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Pokémon Scarlet and Violet are the first pair of Generation IX games in the main Pokémon series, and released on Nintendo Switch on November 18, 2022. They feature an open world, building upon the foundation set by Pokémon Legends: Arceus. The games take place in the Paldea region, based on Spain and Portugal.

The player has just moved to Paldea with their mother, and immediately enrolls in Mesagoza's academy (Naranja Academy in Scarlet or Uva Academy in Violet). As part of the academy's curriculum, the player is tasked to go on a Treasure Hunt; a prestigious assignment given to all academy students in order to encourage them to find their greatest treasure while trekking the region. During their quest to find that which is their treasure, they meet three people who need help achieving certain goals:

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  • Victory Road: Nemona - your enthusiastic Rival - wants you to follow in her footsteps and become a "Champion" ranked Pokémon Trainer by completing the Pokémon League challenge. To attain the Champion rank, you must win eight badges from Paldea's Gym Leaders, then complete the Champion Assessment at the Pokémon League HQ. This is the usual badge quest introduced in every generation (except Sun & Moon, which operated similarly with Grand Trials).

  • Path of Legends: Arven - a senior student at the Academy - wants your help in researching and finding five mysterious "Titan Pokémon" across Paldea. Each Titan is rumored to guard one of the five Herba Mystica, known as incredible ingredients for making food.

  • Starfall Street: The mysterious Cassiopeia tasks the player with completing "Operation Starfall", a plan to forcefully disband a gang of delinquent truants called Team Star. To do this, you must invade each of the five Team Star bases dotted around Paldea - which are usually blockading key routes - and defeat the gang leaders.
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Meanwhile, as the player adventures through the region, they stumble upon Koraidon (Scarlet)/Miraidon (Violet) and earns their aid. Assigned to look after the Legendary Pokémon recovering their strength, the player goes around Paldea for the Treasure Hunt, oblivious to the mysteries that surround the Great Crater of Paldea at the heart of the region...

The game encourages an open-world dynamic by letting the player do any of the three quests in any order they wish to complete them- so unlike most games in the series, you can become the League Champion before defeating the evil team.


These games contain examples of:

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  • 11th-Hour Superpower: All across the Path of Legends, the professor's Koraidon/Miraidon regains its traversal abilities, but not its ability to battle. Come the climactic showdown at the Zero Lab, and the berserk Paradise Protection Protocol's lockdown leaving them as your only option, they not only reawaken their battle form, but barely endure a devastating attack from the Protocol's Koraidon/Miraidon and Dragon-type Terastallize afterward to devastatingly augmented results, defeating the machine's final attempt to defend itself in only a couple of attacks.
  • Academy of Adventure: The main story involves the player character enrolling in an academy (Naranja Academy for Scarlet, Uva Academy for Violet) as they go about their Pokémon journey, including taking part in an independent study project known as the Treasure Hunt, which has three separate branches: Victory Road (defeating the eight Gym Leaders and becoming a Champion), ★ Starfall Street ★ (taking down Team Star), and Path of Legends (helping Arven obtain Herba Mystica from the five Titan Pokémon).
  • Adults Are Useless: The former teachers and staff at Naranja/Uva Academy did nothing about the bullying Team Star's leaders went through, and when they banded together to fight back against their bullies, the deputy of then-Director Harrington deleted all records of the bullying happening, which likely contributed to Team Star getting a negative reputation after their former bullies started transferring to different schools. As a result, Harrington fired the deputy and resigned alongside the entire teaching staff; the current teachers have all been teaching for only a year and a half when the player arrives. By contrast, Clavell does his best to avert this trope, going undercover to figure out why Team Star acts the way they do so that he can help them.
  • Amazing Technicolor Battlefield: The battle with AI Sada/Turo takes place in a room largely composed of iridescent Tera Crystals, though they all turn red/purple (depending on the version you're playing) when the Paradise Protection Protocol takes over for Round 2.
  • Ambiguous Robots: The Paradox Pokémon in Violet all appear to resemble current day Pokémon like Delibird and Hariyama, but are sleek and robotic in design. It's unclear whether they're actually robots or cyborgs, and despite all appearing to be metallic, only one is actually part Steel in Iron Treads and all are just as susceptible to status conditions and being caught just like their present-day counterparts. The official website mentions Miraidon having "internal organs", and in the game Professor Turo refers to it having a genetic makeup similar to Cyclizar so it’s possible they're at least partially organic.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: As is tradition for a new generation of games, many mechanics and gameplay aspects have been updated or streamlined to ease raising Pokémon.
    • While Sword and Shield introduced the concept of Pokémon being able to learn Egg moves from others of the same species and evolutionary stage, Scarlet and Violet now allow what were formerly just Egg moves to also be learned by any compatible Pokémon holding a Mirror Herb while using the picnic feature (provided the Pokémon receiving the move has an open move slot), the idea being that another Pokémon in the party simply teaches the relevant move to its teammate. This also has enabled genderless and entirely male species of Pokémon to gain their own "egg" (or perhaps "picnic" would be more appropriate) moves.
    • Changing your Pokémon's nickname and changing or deleting its moves it already knows can now be done in the Summary screen, no longer needing to visit an NPC for them.
    • Conventional breeding itself has been streamlined to both enable the player to get many eggs in a short time as well as to hatch them much more rapidly.
    • In addition to Bottle Caps now being able to be purchased via money as well as League Points, Hyper Training is accessible starting at level 50 instead of level 100.
    • Items that in previous games could only be gotten via earning Battle Points in battle facilities can now be purchased with money or League Points once you progress far enough in the game.
    • While their availability is randomized, the various Effort Value reducing berries can be bought in bulk via a auction feature in the game. Individual berries can also be found as simple collectibles on the ground rather than needing to be harvested from specific trees.
    • Your Pokémon will not attack a wild Shiny Pokémon in Auto Battle mode, including disguised Pokémon (Ditto, Zorua and Zoroark) and authentic Sinistea. Additionally, several field behaviors of normal Pokémon are nullified for their Shiny variant to make them easier to catch: Shiny Voltorb won't explode when approached, Shiny Sudowoodo runs much slower and won't disappear, and Shiny Sandygast won't dissolve in rain.
    • Your Pokémon don't gain Effort Value points in Auto Battle, helping prevent unintentional stat growths.
    • Normally you can only Terastallize one Pokémon before either having to return to the Pokémon Center or touching a Tera Crystal to recharge it. During most storyline battles that force you into multiple fights in a row (such as Titan Pokémon fights and the Elite Four), the game will automatically recharge your Tera Orb between battles so that you don't have to hold back on using it.
    • Running towards a ledge will cause your character to stop in order to prevent accidentally going off it, and in the event you do go off an edge the game brings up an option to go back to where you fell off by pressing Y, which you can toggle on or off in options. And if somehow you don't get that last option, as long as you have visited at least one Pokécenter, you can just fly back to it.
    • The game world does not pause when you open the menu, but as long as you are in the menu, a wild Pokémon will not attack you. Just beware that they will attack you while talking to a trainer in the field, and the battle will start the moment the conversation is over.
    • Although TMs are now back to single-use, they have had their price significantly lowered compared to the earlier titles in the series. They are now trivial to obtain.
    • In order to prevent players from becoming stuck during the several Nemona battles that occur immediately after a gym leader battle, your party is automatically healed.
    • Given you can pretty easily enter battle with trainers at a far higher level than you, the game provides the option to end such a battle immediately. The result is the same as losing the battle (giving up money and going to a Pokémon Center), but saves the player the time they would otherwise be stuck watching their whole team get knocked out.
