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Contrasting Sequel Antagonist / Video Games

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Contrasting Sequel Antagonists in video games.


  • Devil May Cry:
    • The villain of the first game is Mundus, the ruler of the demon world. He is portrayed as a malevolent and terrifying force whose presence is felt throughout the game even when he isn't in the same room with you.
    • Arius is the villain of the second game. While Mundus was the most powerful demon in the demon world, Arius is a human who relies on magic, technology and wealth to be a threat.
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    • Devil May Cry 3 features a Big Bad Duumvirate consisting of the half-devil Vergil who is Dante's brother and the human Arkham who seeks to claim the power of Sparda to become a powerful demon himself.
    • Sanctus in Devil May Cry 4 is introduced as the seemingly benevolent head of the Order of the Sword before being revealed as a power-hungry man who seeks to become a demon and is willing to sacrifice anyone to do it.
    • Urizen from Devil May Cry 5 is the first full-blooded demon main antagonist since Mundus from the first game. He is also the first villain since Vergil in 3 to defeat Dante in their first battle which isn't surprising given he is Vergil's demonic half made flesh.
  • Dishonored 2: The usurper queen Delilah Copperspoon is a supernatural entity compared to the corrupt politician, Hiram Burrows and General Farley Havelock from the first game who were realistic.
    • Lord Regent Hiram Burrows is strict, shrewd, and seeks to stamp out the Loyalists and thwart Corvo the entire game. In contrast, the Duke of Serkonos Luca Abele is mostly indifferent to events unfolding and spends most of time hosting orgies and lavish feasts at his palace. The Duke is also heavyset and wears light-colored clothing, in contrast to the Lord Regent who is thin and is quite fond of dark trenchcoats.
  • Fable:
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    • In Fable I, the villain is a powerful monster called Jack of Blades who wants to conquer the world and the hero has two epic fights with him to the death.
    • In Fable II, Lucien Fairfax is the former mayor of Bowerstone who tries to use the dark power of The Tattered Spire to resurrect his murdered family but was corrupted by its construction and power. Lucien doesn't even get a proper boss as one of the heroes will just knock him down the spire.
    • And in Fable III, the final boss is a horde of eldritch monsters led by the Crawler who force the king/queen to make desperate choices and kill infected friends. There's no ambition, no greater plan for Albion's enslavement, just an all-consuming hunger.
  • In all of The Legend of Zelda games that feature the same Link but follow a different villain, the new villain will contrast the previous in one way or another. (Often they inevitably end up being Hijacked by Ganon anyhow.)
    • The first game had Ganon, a feared leader of the monsters that ravaged Hyrule, and who is defined by his desire to possess the full Triforce. He evades Link with invisibility and fires magical bolts at him. The Final Boss of Zelda II: The Adventure of Link was Link's Shadow, a Doppelgänger of Link and a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere. He is the final test that must be overcome before Link can obtain the Triforce of Courage, and he relies entirely on his sword to fight.
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    • The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past features the return of Ganon, having used the alter ego of Agahnim as he sought to regain power. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle Games also have this effect, as the two games are meant to be played one after the other: Onox is a large, armor-clad monster who relies on brute force and brings chaos to Holodrum by sending the seasons out of order. Come the final battle, he transforms into a dragon and revels in his newfound power; Veran is small, slight, relies on magic, and spends most of the game possessing other characters. She travels back in time, corrupting Queen Ambi and convincing her to force the people of Labrynna to build the Black Tower. Veran assumes her insect forms in the final battle, but only as a last resort. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening features the Nightmares, who differ from all other villains in that they want to save the world, as while they are a threat that keeps the Windfish asleep, defeating them and waking up the Windfish will cause Koholint Island and its inhabitants to disappear.
    • In The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Ganondorf is the king of the Gerudo who seeks to claim the Triforce to conquer the world of Hyrule out of his hunger for power. In The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, the demonic entity in the titular Artifact of Doom took control of the Skull Kid to destroy the world of Termina For the Evulz.
    • The sub-trilogy that started with The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker has this with its three main villains. In The Wind Waker, Ganondorf, after breaking free from the seal that contained him, had started to outgrow his original evil nature and become a more complex figure who wanted the Triforce to restore Hyrule despite still wanting to control it. In The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, Bellum was a mindless beast who was trying to break free from its own seal and only seemed interested in consuming life force. Also unlike Ganondorf, Link does not know of Bellum's existence until midway in the game. Even their signature hideouts fit this. The island-based Forsaken Fortress was designed by Ganondorf to repel any intruders, and he abandons it partway through the game. Bellum's Ghost Ship is mobile and lasts the entire game, and it was designed to use rumors of treasure to lure people in to have their life force drained. They are followed by Cole in The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks, a small, leprechaun-like demon who at first pretends to be on the side of the royal family. While Ganondorf was an Affably Evil Magic Knight and Bellum was an Eldritch Abomination with powers derived from the Sands of Time, Cole is a Smug Snake who has to fall back on his dragon Bryne or his superior Malladus when faced with a threat.
    • Yuga and Lady Maud were both obsessed with beauty, but in different ways. Yuga was a vain painter while Lady Maud was a vain fashion designer. Yuga was The Sociopath who manipulated Princess Hilda by pretending to care for Lorule so he could claim the Triforce to remake the world in his image, Lady Maud cursed Princess Styla with an ugly dress as a "gift" because she hated her cute outfits and is offended that it is called a curse. Another departure from the series usual villains is that Lady Maud doesn't die when she's defeated.
    • Though The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is a prequel to the franchise, Ghirahim was designed with this mindset as a contrast to Ganondorf. Ganondorf wears black armor while Ghirahim wore a white suit. Ganondorf was muscular and masculine, Ghirahim was slim and feminine. Both take on transformations, but while Ganon was a hulking pig monster, Ghirahim's transformation, his true form, was still the same body type.
    • In a strange case of a character being this to themselves, the Ganondorf in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was specifically designed to contrast his appearance in Wind Waker. In the Wind Waker timeline, Ganondorf is humbled by his defeat at the hands of the Hero of Time and the Goddesses' flooding of Hyrule, leading to an Older and Wiser Ganon who, while still evil, shows signs of being a Noble Demon and Well-Intentioned Extremist who seems to genuinely regret some of his past actions, or at least the way they turned out. In the Twilight Princess timeline, however, Ganondorf's initial plan to get the Triforce is thwarted before it even begins, only for him to later get the Triforce of Power anyway due to a "divine prank" that was the result of the Hero of Time's Time Travel. This turns Ganon into a manipulative, sadistic brute with a god complex and no redeeming qualities whatsoever.
