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Come and stay at the Last Resort. You may never lea- er, want to leave.
Luigi's Mansion 3 is a third-person adventure game developed by Next Level Games for Nintendo Switch. The third entry in the Luigi's Mansion series, the game released on October 31, 2019, just in time for Halloween.
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Luigi has received an invitation to go on vacation in the Last Resort, a luxurious hotel. Naturally, he jumps at the opportunity and brings along his brother Mario, Princess Peach, and 3 Toads, with the Polterpup from the previous game tagging along as well. Unsurprisingly, it turns out to be a haunted hotel and a trap set by King Boo and the owner of the hotel, Hellen Gravely, to capture Mario and company. With the help of E. Gadd, the new Poltergust G-00, and even Gooigi, Luigi must once again conquer his fears and rescue everyone. But it won't be easy...

After the mission-based structure of Dark Moon, this game returns to the more open-ended style of the GameCube original. Luigi must explore each themed floor of the hotel while fighting ghosts, solving puzzles, and defeating bosses to obtain elevator buttons that he can use to reach more floors, meeting a strange cast of ghosts along the way. The Poltergust G-00 gives Luigi several more tools to play with, such as Suction Shot plungers, and he can now summon Gooigi to reach new areas and provide extra firepower. The ScareScraper multiplayer mode returns from Dark Moon, now supporting up to eight players at once.

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The teaser trailer can be viewed here, and the E3 2019 trailer here. Nintendo Treehouse's gameplay presentation can be watched here.


Tropes found in Luigi's Mansion 3 include:

  • Ability Required to Proceed: Most of 12F (The Spectral Catch), including the Captain Fishook battle, is blocked off by a ship bow that's too large to suck up normally. You need to come back later once you've acquired the Super Suction upgrade (which itself requires a second trip to B2), allowing you to destroy the bow and expose the restaurant's entrance. Curiously, this is the only mandatory use of Super Suction in the game, as the other areas where it can be used only help with collecting some gems.
  • Achievement System: This game has four different types of achievements: Collection, Hotel, Battle and Scarescraper. The collection achievements relate to collecting all the gems on each floor and the type of money you amass. Hotel achievements are more miscellaneous, involving such things as riding the elevator 50 times, finding and interacting certain objects, etc. Battle achievements involve defeating different types of ghosts while Scarescraper achievements revolve around clearing floors and defeating rare ghosts.
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  • Action Commands: Something the game doesn't directly state is that when slamming a ghost, if you press the button just as the ghost hits the floor, you'll slam it again faster than you would just by Button Mashing. Mashing usually gets you 4 slams, but good timing will net you 5 (and it's upgraded to a possible 7 after you acquire the Super Suction, another thing the game neglects to mention). This is also important when fighting Boos, as they can be slammed indefinitely until a dropped input, and will cough up gradually bigger amounts of cash for bigger slam chains.
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us: The final battle has King Boo pick up and tear open E. Gadd's portable lab to imprison him and the three Toads in a painting.
  • Ambiguously Evil: Hellen (and Polterkitty by association) and King Boo are the only clearly evil ghosts in the hotel. While the regular ghosts were under the influence of King Boo's crown and are freed when it is destroyed, the boss ghosts are unaccounted for in the ending and may or may not have been in the same boat. The issue is further muddied by the Retcon of the ghosts always having pupil-less eyes, whereas in Dark Moon this only happened when they were under King Boo's control.
  • And I Must Scream:
    • King Boo imprisons not just Mario, but also E. Gadd, Peach and the Toads in portraits.
    • This is also Luigi's fate in the "Good Night!" sequence.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • A lot of fans were divided about Dark Moon's mission-based structure where Luigi always goes back to the lab after finishing one of many missions in that game. This game, however, usually allows you to keep advancing after getting an elevator button, unless something takes it away from you again or Gadd has an upgrade for you. In addition, Luigi can willingly go back to the lab at any time, leaving it up to him for the most part. Even the first Luigi's Mansion had mandatory returns to the lab after defined episodes of the game, but here, there's only a few required returns tied to the plot.
    • The Dark-Light Device no longer has an overheating problem and a meter, allowing Luigi (and Gooigi) to use it for as long as they want without harm. This helps greatly in catching Boos, and makes the possessed enemies much easier to defeat than they likely would have been with the old mechanics, as they require a few seconds of exposure to the Dark-Light once stunned.
    • Gold Bones can now be purchased at any time and last as long Luigi doesn't die. He can also purchase multiple ones if he has the money for them. In Dark Moon, Gold Bones can be found in random objects, one per mission, and only last for that certain mission (meaning a Gold Bone found in Mission 1 can only be used for that mission and nothing later).
    • Items like gems and keys are no longer vacuumable, making it easier to prioritize objects and money around them and preventing Luigi from sucking up a collectible and the objects around it fading during the animation.
    • Luigi and Gooigi can normally only have one plunger fired at a time each, but for objects requiring two, if one of them vacuums the other's plunger, the first character can create a second plunger to streamline things and let the two slam an object without having to make the other character let go and create their own plunger.
    • In Dark Moon golden animals were intended to be burst with the Strobulb and simply vacuuming them rewarded absolutely nothing. Here, doing the latter also gives you the cash bonus.
    • Gem Goobs are hard to catch, sure, moving in the same erratic patterns as Golden Goobs, but unlike the latter, they never actually flee, preventing you from missing out on a gem simply because you weren't fast enough.
    • If you spend too long in a room or boss without solving the puzzle, E. Gadd will call in with a hint.
    • Small creatures such as mice, spiders, and bats will now drop money whether they are flashed by the Strobulb or vacuumed up with the Poltergust, preventing any cases of Damn You, Muscle Memory! from players more familiar with the mechanics of the first or second game respectively.
  • Art Evolution: Luigi looks way more detailed in the final build than he was in the reveal trailer. The same goes for a lot of the environment. The aesthetic of the ghosts is also much more detailed than Dark Moon, and the bosses are just as, or perhaps even more defined than the Portrait Ghosts from the first game.
  • Artifact Title: Even more so than the previous game. While Dark Moon still took place in mansions, even if they weren't specifically Luigi's, this game neither takes place in a mansion nor is it Luigi's.
  • Ascended Extra: Gooigi first appeared as the 2nd player in co-op mode in the Nintendo 3DS port of the original Luigi's Mansion. Here, he's a core game mechanic, required for many puzzles and boss fights.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: The Super Suction upgrade to the Poltergust. It allows you to suck anything and everything into your vacuum, including ghosts without having to stun them first. However, you need to use a special socket to provide the Poltergust with the power needed to use this function, and there are only three in the entire game since you get it so late, and there's only one instance where you need to use it to progress.
  • Bag of Spilling: Averted with returning Poltergust mechanics, as Luigi's behavior with features such as the Strobulb and the Dark-Light clearly indicates he remembers them, and the controls are explained to the player with on-screen instructions rather than in-universe by another character. However, this trope is also played straight with the Dark-Light Device itself, which isn't attached on the Poltergust to begin with and must be reclaimed on the second floor.
  • Banana Peel: If Luigi steps on a banana, it will cause him to slip and lose 1 health point. Oozers like to make these a hazard.
  • Bait-and-Switch:
    • When King Boo shows up in the Master Suites after Yellow Toad is rescued, he decides to take one of the two remaining paintings (Mario & Peach) for a scheme of his own. Someone familiar with the series' conventions would expect him to take Mario's painting, but it turns out to be Peach's painting he brings with him, and Hellen is guarding Mario.
