs a bath.
  • Cute Kitten:
    • He doesn't look much like one, but Doraemon is a robot cat. He had cat ears once upon a time, but they were chewed off by a mouse when he was sleeping. Poor guy is now terrified of them.
    • His sister Doremi invokes this trope full force.
  • Dancing Theme: One of the renditions of "Doraemon no Uta", the opening theme.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • The 2005 anime has its moments. Best illustrated with "The Girl Who Loved Nobita", and at first simple story, but it's full of villains who sent Lulli to kill Nobita for indirectly foiling his ancestor's attempt to hack the military. When she overcome their control, they tried to bomb her along with Nobita, which caused her to sacrifice herself to put them down.
    • Early The Doraemons spinoff manga is this, with more emphasis on action and life-threatening hijinks.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Doraemon and Suneo are the snarkiest, though Nobita also has his moments.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: Doraemon: Nobita and the Knights of Dinosaurs would become Doraemon: Nobita and the Dragon Knights if the Japanese title was to be translated directly.
  • Disneyfication: In one story, after Nobita tells The Little Mermaid unmodified to his little cousin, she wails without a break. To make her happier, Nobita attempts to Disneyfy the story by entering the story world and making Sophia and the prince together Happily Ever After. He succeeds, yet his cousin still cries, this time for the changed ending.
  • "Do It Yourself" Theme Tune:
    • The main characters get to sing the theme song "Doraemon no Uta" for the 40th anniversary of the anime series.note  Doraemon himself also get to sing other songs from time to time. Most notably "Boku Doraemon".
    • The characters sing the theme song in the Spanish dub of the 2005 series.
  • Downer Ending: Most episodes for Nobita. There are a few exceptions though.
  • Dreadful Musician: Gian has a horrible, devastating singing ability. Shizuka plays the violin as bad as Gian's singing. Heck, one episode even has Suneo make up a conspiracy theory about a guy using Gian's voice for assassinating people which is, fortunately, not true. And in the movies, his singing drove away a group of sirens, an accompanying whale monster, and, in another unrelated occasion, knocks out two battling giant monsters. And in the 2005 remakes, one of the special episode involves combining both of their "talents" to defeat the Dracula Robot in the future where they play/sing for the ENTIRE earth!
  • Dream Episode: "Livin' the Dream" is about Doraemon using a dream director's chair to direct one of Sneech's dreams to Noby's liking.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: This scene in the 2005 episode: Reversal Arrow.
  • Dub Name Change: The English comic and show change most of the names of the characters and items.

     E-H 
  • E = MC Hammer: In "Experimental Dream Schemes", as Noby's Dreamplayer dream starts to malfunction, Princess Sue from his earlier sci-fi dream tells him to solve some math problems. The math problems written on the chalkboard are entirely nonsensical ones such as "monkey + dog - cat =", "ABC + DEFG =", and "sunflower x watermelon =".
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • In the first one year and six months of the 1979 series' broadcast, It was a 10 minutes daily anime series, airing one episode each day. (saved for Sunday) Until 1981 when it became a half-hour weekly anime, airing two episodes each week (with some weeks airing one episode as a two-parter) until the series ended. And the background of the title card was originally yellow before they changed it to a different colour with Doraemon being animated.
    • The early episodes of the 2005 series also bear resemblances to the 1979 series in term of character designs at times.
    • Early on, Doraemon used to have the ability to turn invisible by pulling his tail. His tail later changes to function as a power switch after several gadgets that could turn the user invisible were introduced.
    • If you watch the first episode of the 1979 anime, "Nobita's Dreams Town", you'll see a random, unnamed tall guy that was friends with Gian and Suneo, he never shown up again until the series' finale. He is however occasionally shows up in the manga along with a nameless fat guy to serve as random extras.
    • Doraemon is more of a Butt-Monkey in his earlier appearances. This is reflected on how he was drawn during the early days of the manga's run.
    • Nobita's voice sounded much more different in the early episodes of the 2005 anime than how it is now. It was higher pitched and levelled. His height also seemed shorter, when in later episodes, he's taller. He also didn't wear his usual yellow shirt. This also goes for characters who had slightly different designs, voices, and clothing.
  • Edutainment Game: Several for the Game Boy Color, and several for the Sega Pico and Advanced Pico Beena.
  • Embarrassing Damp Sheets: In "The Insect of Ignorance", Nobita reads Suneo's diary and finds out that he is a bedwetter.
  • Episode Title Card: The 1973 anime have Doraemon holding the title card. While both the 1979 anime and the 2005 anime have a few variations over the years.
  • Everybody Laughs Ending: Several episodes, usually at the expense of one (or more) character. If it's not Nobita, it will be Gian or Suneo or both of them.
  • Everyone Chasing You: Happens often to Nobita due to misusing a gadget and an episode sometimes ends with this.
  • Everything's Better with Dinosaurs: Noby's Dinosaur is all about this.
  • Excited Show Title!: In the Hindi dub, every single episode title ends with an exclamation mark.
  • Expy: Some of Doraemon's gadgets are very similar to gadgets from other series, either in function or in appearance. For example, the What-if? Box is a red telephone booth that can essentially jump dimensions.note 
    • The character designs in the anime and manga shares a template with many of the Fujiko duo's other creations. Take, for example, Kiteretsu Daihyakka. From the character design perspective, they all look almost the same. The only twist here is that Nobita's counterpart in Kitretsu, Eiichi, is a Child Prodigy while Doraemon's counterpart, Korosuke, is bumbling and incompetent. The other characters are pretty much carbon copies of Gian, Suneo and Shizuka.
  • Elaborate Underground Base: One of Doraemon's gadgets allow to create one of these instantly. It can be big enough to become a city of its own, which Nobita then exploit to create his own dictatorship (Played for Laughs). However, one of the movie deals with the sinister encounter with The Reptilians when Nobita and co Dug Too Deep...
  • Eyelid Pull Taunt: In "Noby, the Great Illusionist", Sneech taunts Noby by doing this when the latter asks for his Cardosaur trading card back.
  • Face on the Cover: The cover for the first manga volume is Doraemon's face.
  • Fairy Tale Motifs: All over the place, Most notably "Doraemon: Nobita's Mermaid Legend" follows the basic plot/theme of "The Little Mermaid" in Sophia's arc to a Happily Ever After.
  • Family Theme Naming: Pretty much all the male Nobis are named after their last name: Nobita, Nobisuke, the other Nobisuke, Nobirou, Nobiru...
  • Fanservice: Shizuka naked in the bath (or in the shower) and her Panty Shot scenes. Downplayed in the remake.
  • "Fantastic Voyage" Plot: An episode features the title character and Nobita going inside Shizuka's body to retrieve a diamond she accidentally swallowed.
  • Fartillery: Multiple times.
    • One manga episode deals with Nobita trying to come up with a neat trick for a New Year's talent show. Doraemon gave him a bunch of sweet potatoes that, when eaten, produces melodic 'gas'. Unfortunately, Doraemon forgot to tell him not to eat more than one at a time...
    • Another episode deals with the "Strengthening Gas", a gas that when sprayed on a body part, strengthens said body part. When Gian heard about this, he demanded Nobita spray it all over his body. Unfortunately, after one spray on the butt, the gas ran out. As Giant was about to beat Nobita, he farted and said fart launched him to the sky.
  • Fat Bastard: Gian, who else? He does get some Character Development over the series' run, however, turning into a big guy with a temper, especially in the movies. In some episodes, Bochako counts too.
  • The Federation: The Space/Time Patrol Squad. The Space division generally concerns itself with intergalactic matters in its relative present, while the Time division acts as Time Police.
  • Fictional Holiday: Nobita once uses one gadgets to declare "Do Nothing Day". Hilarity Ensues.
  • Fire-Breathing Diner: Dora-nichov, one of the spin-off characters has the ability to transform into a wolf when he looks at a moon-like object and can breathe fire when eating something spicy.
  • First Contact Faux Pas: In one story where an alien scout ship was sent to earth, the (mini) ship comes across Nobita and Doraemon watching a kind of Super Sentai-like show where they beat up aliens and the aliens in the scout ship concludes that Humans Are Warriors who are too violent for further contact.
  • Fleeting Demographic: Young children, though adults can still get a good laugh out of it.
  • Floating Clocks: Nobita's desk drawer is linked through some kind of hyperspace that, with a special vessel, you can use to travel through time. Said hyperspace has a lot of distorted clocks flying around.
  • Flying on a Cloud: In the episode "My Own Golden Cloud", Doraemon catches a cloud creature for Noby to ride so that he can avoid being late for school. As usual, Noby is still late for school because he didn't have time to practice riding the cloud.