    • Calamity Ganon in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is considered by the people of Hyrule to be a force of nature; nothing like the Sorcerous Overlord incarnations it had assumed previously. It takes the form of a great miasma cloud in the shape of a serpentine boar, encircling the ruins of Hyrule castle where Princess Zelda has been keeping its true form contained for the past century.note 
  • Final Fantasy has done this from the beginning.
    • Chaos was The Man Behind the Man who entered a mutual agreement with the Fiends.
    • The Emperor made the fact he led his forces a fact and betrayed the Devil to go One-Winged Angel.
    • Cloud of Darkness is a natural force come to pass and made its appearance at the very end.
    • Zemus orchastrated the entire game from afar with mind control, and came back through sheer rage.
    • Exdeath is a centuries old clump of demons stuffed into a tree that is now trying to destroy the world with The Void.
    • Kefka broke a lot of ground for Final Fantasy baddies by not only being completely cuckoo-for-Chocobo-Puffs, but also starting off fairly weak. Midway through the game, you actually fail to stop him from playing his trump card and he gains godly power through manipulation.
    • Sephiroth used to be the hero to all. You also spend a lot of time doing things for him.
    • Ultimecia is a sorceress from the future who uses the present sorceresses as proxies. Her use of Seifer also foils Squall's relationship with Rinoa.
    • Kuja is a theatrical, misanthropic artificially made young man who goes mad when he finds out his true identity.
    • Final Fantasy X has a lot of villains, but the biggest foil is Jecht, Jerk Jock supreme who followed a path similar to his son's own and now regrets what he does. Seymour was driven insane by a combination of parental abandonment and an addiction to magical powers.
    • Vayne, like Kefka, isn't some great evil supernatural force, but a normal man. But unlike Kefka, he isn't completely insane. Instead, he is a brilliant politician and military tactician who decides to win the long war between two powerful empires by seizing control of the world's most important natural resource. He is calm, collected, and unlike most Final Fantasy villains, he comes the closest to winning in the end and in some ways, does get what he wants. Also unlike many Final Fantasy Villains, he isn't shown very often in game, but his decisions are immediately felt worldwide.
    • Final Fantasy XIII by contrast has Barthandelus, who is effectively one of the manipulating gods that Vayne would have opposed, and who seeks the destruction of those he is charged with protecting. And while his plan does eventually work, it doesn't occur the way he wanted and takes far longer to come to pass (around another 1000 years).
    • Caius Ballad from Final Fantasy XIII-2 rounds back around to being a man, albeit an enormously powerful one. In comparison to Barthandelus, who was a Well-Intentioned Extremist based on the world, Caius only cares about one person, Yuel, and is willing to destroy time to preserve her. And while, like Barthandelus, he gets what he wants...it's not in the manner that he hoped for.
    • The divinity phase is switched once again for the finale of the XIII trilogy, Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII with Bhunivelze, who is presented as the Big Good initially and genuinely wishes to save everyone. Until it's revealed that while he does intend to do so, he also intends to filter humanity into soulless puppets, while Caius wanted to preserve Yuel.
    • Final Fantasy XIV, being an MMORPG, features a succession of antagonists over the course of its run.
      • In the original "Legacy" game, the Big Bad was Legatus Nael van Darnusnote  of the Garlean Empire. Believing that the threat of Primal summonings in Eorzea was too great, and being corrupted by the presence hidden inside the moon of Dalamud, the Legatus enacted "Project Meteor" to bring the moon crashing down on the Eorzean nations.
      • In "A Realm Reborn", the reins were taken by Legatus Gaius van Baelsar who subscribed much more to a sort of Pragmatic Villainy. Believing in conquest over destruction, Gaius sought to establish dominance and combat the Primal threat by piloting the Ultima Weapon. However, he ended up being an unwitting pawn of the Ascian Lahabrea, who caused the Ultima Weapon to blow up Gaius's own base before Gaius was defeated by the Warrior of Light.
      • The "Heavensward" expansion has a Big Bad Duumvirate due to the Forever War between the Ishgardians and the dragons. The bulk of the story arc leads to a confrontation with Ishgard's ruler, Archbishop Thordan VII, who actually hijacks Lahabrea and devours the Ascian's energy in order to turn himself and his most loyal knights into Primals. The following updates, though, focus on the dragon Niddhog as the primary threat to peace. Having long ago lost himself to an all-consuming rage and lust for revenge against Ishgard, Niddhog is more of a force of pure malice than anything else.
      • In "Stormblood", the antagonist is Zenos yae Galvus, crown prince of the Garlean Empire. Unlike the previous foes, Zenos is a pure Blood Knight who doesn't actually care about anything other than finding an opponent to fight who will actually pose a challenge. He eventually decides that the Warrior of Light is both his greatest enemey and only "friend".
      • "Shadowbringers" has Emet-Selch, a.k.a. Solus zos Galvusnote , a.k.a. Hades. One of the most powerful and manipulative of Ascians, Emet-Selch is the architect of incalculable suffering throughout the ages, yet presents himself as an Affably Evil friendly enemy for most of the story arc. When you get toward the end of the expansion, however, you find out that he views the world as "broken" by the Big Good, and every calamity he and his brethren have brought about has been for the purposes of rejoining the shard worlds with the source so that the utopian home he remembers from ages past can be rebuilt.
    • Final Fantasy XV features Ardyn. In contrast to the previous villains, who either didn't have personal relationships with the heroes or did, Ardyn wants to kill Noctis from the get-go; in comparison to Sephiroth and Cloud, who had developed enmity in their backstory; Noctis barely even knew who Ardyn was initially. Rather than be embraced in a way by the gods like the fal'Cie and Bhunivelze would do with the heroes of the XIII trilogy, Ardyn was spurned and shunned by them, and while they ultimately intended to save existence to a degree, Ardyn makes no such claims; he only wants Noctis to survive so that he can kill him at his strongest, the world be damned. Finally, unlike most humanoid villains, he doesn't have a One-Winged Angel form and is fought specifically as a Duel Boss. And on top of all that, he has his own personal Guardian Force Ifrit, which he summons against a party that cannot control the appearance of their own Guardian Forces.
  • The final bosses of the Super Smash Bros.. games may be lacking in on-screen personality or depth, but they are very distinct from each other visually and thematically.
    • Master Hand is the final boss of the first game, and is traditionally the final opponent in the Classic Mode of subsequent games. It is vaguely implied that Master Hand is the creator of the Super Smash Bros. universe, and may be the representation of a child playing with his action figures. Later games imply further that Master Hand enjoys challenging the fighters to test their worth.
    • Melee introduces two new bosses; Crazy Hand and Giga Bowser. Crazy Hand is Master Hand's opposite number, being chaotic and destructive as opposed to careful and creative, but despite their differences the two hands make a pretty effective team. Giga Bowser is a powered-up transformation of Bowser unique to the Super Smash Bros. series who serves as the game's ultimate challenge, only appearing when certain conditions are met.