    • When Morty suddenly notices Luigi, grabs him and says "YOU! Wait a second! Hold it right there!", one might think that he recognises Luigi from the wanted posters and become the usual hostile kind of ghost despite Luigi getting back his beloved megaphone for him. In reality, Morty declares that Luigi has some nice features and a good build, perfect for starring in his next film!
  • Bandit Mook: The Thieving Slinker, a boss variant introduced in Scarescraper's first update. If it grabs a Luigi, it will teleport his Poltergust to a random location in the boss room. While not as much of an inconvenience as the events that scatter the team's vacuums across an entire floor, it can lead to some dangerous situations, especially paired with Lethal ghosts.
  • Batman Gambit: King Boo pulls an implied one. The reason he chooses to guard Peach's painting over Mario's was because he expected Hellen to fail and let Mario get freed, since he had lost confidence in her at that point. However, as long as he had Peach, both Mario brothers would come after him anyway (like they always do with Bowser), allowing him to set up another trap at the roof.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: King Boo is the primary threat as normal, but this time he is being aided by the hotel owner, Hellen Gravely.
  • Big Boo's Haunt: Goes pretty much without saying, including once again the Trope Namers...
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • Right when King Boo has Luigi and co. finally cornered and ready to turn them into a portrait, Polterpup appears and pushes Luigi out of the way before the frame drops on them.
    • Polterpup also saves Luigi in the Boilerworks from potentially drowning when knocked into the water by Clem. (While Luigi can swim in other games just fine, here the Poltergust G-00 appears to drag him down in this scene.) Polterpup thus essentially acts as a life ring.
    • And in the ending, when the hotel collapses, Polterpup grabs Luigi just before he hits the ground.
  • Big Eater: As soon as the group arrive at the hotel, Mario is already eyeing up the buffet and when you enter his room later, there are several empty pizza boxes, implying Mario just had a big ol' feast for himself.
  • Bizarrchitecture: The hotel's construction is highly eccentric. Alongside more typical amenities such as a shopping center and high-class restaurant are features such as a vertical botanical garden with overgrown hotel suites, a medieval jousting arena, multiple fully-equipped filming stages, a recreation of an Egyptian pyramid, a pirate themed restaurant with an entire lagoon and pirate ship inside, and a swimming pool several stories above ground level - which is a very unsafe place to put it. Moreover, the entire hotel seems to be bigger on the inside since several "floors" are multiple stories in height and their floor plans seem to clash with the hotel's outer facade. Perhaps the most bizzare part, though, is that everyone has to use the elevator to get to every floor past the second- there is no stair access between floors aside from a flight connecting the basement to the lobby.
  • Book-Ends:
    • The game opens with Luigi, Mario, Peach and the Toads coming to the Last Resort, and ends with them all leaving the rebuilt Last Resort (now managed by the ghosts no longer under King Boo's control).
    • In the intro, Luigi is sleeping in the van when Polterpup jolts him awake; in the ending, Polterpup jumps into Luigi's lap, and they fall asleep together.
  • Boring, but Practical: It seems the ghosts know they don't need to flex their supernatural muscles when mundane approaches prove just as effective.
    • To keep Luigi sealed in the hotel, the ghosts don't create supernatural barriers like they do to trap him in smaller rooms...they just board and chain the front doors to heck and break the garage gate.
    • In several places, Luigi is forced to take roundabout paths through the hotel simply because the ghosts left things in front of doors, preventing him from pushing them open.
    • Hellen Gravely's boss fight is mostly fought by her high-tech security system, with her having a single simple attack that's not even supernatural in nature. The security system is more than enough to make her a challenge, though, with most of the fight being about trying to shut off its laser barriers with Gooigi (who will also be occasionally washed away by water) while Luigi is in harm's way.
  • Boss-Only Level: Some floors are much smaller and have unbarred paths to the bosses. There are still side rooms and gems to find, but they're optional like in any other.
  • Boxing Battler: Two Hammers, one of them having boxing gloves and the other constantly chucking weights, attack Luigi in the Fitness Center. The boxing gloves block Luigi's Strobulb flashes, so he has to bait the one with the weights into throwing them into the other, rendering it dizzy and vulnerable to Luigi's Strobulb. It's much harder than it sounds.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: The Tomb Suites floor is themed after ancient Egypt, so all the usual tropes are in full effect; hieroglyphic wall art, snakes, mummies, a big pyramid full of booby traps, and an Egyptian queen boss ghost who sleeps in a sarcophagus.
  • Bullfight Boss: King MacFrights charges at you in a joust while wearing armor, and must be stunned and slammed around.
  • The Bus Came Back: Boolossus returns as a boss in the Scarescraper after being absent from Dark Moon.Though... 
  • But Wait, There's More!: A gloriously cheesy (and official) advert invoking the style of the Infomercial, complete with Canned Laughter, uses this line when explaining the capabilities of the Poltergust G-00. Can be viewed here.
  • Call-Back:
    • The final fight against King Boo has him duplicate himself into two and later three, with the decoys bearing his old design from the original Luigi's Mansion.
    • King Boo describes the Poltergust as making a "SHWEEERRPP-SHLOOOOP-WHOOORPP-SHLEEEOOORG" sound. Exactly the wording he used in the final battle of the first game.
    • Symbols of the Dark Moon appear in various places throughout the game, and in a couple of spots, there are scale models of Gloomy Manor, that game's first mansion.
  • Canine Companion: Since becoming his pet, Polterpup is such for Luigi throughout the game, popping up from time to time as he explores.
  • Cats Are Mean: Hellen owns a ghost cat named Polterkitty, who turns out to be just as eager to steal key items as Polterpup was in Dark Moon, and more malicious in doing so. When you finally corner her, she then proceeds to promptly turn into a spectral cat-beast to violently resist giving the buttons up.
  • Cat Scare: Done several times, with Polterpup and even a freed Mario popping out and startling Luigi off his feet while trying to guide him.
  • Catch a Falling Star: When the Last Resort falls apart after the Final Battle, Polterpup quickly and successfully breaks Luigi's fall a foot before he hits the ground.
  • Chekhov's Skill:
    • Some bosses will test you on mechanics you've learned earlier in their associated floor. For example, Kruller can only be accessed via Gooigi phasing through the gate separating them, Dr. Potter's plant needs to be cut off with a saw, and Clem must be fought while riding a duck pool floatie.
    • If you mess around with the Toads immediately after rescuing them from certain bosses, you may find that they can be sucked up and launched into the air as projectiles. It's harmless and amusing at first and often grants treasure bonuses, but you're later required to do this during an Escort Mission with the red Toad, as he can break down walls and reach areas that Luigi himself can't get to.
  • Chest Monster: The game introduces a new type of Spirit Ball in purple, which doesn't hide objects, but instead infests and curses them, turning them into these. Luigi can come across innocuous trash bins and treasure chests only for them to wake up and attack, so he must find a way to stun them and then drive the Spirit Balls out with the Dark-Light so he can vacuum them up and return the object to normal.
  • Clipped-Wing Angel:
    • Paranormal Productions's boss is just a Goob wearing the top half of a monster suit. Luigi has to knock the monster suit off by propelling three energy balls into the ghost, and afterwards, it becomes a standard enemy that Luigi can defeat to end the fight.
    • Ug himself is significantly more straightforward than the T. rex skeleton he was possessing.
    • King MacFrights is left with only a pathetic Spin Attack once you destroy his armor.
    • Johnny Deepend cannot move once he's trapped in the swimming pool drain, and has very low HP.