  • Foregone Conclusion: Every single episode concerning Nobita and Dekisugi's rivalry will end up badly for the former.
  • The Foreign Subtitle: The American English dub is titled Doraemon: Gadget Cat from the Future.
  • Forgotten Phlebotinum: One of the most Egregious examples. There are several predicaments that Doraemon and co. face that one of his gadgets that have been mentioned in previous episodes could have easily get them out but for some reason, Doraemon seems to have to use the gadget that was introduced in the episode they were in. One the early gadgets of the week (chapter 54, "Lies Become Truths") was a beak-like toy which one could wear, and anything uttered while using it will be spontaneously proven as fact. Nobita lied that his father can shatter a huge rock with his bare hand, and then he can do it with ease. Quite frankly this should have made any other gadget Doraemon had introduced, or will ever introduce, completely and utterly obsolete. It was never mentioned again ever since. Particularly frustrating in Doraemon feature films and volume-length comics, which featured life-threatening situations.

  • "Freaky Friday" Flip: Played out several times, usually with Nobita trading places with Shizuka. Needless to say, it turns out that Nobi is just as big a loser no matter whose body he's wearing. Worse still, Shizuka decides she actually likes being a boy and refuses to give Nobita his body back. She only relents around bathtime, when she suddenly realizes exactly what Nobi will see whenever "he" removes "her" clothing.
  • Freeze-Frame Ending: "Battle of the Dueling Nobys" ends with a freeze-frame of Doraemon and Noby.
  • Full-Body Disguise: In "Noby, the Great Illusionist", Noby uses a full-body disguise of Sneech's mom to retrieve his rare Cardosaur trading card from Sneech. He does the same thing to retrieve his Beast Mask comic from Big G by disguising himself as Big G's sister, but Big G doesn't fall for it and Noby runs away in panic.
  • Furo Scene: Shizuka spend much of her free time bathing. And almost every time she gets in the bath, Nobita (sometimes Doraemon, Gian or Suneo) ends up accidentally walking in thanks to Doraemon's gadgets.
  • Generation Xerox: Every single one of Nobita's ancestors (including his father) is a loser with no backbone who is constantly bullied by Gians and Suneos. This gets swapped with Nobisuke (Nobita's son), though, as he is the one who bullies Gian and Suneo's sons. Also, it seems that they all have Nobi somewhere in their names.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: As noted above under Censor Steam, the Disney XD broadcast dub managed to somehow get away with a naked Shizuka joke.
  • Gilligan Cut: Inverted. In one of Disney Channel India's English-dubbed episodes, "Welcome to the Haunted Inn", the Hazy Inn's owner gladly says he'll do his best to prepare food for his guests. Cut to the next scene, he informs Nobita, Doraemon, and Shizuka that he only has enough food for them and it would take a long time to be able to feed everyone in the inn.
  • Girl Next Door: Shizuka, to all three boys — but especially to Nobita.
  • The Glasses Gotta Go:
    • Nobita eventually has eye surgery and fixes his eyesight. In 1979 anime, however, he gets to keep his glass.
    • 2005's anime show that in the young days Nobita's mom looks very good when removing her glasses.
  • Gonk: Suneo and Gian, while not absurdly ugly, are certainly not handsome. Their designs are substantially different from the designs of the other main and background characters, and other characters have often described them as being quite ugly. However, due to the art style of the show, they don't really look all that ugly and may even be cute to some.
  • Gratuitous English:
    • The Hindi dub uses little bits of English in many of its episode titles.
    • The Japanese song "Happy ☆ Lucky Birthday!" has the English lyrics of "Happy Birthday to You".
  • Gratuitous Spanish: In the American English-dubbed episode "Rub-a-Dub-Dub, See the World from a Tub!", when Sue is sent to Spain in the Bathmobile, Noby says "Off to Spain!", and Doraemon replies with "Vaminos!" (Spanish for "Let's go!").
  • Hammerspace: Doraemon's pocket holds a ludicrous amount of gadgets, several of which (such as the Anywhere Door) is much bigger than even Doraemon himself.
  • Happy Birthday to You!: "Happy ☆ Lucky Birthday!" starts out as a standard version of "Happy Birthday to You" before it turns into its own unique song.
  • Hit Flash: Two appear in "Action Quiz" both times Big G hits Noby.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Nobita's attempts to solve his problems with the help of Doraemon's gadgets pretty much always end up making things worse.
  • Human Cannonball: One gadget, the Youzooka, is a big gun that can be used to shoot people into the air.
  • Hypno Pendulum: One of Doraemon's gadgets, as shown in "Doraemon's Time Capsule", is a wand that acts as a hypnotic pendulum that can hypnotize even artificial intelligence such as robots.
  • Hypocritical Heartwarming: One episode is about Doraemon taking a day off, hoping Nobita would be able to take care of himself without him. Unsurprisingly, Gian and Suneo tell Nobita that he can't do anything without Doraemon, and deliberately mess with him to get him in trouble. However, after seeing Nobita being picked on by two older thugs who were ready to beat him up, they decide it's too much and try to defend him, telling the thugs to leave their friend alone.

    I-L 
  • I Am Not Weasel: A running gag: when someone first meets Doraemon, they think he's a tanuki. This makes Doraemon really mad since he's a robotic cat without ears.
  • I Heard That: In "Action Quiz", Big G says that the Action Quizzer's problems are hard enough that only a really smart person would be able to answer them correctly. Noby comments he wanted to choose Ace as his helper because of this and Big G yells "HEARD THAT!" and hits Noby.
  • Iconic Outfit: A yellow shirt and black shorts for Nobita, a pink dress for Shizuka, and an orange shirt with the letter "G" on it for Giant. As a whole, the series typically averts the Limited Wardrobe trope though (without going into Unlimited Wardrobe territory).
  • Idiot Ball: Many characters hold it, in order to make the repetitive plotlines work.
    • Nobita is the biggest offender, combined with endless Aesop Amnesia. In every episode, he makes the same mistakes that always end up blowing up in his face, over and over again.
    • Gian and Suneo are a close second. Every time Nobita shows a surprising talent/ability/power that he didn't have before, they are shocked. This, despite that fact that they know everything about Doraemon's reality-warping gadgets and they also know Nobita uses these gadgets all the time. Yet Nobita manages to fool them for a good part of the episode and only towards the end, they come to realize that maybe this has something to do with Doraemon's gadgets.
  • Identical Grandson: Taken to ridiculous extremes. All of the main cast has almost-look-exactly-the-same parents, siblings, relatives, ancestors and descendants.
  • In Space, Everyone Can See Your Face: In "Experimental Dream Schemes", during his science fiction dream, Noby's face is clearly visible through his space helmet.
  • Inconsistent Dub: The English comic and show aren't consistent with each other's titles. An example would be 'Big G's Special Stew' in the comic and "Big G: Master Chef" in the show.
  • In Spite of a Nail: Nobita's still going to have the same grandson even though he's marrying someone else. Unless it's a Stable Time Loop.
    • Though some may speculate that Nobisuke doesn't have to be the son of Nobita and his wife.
    • Then again, it may just be that Nobisuke in all timelines takes strongly after his father.
    • There are also several plausible theories that Sewashi fabricated the photo album that he showed to Nobita in the first episode. Notice they said this in the very first manga chapter that even if Nobita changes his wife, Sewashi will still be born and it is just like getting to the destination by a different method of travel.
  • Incredible Shrinking Man: Doraemon has various gadgets with this effect like the "Small Light", a flashlight that can shrink objects and people to minuscule sizes. Another tool that is used in a similar capacity is the "Gulliver Tunnel", which causes a person to grow or shrink depending on which entrance they take; however, its ratio of shrinking and enlarging is fixed.
  • Ingesting Knowledge: In one chapter, Nobita eats a special kind of bread that lets him remember anything printed on it...until he poops it back out...
  • Instant Bandages: Several times. For example, in "The Action Planner", Doraemon suddenly gets bandages on his head after the Action Planner attacks him while trying to get him to stick to Noby's schedule.
  • Instrumental Theme Tune: The early episodes of the 2005 series use an instrumental version of "Doraemon no Uta" as the opening.
  • Interspecies Romance: In the 25th movie Doraemon has his love interest Sharmee. Sure they're both cats, but let's not forget Doraemon is also a robot. So this is technically played straight.
    • Doraemon has a neighbor cat named Michan as his girlfriend during the normal time.