    • Brawl gives us Tabuu, the first villain with a clear motivation. He's explicitly a being from another dimension who aims to absorb the Super Smash Bros. universe into his domain of Subspace. He differs from previous bosses in being the most human-like villain of the series so far.
    • Master Core is the True Final Boss of 4, being a monstrous transformation of Master Hand which is implied to be his full strength unleashed. Master Core's battle consists of multiple distinct phases, which is a first for the series.
    • Galeem and Dharkon from Ultimate are the most distinctive villains so far. In terms of design, all of the previous villains looked vaguely anthropomorphic or creature-like; Galeen and Dharkon are utterly alien beings that look completely inhuman. In terms of motivation, Galeem seeks to control the universe whereas Dharkon seeks to obliterate it. This makes them a contrast to the Hands, who are ambiguously evil and don't seem interested in domination. Also unlike the Hands, who get along well and make a good team, Galeem and Dharkon absolutely hate each other; even when they're forced to team up, they actively fight amongst themselves.
  • BioShock
    • BioShock 2 was very blatant about this. The first game's antagonist, Andrew Ryan, was a hardened capitalist and atheist who believed that self-serving actions will ultimately lead mankind to create utopia, and had founded the secret city of Rapture to work toward that end. Sofia Lamb, who had taken over the city by the events of 2, was a psychologist who believed human nature to be ultimately evil and strove to use the genetic engineering serum Rapture's scientists had discovered to create a new race of utterly selfless humans — and, while not overtly religious herself, is not above using religion as a means to that end. This extends to how they're treated by the plot as well: In the first game, Ryan's plans had already come to fruition by the start of the game and proven to be a miserable failure, and your support character who strings you along to kill him is out for revenge; Lamb, meanwhile, has yet to carry out her plans, and your goal is to stop her.
    • In BioShock Infinite, you face off against Zachary Comstock, who is overtly religious and believes that his own (eventually) hidden city is destined to actively destroy the "Sodom below", in contrast to Ryan, who believed that the Cold War would ultimately lead mankind to destroy itself. Also while Ryan is a strict Athiest, Comstock is a born-again Christian who delivers sermons to his populace and justifies his less-than-Utopian society with what he claims is divine law. Ryan's dystopia was born from not caring about his own population and letting them exploit and poison each other with merciless capitalism, while Comstock's comes about from slavery and enforced mistreatment of "lesser" people. Finally while both men had a distaste for the way the United States was run in their age (Ryan with the New Deal under Roosevelt and Comstock with the freeing of the slaves by Lincoln), Ryan's intention was to cut off all ties with the United States and make a new Utopia of his own. Comstock desired to keep a "Pure" form of the country preserved, and eventually return to "correct" the decaying nation with force.
    • It's worth noting that despite wildly varying beliefs and philosophies, the antagonists of each game inevitably end up very similar. All three are Hypocrites who betray their ideals to pursue their own goals, all three use their world-views to justify the exploitation and suffering of others, and all three ultimately have their Utopias crumble all around them. They all work to illustrate the series overarching moral that extremism to any one viewpoint is bad.
  • In Clock Tower, both of the ScissorMen from both games have different characteristics from each other. Bobby, the first ScissorMan had a very ugly appearance who followed the orders of his mother, and didn't had the slightest bit of intellect. Dan, the Big Bad of the second game has a more handsome look, was a lot more intelligent than his brother, walked in his ScissorMan guise with a limped leg, and unlike how Bobby obeyed his mother, Dan is capable of corrupting and manipulating people into serving him. Also while Bobby kept his killings a secret, Dan makes his murders known to the public, as well that Dan kills people simply cause he desires too, Bobby killed following his mother's words.
  • In the first Halo trilogy, the main threat, aside from the Covenant, was the Flood, a biological Hive Minded parasite led by the Gravemind. In the second trilogy, their role is taken up by Forerunner Promethean constructs, led by the Didact in Halo 4 and Cortana and the Warden Eternal in Halo 5: Guardians. Notably, the Prometheans were deployed against the Flood during the last days of the Forerunner Ecumene. The Covenant themselves go from the dominant force in the Orion Arm in the first trilogy to a smaller but more fanatical terrorist group in the second one; in fact, the specific faction the player fights is only one of many Covenant remnants.
  • The main antagonists in Pokémon tend to do this, normally taking in account the respective legendary mascot Pokémon of every generation of games, which also normally counts as an antagonist in a primal way:
    • Generation I introduces Giovanni, a well-known mob leader who secretly holds the title of Gym Leader, and his Team Rocket, a mafia-like organization whose main motivations are profit. Though not faced in the main story, there is also the local "major" Olympus Mon Mewtwo, an extremely powerful clone of Mew, though Team Rocket has no connection with it (despite what the animé may say).
    • Generation II introduces Archer, Ariana, Proton and Petrel, the new commanders of Team Rocket, who unlike Giovanni, are quite weak on their own and only desire the comeback of their leader, their desperation being a main point of the plot. Lugia and Ho-Oh contrast Mewtwo in being a more benign (though hardly less dangerous) duo who are constantly at odds against each other, though they are (again) never mentioned by the villains and are completely optional encounters (not so much in the remakes).
    • Generation III:
      • The game introduces two different teams, as opposed to only Team Rocket in the previous two generations. Maxie (leader of Team Magma) and Archie (leader of Team Aqua), as well as being Foils to each other, are also radically different from the previously thuggish antagonists, being ecoterrorists who plan the best for humankind in their own distorted views; as well as Groudon, Kyogre, and Rayquaza, super-ancient masters of land, ocean, and sky, who unlike their previous counterparts are integral to the plot, and while not evil per se, are definitely more brutal and dangerous to the world than Lugia, Ho-Oh, and even Mewtwo.
      • While the previous rival characters, Blue and Silver, were jerkasses, Brendan/May and Wally are both Friendly Rivals; future rivals would all be much friendlier, with the exceptions of Gladion and Bede. In addition, Brendan/May is the only rival who totally quits being a Pokémon Trainer during the game, to the point that in the original Ruby and Sapphire they are the only rival who never fully evolves their starter (this was altered in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire).