  • Closed Circle: The first visit to the lobby after the trap has been sprung shows the ghosts barricading the main door to keep Luigi and co. trapped. All other exits and even phone lines have also been tampered with to ensure no chance of escape or contacting outside help until King Boo and Hellen Gravely are both dealt with. However, some of Professor E. Gadd and King Boo's comments imply Luigi could escape any time if he really wanted to, but, to Gadd's frustration, he refuses to leave without saving Mario, Peach, and the Toads first.
  • Combination Attack: Hammers and Slinkers have two tails. If two players team up and each grab a tail in Scarescraper (or by using Gooigi in the story mode,) they can slam the ghost onto the floor together, and the resulting attack deals twice as much damage and creates a damaging shockwave.
  • Console Cameo: As in the previous two games, Gadd gives Luigi a Nintendo system to communicate with him. This time, it's the Virtual Boo, based on the Virtual Boy, complete with red and black graphics.
  • Continue Your Mission, Dammit!: In the early parts of the game, you are mostly free to explore, but if you don't go immediately after the current objective, E. Gadd will chime in periodically to remind you of your goal, and sometimes Polterpup will railroad you into completing a certain action before you can leave the area and do something else. After a certain point, Gadd's hints can be turned off in the game's settings, making this less of an annoyance.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Giant Spider who acted as the first boss of Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon appears as a prop in one of Paranormal Productions' movie sets, with the music alluding to the theme that played during the boss fight.
    • Two of the movie posters on the same level are depicting Mario Strikers.
    • During his battle with Luigi, Amadeus Wolfgeist possesses his own piano to attack Luigi with, which is more than likely a reference to a...certain room in Super Mario 64's Big Boo's Haunt. It's also worth noting that Wolfgeist's strategy of taking control of large inanimate objects to fight Luigi with is similar to what the Harsh Possessor did in Dark Moon.
    • Some of the pipes which Gooigi can travel through are more realistically depicted versions of the standard green Warp Pipes of regular Super Mario Bros. games. However, these ones can only travel between areas of the same room and Luigi himself cannot use them at all since they're barred.
    • One puzzle in the Dance Hall involves pushing a section of a brick wall out and having Luigi hit it by burst-jumping underneath it for money and a gem, a clear nod to the standby Mario mechanic of breaking blocks by jumping under them. It even adopts the appearance of a used block when Luigi finishes.
    • Captain Fishook wouldn't be the first shark pirate captain with a hook for a fin in the Mario franchise.
    • The game once again features pearls as money collectibles after they were absent from the second game, though they aren't dropped by bosses and don't come in multiple sizes.
    • The Hotel Shops floor revolves around hunting for keys with playing card symbols to progress through it, which was the structure of the entire first game, having playing-card keys behind each area boss that unlocked the next section of the house.
    • Another reference with keys is that one is obtained by running on a treadmill, much like the one in Biff Atlas' room in the first game.
    • The Garden Suites floor is a large vertical space overgrown with plants, much like the Haunted Towers mansion in Dark Moon.
    • Paranormal Productions on the 8th floor revolves around unlocking portals so Luigi can carry items between themed areas to solve puzzles, with the necessary items in the wrong rooms. This is the exact same gimmick as Dark Moon's Treacherous Mansion, even using a similar surrealist conceit with the cameras to the Poltergeist fight in the Treacherous Mansion's third mission.
    • There's an Egyptian area with ghosts that dress up as mummies, and they work the same way as in Dark Moon, though multiple ghost types can be "mummies" in 3.
    • Boss ghosts Nikki, Lindsey, and Ginny are young girl magicians, and one of the rooms on their floor has the directions inverted, with the floor really being the ceiling and furniture seemingly obeying multiple axes of gravity by being placed on the walls as well. This likely evokes Sue Pea in the first game, a young Portrait Ghost girl whose bedroom is completely upside-down when you fight her.
    • There's a white beach ball in the Sandy Great Hall of the Tomb Suites with a Boo face, looking extremely similar to the Boo Ball decoys that could fool Luigi's Boo Radar in the first game.
    • Some of the boss ghosts seem to evoke previous ones. There's a pianistnote , a buff athletenote , and Nikki, Lindsey, and Ginny are a trionote  and multiple young ghosts serving as one bossnote . One method for making Chef Soulffle vulnerable matches the method for weakening Chauncey in the first game. Also, like the first game, there is a lone friendly character ghost in Morty and he's also an optional capture, much like the first game having Madame Clairvoya as an ally and featuring a few Portrait Ghosts that were purely optional fights.
    • During his boss fight, King Boo will create copies of himself that have two fangs rather than the standard row of four Boo teeth the real one has. The two-toothed design of the copies is a reference to the original Luigi's Mansion Boos, who, including the King, had fewer teeth.
    • Just before King Boo is finally captured, he stares down Luigi, mirroring a piece of promotional artwork from Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon.
    • When Luigi finally captures Captain Fishhook, he takes a stance appearing as if he is fishing. The manual for the original game had a section explaining the new at the time ghost capturing mechanic as if the player was fishing and suggested to them to pretend it was that.
  • Cosmetic Award: Getting all the gems rewards you with a diamond plunger, all the Boos with a Boo flashlight lens, and all the achievements with a golden Poltergust.
  • Crazy-Prepared: For some reason, Luigi decided it was necessary to bring a torch (AKA, a flashlight) in his luggage to what he believed to be a luxury hotel. Of course, this is just as well since it's the only thing Luigi has until he gets the Poltergust G-00.
  • Critical Annoyance: The beeping heartbeat sound which plays when Luigi is at low health. It gets faster and louder the lower he is on health and the rumbling in the Joy-Con gets stronger too.
  • Cruelty Is the Only Option: In order to defeat the boss of the Unnatural History Museum, you must let it chew on Gooigi. This actually One Hit Kills him, though fortunately, he can regenerate. Granted, it's debatable if Gooigi feels any pain from this given how expressionless and alien he is, but Professor E. Gadd clearly feels bad when giving you the hint nonetheless.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: Luigi gets taunted multiple times by the Boss Ghosts in cutscenes, yet doesn't try to capture them, even when they're vulnerable.
  • Cutscene Power to the Max: King Boo's portrait attack has the power to instantly seal away any character, even Mario, and only sheer dumb luck prevents Luigi from suffering the same fate the two times he tries to use it on him. He would be a lot more threatening in his Final Boss battle if he just kept trying or used his Reality Warper powers to make landing the portrait easier, but instead, he uses more generic attacks, only bringing out a massively enlarged portrait as a last-ditch attempt to trap Luigi. Even then, rather than slamming on Luigi immediately, it takes 4 minutes for the portrait's full effect to work, giving Luigi ample time to defeat King Boo and stop the attack.
  • Dance Battler: The ballet ghosts on 4F and the disco dancing crew on 14F. Both groups are minions of the floor's boss, and serve as the first-phase obstacle in the fights.
  • Darker and Edgier: Compared to Dark Moon, at least. While still having plenty of cartoony goofiness, the game has an overall darker atmosphere closer to the first game, the ghost designs lean more on the uncanny valley compared to the cuter ones of the previous game, there are some surprisingly brutal traps and attacks from some of the bosses, and the game has one of the bleakest Game Over sequences in the entire Mario series.
  • Defiant to the End: King Boo sees Luigi as this when he narrowly dodges getting trapped in a portrait with his friends right before the final boss. In reality, Luigi was frozen in fear! It was Polterpup that pushed Luigi out of the way of the portrait right before King Boo slams it on them all, and King Boo somehow failed to notice.