    • Previously, Mii chan was a toy cat. Although mechanical at that, so not too much of an example if you think about it. Ended with the Unsettling Gender Reveal.
    • Also in The Doraemons Special series, in a few story arcs, being robot cats doesn't stop the Doraemons from getting human love interests. Examples are:
      • Dorarinho had Uno during the Dinosauroid arc and in a limelight chapter of his, he had Izami who even turned out to be a guy no less.
      • Doramed fell in love with Queen Supika of the Kouzai Kingdom that results in a very sad scenario.
      • Also, Matadora had Iris during the Medusa arc and also Ship Tease with Carmen, his boss's daughter.
      • Doranichov fell in love with an Ill Girl named Mari who wanted to watch Milky Way as her last wish before she die, the Little Mermaid Princess which he chose to give her happy ever after with the prince, and his current girlfriend is Nina, a songstress.
  • Introductory Opening Credits: The opening of the 2005 anime has many variations, one of them being the five main characters introduced with their names in the background in big roman letters.
  • Invisibility Cloak: Some of Doraemon's gadgets are capable of invisibility. Fujiko F. Fujio was mindful of why true invisibility and vision didn't mix, and so the ones that can be applied to humans mostly work on perception filters. For example, the 'Blind Spot Star', which makes the image of the one who wears it always fall on the others' blind spot, and the 'Pebble Cap', which makes the one who wears it as unnoticeable as a pebble at the side of the road.
  • It Tastes Like Feet: In the American English version of "Big G: Master Chef", Sneech mentions that Big G's food tastes like feet as he is eating it.
  • Jacob Marley Warning: It's Doraemon's raison d'etre to stop Nobita from becoming a Future Loser, but occasionally, Future Nobita himself appears to whip his younger self into studying diligently. These are some of the most unsettling episodes since Future Nobita knows his past-self's tricks and possess Doraemon's future gadgets.
  • Jerkass: Some adult characters are downright assholes. For example, when Nobita comes across a box full of abandoned kittens, a mean-looking man nearby accuses Nobita of bringing the little ones there, then chases the boy and forces him to bring the box away.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Nobita (defaults to selfish and lazy), Gian (defaults to mean and bullying) and Suneo (condescending and a liar) can definitely come across as jerks, but in the end, they're still good-hearted kids who are capable of caring about others, which is much more profound in the movies.
  • Karma Houdini:
    • One episode has Nobita using Microphone Interviewer Gadget to find out about a relationship between two actors which cause mayhem but ultimately brought the two of them closer and avoided a scold from Doraemon because of this.
    • Most of the time Gian bullies Nobita and gets away with it. Even if Nobita temporarily gets back at him with Doraemon's gadgets, he (and Suneo) will still be back on top by the end of the episode. He also steals and breaks Suneo's toys and gets away with it because Suneo is terrified of him.
    • Again in "Victory Cheerleader Pompom". Nobita uses the gadget on Tamako to avoid the scold from Nobisuke. The gadget allows the user to win anything with the cheer from the wearer that is female.
    • Believe it or not... there is an item from the future that creates Karma Houdinis called "The Devil Passport". Nobita would do something horrible and if it flashes it to the nearest person he gets away with it. Subverted as eventually, Nobita does feel guilt for all the bad things he got away with and the guilt makes him make amends for it.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: Mrs Goda is pretty much humanized of this trope for Gian.
  • Kid Detective: At least one episode has Nobita becoming Sherlock Nobita and using the Sherlock Holmes Kit to solve a mystery.
  • The Kiddie Ride: Unavoidable. All made by Namco Bandai under the Banpresto brand, there's a Doraemon time machine ride with an interactive screen and buttons (actually, there are two versions of the time machine ride- the one with the interactive screen mentioned, and an older, smaller version of the ride that lacks the screen), a Giant Doraemon that fits two kids and move in a spinning motion (also having an interactive screen and buttons), a Doraemon pirate ship (again, with an interactive screen and buttons), one with Doraemon sitting on a cloud with the rider, and a fire engine with Doraemon on it. Again, sadly, officially they're No Export for You and can only be found in Japan, although like other Japanese arcade machines they've been unofficially exported to other Asian countries via grey-market imports. Aside from that, however, there are also dozens of Chinese-made unlicensed knockoffs which are sadly, much more prevalent.
  • Kissed Keepsake: In "The Connection Cap", Noby uses the Connection Cap to meet the celebrity actress Serra Ivy. She holds Noby's hands, and he is very flattered and exclaims that he'll never wash his hands again. Serra comments that doing that would be very unsanitary.
  • Landing in Someone's Bathtub: A Running Gag is that Shizuka never gets a bath without Nobita, Doraemon, Gian or Suneo accidentally entering with the Everywhere Door or other like gadgets.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Pretty much every episode that Nobita misuses Doraemon's gadgets.
  • Late for School: Nobita, frequently. Some episodes have him finding a way to avert this with varying degrees of success.
  • Latex Perfection: In "Noby, the Great Illusionist", Noby uses a Full-Body Disguise of Sneech's mother to retrieve his rare Cardosaurus card from Sneech, and later uses a similar disguise of Big G's sister to retrieve his Beast Mask comic from Big G. Both times, he uses latex masks of whoever he is disguised as that fit perfectly over his head.
  • LEGO Body Parts: Several gadgets have resulted in characters' heads being swapped with each other, such as the Switcherator from the episode "Invasion of the Body Swappers!".
  • Lethal Chef:
    • Gian's cooking is just as bad as his singing. Or maybe worse. The most common result is food-poisoning. He even accidentally poisoned himself in one episode, much to the relief of his friends.
    • Annie, the daughter of the sheriff of the planet where Dora the Kid protected is also one. In her case it's lethal Food Porn.
    • Nobita himself as well, as illustrated in the "Home-Ec Apron" episode when he and Dekisugi compete in a fried-rice cook-off. Nobita had been using one of Doraemon's gadgets to make himself an ace at housework (including cooking), but the gadget short-circuits and Nobita's true culinary ineptitude is exposed. Nevertheless, Shizuka, realizing how hard Nobita worked on it, manages to get it all down.
  • Letterbox: Inverted. When some classic episodes air on Boing, they are zoomed in and the top and bottom are cropped off to make the show match a 16:9 TV screen.
  • Licensed Game: Unavoidable, but some were surprisingly good.
  • Lighter and Softer:
    • Almost all of the Big Damn Movie and video games, no matter how dark it is, portrays the kids as True Companions with little to none of the Jerkass attitude exhibited in the regular show or manga. And the movies usually have a Happy Ending instead of the sometimes Downer Ending of the regular episodes.
    • Later volumes of The Doraemons manga are also this and also Denser and Wackier compared to the earlier ones, focusing more on wacky future school hijinks instead of battles against sinister villains.
  • List Song: The song "The ABC’s of Class-F" includes a list of Fujiko Fujio characters and their abilities:
    He's here! He's here! From the sky comes Perman!
    No way, telekinesis?! Esper Mami!
    Inventing smiles, It's Kiteretsu and Korosuke!
  • Literal Genie:
    • In one of the chapters of the manga, Doraemon introduces a robot that tests the purity of the heart of a person and grants the person 3 wishes if they're worthy. Gian and Suneo find out when the robot grants Shizuka three wishes and arranges to trick the robot into thinking them worthy. Greed then overcomes the boys and both use their final wishes to turn each other into anthropomorphic pigs during a heated argument.
    • The Anywhere Door can be a bit of this when requesting locations (for example, "I want to go camping somewhere high" will result in you stepping out into the air).
    • Several other tools are similar, including one that "makes the listener believe anything".
  • Living Toys: A lot of Doraemon's gadgets can bring toys to life, in various ways. The most famous one is probably the wind-up key that serves as the focus for one movie, that permanently gives life to any object shaped like a living creature that has the key placed on its back and turned. The heroes use it to populate a planet with various adorable living dolls, but one monkey doll steals it and brings to life a biology lab skeleton, a "peeing boy" fountain, and a panda mascot. All three of them use their unique skills/appearances to help defeat the villains in the climax.
  • Loud of War: Gian's singing is so bad, everyone's scared of it. Suneo even posits that his singing can be weaponized. This is particular how Gian wards off Enthralling Sirens and make the Sea Monster faint in the original Doraemon: Nobita's Great Adventure into the Underworld manga and movie.

     M-P 
  • Made of Evil: Angolmois from Doraemon: Nobita's Drifts in the Universe is suggested to be this, as he has powerful Psychic Power despite being assembled with primitive components.
  • Magic from Technology: The Anywhere door, the What-if? Box, etc.