    • Generation IV introduces Cyrus, a 27 year old Straw Nihilist who hopes to destroy all of existence, since he sees humans and reality as a whole as pointless, as opposed to Maxie and Archie's Well-Intentioned Extremist motivations. Team Galactic, unlike the previous teams, exists in the open and are constantly treated as a bunch of harmless weirdos (that is, until they start bombing places). Palkia, Dialga, and Giratina, along with Arceus, are each an Animalistic Abomination that embodies cosmic concepts, such as space, time, antimatter/otherness, and divinity, respectively, unlike their very Earth centered previous counterparts. Their threat comes less from natural brutality and more from sheer destructiveness and alienation, such as Giratina accidentally creating a world consuming black hole-like portal while trying to protect reality. Giratina also deserves mention for being a foil to Rayquaza, with both of them being the third members of their groups. While Rayquaza is the more benevolent of his trio, Giratina, while serving a similar function, is much more destructive and less noble.
    • The first games of Generation V introduce N, a boy raised by Pokémon with very strong convictions, but very little knowledge of the outside world, and Team Plasma, a PETA-esque Animal Wrongs Group who makes the the population of the Pokémon World question their beliefs. The sequels then cut to the real Big Bad, Ghetsis, N's megalomaniacal evil father, and the second incarnation of Team Plasma, who evolved to full blown terrorists interested in world-domination. Local legendaries Reshiram, Zekrom, and Kyurem are a group who use to be one single Pokémon, and unlike the cosmic-themed trio of Palkia, Dialga, and Giratina, they represent the very human concepts of truth and ying, ideals and yang, and emotional voidness. Kyurem also is a foil to Giratina and Rayquaza, seeing as it allies with Team Plasma due to its desperation to be complete once again.
    • Generation VI introduces Lysandre, a beauty-obsessed man, and Team Flare, a group of supremacists who believe that only themselves are allowed to live. Unlike the other villains, Lysandre is a Villain with Good Publicity, being respected across Kalos for his inventions such as the Holo Caster and for his philanthropy, and unlike the selfish Ghetsis, he sees his plan as doing the world he loves a service by protecting its resources from being used up. The trio of Xerneas, who represents life, Yvetal, representing death and destruction, and Zygarde, who represents equilibrium and potential, having a Nordic inspiration, as opposed to the eastern influenced Tao Trio of Reshiram, Zekrom and Kyurem.
    • Generation VII features Team Skull, a... rather inept equivalent of Team Rocket that is regarded by a good deal of the Alola region as a joke, but share similar motivations, led by Guzma, a violent man who turned to crime after failing to become a Trial Captain. The real antagonists, however, are the Aether Foundation, led by Lusamine, an abusive mother who is obsessed with things 'deserving of her love' and seeks to remain in Ultra Space with Nihilego, with which she has an intense obsession. For that matter, she contrasts all the previous Big Bads by being the first female one in the series. Contrasting Gen VI's Nordic inspirations, Solgaleo and Lunala are alchemy-themed, merely 'represent' the sun and moon rather than embody concepts like the previous legendaries, and are actually from Ultra Space, not to mention evolve from a Pokemon you've seen for most of the game — Nebby. The more antagonistic Ultra Beasts contrast with legendaries from previous games in that while they're on the same power level as legendaries, they're common Pokemon in their own dimension and are completely new to science. Design-wise, while legendaries have a passing resemblance to familiar animals, the Ultra Beasts are quite alien, often lacking anything in the way of a face.
      • Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon's Big Bad is Necrozma — in a series first, it's the first one to be a Pokémon acting on its own as opposed to being controlled or influenced by a human. Unlike the benevolent Solgaleo and Lunala, however, Necrozma steals light rather than emits it, and it swiftly overpowers one of the two and absorbs it. And unlike Kyurem before it, it has a "true" form — Ultra Necrozma, which the player fights as the Climax Boss in Ultra Megalopolis. On a related note, in order to fit Necrozma into the plot the human villains of Gen VII become genuinely altruistic and hoping to stop Necrozma from destroying Alola. The problem is Lusamine is out of her depth and it is implied she is doing this because she is mad with grief over losing her husband and is terrified of losing anyone else. While past villains were often Well Intentioned Extremists, they were more selfish in their desires.
    • Generation VIII features Team Yell, who are more like the Pokémon world's version of Football Hooligans. They just so happen to be loony fans of Marnie, one of The Rival characters to the player, and want her to become the next Champion of the Galar region. As such they go out of their way to obstruct the other participants of the Gym Challenge so that Marnie is unchallenged. This makes them the first villain team to be directly connected to the player character's journey to become Champion. Their "leader" Piers is a Gym Leader like Giovanni, but unlike the Team Rocket boss, his association with Team Yell isn't hidden, having their symbol adorn his gym and shirt. His only goal is to retire from his Gym Leader position and have his sister Marnie take over. He even helps the player out post-game. The real villain is Chairman Rose, who has been using the tournaments to gather energy in order to awaken Eternatus.
    • The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games contrast their villains too. The Explorers villains try to create a Bad Future to preserve their own survival while the villains of Gates of Infinity are a suicide cult who have grown so depressed at the state of the world and the uncaring attitudes of those in it that they are willing to let an Eldritch Abomination destroy it. Meanwhile the villains of Super Mystery Dungeon are Brainwashed and Crazy by the local Eldritch Abomination as opposed to the other villains who were willing participants in villainy. The Bittercold from Gates was also more of a force of nature than a character that was defeated by rejecting it while Super had the Dark Matter which was sentient and was defeated by accepting it.
  • Tales of Berseria turns out to be a prequel to Zestiria, but the point remains. Artorius is the first Sheperd in history and is a Villain with Good Publicity, loved by most of the citizens because his actions allowed Malakhim to become controllable, which allowed people to rein in the problems of daemons roaming around. He was also a tragic hero with Hidden Depths, with his ultimate goal being well-meaning. In contrast, Heldalf was mostly made out to be nothing but pure evil and having little to no desire of doing anything but spreading Malevolence wherever he appeared. He does eventually get revealed to be a bit more of a Woobie, cursed with loneliness, but he remains irredeemible. There's also how they relate to the game's protagonist: Velvet has a very personal connection with Artorius, since he's her brother-in-law and he killed her younger brother, while Sorey has zero connection with Heldalf, except that he's the Shepherd whose duty it is to defeat the Lord of Calamity. Though there are implications that Heldalf may be Sorey's father, unbeknowst to the latter.
  • World of Warcraft's expansion villains generally tend to contrast each other to some degree.
    • The main villains of Burning Crusade (Illidan Stormrage and Kael'thas Sunstrider) are egomaniacal, mana-addicted elves in extreme denial about their relatively small roles in the greater scope of things. They are ultimately manipulated by the overarching Big Bad, Kil'jaeden, whose summoning is the primary threat.
    • Wrath of the Lich King has the titular Lich King: Arthas Menethil, who was the original Arch-Enemy of the previous two and ultimately caused their conditions by defeating them. He came the closest of all the villains to total victory, contrasting Illidan and Kael'thas's inadequacy as threats. It was his remaining sanity that did him in while the last two's instability led them to betray their allies, leaving them easy pickings.