  • Demoted to Extra: The regular Boos. Unlike previous games, fighting them is not required to progress through Story Mode (though like the gems, there is a Bragging Rights Reward for defeating all of them). There isn't a mandatory Boolossus/Big Boo fight either, with the former only appearing in ScareScraper.
  • Descending Ceiling: Two of the trap rooms in the Tomb Suites operate on this. To the left, there's a room with a spike ceiling that lowers after you solve a scale puzzle, forcing you to solve it two more times to finally shut it off for good, and in the room to the right, there's a ceiling suspended by chains, which three laser statues slowly melt and shatter, forcing Luigi to push the sand around so he can climb up to the statues and shut them off before they break the chains and the ceiling crashes down.
  • Desperate Object Catch: Luigi catches the falling portrait with everyone in it just before the hotel starts to collapse.
  • Destructive Saviour: Luigi will completely demolish all the rooms inside the hotel in his quest to rescue Mario and the others, and in the Final Battle with King Boo, the entire hotel itself is reduced to rubble in the fight. Thankfully it's rebuilt in the credits.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • The boss of 2F (Chef Soulfflé) does not spawn until the boss of 3F (Kruller) is defeated to prevent Sequence Breaking, as 2F is reachable without the relevant elevator button.
    • The same goes for Captain Fishook, to a greater extent. It's normally impossible to reach 12F's beach without Super Suction, since there's a blockade in front of the main entrance, but if you somehow get past that (i.e. clipping through it), Fishook won't spawn until you acquire the upgrade you're supposed to have.
    • A sidepath which requires rescuing Red Toad from the Boilerworks requires you to take a new long way around because a Hammer fell asleep in front of a door directly to the elevator. If you try to use the instant Lab teleporter from the Virtual Boo, E. Gadd tells Luigi that it, rather inconveniently, just stopped working. He even lampshades the situation.
    • After every Toad rescue, you have to take the Toad to the elevator, and during the time between saving him and sending him to the Lab, you can fire him from your Poltergust to hit and break objects you couldn't interact with otherwise. Most of the time, there is no reward but money you couldn't obtain without the Toad, making them bonuses with a set window for claiming them. However, on 12F, there are gems and an achievement, completion rewards, that are obtained by launching things from the Poltergust to break objects. In this case, however, the bones from the broken dinosaur skeletons remain on the floor as projectiles in case you missed your chance to use the rescued Toad, keeping those rewards obtainable.
  • Didn't See That Coming: Hellen's scheme to help King Boo mostly went off without a hitch, but upon Luigi reaching the top floor, she grouses about the glaring flaw that really should've been obvious in hindsight: that Luigi is a coward. She didn't expect him to run away in the intro sequence, thinking he'd instead try to bravely fight King Boo and fail. This costs her big time once Luigi returns armed with the Poltergust and goes full Cowardly Lion, taking out every ghost in the hotel below her and finally reaching her office.
  • Distressed Dude: Mario is once again trapped inside a painting. This time, he's also joined by several Toads and Peach, as well as E. Gadd!
  • Diving Save: Unintentional, but an affectionate tackle from Polterpup pushes Luigi out of the way of King Boo's final trap, setting up the Final Boss.
  • Drives Like Crazy: In the opening cutscene, Red Toad drives the bus that's carrying Luigi and co. swerving all the way to the hotel, partly hitting the entrance gate, running over the curb and flooring a sign before stopping, presumably because he isn't actually tall enough to see over the steering wheel.
  • Do Not Go Gentle: When Luigi is first investigating Peach's scream in the dark of night, his search carries him past Mario's room where the toppled chair and disorganized pizza boxes (along with one slice on the floor near the chair) show signs of a struggle. Clearly, the elder brother wasn't as easy to pin down as Peach, whose room is largely untouched with nothing appearing wrong save for her absence.
  • Donut Mess with a Cop: The security guard is an overweight ghost named Kruller.
  • Down the Drain: The Boilerworks become an example of this once Clem floods the place. Reaching him requires shutting off the water to reverse this state.
  • Dynamic Loading: The elevator that Luigi travels in allows the game time to load the next floor. If you look at the mirror, the elevator doesn't take the actual number of floors travelled into account regardless of where the player is going to and from. However, Luigi can still move about and perform various moves (and hum the elevator music to himself if he stays still) and since it would naturally take some time for an elevator to go between floors in a hotel, it doesn't even feel like loading.
  • Easter Egg: Activating the radios found around the hotel plays various renditions of the Luigi's Mansion theme including the Dual Scream version from Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon.
  • Elite Mooks: The Rare Ghosts found on the fifth floor of a ten floor run in the Scarescraper are considerably stronger than their base counterparts, having more HP and stronger moves, like being able to throw bombs.
  • Escape Artist: One bathroom in the Twisted Suites has a walk-in shower made up like an escape tank, chained shut and with the pipes to the bathtub diverted into the shower as if to fill it for an escape act. When the magician triplets summon ghosts and scramble the rooms, a Hammer bursts out of the tank.
  • Escape Sequence: The prologue ends with King Boo attempting to trap Luigi in a picture frame, just like he did with Mario, Peach and the Toads. Since Luigi is completely defenseless at the moment, all he can do is run to the end of the hallway and jump down a laundry chute to escape.
  • Escort Mission: At one point, Red Toad goes missing in the Boilerworks with an important Poltergust upgrade, causing Luigi to go after him. Toad and the upgrade (which requires Toad to get) are actually recovered rather early, but because the normal entrance to the level becomes blocked by a sleeping Hammer, as well as the fact that the transporter directly back to the lab gets disabled (which E. Gadd quickly Lampshades if you try to use that), the player will be required to look for an alternate exit (that can only be accessed with Toad too, conveniently enough). This segment also introduces a specific type of Slinker that attempts to capture Toad, thus introducing the escorting aspect.
  • Female Feline, Male Mutt: The rough-and-tumble good-boy Polterpup and his male owner Luigi are countered in this game by the female Hellen Gravely and her slinky, feminine Polterkitty, creating this gendered pet dynamic.
  • Fisher Kingdom: Each floor (outside of the Lobby first floor) is home to a boss ghost that reflects said floor's theme, such as;
    • Clem, a mechanic ghost for the Boilerworks B2 floor.
    • Steward, a bellhop that is fought in the Basement B1 floor.
    • Chef Soulfflé, a chef ghost in the Mezzanine second floor, which boasts a beautiful dining room and large kitchen.
    • Kruller, a fat security guard ghost that is fought in the Hotel Shops third floor.
    • Amadeus Wolfgeist, a pianist ghost for the Great Stage fourth floor.
    • Chambrea, a maid ghost for the RIP Suites fifth floor.
    • King MacFrights, a king/knight ghost for the Castle MacFrights sixth floor.
    • Dr. Potter, an old gardener ghost for the Garden Suites seventh floor.
    • Morty, a film director ghost for the Paranormal Productions eighth floor.
    • Ug, a caveman ghost for the Unnatural History Museum ninth floor.
    • Serpci, a pharaoh queen ghost for the Tomb Suites tenth floor.
    • Nikki, Lindsey and Ginny, a trio of magician ghosts for the Twisted Suites eleventh floor.
    • Captain Fishhook, a shark ghost for The Spectral Catch twelfth floor
    • Johnny Deepend, a swimmer ghost for the Fitness Center thirteenth floor.
    • DJ Phantasmagloria, a DJ ghost for the Dance Hall fourteenth floor.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • Hellen Gravely seemingly always carries a powder puff to apply her makeup, and the top floor where she lives features some large makeup cases and a broken vanity mirror in her bedroom. She really looks like a monstrous hag, and uses her makeup, presumably with some supernatural magic, to maintain her beautiful facade.