  • Magic Skirt: Shizuka in the 2000s remake series to tone down the fanservice.
  • Makesome Noise: In one chapter, the device of the day is a potion that "solidifies" one's voice. When Nobita shouts "Aaah", the letters AAA (in Japanese) flies out of his mouth. He has used it to shout at Giant and Suneo, knocking them out, as well as shouting towards walls to make the solid voice bounce off towards himself, giving him the ability to fly.
  • Male Frontal Nudity: All three lead boys. It's natural for boys of their age though, and not sexualized in any way. In the 2005 remake, this is mostly averted, as any frontal nudity is always covered, either by a Scenery Censor or them covering up with anything they can find
  • Marilyn Maneuver: Several times to Shizuka with natural wind or often caused by Doraemon's gadget.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: There is a gadget called "Boygirl" that cause this effect. It is a spray which has the ability to make boys girlish and girls boyish.
  • Massive Multiplayer Crossover:
    • This commercial for Fujiko Fujio Land has characters from many Fujiko series, including Doraemon.
    • Characters from numerous Fujiko Fujio works appear together in the Doraemon song "The ABC’s of Class-F".
  • Meaningful Name:
    • Nobita's name means "to grow up and be strong". His Chinese name uses the kanji for "big hero"
    • Shizuka's name means "quiet, silent". Her parents want to grow up and be a kind and caring girl.
    • Gian's name comes from "Giant", he's the largest of the main cast. His real name "Takeshi" means "warrior".
    • Suneo's name contains the kanji of "lord". His Chinese name uses the kanji for "little lord".
    • Dekisugi's name means "overachiever". His English name is Ace Goody.
    • Wangdora's name contains the kanji for "king". He's The Ace of Doraemons.
  • Mind-Control Device: Several gadgets of Doraemon have this power. Every in different ways.
  • Missing Mom: In the 1973 anime. Gian's mom is dead even though in the manga and the later anime series, his mom is still alive.
  • "Mission: Impossible" Cable Drop: In "Noby, the Great Illusionist", to retrieve his Beast Mask comic from Big G, Noby has Doraemon hold him by his cape when they use the Pass Loop on the roof of Big G's house so that he can dodge some bells attached to strings set up by Big G.
  • Mistaken for Apocalypse: Happen in a rather long story. In short, Nobita found that in the near future there is no one in the neighborhood and several ant-like aliens roam it. Thriller adventure ensued, but after everything is done (by sheer dumb luck!), it turns out that everyone is just watching a movie shooting session featuring a famous actress somewhere else.
  • Modesty Towel: Shizuka sometimes after her usual bath. One occasion also has the towel fall down while she is on the phone with Nobita and Doraemon (that has added a video option to phone).
  • Monster Roommate: Doraemon sleep in Nobita's closet.
  • Multi-Part Episode: Several episodes are this.
  • Naked People Are Funny: All nudity of the boys and Shizuka's constant bath scenes... technically not Fanservice (most of the time), instead they're Played for Laughs.
  • Name and Name:
    • Used for the dub Albert and Sydney.
    • Used for 21 Emon & Doraemon: Welcome to Hotel Tsunesha.
  • Negative Continuity:
    • The comics never bother to keep track what sort of gadgets Doraemon has pulled out of his Fourth Dimensional Pocket (except for the most popular recurring ones), just how good friends Nobita is with everyone, or how good Nobita's grades are (they're pretty much almost always abysmal, bar the once-in-a-blue-moon anomaly).
    • Whatever misfortune befalls Nobita using Doraemon's devices, regardless of its severity, as well as any bad situations Nobita drags anyone else into in the process (up to and including their deaths), is gone by the next story, and everyone's back to normal.
  • Never Say "Die": The U.S. English dub of the "Tanabata Shooting Star" episode (aka "Doraemon and the Space Shooters") wallpapers over the fact that Nobita believes Doraemon is dead after the episode's climactic space battle. His line in the dub, "Help me find Doraemon," would suggest that he believes Doraemon is still alive out there somewhere and waiting to be rescued.
  • Nice Guy: Dekisugi, undoubtedly. Shizuka and Dorami are female examples. Doraemon himself is a more flawed and realistic example: he's generally nice and righteous but has plenty of Not So Above It All and Jerkass Ball moments.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: The show have a lot of examples throughout the run.
  • Nipple and Dimed: A couple of episodes in the 80's series show Shizuka taking a bath naked with no use of Barbie Doll Anatomy. There's absolutely nothing else sexual about the scenes (starting with the fact that Shizuka is an elementary schooler), but regardless, the remake series added in Censor Steam.
  • No Ending: Quite possibly, which ends up with the fans creating their own endings in doujin comics. One happy endingnote  (which was legendarily Jossed from orbit, with nuclear fire by the publishers due to the art being picture-perfect to the original series and the ending being more or less beloved by the entire fanbase) and two Downer Endings, one of which was lifted from St. Elsewhere.
    • The Fujiko duo did try to end the series when it appeared that the franchise was losing popularity in the early 70s, resulting in the final story in Volume 6 of the manga. When the franchise suddenly picked up in popularity again shortly after the release of the said volume, they were forced to Retcon that particular story in the first story of Volume 7 of the manga.
    • The 1973 anime series did have an ending, where Doraemon returned to the future and Nobita promised him to grow up to be successful.
    • The two Downer Endings have been written into fanfiction here and here. At least the former is not as downing as the other, because Doraemon actually came back.
  • No Hugging, No Kissing: Averted, even if you cut out the comedic one there are still Theo kissing Kuku in Legend of Sun King and Nobita(as Antonius) kissing Cleopatra.
  • No Mouth: One of the American English-dubbed episodes features little build-it-yourself robots that take on the personality of whoever you mean to make them look like. Their heads do not have mouths, which causes problems for the mini-Doraemon when he tries to eat a dorayaki/yummy bun.
  • No Plot? No Problem!: The Janken video game doesn't really have a plot. It's just a game where you play Rock–Paper–Scissors with Doraemon.
  • Nostalgia Filter: Considering Nobita has a time machine in his desk, this gets occasionally brought up. Once, he reminisced on how much he missed the fun childhood playtimes with his now-deceased grandmother, and travelled back in time to see her again. Turns out he was quite a brat as a kid and frequently threw tantrums at the poor lady.
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up: All the main cast (despite some episodes show them grown-up in the future).
  • Oblivious Adoption: Inverted. In "Noby's Birthday", Noby thinks he's adopted and that Tammy and Toby just found him. It's obvious that Tammy and Toby are his true parents, but Noby doesn't believe this due to how his parents treat him. In the end, he realizes that Tammy and Toby are his true parents.
  • Ocular Gushers: Nobita's kind of a crybaby, so when he sheds tears, they result in this trope.
  • Only Six Faces: The kids and the adults can be seen as if they share a similar size, form of heads, and even eyes. This is most noticeable when you look up at crossover pics from Fujiko F. Fujio's works, and then you look at the girls.
  • Opening Narration: The Disney XD opening has Doraemon explain that he helps Noby with his gadgets, but something always goes wrong.
  • Our Demons Are Different: Even demons are real in the Alternate Universe, they are in fact aliens living in a nightmarish planet surrounded by black flame attempting to invade Earth hundreds of years ago. Bizarre Alien Biology is in full effect that their leader is much larger in size and has his heart detached from his body.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: Dragon from Doraemon: Nobita's Three Visionary Swordsmen is generally True Neutral, he only turns people into stones for self-defence, as it is implied that everyone wants to kill him and bath in his blood for immortality. Luckily for the heroes, while not as powerful, his sweat can still grant someone an extra life. The dragon apparently can also release his sweat at will and falls asleep when his barbel is cut.
  • Panty Shot: Shizuka provides many of these in the original series and some movies.
    • Averted in the 2005 remake that tone down the fanservice. An episode has also Nobita stop this event thanks to "Incident Bomb", a gadget that predicts future disaster and give to the user the possibility to stop them (in this case, Shizuka's panty exposed because of the wind).
    • The Disney XD dub actually retains this in one episode, but at the same time directs attention away from it by having Sue (Shizuka) utter a long, disgusting burp in the same scene (when she would presumably have been shrieking in the original Japanese).
  • Papa Wolf:
    • Gian is very protective of his little sister. If you even think about messing up with Jaiko, you're dead.
    • Doraemon is shown to be this to Nobita in early stories. However, as time went on, the robot got increasingly more annoyed with Nobita's tendency to depend too much on his tools. This results in him becoming more apathetic to Nobita and only helping him when it is really necessary.
    • Nobita can act like this towards the young creatures he "adopts."