    • Deathwing of Cataclysm is a former Aspect driven insane by the Old Gods. Both were heroes before, but Deathwing's body burns with magma while Arthas is Evil Is Deathly Cold incarnate. Deathwing is fought primarily by the Shamans and Druids of Kalimdor, in contrast to the heavy focus on Paladins and Death Knights in Arthas'.
    • Garrosh Hellscream, Big Bad of Mists of Pandaria, more closely resembles Illidan and Kael'thas in that his own ego and pride drive him to villainy. Instead of being forcibly corrupted by the Old Gods like Deathwing, Garrosh was a Willing Channeler of Y'shaarj who never lost control of himself. He is also the only villain who used to be part of the new Horde, while prior villains had left their factions during or before the Third War.
    • Warlords of Draenor has this happen within the same expansion with Grommash Hellscream and Gul'dan. Grom is a Badass Normal who, with Garrosh's warnings, rejected the Burning Legion. Unlike his son, however, he went through a Heel–Face Turn later on. Gul'dan, meanwhile, becomes a follower of the Legion willingly, is the Squishy Wizard warlock to Grom's Badass Normal, and is the only villain with no redeeming traits whatsoever. Where Grom led the Iron Horde directly, Gul'dan is a manipulator who prefers being the Man Behind the Man.
    • The Big Bad of Legion, Sargeras, is the only one out of the expansion's main villains who is never fought directly. The Final Boss is instead his ace in the hole: Argus, a character never seen until his boss encounter and, unlike all the others in the series, is firmly in Tragic Monster territory.
  • Shenmue: The primary antagonist Chai is a skinny and bald lower ranking member of the Chi You Men who wishes to kill protagonist Ryo to prove himself.
    • Shenmue II: Dou Niu is the bald, fat and hulking leader of the Yellow Heads who is a gang war for the dominance of Hong Kong and has greater things to deal with than just hunting Ryo.
  • Many of the 3D Sonic the Hedgehog games have Greater Scope Villains, each of which differ greatly from each other:
    • Sonic Adventure has Chaos, an ancient creature driven by anger and grief to destroy the world.
    • Sonic Adventure 2 has Professor Gerald Robotnik, Dr. Eggman's grandfather. Similar to Chaos, Gerald's actions are driven by anger towards the world, but whereas Chaos redeems themself, Gerald is long deceased and was remorseless to the bitter end.
    • Sonic Heroes has Metal Sonic, the selfsame Robot Me of Sonic, now driven by a selfish desire to prove themself to be superior to their progenitor.
    • Shadow the Hedgehog has Black Doom, the leader of an invading alien army who hopes to take over the Earth.
  • Knights of the Old Republic: Darth Malak is a physically towering villain, who strictly follows the Sith line of strength = power. He's not subtle and will destroy a whole planet for one Jedi and has a simple plan, use the Star Forge, build a lot of powerful weapons and conquer the galaxy. In his death scene, Malak admits that he deserves it because he wasn't strong enough to be the true Sith lord.
    • Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords: the third member of the Sith Triumvirate, Darth Traya is a anti-villain with Black And Gray Morality; she's also a physically weak, blind old woman who begins the series disgraced and exiled by the Sith, and actually spends most of the game as a main party-member known as Kreia. Hating the Force itself for dictating countless galactic struggles in pursuit of balance, she wants to destroy the Force through manipulation of her apprentice the Jedi Exile. Most of the time Traya doesn't kill her most dangerous, potential enemies, but breaks them into serving her, e.g. Anton, Hanharr, Darth Sion. The most 'violent' thing she does beyond self-defense is kill the Jedi Masters who planned to cut the Force from her apprentice.
  • Street Fighter villains vary when it comes to appearances, techniques, and goals:
    • The Final Boss of the original Street Fighter is the Muay Thai master Sagat, who arranged the tournament to test his abilities against the world's greatest fighters.
    • Street Fighter II has M. Bison, the ruthless, power-hungry leader of an evil organization bent on world domination.
    • Street Fighter III introduces Gill, a Messianic ubermensch who leads a secret society that performs unethical bio-engineering experiments; his tournament is his way of seeking out those strong enough to repopulate the planet after the end of the world.
  • Thief
    • The Big Bads of the first two game are representatives of two religions that have a strong Elves vs. Dwarves conflict with each other; the first game's villain, The Trickster, is associated with the Pagan religion, which worships the concepts of chaos, magic and nature, while Karras in the sequel is associated with the Hammerites, who worship order, technology and civilization. The former wants to destroy civilization using a magic ritual, the latter wants to destroy organic life by using machines to flood the city with poison gas. In both cases, Garret forms an Enemy Mine alliance with members of the opposing religion to bring them down.
    • The third game's villain, Gamal the Hag, is associated with a third faction, the Keepers, who believe in the balance between dangerous extremes. While the other two villains had clearly defined ideologies, and goals relating to them, this time the villain has no obvious motivation beyond selfishness and unnaturally extending their lifespan.
  • Mortal Kombat:
    • The final boss of Mortal Kombat is Shang Tsung, an elderly, shapeshifting sorcerer who oversees the MK tournament. His fighting style revolves around tossing fiery skulls and copying other characters.
    • Mortal Kombat II introduces Shang Tsung's master, Shao Kahn. Kahn is a massive barbarian warlord who simply overwhelms his opponents with sheer brute strength and lightning speed...when he isn't taunting them.
    • Mortal Kombat 4 and by extension Mortal Kombat X have Shinnok, Elder God of Death who is less imposing than Shao Kahn, but is skilled in sorcery, has been manipulating events behind the scenes, and fights with giant skeletal hands and necromancy. He also manages to be The Corrupter, manipulating Raiden, Liu Kang, and Daegon into turning evil.
    • Mortal Kombat 11 has Kronika, an ancient being who has been manipulating the events of the entire series from behind the scenes, only taking a more proactive role when Raiden proves to be too immutable an obstacle. On top of being the first female lead villain in the series, she is also coldly pragmatic, indifferent to those around her, and exhibits a mastery over the flow of time that makes her the most dangerous foe in the series up to this point.
  • Resident Evil
    • Resident Evil: Albert Wesker is a emotionally collected and manipulating officer of the S.T.A.R.S special force who plans on betraying his team and let them be used as data for Bio Organic Weapons.
    • Resident Evil 2: William Birkin is a mad scientist who is killed by mercenaries. He injects himself with the G virus to become a monster. William is a more desperate and emotional villain, who tried to hunt his daughter Sherry.
    • Resident Evil 3: Nemesis: It goes full-on monster with the villain being the mysterious hunter known as the Nemesis.