    • Non-berry held items that used to be permanently consumed when they were activated in the main story are no longer gone forever, becoming one use items that come back after the battle ends. This method allows items to be reused without hurting abilities and moves that rely on having no held item (such as Acrobatics).
    • Pokémon that require an Incense to get their Baby forms no longer require it, meaning that breeding Marill, for example, will always produce Azurill Eggs.
    • Tera Raid Battles don't impose the level restriction based on your gym badge count. Only have one or two badges? No problem, feel free to take that Level 50 Jolteon you caught/were given into the raid den. This both prevents a dead party slot and lets the player jump into the harder raids as soon as they please.
      • Similarly, rather than needing to take down the boss in under 10 turns, instead the battle has a timer that ticks down in real time seconds throughout the whole encounter. This lets you theoretically take as many turns as you possibly can while you still have time, giving you chances to buff you and teammates and/or try to disrupt the boss with status effects. You don't have to to constantly attack every turn, though you do need to use at least 3 attack moves and have them connect in order to Terastelize. You are also still punished if you or teammates faint, though not as severely, so if your party's taking a beating, it's not completely one-sided and you still have an opportunity to defeat the boss.
    • When trading, Pokémon your trading partner doesn't have registered in their Pokédex are highlighted, making for more streamlined trades.
    • Pokémon whose evolution methods involved leveling up in a specific area now only require evolution stones (i.e. Crabrawler now evolves with an Ice Stone).
    • Gimmighoul requires 999 coins to be used up to evolve it, which is the cap for how many can be carried, so it would normally be impossible to work toward evolving a second Gimmighoul without evolving one first. However, an NPC in Medali will pick up any coins that the player could not due to the cap, and will give them back once the player has used theirs so the extra coins don't go to waste.
    • The relative lack of required battles (since trainer battles are no longer initiated on sight) means it is also easier to stay at a lower level for those who are looking for a greater challenge.
    • Whenever the game is saved, the previous save is moved to a backup slot that can be accessed and loaded by pressing Up+B+X on the title screen. This provides an emergency option in the event of save-data corruption or if the player feels the need to undo a bad decision that has already been saved over. After loading the backup save, the next save made will overwrite the current one.
    • When battling a usually-powerful wild Tera Pokémon, their HP never drops below about 25% while their Tera type is active, so you're free to use an extremely-powerful attack to knock their HP low enough to easily catch them with lower risk of fainting.
    • Unlike Sword and Shield, you are not punished if an AI ally's Pokémon faints in a Tera Raid, reducing the degree to which the AI is a liability.
  • Arc Symbol: Hexagons are all over the place, and are hinted to have something to do with the Terastal Phenomenon. The crystals produced by Terastallization are hexagonal prisms, the Tera Orb resembles a Poké Ball with a hexagon in place of a button, the Tera Jewels that crown Terastallized Pokémon all have a hexagonal gem with what resembles eyes on it at the front of their base, and the symbol selected to Terastallize a Pokémon is a hexagon with lines extending outward from each corner, which is also Paldea's Origin Mark. They even show up in minor, but unusual places such as being the frames of Jacq's glasses. The Scarlet or Violet book depict what may be the Pokémon that enables Terastallization, with a shell covered in hexagonal scales, though it does not make a physical appearance in the base game.
  • Arc Words: "Treasure" and relating questions to it becomes a titular theme of the game as the story involves the characters, the Player Character included, find what it is that they consider a "Treasure".
  • Art Evolution:
    • This entry features overall shift from the cel-shaded art style that had defined the mainline 3D entries up to this point to a somewhat more detailed and realistic approach.
    • The models of many Pokémon have more detailed textures, as opposed to the flat coloring and shading of the 3D models used in previous main series games. For example, Seviper's body now has visible scales, while Lucario has gained a fluffy fur texture and a metallic sheen for its shoulders and spikes. Both mascots have different textures on their skin and feathers.
    • The character models of the human characters have moved away from being direct translations of the 2D artwork, now appearing similar to the humans in spin-off titles such as Detective Pikachu and New Pokémon Snap.
  • Artificial Stupidity:
    • Besides the usual instances of this in the series, such as wild Pokémon reliably using ineffective moves, there is one good instance of this in the second battle with Nemona. She'll Terastallize her Pawmi to introduce the Tera mechanic to the player, but it's entirely possible the player has captured a Diglett or Wooper by this point. If one of those is sent out, Nemona the master of type matchups will use Thundershock over and over despite it doing nothing.
    • Major battles will always end with the opponent Terastallizing their last Pokémon, even if it'd be more advantageous not to because doing so opens them up to a super-effective hit they weren't previously vulnerable to.
  • Artistic License – Medicine: The Spicy Herba Mystica is said to boost one's metabolism by flushing out toxins and producing a lot of sweat. This is recycling the myth that sweat gets rid of toxins, when in actuality, its only purpose is to control body temperature. Furthermore, a "toxin" is just whatever the body has an excess amount of, which it already gets rid of naturally through excrement.
  • Ascended Extra: The recurring Pokémon Schools in past titles were small optional areas with info for newcomers that veteran players would probably ignore altogether. The resident school in Paldea is the prestigious Naranja/Uva Academy, which is a plot-centric location staffed by a Cast of Snowflakes rather than generic NPCs.
  • Award-Bait Song: Like Pokémon X and Y, a "happy ending" song with lyrics plays during the credits — except this time, instead of only having subtitled lyrics on screen, it's the fully vocalized "Celestial" by Ed Sheeran.