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: One of Doraemon's gadget takes this to the extreme. It's literally just a board that you write someone's name on. Then you hang the board around your neck and anyone who sees it thinks you're the name you wrote. You can even write something generic like "servant" and have it work.
  • Parental Bonus: Let's just say that 40 years later, a lot of Japanese authors and artists have thought up more risqué uses for the tools in Doraemon or other similar gadgets. In fact, the Magical Girlfriend subgenre could have taken its roots from the idea of Doraemon, a non-human being with special powers suddenly showing up and shaking up some loser kid's life, and spinning it in a different light.
  • Periphery Demographic: In "Defender of Justice: Masked Me!", Noby is a fan of the superhero Masked Me, despite being too old for it. invoked
  • Phlebotinum Breakdown: Doraemon's gadgets always have some sort of weakness that causes them to never work as planned.
  • Planimal: The Skyhorse from the episode "The Skyhorse" is a cross between a horse and a bamboo plant.
  • Playboy Bunny:
  • Playing God: A lot of chapters involve Doraemon giving life to inanimate objects, usually with the intention of it just being temporary. The moral quandary of whether or not it's okay to give and take away life at a whim is never really explored. This can be a bit jarring, especially when it involves robots, which Doraemon is himself. This also extends to Doraemon creating entirely new universes with the What-If Box, but at least Doraemon says that the new universes continue to live on so at least they're not killing billions of people when it's time to go home.
  • Pom-Pom Girl: Thanks to the Cheerleader Gloves, a gadget based on the general cheerleader's "pom-poms". It is used for force a person to cheering on an another person. Often used with Shizuka.
  • Portal Door: The "Anywhere Door" which when walked through brings you to any location you tell it, as long as you made sure you worded your request carefully.
  • Potty Emergency: This happens a lot to Nobita in the show.
    • The episode "Malicious of the Demon" has this trope as a major plot point.
    • In "Amaze-ing Maze" note , Nobita has one. It is implied that he wet himself.
    • In "The Flag of Prohibition", the titular flag is placed in the bathroom just as Nobita needs to pee.
  • Potty Failure: Like the above trope, this often happens on the show to Nobita.
    • Gian wets himself after hearing about his friend's secret in "The Insect of Ignorance".
    • In the episode "The Grass Of Forgetfulness", Suneo wets himself at the park.
    • The Disney XD dub, rather than excising scenes of such, altered the context. The puddle that resulted from Nobita wetting himself in one episode was rewritten as him spilling a cup of tea, and in the "voodoo doll" episode when Suneo and Gian are beset with "continuous potty failure" as a result of Nobita holding their voodoo dolls under a running faucet, the scene was altered to make it appear as though the boys were being soaked from above.
  • Power Perversion Potential: There are several gadgets (dogu) with this potential (from stop time to turn invisible). The major example has a Running Gag involving an "Anywhere Door", which lets a person travel anywhere. There are many times Nobita, Doraemon, Gian or Suneo uses it to get to a random place, only to land themselves in Shizuka's bathroom.
    • Some chapters have Doramen too negative-minded about Nobita using his gadget for perverted things like peek under Shizuka's skirt or while she bath. However, Nobita has NO intention of doing it.
    • One episode and chapter had the "XYZ Camera", an X-Ray camera. Guess what happens when a person's picture is taken with that camera?
    • The movie "Nobita's Great Adventure into the Underworld" (both the original version and the remake) has a Running Gag with Nobita using magic power to lift something. But he ended up lifting Shizuka's skirt every times.
  • Prince and Pauper: More like prince and commoner with Theo and Nobita.
  • Product Placement: Some episodes include product placement for CoroCoro Comic, the magazine that serializes the Doraemon comic.
  • Prophecy Twist: In the first chapter, Doraemon proves he's from the future by predicting that Nobita will hang himself in 30 minutes and then be burned alive ten minutes later. Nobita scoffs, but then thirty minutes later, he slips while getting a shuttlecock off the roof and his shirt collar gets caught on a tree branch, making another character joke that he hung himself. Ten minutes later, he falls into a full bathtub and dries himself out in front of a space heater. The phrase "to burn alive" in Japanese is similar to "to warm in front of a fire."
  • Professional Butt-Kisser: Suneo, mostly in relationship with Gian. Backfired when Gian manage to obtain "Mind-reading Helmet" from Nobita.
  • Pun-Based Title: "Fossil Fools" is a pun on "fossil fuels". It's about Doraemon and Noby fooling people with fake fossils.

     R-V 
  • Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs: In the episode "Escape from Score Zero", to teach Noby a lesson after he tries to time-travel to the future to take a sneak peek at his friends' finished school tests so that he'll know all the questions and answers, future Noby brings out the Fists of Force boxing gloves and delivers a rapid succession of punches to his present-day self.
  • Reaching Between the Lines: One of devices Doraemon pulls out is a tool that allows you to reach out over the phone. It leads to disastrous results, as you'd expect with Nobita accidentally ripping Shizuka's skirt from her. Twice!.
  • Reality Warper: Doraemon, with his gadgets, can warp reality to its full extent. Check out the "What If" phone booth. It's able to create a whole new world based on the wish.
  • Recursive Canon: In the museum, Doraemon reads his own book.
  • Red Ones Go Faster: Doraemon has a gadget called "Feeling Cologne" that consists of two colognes, one that makes you go faster when you spray it on you and one that makes you go slower. The fast one has a red label, while the slow one has a blue label.
  • Reflective Eyes: In episode 2a of the 2005 series, Doraemon calls out Nobita for not doing his homework and gets a close-up where Nobita is reflected on both his eyes.
  • The Remake: For newer audiences and to keep the series alive - with Art Evolution (and, unfortunately, more censorship).
  • Retcon: How the Fujiko duo made Doraemon come back in volume 7 of the manga: They revealed, via flashback, Doraemon giving Nobita a "desperation box" that will produce one and only one gadget that he will need at that time before he left. Nobita naturally gets a device that he would inevitably use to bring Doraemon back (albeit by mistake) at the end of the story.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Doraemon himself, of course.
  • Ridiculous Future Inflation:
    • One of Doraemon's Gadgets of the Week is a machine that allows the user to buy things from different time periods (with that period's respective price), by choosing a date and object and inserting the corresponding amount of cash in the machine. Nobita manages to make a profit by buying things cheaply from the past and selling them in the present at an increased price. Unfortunately, he decides to celebrate by ordering a bag of candy from the future...
    • Another time he used time travel to invest his parent's "secret" money stash, collecting a fantastic amount of interest in the far future... except the stack of bills he gets is in the future currency, so Doraemon has to find a collector to exchange it for modern bills. The result is that he only gets a modest increase (but enough for Nobita to get a bump in his allowance).
  • Ripple Effect-Proof Memory: Averted. Everyone, not just Nobita and Doraemon who has any relation to the Time Travel will remember the events, although this rarely happened or even mentioned. The most notable and recurring example is Nobita's grandmother who remembered everything about Nobita's multiple visits to the past.
  • Robot Buddy: The Japanese Trope Codifier.
  • Robo Romance: A few instances, such as Dorami and Dora The Kid.
  • Rock–Paper–Scissors: One song is about rock–paper–scissors and the various moves that can be made.
  • Rod-and-Reel Repurposed: One episode has a random schoolboy admit he once used one to lift Shizuka's skirt.
  • Running Gag: Lots due to the series' long-running status. The most well known is Shizuka's inability to have any privacy in the tub, but there are others.
    • In the manga, Nobita used the Anywhere Door to go to Shizuka's house and once again found her in the tub. Instead of Shizuka getting outraged, as usual, Nobita got annoyed and lampshaded why Shizuka always has to take a bath all the time.
    • Nobita constantly trying to hide the school reports from his mom, with predictable results.
    • Gian getting beaten up by his mother.
    • Suneo being extremely sensitive about his height.
  • San Dimas Time: while never explicitly mentioned, some of the episodes with Time Travelling tend to use this which often leads to some Fridge Logic moments.
  • Sarcasm-Blind: Nobita. One episode has Suneo sarcastically suggesting Nobita to swallow some of the dirt under Dekisugi's fingernails to get smarter, as Nobita once again gets another zero. Nobita actually asks Dekisugi for his fingernail dirt afterwards. Though it may be instead of being Sarcasm-Blind, Nobita feels there's hardly any way he can get smarter, he tries desperately with even the most improbable way, which ironically makes him look even stupider.
  • Scene Cover: Some chapters/volumes have covers taken from panels in the comics.