    • Resident Evil – Code: Veronica: This game's villain is another human-turned-monster, Alexia Ashford, who wants to take over the world.
    • Resident Evil 4: The villain is not a genetically engineered monster but is an unearthed parasite queen of Las Plagas that has possessed a religious leader called Osmond Saddler.
    • Resident Evil 5 gives us Wesker again but this time he's injected himself with the Uroboros virus and declared being a god himself.
    • Resident Evil 7: Biohazard has a family of backwoods rednecks transformed by The Corruption as the antagonists. And it's revealed that each one is a Tragic Monster who became the way they were because they wanted to help a sick little girl.
  • The villains of the Fallout series can vary greatly, though they all generally fall under Well-Intentioned Extremist in one way or another:
    • The original game had "The Master", an insane mutant, who sought to assimilate all of humanity into his Super Mutant Army.
    • The second and third games have the Enclave, one of the most advanced factions in the series, who saw most the Wasteland's inhabitants as impure due to their exposure to radiation and sought to wipe them out. Though by the third game, most of them have decided to settle on just ruling over other humans, as long they're not "too" soaked with radiation.
    • Fallout: New Vegas has Caesar's Legion, a fanatical slave army, that saw reliance on modern technology and medicine as a weakness, only begrudgingly using modern weaponry out necessity, led by a brilliant and charismatic, but delusional, Roman wannabe.
    • Depending on the player's own personal views, the Institute and the East Coast Brotherhood of Steel from Fallout 4 can both be seen as this, both of which are technologically advanced Knight Templars. The Institute is one of the few factions continuing to pioneer science in the post-apocalypse, but they're homicidally short-sighted by a lack of proper government and have their every physical whim granted by their personal machines and enslaved Artificial Humans. This utterly disgusts the Brotherhood, who were founded on the principle of keeping advanced technology out of the hands of those they see as not fit to wield it.
      • The Institute are also this trope towards Caesar's Legion from the previous game. As alluded to above, the Institute is technophilic, basing their entire society around the creation of Artificial Humans. Meanwhile, the technophobic Legion deliberately keeps themselves limited on the tech spectrum because of Caesar's personal beliefs. The Legion is also a purely military organization run in a brutal dictatorship that rules over its subjects with harsh and direct punishment. The Institute is a purely civilian organization run in a loose confederacy (the various Institute divisions are mentioned as mostly working independently unless the Directorate personally steps in and wants multiple departments to work together on a single project) that rules over its subjects with cloak-and-dagger tactics that breed paranoia and makes sure people never know who was really holding the smoking gun. The Legion's military is powerful and expansionist, with only the NCR exceeding their might, while the Institute is actually rather weak in a straight fight, only kept safe by their secrecy and focus on espionage. The Legion also deliberately stylizes itself after both the Roman Empire and Sparta, while the Institute is loosely based after Renaissance Italy and the Soviet Union (although they intentionally try to avoid iconography because they see themselves as the true inheritors of the future and not chained to any past).
  • The Borderlands series features a heavy contrast between Handsome Jack of Borderlands 2 and Colonel Zarpedon of Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel!. Both of them try to wipe out their respective groups of Vault Hunters at the start of their games, but that's about where the similarities end. Jack is the egocentric CEO of the Hyperion corporation by way of a Klingon Promotion who maintains loyalty through a combination of fear and revisionist propaganda; he constantly mocks the Vault Hunters throughout the game and is convinced that he's actually the hero. In contrast, Zarpedon was a high-ranking military commander before Dahl abandoned her unit during the Crackening, and she was well-loved by her men throughout, to the point that they were willing to carry on her cause even after her death; she views the Vault Hunters as worthy opponents deserving of respect and is under no illusions about how horrible her intended actions are, only going through with it because the alternative is worse. Even their ultimate goals differ: Jack is looking for the Vault of the Warrior to help him conquer Pandora by wiping out anyone he sees as a bandit, while Zarpedon was trying to guard the Vault of Elpis to prevent it from falling into the wrong hands until she decided that the only way to guarantee its safety was to destroy the entirety of Elpis (and unfortunately everyone on it).
  • Though the Dreamers serve as a Greater-Scope Villain throughout The Secret World, the major story arcs and downloadable expansion packs all feature their own contrasting villains:
    • Freddy Beaumont, the villain of the Solomon Island arc, is a gloating, scheming trickster of an Evil Sorcerer with no interest in anyone but himself; despite supposedly leading the local Morninglight as a lieutenant to cult-leader Philip Marquard, he's just using them to further his own ends. Plus, he technically doesn't have an army and doesn't bother to fight until the final boss fight kicks off. He's later revealed to be Loki, out to seize ultimate power from the island's Gaia Engine via the sword Excalibur.
    • The Cult of the Aten from the Egypt Arc/Issue #6. In sharp contrast to Beaumont's oily selfishness, they're an individuality-obliterating religious movement devoted to the worship of the eponymous sun deity, and will do anything to ensure that their prophet Akhenaten rises from the grave and brings Aten to Earth - with apocalyptic consequences. Plus, where Beaumont made do with magical firepower and illusions, the cult substitutes with wave after wave of brainwashed mooks armed with mundane weaponry.
    • Her Majesty Mara of the Transylvania arc; quite apart from the fact that she has probably the most varied army in the entire setting - encompassing vampires, werewolves, ghouls and the super-soldiers from the Red Hand labs - she's every bit as spoiled and self-important as her name implies, preferring to hide away in the catacombs of the castle while the rest of the vampire army take over the area. It turns out that she's just a minion for a much more powerful villain, namely her mother Lilith.
    • Introduced in Issue #7, we have Lilith. An ancient entity known and feared throughout the setting for the huge range of atrocities under her belt, she prefers a subtle approach despite her Large Ham tendencies: directing pawns like Mara, Lidiya and Dr Schreber to act in her stead, she prefers to remain hidden while she gets up to Mad Scientist antics; if she has to confront her enemies directly, she presents herself as an ally - the Russian Agent to the players, a surrogate mother to Emma, and Chairwoman Lily Engel to the Orochi Group; and once she has what she wants, she stabs her allies in the back and leaves with her prize in tow.
    • The Black Signal AKA John, first introduced in Issue #9. In contrast to all the other villains, he doesn't spend most of his time attacking the player head-on or creeping around behind the scenes; in fact, he's in constant communication with the player via his own personalized lore entries, using the Bee's lore signal to try to convince the players to join him. While other villains seem to act with some kind of purpose in mind, he seems perfectly content to spend his days using his incredible powers to mess with unsuspecting bystanders and is actually procrastinating in order to avoid facing Lilith again. The biggest contrast of all lies in how young and unfamiliar the Black Signal is: every single villain up until now has been over five hundred years at the very least and usually have some kind of well-established position in the lore of the setting; by contrast, the Black Signal is a total unknown and can't be much older than twenty - and plays the Psychopathic Manchild more often than not.