    • Polterkitty is normally the same size as Polterpup and looks like an ordinary spectral housecat, but when she's cornered, she suddenly transforms into a much larger, panther-like beast. From this, one may assume that her owner, Hellen Gravely, also has a deceptive initial appearance...
  • For Want of a Nail: King Boo and Hellen Gravely's plan are ultimately thwarted thanks to the presence of a laundry chute at the beginning of the game. Had it not been there, Luigi could not have escaped from their initial chase, found the Poltergust G-00, and proceeded to vacuum up every ghost in the hotel.
  • Game-Over Man: King Boo gazes at the paintings of the captured Luigi and the others, before turning around to laugh at you.
  • Garden of Evil: The seventh floor is a large tower of suites that may have started out tasteful, but ended up ridiculously overgrown in the care of Dr. Potter, the boss ghost there.
  • Genie in a Bottle: In the desert room of the Tomb Suites, you can uncover a magic lamp buried in the sand. Suck it onto your nozzle and hold on it for long enough, and a Golden Goob emerges.
  • The Glomp: Mario when Luigi frees him.
  • Goggles Do Something Unusual: As in Dark Moon, one of the items you can find in the Scarescraper is the Dark-Light Goggles which lets you see otherwise invisible items at all times.
  • Gold Makes Everything Shiny: In the prologue, the hotel initially appears to be this as befitting its luxury status with gold floors, gold walls, gold bathrooms and even gold furniture and as such, everything is ludicrously shiny. Naturally, it's all a trick and Luigi sees the illusion fade away as soon as he sets outside his room.
  • Gotta Kill Them All: This time, King Boo locks all of Luigi's friends in portraits, including Mario, Peach, three Toads and even E. Gadd. The former three have their mugshots in the lobby crossed off, as if checking off who has fallen into the latest trap.
  • Go-to-Sleep Ending: The game ends with Luigi zonking out with Polterpup in the van.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: While Luigi is slamming ghosts caught in his vacuum, he can whack them into other nearby enemies in order to stun and weaken them.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • As noted above, it is possible to slam a ghost five times (seven times once you get the Super Suction) with proper timing, just as the ghost hits the floor, as opposed to just Button Mashing. Also, most of the achievements are blanked out with little clue on how to unlock them unless you look them up, interact with pretty much everything or stumble into them by chance.
    • The game never tells you this, but (similar to the first game) the amount of money you collect factors into the ending (even if only slightly). You have to collect a minimum of 70,000 G to get the "Rank A" ending.
  • Healing Hands: The green Medic Goob, a boss variant introduced in Scarescraper's second update, can restore the health of every other ghost in the room left unchecked.
  • Holler Button: Pressing on the D-Pad lets Luigi and Gooigi call out for Mario in Story mode, or request help from teammates in Scarescraper mode.
  • Hope Spot: Sometimes after Luigi beats a boss ghost, its associated elevator button is stolen at the last second, and he has to backtrack to acquire it for real. This first happens with a mouse scurrying around the Mezzanine floor, then later occurs twice with Polterkitty, who must be chased through multiple floors.
  • Improbable Weapon User: The ghosts are able to pick up a variety of items to attack Luigi with including books, billiards cues, weights, etc.
  • Instakill Mook: Well, perhaps Mini-Boss, but the Lethal variants of the ghosts found on Scarescraper will defeat a player in a single hit (though this isn't extremely devastating since they can be revived.)
  • It's All Upstairs from Here: The hotel that is the game's setting, obviously, but Dr. Potter's floor in particular is specifically about climbing a huge flight of stairs to retrieve one of the elevator buttons, after he grows a plant that takes it above. The game's path isn't entirely straight up the hotel (the fifth floor is visited second, and the sub-basement floor is visited twice later in the adventure), but the goal is to reach the top.
  • It's a Wonderful Failure: The "Good Night!" sequence treats the player to a scene of King Boo gazing at Luigi and the rest of victims trapped in paintings, before turning to the player and laughing.
  • Jump Scare:
    • In a cutscene in the Lobby area, one ghost starts to leave, looking as if it hasn't noticed Luigi, only to quickly fly up to him and scream at both him and the camera.
    • The balcony to E. Gadd's room on the fifth floor features a telescope. Look through it for a few seconds and a Gem Goob pops up in the view and can be subsequently caught.
    • In the Master Suite, you can uncover a model of Gloomy Manor in a glass case. Looking into it for a few seconds, a Golden Goob appears in your face.
  • The Klutz: Luigi inadvertently draws attention to himself from ghosts at least twice by not fully being aware of his surroundings. For example, he accidentally knocks off a piece of glassware in the dining room whilst trying to sneak past a group of ghosts. Later, in the Boilerworks, Luigi comes across a sleeping Clem and whilst trying to back away, stands on a loud rubber duck, which wakes up Clem who then proceeds to cause Luigi a lot of trouble.
    • Luigi has a tendency of dropping the elevator buttons either by being startled out of his wits, thus letting the buttons go in the process, or just plain having them snatched out of his hands. If Luigi kept a better grip on them or just put them away immediately, he wouldn't spend as much time getting them back.
  • Knife-Throwing Act: There's a chest of blades and a knife wheel in the Twisted Suites. Vacuuming the wheel to spin it will see some blades throwing themselves into it with perfect accuracy, granting Luigi a gem.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Ug. Unlike the other boss ghosts, who have goofy intros, interactions with Luigi and show quirky personalities during their fights, he's played almost completely seriously, with the lead-up to his fight being intense, being legitimately scary while possessing the T-Rex skeleton with his true appearance not being revealed until it's destroyed, and even once it's destroyed and you are fighting him himself, he's still more menacing appearance-wise than most of the other boss ghosts and only shows any goofiness when trying to escape the Poltergust's suction.
  • Laser Hallway: The final floor features several rooms with laser security that will damage and knock Luigi back if he comes in contact with them, while instantly destroying Gooigi if it comes in contact with them, and the hallways also have lasers skimming across the floors during a ghost brawl. Bizarrely, one of the most heavily guarded rooms in the building is Hellen Gravely's bathroom, which has multiple moving lasers down its paths.
  • Last Episode Theme Reprise: Clearing out a key room in the Master Suite also rewards you with the BGM changing to a variation of the title theme.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: Luigi adopting the Polterpup was only revealed in the ending of Dark Moon, but this game made it obvious starting with the E3 2019 trailer.
  • Laughably Evil: The ghosts, especially the boss ghosts, tend to be goofballs.
  • Level Scaling: Averted. Not only does Luigi not receive any upgrades to his abilities like he did in Dark Moon, but the enemies never increase in health or difficulty and do not have stronger versions, which is contrary to both previous games. Instead, Luigi's tools and combat capabilities remain the same strength (with only a slight upgrade to his Slam capacity after getting Super Suction), and enemies have more HP from the start, but don't change as the game goes on (although Gem Goobs tend to have higher HP the higher up the hotel you go).
  • Load-Bearing Boss: Once King Boo is defeated, the entire hotel falls apart. Luigi survives thanks to Polterpup, while everyone else was still relatively safe in the painting. Once the ghosts free themselves from the containment unit and King Boo's control gem breaks, they realize that their home is now gone. Fortunately, E. Gadd uses the money Luigi found throughout the game to construct a new hotel, with the heroes and ghosts working together to build it.
  • Lots of Luggage: Peach brings a large pile of bags and suitcases, which her Toad attendants struggle with.