  • Scenery Censor: In "Transformade", Noby transforms out of his alligator form after he realizes he may be taking his animal transformations a bit far. He then remembers his clothes came off when he transformed, and his body is covered by various nearby objects, such as the grass and a police car.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Connections!: Suneo's father has high-powered connections that allow his son to meet celebrities, get early unpublished comic books, etc. He always brags about it.
    • Averted when Gian asked Suneo to use his said connections to let him perform on TV.
  • Series Fauxnale: The end of Book 6 has a story where Doraemon have to go home. To prove that Nobita can stand by himself, he decided, no matter how bad it is, to fight Gian. He succeeded to make Gian running away in shame, while Nobita had to be carried home. The story ends rather tearjerkingly as the drawer Time Machine turns into a regular drawer...
    • But then, the next volume has it that Doraemon left a box-shaped like himself, containing a drink called "Lies 800" in which anything spoken is a lie. After getting lied to badly by Gian and Suneo, Nobita exacts his revenge to Gian and Suneo, and after that, Nobita spoke that Doraemon did not exist. Thanks to the effect of "Lies 800", Doraemon actually returned, and Nobita tearfully hugs Doraemon while proclaiming "I am so unhappy that you won't be at my side forever!"
      • The whole story was made because, during the magazine era, Doraemon's popularity was thought to have waned that until positive feedback shows that the readers really missed Doraemon.
      • The story above was adapted into the "Stand By Me" CGI movie as the last segments.
  • Series Goal: The entire goal of the series is to get Noby to grow up to live a happy life.
  • Series Mascot: Aside from an original dragon creature, Doraemon serves as the mascot for CoroCoro Comic.
  • Serious Business: Parodied in a chapter when Nobita changed reality so that string figures became the Serious Business of the world. There are even worldwide tournaments on who can make the best string figures, which is more popular than any sport. Of course, since Doraemon has no fingers, he doesn't enjoy it.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: Doraemon's purpose for coming to the present time is to change Nobita's attitude, which will lead to the Bad Future mentioned above.
  • Shining City: Doraemon portrays Tokyo and another metropolis in the world being this way in the future. Calculating from the age of the daddy Nobita, it should have been within the 2000s...
  • Shipshape Shipwreck: In the very first episode of the 2005 series, "The Fishing Pond in My Studying Room", Doraemon and Nobita try to escape from a shark in the ocean and find a sunken ship to hide in. The wrecked ship is noticeably battered but is sitting perfectly upright.
  • Short Film: Several have been made. Some are crossovers.
  • Shout-Out: Lots, to its contemporaries and classics alike, and some even to Western pop culture.
  • Shower Scene: As a running gag, poor Shizuka never gets to finish a bath or shower, and takes them all the time. Literally so, as she's tried in other time periods, just to be interrupted by Nobita, Doraemon, Gian and Suneo.
  • Shrink Ray: One of the recurring gadgets in Doraemon is the "Small Light". A flashlight-like shrink ray which shrinks any object and person down. It does wear out eventually as seen in one movie, however. It also can be used to enlarging things back before the "Big Light" gadget, which does the opposite, appear in the series.
  • Silence Is Golden: Some of the video games lack dialogue or even music.
  • Similar to the Show: Some airings of the show include commercials where the characters advertise products. An example would be this commercial for Pizza Hut and Pepsi Boom.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Suneo fancies himself the most good-looking, intelligent and talented of the gang. Well, at least he's kind of right about the last two things, with only Shizuka who may be better (and who obviously looks better)...
  • Smart Ball: In 'The Wild Pet House', Nobita has to spend some time away from his pet elephant Trunks because he has to do his homework. Noby usually struggles on his homework, but in this chapter, he does his homework at an uncharacteristically fast rate so he can get back to playing with Trunks. He even says that it's a miracle how quickly he finished.
  • Smug Snake: Suneo, mostly played for laughs.
  • Snot Bubble: Common occurrence with Nobita.
  • Sobriquet Sex Switch: An episode has Nobita wish himself into a reality where he was a girl and everyone calls him "Nobiko".
  • Solid Clouds: The gadget "Compaction Cloud Gas" that transforms ordinary clouds into this.
  • "Sorcerer's Apprentice" Plot: Nearly every episode of the show involves Nobita (or occasionally one of the other main characters) doing this. It's usually averted in the movies.
  • Spin-Off: Dorabase, The Doraemons, and some Dorami movies.
  • Split-Screen Phone Call: In the episode "Earth Elevator", when Suneo calls Nobita about his trip to Brazil, both characters are shown in a split-screen.
  • Stable Time Loop: Doraemon is fond of this. Many times the titular character and Nobita time-travel to fix an event in the past, only to end up being responsible for whatever they are trying to fix in the first place.
  • Stock Femur Bone: Nobita uses this kind of bone in "The Human Piggy Bank" in an attempt to get the Guard Dog Bank to give him his money. It doesn't work.
  • Stout Strength:
    • Played straight with Gian. Being fat also makes him the strongest.
    • Deconstructed in one episode when a gadget makes Nobita even fatter than Gian and he believes to be now strong enough to defeat him. Suneo thought so too and this made him quickly switch to Nobita's side and encourage him to beat up Gian. Except that in his case it didn't work. Despite his weight, he was still the same weak Nobita and got his ass kicked.
  • Straw Loser: There's an episode when Nobita has a new classmate who is even more inept and hopeless than him (worse at both academics and sports). Nobita, usually the worst at everything, starts hanging out with him just to make himself look better in comparison.
  • Strictly Formula: 90% of the TV episodes involve Nobita suffering a predicament, begging Doraemon for a gadget, Nobita abusing said gadget/getting the gadget stolen by Gian and Suneo, then suffering the consequences. The fun is in seeing what the gadget is.
  • Stripperific: In a story, Suneo designs a costume for Shizuka and comes up with this. Shizuka doesn't take it well.
  • Stupidity-Inducing Attack: The Time-Dumb, a timed explosive gadget that when detonated, creates a pink gas that causes any victims to act like utter fools for a couple seconds.
  • Sufficiently Advanced Alien: Nobita became one in Nobita's Genesis Diary when he decides to create his own world.
  • Super Drowning Skills: Nobita can drown in puddles.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: Doraemon to Suneo/Sneech in the episode "Time Cloth" ("Time Kerchief"). The English dub features this exchange:
    Sneech: [after handing Doraemon a box of junk] So whatcha want it for, huh?
    Doraemon: Can't say. It's a secret. So I'm not gonna tell you that we're using one of my gadgets to make all this old stuff new again, nope, won't get it out of me.
    Sneech: [snickering] Sure, the secret is so safe with you!
  • Tastes Like Friendship: The Momotaro Dango (a reference to Japanese folklore), which can instantly befriend any creature it is fed to.
  • Theme Tune Extended: The various theme songs have gotten extended versions on CDs with additional verses.
  • Thinly-Veiled Dub Country Change:
    • Being a kids' series, many foreign dubs of Doraemon attempt to relocate the series to the dub's country of origin, despite none of the very Japanese background imagery being changed.
    • Variation: a common thing that happens with European Portuguese dubs of anime is changing the currency used to a local currency, while still keeping it set in Japan. So people will refer to cents instead of yen, despite the coins and bills appearing clearly being yen coins and bills. Doraemon is one of the earliest examples.
    • The English dub changes the setting to America, changing yen notes to dollar bills such as the above example, although they don't change things like kneeling on the floor to eat.
  • Those Two Guys: Suneo and Gian.
  • Three Wishes: The Hermit Bot in the episode "A Good Deed in a Weary World" gives three wishes to anyone who is kind to it and takes care of it.
  • Time Capsule: The American English-dubbed episode "Doraemon's Time Capsule" is about Noby borrowing the eponymous futuristic time capsule and accidentally sending the contents within 100 years into the past. Then he sends it to the future on the day Doraemon was born and has to go find it again before it causes a change in the timeline from just-born Doraemon seeing the items it contains.
  • Time Is Dangerous: Time Travel is achieved by going through a tunnel-like space on your Time Machine. Should one get knocked out of the machine and into the tunnel, one will be stranded in time. The problem is, Doraemon's time machine is basically just some futuristic devices bolted to a tatami, so the risk of being thrown overboard is always there. Dorami's is safe because it's a flower-shaped capsule. Have we mentioned that some bad guys have their own time machine, so you can have a chase in time while you chase in time?
  • Time Machine: Doraemon has one that is located inside of Nobita's desk.
  • Time Paradox: Again, with the casual use of time travel, there are quite a lot of episodes dealing with time paradoxes.