    • The Bogeyman of The Park tie-in game. A monstrous, illusory presence haunting Atlantic Island Park, he has no overarching agenda, no ambition to rule the world, no desire to take revenge, no secret mission to complete: he just wants to feed on the joy and terror of anyone unlucky enough to stray into the park - and god help you if you're not suitable for feeding on. It's actually because he's already gotten what he wants: Nathaniel Winter's transformation into the Bogeyman has given him the magical power and immortality he desired, and now he wants to hang onto it by fueling his hunger.
  • In the Fire Emblem series:
    • Most main antagonists are either hulking Tin Tyrants or manipulative Evil Sorcerers who seek to Take Over the World or incomprehensible dragons or other god-like entities that seek to level it. They also tend to be the be-all end-all leaders of their factions and have their own unique classes. The Final Bosses of Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 and Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest, on the other hand, buck this trend.
      • In Thracia 776, Veld is certainly a major threat, but he is clearly subordinate to the main antagonists of Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War, Manfroy and Julius. He is also a surprisingly weak Dark Bishop who is only separated from the random chapter bosses you mow down by his personal Stone tome.
      • In Fates: Conquest, Takumi is your own brother who seeks revenge on you for betraying him and getting his mother killed. He is never given the Big Bad position on his own, as he is either subordinate to Ryoma or a thrall of whatever corrupted Garon (revealed to be Anankos on the Revelation route). Finally, he is a mechanically unremarkable Sniper who relies on a very dangerous skillset and a stupidly powerful 1-4 range weapon to kick your ass.
    • Sacred Stones has Lyon. In contrast to Nergal and Zephiel from the Elibe duology, Lyon isn't an Obviously Evil Tin Tyrant or Evil Sorceror with a sympathetic backstory. Instead, the Big Bad is a Tragic Villain whose friendship with the heroes helped lead to his fall to villainy - and it's not due to the heroes actions messing things up, it's due to his own attempts to get better that he messes up and falls.
  • Iron Marines makes a contrast with the villain factions of the game's three worlds/planets, with their motives, their nature and their weaponry/abilities.
  • The various endgame 'conspiracies' in Criminal Case vary from season to season.
    • The first season had the Crimson Order, an Ancient Conspiracy who ran the city of Grimsborough since the founding of the city, having seized control of a gold mine from the Aloki land. The player never heard or dealt with them until after the PC's commanding officer committed murder on their behalf, and they are quickly dismantled once the police are onto them.
    • Pacific Bay's final cases featured a much smaller and more recent faction that directly involved one of the player's partners. There is no official name to the group, and it basically consists of one Omnicidal Maniac trying to destroy Pacific Bay and the people it roped into helping him.
    • World Edition featured Sombra, the multinational criminal organization with plans to Take Over the World. Unlike the previous two seasons, the Bureau knows about the group from the beginning, and bringing down Sombra is their mission statement and the reason they were founded.
    • Mysteries of the Past had several groups, including the Irish and Italian criminal gangs and the Rochester family trying to gain control of Concordia through various schemes. The season finale had the player take on Justin Lawson, a Knight Templar Fallen Hero who'd become a tyrannical dictator over their city.
    • The Conspiracy features Ad Astra, a small, close-knit group of young intellectuals who believe they are entitled to dominate the world because of their intellectual superiority. At the end of the storyline, they've become full-fledged supervillains - albeit ones on the run from their true founder.
    • Travel in Time had the Ptolemic Dynasty, who manipulated history to become rulers of an Egypt-themed dystopia. While directly responsible for all the team's troubles, they aren't revealed until halfway through the series thanks to the machinations of a particularly nasty Sixth Ranger Traitor on the team.
  • Though Deltarune is not an outright sequel to Undertale, the King of Spades can be seen as this to Asgore. Though he does have a pretty tragic backstory, by the time you confront him he's clearly beyond redemption, and has no qualms about killing his own son.
  • Dead Space: the first and second games had psychotic, violently deranged human villains. The third game's human antagonist is, in contrast, a very calm, polite, and soft-spoken man. He's no less insane and ruthless, however.
  • Baldur's Gate: The first game's Big Bad, Sarevok was a scenery-chewing Tin Tyrant who, in spite of his appearance and demeanor tried to accomplish his goals through a far-reaching plot to manipulate politics and trade on a nation-wide scale. This is contrasted with the sequel's main villain Jon Irenicus, a quiet, intellectual Mad Scientist who chose overwhelming displays of arcane might as his path to power.
  • In Dark Souls I and Dark Souls II, Gwyn and Vendrick's wife Nashandra contrast pretty heavily. The former was a king who founded his kingdom, is associated with light and fire, may have been manipulated to some degree by Frampt, sacrificed himself to preserve the First Flame, and is found in an essentially mindless state defending said Flame; the latter was a queen who brought the kingdom to ruin, is associated with darkness and death, manipulated Vendrick into the actions that brought Drangleic to ruin, seeks to claim the Throne of Want (which appears to be tied to the First Flame) for herself, and is an active, intelligent participant in the fight. The final battles even contrast: Gwyn is at the First Flame already, while Nashandra goes there once you've cleared the way, to the point that she walks through the boss fog if you've met the conditions before killing the Throne Watcher and Defender. Of note, II pulls this as a Bait-and-Switch; Nashandra barely gets a mention, with everyone talking about King Vendrick, so it looks like Vendrick is going to be a Recurring Element resembling Gwyn in the same way that other bosses echo ones from the first game...and then you actually find Vendrick, now a giant, completely mindless Hollow who can only stagger around in circles and won't even fight you unless you aggro him, and realise things are a bit different now.
  • Justice and Dizzy from Guilty Gear: The Missing Link and Guilty Gear X. Both are Commander Gears, and even relatives (Dizzy is Justice's daughter,) but while the former is a genocidal warlord in Powered Armor out to exterminate all mankind, the latter is a kind Friend to All Living Things who just wants to be left alone, and the only reason you're going after her at all is the threat she poses as a Commander Gear. They both have Testament as their right-hand man as well, who himself is notably different in personality between games, being the Lone Psycho kind of Goth in Missing Link as a result of being controlled by Justice, and a Gloomy Atoner Goth in X as he chooses to protect Dizzy of his own free will.
    • I-No from XX isn't a Gear at all and has no connection to Justice, and is working for another character - That Man. She's also utterly sadistic and manipulative, frequently causing mayhem for no reason other than The Evulz, leading to That Man having to clean up her messes when they get too extreme.