  • MacGuffin: The elevator buttons, each one in the hands of the floor bosses, are required to reach the top of the hotel.
  • Mad Love: Hellen Gravely is deeply infatuated with King Boo. So much so that she broke him out of his containment and lured Luigi and friends to the Last Resort to trap them into paintings, all to impress King Boo. King Boo doesn’t seem to notice or care about her affections, and is only interested in her effectiveness in helping him catch Luigi.
  • Marathon Level: The 20-floor option added as Scarescraper DLC. Runs are roughly 2 hours long on average, with the boss floors adding new and tougher ghosts, mix-and-matching them to make devious teams, and even giving Boolossus additional attack patterns.
  • Marilyn Maneuver: For the brief time in the opening of the game when E. Gadd is following you, using the Strobulb on him results in him pulling one of three comical poses, including one mimicking Marilyn Monroe’s iconic dress pose with the tails of his lab coat fluttering!
  • Meaningful Name: The Last Resort is owned and operated by ghosts and is the site of King Boo's latest scheme, and its owner is Hellen Gravely.
  • Metronomic Man Mashing: Luigi can perform this on ghosts while they are being sucked by the Poltergust G-00, taking the place of the Power Surge mechanic from Dark Moon. This can do immense damage to both the ghosts and the surroundings (which can include other ghosts hit by the ghost Luigi is mashing with). This is also the only way to damage Boos.
  • Mickey Mousing: During the first phase of the fight with Amadeus Wolfgeist (the phase where he throws chairs at Luigi), the score syncs up with him throwing the chairs; lower-pitched chords when the chairs rise up off the ground, and higher-pitched flourishes when the chairs are launched at Luigi. Justified, as in this scene, not only is Amadeus attacking Luigi, he's also providing the background music for the fight.
  • Mini Mook: The Mini Goobs and Mini Hammers. They always show up in swarms, but they all get sucked into the Poltergust instantly without putting up much of a fight. Scarescraper occasionally has capture floors that consist of nothing but these.
  • Monster Closet: One of the tricks added to the DLC floors for Scarescraper. Savvy players might find an invisible door leading to a secret room and expect to find the usual chest full of powerups; instead, they wind up in a mosh pit with six 300-HP Hammers at once. Said Hammers are variants unique to these rooms, so if you want to complete your ghost gallery, you'd best find some flashlight and vacuum upgrades to survive the ordeal.
  • Mook Bouncer: The Warp Slinker, a boss variant introduced in Scarescraper's second update. If it grabs a Luigi, it will teleport him out of the boss room to a random one elsewhere on the floor, harking back to the boss Sneakers from Dark Moon.
  • Mook Maker: The Diffusing Goob and Hammer, boss variants introduced in Scarescraper's second update. They can spit out swarms of Mini Goobs and Mini Hammers respectively, adding a ton of extra bodies to the fight that can be difficult to control without a flashlight upgrade.
  • Mouse Hole: Multiple ones are featured around the hotel, and usually give money if vacuumed. On the second floor, they become escape routes for mice that take your elevator button, forcing you to chase them between rooms.
  • Multiple Endings: Professor E. Gadd is rebuilding the hotel. And just like the original game, the scope of the hotel depends on how much money you collected throughout the game.
  • Muscles Are Meaningless: Luigi doesn't exactly have defined muscles but he's nonetheless capable of swinging various heavy objects over his head including toolboxes, benches and even vending machines with nothing but a suction plunger for better grip.
  • Nekomata: Polterkitty has multiple tails, is a shapeshifting ghost cat, and even has traditional Japanese music as her Leitmotif. Taking her down involves pulling off her tails, and the second time she's encountered, the last one allows Luigi to fully vacuum her up.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: Captain Fishhook, the boss on the pirate themed Spectral Catch level, is a ghostly pirate shark.
  • No OSHA Compliance:
    • The Boilerworks on the lower basement level would not be safe for the living to work in due to the presence of spikes, hazardous walkways, and frequent flooding. Though considering the hotel staff are all ghosts, this isn't much of an issue for them.
    • In the credits, everyone helps re-build the hotel cue pictures of Luigi and co. sitting on girders and the like without any kind of safety equipment to stop them from falling off.
  • Non-Standard Game Over:
    • If you fail to outrun King Boo at the beginning of the game, you'll be treated with a cutscene where King Boo corners Luigi and throws the portrait frame on top of him as Luigi screams in terror. Luigi also happens to be in the same pose that you would see in the standard Game Over sequence.
    • This also happens if you let Toad get taken away by a ghost while escorting him back to the elevator.
  • Notzilla: One boss fight of the game is a big homage to Kaiju films. Luigi meets a ghost film director named Morty who casts him in a giant-monster movie... as one of the monsters, meaning that Luigi gets to fight a ghost wearing the top half of a Godzilla-like costume in the middle of a miniature city.
  • Numbered Sequel: An interesting case, as the previous game didn't make use of this in North America. This was due to the game being released with less of a gap since Dark Moon than Dark Moon had since the original, so the number felt more like it was cementing the game as part of an established franchise, rather than it being a surprise sequel over a decade later like Dark Moon was.
  • One-Winged Angel: When you finally corner Polterkitty, she will Hulk Out into a big, teleporting hunting cat which promptly attempts to maul Luigi.
  • 1-Up: This game has Gold Bones, carried over from the last game, which you can purchase from E. Gadd's shop for 1000 money each that allow Polterpup to bring you back to life if you have them. Otherwise, you'll just start from your last autosave point.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: The hotel staff are obviously ghosts in masks, complete with plainly visible straps. They also plainly have no ankles and one of them even floats out of his boots if interacted with. None of our heroes fully catch on, but Luigi will make a perturbed face around them.
  • Permanently Missable Content: While not game-breaking, there are several puzzles and interactions granting money that are only available at specific points of the game. This is most common with things that can only be done while you have a Toad with you to launch during an escort sequence, but there are other cases, like an electrical box in the Boilerworks that can only be opened while the water is filling the place, since you can't open a pipe for Gooigi after the water drains to reach it, and a Golden Goob that will only appear if you run the film in Morty's room before the floor's boss fight. None of these interactions are tied to achievements or gems, but they could impact your end-game rank by denying you some treasure.
  • Pretty in Mink: Hellen Gravely comes down in style with sunglasses and a fur stole. However, she's a Rich Bitch who is part of a Big Bad Duumvirate with King Boo in capturing everyone and getting revenge on Luigi. Also, she's not really pretty and is using some kind of glamor to look beautiful.
  • Piñata Enemy: Gold rats, spiders, ghosts, fish, and crows are hidden throughout the hotel and give a large amount of money if you manage to defeat them.
  • Piranha Problem: For whatever reason, there are red-bellied piranhas in the sewers and tunnels underneath the hotel, although they're not much more than a minor nuisance.
  • Plot Hole: If King Boo's painting is E. Gadd's favorite, why did he sell him at a garage sale in Dark Moon?
  • Point of No Return: Before going through the door that leads to the rooftop in Hellen Gravely's office, Luigi receives a call from E.Gadd, who asks if he is ready to continue going. You won't be able to go back if you do, unless you quit the game and load your last save.
  • Production Foreshadowing:
    • The Poltergust G-00 debuted in the reveal trailer for Simon and Richter Belmont in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate one month before the reveal trailer for this game. In the former trailer, Luigi fired one of his plungers at a Mummy. In the game proper, his front and back throw resembles the new Slam mechanic.