  • Time Police: The Time Patrol, the setting's Time Police, often act as The Cavalry. With the cast's casual use of time travel, it wouldn't be surprising if The Time Patrol actually put the cast on close watch.
  • Time Travel: Happened quite a lot throughout the series.
  • Timey-Wimey Ball: The way time travel works in this series is either Stable Time Loop or that time is mutable, depending on the story. Quite a number of stories have Nobita trying to avert something in the past or present, only to result in that event to happen in the first place. Other stories include time criminals who are trying to meddle with history to install himself as overlord of the world, or how an impending Robot War is averted by having a chat with the original creator, resulting in one robot character getting Ret Goned
  • Title Theme Tune: An an an, tottemo daisuki, Doraemon! ("Ah, ah, ah, I love you very much, Doraemon!")
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Doraemon's favorite food is dorayaki, while Dorami's favorite is melon pan.
  • Truncated Theme Tune: The Brazilian Portuguese dub cuts the theme song down to 4 seconds.
  • Twinkle Smile: In "Experimental Dream Schemes", at the beginning of Noby's "Chase the Sun" dream, when Sue, Big G, and Sneech find Noby, he smiles and his teeth twinkle, complete with an Audible Gleam.
  • Tyop on the Cover: The Hindi episode "Everyone Are Jealous of Nobita!" has an error. It should be "Everyone Is Jealous of Nobita!"
  • Tyrannosaurus rex: Noby encounters one in Noby's Dinosaur.
  • Tsundere:
    • Amusingly enough, Shizuka is actually of type B as she is seen jealous of Nobita with other girls from time to time.
    • Dorami is also type B whose Tsun side is only shown to her boyfriend, Dora the Kid.
  • A Twinkle in the Sky: In "Machine Copy Machine", when Big G turns Doraemon into an aeroplane, the latter flies away and disappears with a twinkle. Later in the same episode, when Noby uses the Machine Copy Machine to turn into a rocket, he also disappears with a twinkle.
  • Two Shorts: Each episode of the American English dub comprises two 11-minute segments.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife:
    • This trope is played straight in the original manga with Nobita being plain while Shizuka is highly attractive but gradually downplayed when Art Evolution of the animes, movies and even the manga itself as Nobita is later drawn less plain and more adorable as a boy at his age can be. Recent anime episodes and movies also have Nobita's eyes become like Shizuka(minus eyelash of course) whenever he isn't wearing glasses. He aged just fine too as an adult.
    • Nobita's parents are also downplayed version with Tamako is actually very beautiful when she doesn't wear her glass but Nobisuke isn't a gonk either.
    • Doraemon himself and his former girlfriend Noramyako (after her Art Evolution). Sure Doraemon's not unappealing, but he's still your standard stout and chubby robot cat model compared to the tall, curvacious female bot.
  • Umbrella of Togetherness: Nobita and Shizuka share an umbrella once. There is also a gadget that invokes this trope; when a guest enters under the umbrella he becomes very affectionate to the user.
  • Untranslated Title: Doraemon: Noby vs. the Mecha Army is titled Doraemon: Nobita Tetsujinheiden in the Speedy Video dub, which is roughly its title in Japanese.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight:
    • Why doesn't anyone in Nobita's neighborhood find it strange that he is constantly hanging out with a blue tanuki with no ears again?
    • In the episode "Battle! Gian vs. Army of Monsters", Gian finds Nobita's gang's clubhouse and decides to take over it. Doraemon gives the others leis that transform them into monsters to scare Gian, but Gian isn't fazed in the slightest and just asks the monsters to help him with mundane tasks.
  • Useless Superpowers: Not really useless, but not really useful in the setting. Even though he's bad at almost everything, Nobita is really talented at shooting and playing string figures. He sometimes says that he's supposed to be born in the old west. There is even an episode where he was stuck in the Old West and became a sheriff's deputy. The talent is obviously more useful in the movies.
  • Ventriloquism: Inverted with the "Ventriloquism Doll" gadget. It will talk like the user and trick the listener(s)'s into believing what the doll said. However, should the gadget be stopped, the listener will immediately come back to sense.
  • The 'Verse: Surprisingly, a lot of Fujiko F. Fujio's works seem to share the same universe.
    • Doraemon and Nobita once saved a hotel from bankruptcy. The hotel owners are clearly the ancestors of the main character from 21 Emon.
    • Sumire Hoshino, an artist that often appears in the series, is the grown-up version of Perman 3, one of Perman's protagonists. There's even an episode dealing with Sumire telling Doraemon and Nobita about her faraway lover. Sumire never tells the name of his lover, but there is a picture of Mitsuo Suwa, the original Perman and its main protagonist, on her pendant. Mitsuo was sent to Birdman's headquarter to be a full-fledged member of the galactic peacekeeping organization at the end of Perman.
  • Versus Title: The 2020 episode "Battle! Gian vs. Army of Monsters".
  • Video Phone: One episode features one of these using the house's television. The video feed was also (obviously) one-way.
  • The Virus: The space alien in Nobita's Galactic Express wants to take over a human body.
  • Visible Invisibility: In "Noby, the Great Illusionist", Noby uses his illusionist cape to make himself invisible so that he can sneak into Big G's room and retrieve his comic. While he is using the cape, he is still visible, but he is transparent.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Much as Gian and Suneo like being jerks to Nobita, they are still his best friends.
  • Vocal Evolution: In the sound department, the dubbing quality has improved a lot in the Malaysian version. Early dubs mute the background effects and music completely when the characters talk, presumably because they were unable to secure a minus-one version of the audio track to work with and didn't want to go the Voiceover Translation route back then. More recent dubs and redubs have the VAs record over a minus-one of the audio track and thus the BGM and sound effects doesn't fade out when the characters talk anymore.

    W-Z 
  • Water Is Air: Inverted in an episode where the gadget-of-the-week permitted the protagonists to treat air as water, for recreational purposes.
  • Waterfall Shower: Shizuka takes a shower under a little waterfall in an episode where Nobita and his friends go on a desert island.
  • The Watson: In The Doraemons Special series, Nobita's personality can almost be entirely summed up to be this.
  • Weapon Wields You: The Denkoumaru, a katana which beats opponents automatically by taking control of the wielder's arms. Obviously very useful in the Big Damn Movies. Unlike most other examples, this gadget still just beats those who are deemed as enemies by its wielder, instead of choosing its own enemies, for it doesn't have a will but an AI for calculating the most effective moves. It can still cause the wielder to fight unwillingly against those who threaten his/her life, though.
  • What If?: Used with the gadget, the "What if? Box". It's a telephone booth which user can say a "what if" scenario and it will change the world to matches their description. (Do the Doctor and Bill & Ted know about this?)
    • Also used with "The Fringe Theory Badge Club". But instead of changing the world as the user desire. It applied existing theories (that aren't turn out to be true) to the real world. And only the people who equipped the badge can see the effect.
  • White Void Room: Before some episodes begin, Doraemon runs around in a white room and says, "Doraemon will start!"
  • Wingding Eyes: Frequently used. For example, in the "Secret Gadget Quiz" segment at the beginning of Season 3 episode 7, Doraemon's eyes become hearts when he mentions that his crush Mii-chan gave him the dorayaki that Nobita ate.
  • Worthless Treasure Twist: At the last volume of Doraemon manga, a chapter was about Nobita, Doraemon, Giant and Suneo competed in finding real treasures as 2 pirate teams. The treasures were there before they decided to make it as a pirate game. However, the very pirate game (which consisted of them sailing at sea and shooting cannonballs at each other) delayed their treasure hunting, resulting in someone had already dug the treasures ahead of them.
  • Writers Cannot Do Math: In an episode, Doraemon gives Nobita a special plate of cookies that double every 5 minutes (so if he starts with one, after 15 minutes he will have 8 cookies), warning him that he must eat every single one of them quickly. In the end, he throws away one and returns after a while to find a big pile of cookies. Unable to eat them all, they choose to throw them to space, and later Doraemon tells Nobita that a whole galaxy made of cookies has formed. In reality, if they doubled every five minutes, in less than 15 hours the mass of the cookies would be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the whole universe. Oops.
  • Written Sound Effect: There's a drink that makes your sound solid, turned it into letters. The size is according to how loud you speak it.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?:
    • Doraemon, despite being a robotic cat, is scared to death of mice ever since a robotic mouse bit his ears off (by mistake) and caused him to turn blue prior to the series.
    • Dorami, Doraemon's little sister, is afraid of cockroaches.