    • Valentine from Overture is once again connected to Justice, and is an Emotionless Girl dutifully working to further the agenda of an unknown Big Bad (revealed in Xrd to be The Universal Will.) The only time she shows emotion when you finally thwart her plans, at which point she flies into an Unstoppable Rage.
    • Ramlethal from Xrd is another "Valentine" like the one in Overture, and from her first appearance it's clear from her sporting a Slasher Smile at the end that while she tries to keep up an act of being an Emotionless Girl like her predecessor, she's already developing emotions. Also unlike her predecessor, she's actually redeemed at the end of the story.
  • The Evil Within 2 has a big bad triumvirate versus Ruvik. In the first game, Ruvik's main goal was to escape back to the real world. This game's antagonists, Stefano and Theodore, have no intention of leaving; Stefano wanting to stay to "make [his] art forever", while Theodore wants to take control of Mobius (and by extension, the rest of the world) through the influence Union gives him. Subverted with Myra, as she originally entered Union to get her daughter out while she stayed behind to destroy Mobius, only for Union's malleable nature to corrupt her. Also, Ruvik was sinister and mysterious whereas Stefano and Theodore behave in a more theatrical and flamboyant manner that wouldn't be out of place in, say, Dead Rising.
  • Spyro the Dragon
    • Gnasty Gnorc in in the first game is a muscular goblin who’s simply agitated by the dragons making fun of them rather than being a borderline-malicious individual like some of the later Big Bads, prompting him to turn all of them (Except Spyro, since he’s too small for his spell to detect) into crystal statues. Other than that and his ability to turn gems into gnorc soldiers, Gnasty has absolutely no experience when it comes to magic.
    • Ripto in Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage!. In a stark contrast to the aforementioned Gnasty Gnorc, Ripto is short, action-oriented, and has somewhat better experience with magic, being able to turn orbs into robotic mounts during the final battle. Also, while he also despises dragons as a whole, no explanation is ever given as to where that hatred came from. Not only that, but most of the enemies in the game are random threats that Spyro runs into while trying to collect the talismans, rather than goons working directly for Ripto.
    • The Sorceress in Spyro: Year of the Dragon. Similarly to Gnasty Gnorc, she’s an Orcus on His Throne type of antagonist who doesn’t become a direct obstacle to Spyro until the end of the game. Contrarily though, she’s more politically-backed than Ripto or Gnasty in that she’s the monarch of the Forgotten Realms, as well as the fact that her minions are an already-existing race known as the Rhynocs, who work as hirelings sent out to kill Spyro any chance they get. Considering her title, she also has a good deal more knowledge of magic than either of the previous villains, which is especially true when she turns one of her guards into a gargoyle-esque beast intended to eradicate everyone who chooses to side against her. Lastly, she’s the only villain who is explicitly stated to have no qualms against committing genocide on the dragon hatchlings, just because watching them wriggle around in her throne room grosses her out.
    • Grendor in Spyro: Season of Ice. He stands out from the rest of the antagonists by starting off as a puny mook who is unhappy with his position as a librarian. In a desperate act to heighten himself socially, he attempts to learn some of The Sorceress’ magic, only for it to go awry and transform the poor Rhynoc into a two-headed (And on top of that, split between being constantly depressed and frustrated on each side) scourge. He also sticks out for being one of the only antagonists to perform a Heel–Face Turn, who even decides to appreciate his job of being a librarian after Spyro defeats him and Zoe reverts him to his non-magical state.
    • Red in Spyro: A Hero's Tail. He’s the first villain to be a dragon himself as opposed to a non-dragon who holds some type of a grudge against the dragon race. Near the end, he converts the gnorcs into robotic goons and the final battle also involves him turning into a colossal mech, emphasizing his connection to machinery as opposed to brute force, evasiveness, or having a political advantage. As of Shadow Legacy, he’s the only other antagonist to perform a Heel–Face Turn. In Red’s case, instead of his evilness having been caused by accident, he was brainwashed by the villain of that game, which leads us to…
    • The Mysterious Figure/The Sorcerer in Spyro: Shadow Legacy. He first shows up as a conspicuous-looking hooded wanderer who is revealed to have mind-controlled Red prior to the events of A Hero’s Tail. While the previous few villains were hammy to some extent (Even The Sorceress, who is a Vile Villain, Saccharine Show in her own right), this villain is utterly devoid of any humor and is far more reserved in his tone of voice (Not to mention, his absolutely terrifying dragon form in the final boss fight), more befitting of an antagonist in the reboot. He’s also the only villain to fall in Karma Houdini territory, getting nothing more than a devastating blow to his reputation and fleeing the final battle so he can formulate another scheme against the good guys.
  • Rayman:
    • Mr. Dark in Rayman (1995). He primarily wears an indigo robe and sombrero-like hat, is about a head taller than the title protagonist, and doesn’t make himself physically available prior to the final battle besides stealing the Great Protoon and kidnapping Betilla. He’s also skilled in magic, as shown by his ability to steal Rayman’s powers one by one in the final level, summon flame projectiles to corner his adversary, (depending on the player’s interpretation) capable of shapeshifting, and (in the Game Boy Color version) attack his adversary with lightning bolts.
    • The second installment introduced the world to the one and only Admiral Razorbeard. Despite being an Orcus on His Throne like Mr. Dark, he differs from him by being diminutive, wears a red and white garb, and gets significantly more lines of dialogue than Mr. Dark (Who only spoke once in the entire game). Also, unlike the previous villain, Razorbeard cannot use magic but rather relies on machinery (As evidenced by his pirate gang being robots and his piloting of the Grolgoth at the end).
    • Rayman 3: Hoodlum Havoc has Andre the Dark Lum Lord, a black-bodied, unclad, black-comedy spewing, and very small vermin who turns the red lums into his loyal followers and spends a large portion of the game in Globox’s stomach. In contrast to the robot-commandeering Razorbeard, Andre relies on tearing off pelts of animal fur in order for his lum goons to stand any chance against Rayman and building everything from scratch since he and the other black lums just came into existence. The other major antagonist of this game, Reflux the Knaaren, is also dark-bodied but much larger, wears a sienna loincloth, wields a magic staff, has very few funny quirks compared to Andre, and is primarily motivated by revenge against Rayman after losing to him in their first encounter. By the time he teams up with Andre in the game’s closing moments, they become the very first contrasting-antagonist twosome in the series. On top of that, due to the fact that part of his essence continued existing inside of Globox after his defeat, Andre becomes the main threat again in Hoodlum's Revenge. Although the original Reflux is Killed Off for Real, Andre manages to transform the hypnotized Globox into a clone of the disgraced Knaaren warrior, preserving the shared state of Big Bad that they shared when they first met to some extent.

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