  • Pull a Rabbit out of My Hat: An unsurprising motif in the magic show-themed Twisted Suites. There are several stuffed rabbit dolls you can vacuum up for an achievement, and one of the magician bosses pulls one of the dolls out of her hat in a cutscene. There's also a topsy-turvy image that shows a magician from one angle, but a rabbit in a hat when vacuumed to flip it, and some purple Spirit Balls turn a key into a golden rabbit that you have to catch and revert to normal.
  • Recurring Boss: Polterkitty, who occasionally steals your elevator buttons and has to be hunted down. Unlike the Polterpup, she fights back viciously when cornered.
  • Recurring Riff: Unlike the Theme-and-Variations Soundtrack of the last game, Every floor of the Last Resort Hotel has its own ambient theme and often with one or more variations. Naturally, the final floor's is an arrangement of the title theme music.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: The Lethal variants of the boss ghosts, introduced in Scarescraper's first update. They all have black bodies with glowing red eyes and auras, and they can all knock Luigi out in a single hit.
  • Retcon: A small one: Polterpup has pupil-less eyes in this game yet is still the friendly, helpful dog he is even though Evershade Valley's ghosts only lacked pupils while going berserk due to the Dark Moon being shattered.
  • Rooftop Confrontation: The final battle against King Boo takes place on the roof of the hotel.
  • Saw a Woman in Half: This trick appears in the Twisted Suites, and using the Poltergust to move the saw will reveal the two Golden Goobs who would presumably play the "head" and "legs" roles in the trick.
  • Schmuck Bait: Luigi and friends get lured into yet another trap on the promise of being invited to a luxurious hotel. Even King Boo didn’t expect them to fall for essentially the same trap as in the first game. He prepared for it all anyway.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: E. Gadd attempts this upon being rescued, only to be stopped by Luigi who tells him that his friends are trapped inside the hotel. E. Gadd then begrudgingly agrees to stay behind and help Luigi rescue them. Later on, Luigi himself attempts this right after rescuing Mario. Mario won't let him and insist that they push forward, seeing how Peach is still trapped.
  • Self-Deprecation: Professor E. Gadd talks highly about his newest invention: The Virtual Boo. He tells Luigi about his plans to publicly market it and it'll "fly off the shelves". Anyone who knows about the history behind the console will see how heavily the irony is being coated on. Even the visual graphics when compared to the Game Boy Horror and the Dual Scream are worse.note 
  • Sensitive Guy and Manly Man: Luigi and Mario, as per usual. Highlighted during the climb to the final battle, where Mario cheerily barrels ahead and uses his jumping skills to easily clear the same obstacles that require Luigi to carefully maneuver around them. Mario even accidentally causes a few Jump Scares for his poor brother.
  • Sequel Escalation: Downplayed. In the original Luigi's Mansion, King Boo concentrated on having Mario captured, while in Dark Moon he repeated the plan alongside a scheme to destroy the universe. This time, he captures Mario and Luigi's other friends, and in a Freeze-Frame Bonus, you can see King Boo holding an empty portrait in front of a cowering, poltergust-less Luigi. E. Gadd is also captured as well in a painting, but unlike Dark Moon there's no universe-destroying aspect. That being said, the ScareScraper multiplayer mode can now allow up to 8 players, compared to Dark Moon's 4, and this is by far the largest location the series takes place in.
  • Shark Fin of Doom: Worn by some ghosts down in the Boilerworks who will pop your rubber ring given the chance. Also naturally used for introducing Captain Fishook on The Spectral Catch floor.
  • Shell Game: The three ghost magicians; Nikki, Lindsey, Ginny, in the boss fight. After one of them gets captured, one will replace the missing member with a bomb, forcing the player to pay attention in order to avoid the trap. This becomes more difficult when there's only one sister left as the lights will start flickering once the hats start spinning faster around, requiring the player to account for the hats' motion during the brief blackout to keep tracking the correct one.
  • Shock and Awe: King Boo and the boss of the ScareScraper, Boolossus, can call down several bolts of lightning from above, forcing the player to find a safe spot before they strike.
  • Shockwave Stomp: Hammers can slam the ground, sending out powerful waves to hurt Luigi. This is also one of the attacks used by Boolossus in the Scarescraper though its range decreases as Boolossus decreases in size. King Boo can also use this move.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Sorting Algorithm of Threatening Geography: Bizarrely played straight then averted at the end. The hotel follows a Bizarrchitecture where the lower floors are rather mundane, but the higher floors become increasingly more nonsensical as you proceed, featuring castles, a pirate beach and even an ancient pyramid. Then you reach the 13th Floor, which is a rather standard Fitness Center that wouldn't be out-of-place in your average 4-star hotel, followed by a typical nightclub that's not really outside the realm of possibility for fancier buildings. And then there's the penthouse, which, when you ignore the insane security measures and the King Boo themings, is close to what an actual penthouse suite can be like.
  • Sound Test: Although this wasn't originally included within the game at release, patch 1.3.0 added this to the in-game gallery, each separated into albums that contain all the specific music heard on a floor or in selections for tracks that fit elsewhere (such as the themes for Polterkitty).
  • Spanner in the Works: Polterpup helps out Luigi at various moments but most notably before the final battle when he pushes Luigi out of the way of the portrait King Boo slammed down on Mario and Peach. King Boo doesn't even seem to notice Polterpup.
    • Hellen Gravely also inadvertently creates her own spanner by inviting Professor E. Gadd to the hotel under the pretence of holding a ghost convention in order to kidnap him. While this seems like a great idea as E. Gadd's inventions are responsible for capturing King Boo as well as other ghosts, E. Gadd decided that he not only would he bring along some ghost portraits to show off at the 'convention', he'd also bring Gooigi and the latest Poltergust G-00 too, the very thing needed to defeat King Boo.
  • Special Effect Failure: Deliberately invoked in a filming room that parodies The Ring. The Sadako/Samara prop that's supposed to be a Jump Scare has a rubber ducky resting on top of its head.
  • Stage Magician: Nikki, Lindsey, and Ginny, the triple boss of the Twisted Suites. Their magic is more than an illusion, and the entire floor is based on magic shows.
  • Stock Dinosaurs: Dinosaur fossils seen in the Unnatural History Museum are Triceratops, Stegosaurus, raptors, and Tyrannosaurus rex. On the other hand, the token pterosaur is Ludodactylus.
  • Stylistic Suck: The ghost girl prop in Paranormal Productions is less scary when you see the sunglasses and rubber duck on her head.
  • Superman Stays Out of Gotham: During the brief period when we get to see Mario in action, where he effortlessly wall jumps to the roof of the hotel (something which takes Luigi a good few minutes to do) while showing no fear whatsoever, it becomes clear that this would be a very different game if he were the player character.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: The game has all-new ghost types (excepting Boos), but most of them are extremely similar to Dark Moon's.
    • Goobs are like Greenies, being the most basic type of ghost with the lowest health, and employing weapons and protection from Luigi's Poltergust.
    • Oozers are this game's equivalent to Hiders, being skinny ghosts that hide in furniture and throw things at Luigi while he's busy catching other ghosts. Additionally, their ability to leave tripping hazards in the form of banana peels is similar to both Dark Moon's Gobbers and the first game's Garbage Can Ghosts. Going a step further, the first time you meet these slim ghosts is in a pool hall, and they attack by throwing pool balls at you, not unlike Slim Bankshot from the original Luigi's Mansion.
    • Hammers are the most...transparent copy, being large red ghosts with heavy attacks like Slammers in Dark Moon. Their faces are almost identical to Slammers' as well.
    • Slinkers are like Sneakers, as they sneak behind Luigi to startle him out of a suction, and can target Toads. They can also latch on to Luigi like the first game's Grabbing Ghosts.