  • X-Ray Sparks: In "Action Quiz", the Action Quizzer electrocutes Noby and Big G each time they get one of its questions wrong. There are two instances where Noby and Big G's skeletons are visible as they are being electrocuted.
  • X-Ray Vision: Some of Doraemon's gadget has this functionality. For example, the "Xyz Light Camera" can be used to see the contents of objects, similarly to an x-ray.
  • Yamato Nadeshiko: Shizuka Minamoto is the prime example for Japanese's anime & manga society. She's a soft-spoken, nature-loving, and caring girly girl who addresses Nobita using honorifics. She's shown to be pretty good at almost everything except violin.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Suneo frequently calls Nobita (along with Shizuka and Gian) over to announce something fun (e.g. one of his family vacations), only to tell Nobita that he's not invited.
  • You Are Grounded: This happens to Nobita all the time in the American adaptation. He always gets grounded, unlike in the Japanese version where he gets sent out of the house by his mom (a typical Japanese household punishment used by parents). Doraemon is occasionally grounded along with him.
  • You Can't Fight Fate: There is an extremely depressing explanation about why Nobita is so afraid of Giant and Suneo. An episode traces this back to kindergarten times when Nobita was first bullied by Gian and Suneo. His fearfulness was born and stuck at that moment because he failed to fight them. In order to eliminate this mentality, Nobita returned to the past and managed to bully them back. However, while he bullied them, he was watched by little Shizuka, the girl he liked since he was a kid and his future bride, and as a result, he earned her hatred. In the end, Nobita has to choose: be immune from Giant and Suneo's bullying, or earn Shizuka's forgiveness? He chooses Shizuka's forgiveness, and that restores his fearfulness of Giant and Suneo for life.
  • Young Gun: Nobita whenever the cast travel to a Western-y age/planet/dimension/whatever. The boy might be a total loser in other aspects of life, but when the plot requires that someone is shot, he does the shooting competently.

    Movies 
  • Adaptation Expansion: The manga adaptation of the 2005 series movies tend to expand on the story in general. Showing more background stories or having some events played out differently compared to the movie it was based on.
  • Adaptational Heroism: For the main five, where the "ass" part of Jerkass was removed and replaced with Jerk with a Heart of Gold, and that was at its worst.
  • And You Thought It Was Real: Used in the 2015 movie "Nobita's Space Heroes". The cast is shooting for a movie and an alien comes to them for help thinking they are superheroes.
  • The Bermuda Triangle: In one Big Damn Movie, the heroes discover that the anomalies in this region are because of the Triangle being part of an ancient force-field, home to an AI gone insane.
  • Big Damn Movie: LOVES this trope. The regular manga and TV series involves just the mundane daily life of the protagonist, his robotic cat, and his other elementary school friends in suburban Tokyo. However, the series' movies will always be huge epic adventure stories (often set in elaborate sci-fi/mythological/high fantasy locations) and the main characters are inevitably portrayed as the brave action heroes.
  • Casting Gag: Be it a coincidence or not, Masako Nozawa (who was the second voice of Doraemon in the 1973 anime) got cast as a young version of Nobita's dad in the 2012 movie, Doraemon: Nobita and the Island of Miracle ~Animal Adventure~.
  • Demonic Possession: Happened to Suneo twice in two movies, first possessed by one of the Yadori Alien and latter by the Big Bad evil sorcerer Uranda.
    • Also happened to Nobita once in the same movie. He, however, is prepared for it the second time and defeat the Yadori Emperor.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: Doraemon: Nobita and the Knights of Dinosaurs would become Doraemon: Nobita and the Dragon Knights if the Japanese title was to be translated directly.
  • Disneyfication: The whole Doraemon series mellowed down most of the fairy tales and famous stories they adapted, most notably in "Doraemon: Nobita's Mermaid Legend" movie. The plot was closer to the source than the Disney movie, but in the end, Sophia and the entire mermaid tribe live happily ever after anyway.
  • "Do It Yourself" Theme Tune: The 2015 movie features a unique version of the theme song sung by the main characters of the series.
  • Foreshadowing: These movies love to foreshadow scenes that are very important.
  • Forgot About His Powers: The movies will always have a big war towards the end. And yet despite the overabundance of useful gadgets, Doraemon only remembers the rather weak Air Cannon. Cue a Curb-Stomp Battle delivered by the enemies until the protagonists have to rely on Deus ex Machina or Heroic Sacrifice. Often, though, the trope is subverted because Doraemon usually has his gadgets in repair of out of power (makes sense due to the sheer number [over 4 digit] of them). He's only got multiple versions of the most common (and likely cheapest) gadgets in hand for most of the time. (Even the iconic takecopters are often lacking in battery power.)
  • A Form You Are Comfortable With: Seed Sower from Nobita and the Spiral City explaining why he appears as a human to Nobita.
  • Girl of the Week: The movies, especially later ones, where there will be a token girl even though the main focus isn't on her at all...most of the time.
  • Green Aesop: Used frequently in the movies. In most stories, and especially in movies, humans destroying the environment won't result in a disaster on its own; that would take too long. Chances are, alien civilization will plot to intervene and destroy humans first to prevent said environmental disaster from happening.
  • Humans Are the Real Monsters: Almost every civilization Nobita and his friends run across in the movies has some sort of grudge against humans. Usually paired with Green Aesop above.
  • Letterbox: Some movies have this when released on VHS or DVD. As the movies were produced in the 16:9 aspect ratio since Nobita's Great Adventure in the South Seas onward.
    • Interestingly, this is inverted with the older movies when they're first released in Japanese theatres. The first 18 movies were made in the 4:3 aspect ratio but were shown in theatres in the 16:9 aspect ratio. They were generally good at not making important details got lost from the crop. So this is a non-issue for the most part.
  • Non-Serial Movie: All of them.
  • Make Wrong What Once Went Right: The Big Damn Movie villains are especially fond of this.
  • The Movie: It will have more than 30 movies in a year or two, but since the story doesn't have a real ending nor it has any development, plus what most of what the studio's doing nowadays is to remake em'all for new generation's kids. All Doraemon movies (except some short movies and spinoffs) are considered not the Non-Serial Movie.
  • The Nudifier: In the movie Doraemon: Nobita's Secret Gadget Museum Nobita accidentally activates a "hyper vacuum" that sucks up the clothes Shizuka is wearing, including her underwear.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: Sophia and the whole mermaid and merman tribe from the 2010 movie, "Doraemon: Nobita's Mermaid Legend".
  • The Remake: Starting with 2006 movie "Doraemon: Nobita's Dinosaur 2006" which is a remake of the first movie. After that, several movies were given the remake treatments.
  • Saint-Bernard Rescue: A strange case where it can be Justified happens in one of the movies. In that movie, Nobita and co time-travelled to the pre-historic era to stop a time-criminal who has established a personality cult of cavemen, and his temple is in a snowy mountain. A blizzard descended upon them and they fainted one by one (what were they thinking?). However, Nobita is rescued by a mammoth that dispenses a strange liquid that resuscitates him, via its flail, in the spirit of St. Bernard dogs. Later, it turns out that that mammoth is actually Time Police robot in disguise, who has been tailing the fellowship to find out the criminal's hideout.
  • Sand Is Water: Sand ships and sand dolphins can be purchased in the ridiculously advanced future; in one Big Damn Movie, Nobita and company discover that Sinbad the Sailor (of the Arabian Nights) was the beneficiary of such gifts from a grateful time-travelling tourist who'd got stranded in the desert and saved by Sinbad.
  • Scenery Porn: The TV series and the older movies (1980 to 2004) are not known for their good animations, (The 2004 movie but holy crap the newer movies (2006 onward) are just simply gorgeous.
  • Tender Tears: Loads and loads in the movies, especially those that started to be done in the 2005 anime era.
  • Title: The Adaptation: All movies are titled Doraemon, later Doraemon the Movie, followed by a subtitle. Which also have to have the word Nobita in it. (Stand By Me Doraemon being the sole exception)
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: Most of the main villains of the movies are shown to be outright malicious and evil, to the point where they try to kill the main cast as means of eliminating those who oppose them. Keep in mind the main cast mostly consists of children.
  • What If?: Played with Nobita's Great Adventure into the Underworld. Nobita wishes for a world where magic exists, and he gets to experience there and have adventures. However, things quickly spiral down fast, and Nobita wants to use the What-If Box again to go back to his real world. However, he learns that doing it will not solve the problem at all. Not to mention, he promised a new friend that he will return to save them. So he makes up his mind and goes solve the problem the hard way. An Aesop was had!

"as long as you're here, you bring us happiness!"
— Ending line of the Japanese theme song.

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