    • Trappers, being the least obvious example, still share similarities with Creepers, being anchored ghosts without HP that can incapacitate Luigi. They also have the undetectable nature of the first game's Ceiling Surprises, which also inspired Creepers. Trappers render Luigi completely helpless, however, and Gooigi is required to save him and defeat the ghosts.
  • Suspicious Video-Game Generosity:
    • Early in the Garden Suites, you come across an elevator button, with no boss ghost in sight. That was quick! Or at least it would be, if it weren't for Dr. Potter growing a plant underneath and taking it up several stories high up the flight of stairs.
    • While it's a very short level, the Dance Hall also has this scenario. The button is out on the floor, but as you approach it, DJ Phantasmagloria and a Goob dance crew appear and take the button.
  • Stealing the Credit: After beating Kruller (the mall cop ghost boss), which is fought entirely with Gooigi, Luigi exclaims "I did it!" from outside the boss arena. In co-op mode, this is followed by Gooigi parroting him from inside the arena, causing Luigi to cringe in realization. However, it's complicated by the fact that it's ambiguous whether Gooigi is really autonomous or sentient.note 
  • Taking You with Me: Attempted during the final boss. After Luigi and Gooigi wail on King Boo twice, he angrily initiates a Last Ditch Move where he enlarges the painting that Mario and co. are trapped in to building size and tries to bring it down on the entire hotel to finally seal Luigi inside, except while sealing himself inside in the process. The player only has four minutes to vacuum King Boo before it plummets down on the building, ''Majora's Mask'' style.
  • Teamwork Puzzle Game: Thanks to Gooigi's presence, this is now possible. Many puzzles require the player to switch between Luigi and Gooigi in order to progress through levels or beat certain bosses.
  • Theme Tune Cameo: The original Luigi's Mansion theme appears in references and rearrangements in multiple places, the Dark Moon theme is used for the elevator, and the upright piano in Amadeus Wolfgeist's dressing room plays the "Library Piano" theme from Dark Moon once you fix it.
  • Time-Limit Boss: The fight with King Boo turns into one after landing two hits on him, for he summons a giant painting that will consume the entire hotel with Luigi inside in four minutes unless you deliver that final blow.
  • Tyrannosaurus rex: The boss of the 9th floor, Ug, possesses a Tyrannosaurus skeleton for the first part of the battle.
  • Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay: The Master Suite is heavily guarded with security lasers all around, but you wouldn't know it until you stumble into one. To make them visible, you need to perform a Burst to throw up some dust, which is how beams of light and lasers work in real life, requiring some kind of fog or haze to scatter them so they are visible.
  • The Unfought: Unlike the other boss ghosts, Morty is the only one that doesn't fight Luigi despite the built-up suspense around getting his megaphone back and getting him to notice Luigi. Instead, the boss of his floor is the monster-suit ghost in his film, and he happily gives Luigi an elevator button once Luigi helps him finish his film (by defeating said monster-suit ghost). You can suck up Morty once you get the button from him while he's finishing up the movie, or after he's done if the player decides to leave him alone and go after a few more floors.
  • Verbal Backspace: The narrator of the E3 2019 trailer says of the hotel "You may never leave...ergh, want to leave."
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: You can capture Morty in his room, after he willingly gives you the elevator button. What's more is that if you choose to catch him before he finishes editing the movie you helped him make (it gets finished after the first fight with Polterkitty), the movie will never get completed. You even get an achievement for it!
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: The majority of the game is cute and funny even when scary, except for King Boo, who's gone even more insane, looks more terrifying than ever, and is doing everything possible to ensure his victory. This includes capturing both Professor E. Gadd and Princess Peach in paintings (capturing the former leaves Luigi on his own in the beginning, while he seems to have captured the latter purely out of spite), and blocking off the entrance/exit so that Luigi is actually trapped in the hotel. Not to mention that unlike the first two games, this one has a Game Over cutscene in which we get to see King Boo admiring his collection of paintings (now including Luigi) before turning to the player with a devilish grin.
  • Villainous Breakdown:
    • Once Luigi reaches the hotel roof, King Boo drops his Slasher Smile entirely, and opts to trap everyone in an ensemble portrait. But after Luigi narrowly escapes, thanks to Polterpup, he finally loses it and threatens to kill Luigi in the Final Battle.
    • Hellen Gravely becomes increasingly unhinged as Luigi gets closer to the top floor, to the point that when they finally meet for her boss fight, she's seething in rage at his presence. It's enough to make her drop her beauty facade and reveal that she's really an ugly hag.
  • Villains Out Shopping: You come across a lot of ghosts (including several of the bosses) just minding their own business, and they can be just as startled by Luigi as Luigi is by them!
  • Visual Pun:
    • Amadeus Wolfgeist becomes extremely unhinged and angry after you survive the first two rounds of his fight, and he dives into his piano to possess it in fury. It seems like there may be a "mad pianist"/"mad piano" pun in reference to the Mad Piano from Super Mario 64, the Mario world's only other haunted piano that became infamous as one of the scariest things in the series.
    • If you spin the clock hands in the kitchen, it will spew out dollar bills... because time is money, you see.
    • There are some places where the toilet-paper rolls are made of dollar bills, suggesting a joke about the ghosts "being so rich, they wipe their asses with money".
    • One bathroom inside the Great Stage contains a tuba stuck inside the toilet. Blowing into the tuba causes it to play a note and produce a gem from the other toilet. Hmmm....
  • Walk Like an Egyptian: The final barrier to return to the bedroom in the Tomb Suites is a wall. Inspecting it shows a graphic of Luigi in this pose, so he imitates the pose and lines up with it, activating the panel, which spins him back into the bedroom.
  • The Walls Are Closing In: Castle MacFrights' dungeon cells include a spike wall trap that incrementally closes in, trapping Luigi. Gooigi must deal with the scene outside the bars in time to save Luigi.
    • Also, the Tomb Suites feature a room with a scale that must be weighed so that the counter above matches the image thrice. Once Luigi completes the first image, the ceiling begins to descend. Fortunately, completing the second image raises it a bit so he can solve the puzzle a third time and stop the trap for good.
  • "Wanted!" Poster: After his first run-in with and narrow escape from King Boo, the ghosts put up wanted posters of Luigi throughout the hotel, along with a reward of a bag of gold under his head.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Despite the boss ghosts all being captured and Morty possibly left alone, none of them (sans Polterkitty and Hellen with King Boo) appear again during the credits or ending sequence along with the rebuilt Hotel, despite the vault being emptied in the ending cinematic and releasing the standard ghosts.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: If Luigi attempts to leave a room before freeing one of his friends from a painting, E. Gadd immediately express dismay that Luigi would even do such a thing.
  • You Have to Burn the Web: Occasionally, Luigi needs to suck up an incendiary exponent with the Poltergust G-00 and push it against the web in order to progress.
  • Zerg Rush: Attempted by the ghosts before you unlock the final door to go and fight Hellen Gravely. Luigi has to fight off swarms of ghosts whilst also periodically jumping over lasers.
  • Zero-Effort Boss: You literally cannot die against Kruller as he can only be reached by Gooigi who can be endlessly regenerated. Besides, his main method of attack is a water gun- sure it works on Gooigi, but it would have no effect on Luigi.

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Lethal Ghosts

The red and black Lethal Ghosts can insta-down each player.

How well does it match the trope?

5 (2 votes)

Example of:

Main / InstakillMook

Media sources:

Main / InstakillMook

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