  • Awesome Anachronistic Apparel: The Professors both wear clothing that would be more at home in other time periods (a cavewoman-style outfit for Sada and a futuristic jumpsuit for Turo).
  • Awesome, but Impractical: The move Revelation Dance is a Normal-type move that changes its type to match the primary type of the user. It also changes type when the user Terastalizes to match their Tera Type, and at 90 base power, it is more powerful than Tera Blast. Unfortunately, this move is also stuck as the Secret Art of the very mediocre Oricorio, meaning you're probably better off using a better Pokémon with Tera Blast than trying to slot Oricorio on your team.
  • Back Stab: Carrying over from Legends Arceus is the ability to ambush wild Pokémon when their back is turned by hitting them with a Poké Ball. When successful, the wild Pokémon will be stunned and unable to act for the first turn of the encounter, and the chance of successfully catching it also increases.
  • Bait-and-Switch:
    • Going off of the trailers, the player may know that Koraidon/Miraidon has the ability to dash, jump high, swim, glide, and crawl on walls. Looking at the Titan Pokémon you need to defeat to unlock those abilities, many of them seem to line up with their own movement patterns... only for none of them to match up.
      • The cliff face-crawling Stony Cliff Titan doesn't give you the ability to crawl on walls, but the ability to dash.
      • The flying Open Sky Titan doesn't give you the ability to glide, but the ability to swim.
      • The quick tunneling Lurking Steel Titan doesn't give you the ability to dash, but the ability to jump higher.
      • The rampaging Quaking Earth Titan doesn't give you the ability to dash either, but the ability to glide.
      • The lake-bound False Dragon Titan doesn't give you the ability to swim, but the ability to climb walls.
    • Throughout the trek through Area Zero, it isn't a stretch to assume the professor, or whomever is really speaking with the heroes throughout the journey, is tricking the kids into setting them free and helping unleash some terrible disaster, given the professor's odd, mechanical dialogue and the various things revealed throughout the journey. However, once you make it to the Zero Lab and the Professor AI can properly explain things, it turns out that the AI is benevolent, and only opposes the player in the end because their programing forces them to, a threat that the AI properly informs the player of before they commit to the finale. Moreover, while there is a terrible disaster, the threat of the Paradox Pokémon escaping the Area Zero and overunning the ecosystem, its cause was set into motion long ago, and the heroes were actually called to stop the disaster before it comes to pass.
  • Blow You Away: The game introduces the closest thing it can to a "Wind type", it now categorizes certain moves as "wind-based moves" that activate certain abilities (much like sound-based moves in earlier generations). A full list of wind-based moves as of Generation IX (that are usable, since Silver Wind and Ominous Wind aren't in the game) can be found here.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • The game's announcement trailer is the first time that a region's starter Pokémon had their designs revealed without their names, with those being announced afterwards separately on social media. It is also the first time since Pokémon X and Y that the starters were revealed with only their 2D artwork, as opposed to their in-game models.
    • This is the first time that the protagonists have different colors of starting outfits depending on what version you play. The outfit worn in Scarlet is vibrant and orange-ish, while the Violet outfit is darker and purplish. These are also the first games in the series where the protagonists have the same outfit model regardless of gender.
    • Professors Sada and Turo aren't named after plants like the professors from previous games, instead having names related to "past" and "future". This is also the first game where the local professor the player associates with is different between the two versions.
    • Though the first two generations had some degree of nonlinearity at certain points in their storylines, this is the first to allow gyms to be done in any order. Also, rather than being a position only held by one character, Champion in this game is instead a rank awarded to anyone who pass a test known as the Champion Assessment.
    • While the Player Character dealing with the region's evil team has always been placed alongside the gym challenge (which is called Victory Road in this generation) in the main storyline, this is the first generation where it's a core story in its own right with the ★ Starfall Street ★ storyline. In addition, the Path of Legends storyline takes cues from Pokémon Legends: Arceus' storyline, but is now juxtaposed alongside the main gym challenge as well.
    • In addition to the paths being treated as separately important storylines, this is also the first mainline Pokémon game to have the battle against the Elite Four and Champion not be the final major event in your game, and the Pokémon League being your final location. Instead, it's only one of the three paths you must play through, and all three paths have to be completed before you can unlock the true final story and boss "The Way Home" á la Sonic Adventure 2.
    • In most mainline Pokémon games, your region's Professor and their laboratory are typically among the first locations you end up visiting to start your journey, and oftentimes are un-related to the bigger conflicts that come along later in the story. In here, your region's professor's laboratory is one of the last levels in the game, with said professor being a major source of conflict that drives the story in the background.
    • Pawmi is the first Pikachu Expy since Pikachu itself to evolve.
    • Earlier generations introduced party Pokémon following their trainer in the overworld, but the "Let's Go!" feature of these games is the first that allows them to fight wild Pokémon in auto battles with little to no input from the trainer.
    • This is the first odd-numbered generation to introduce evolutions of old Pokémon, something usually only done in even-numbered generations. note 
    • This is the first generation where NPC trainers won't challenge you to battles as soon as they spot you. Instead, you have to walk up and challenge them. NPCs will also have text icons appear over their head when you get close, so unlike previous generations, you can tell in advance which ones will challenge you to a battle and which ones only want to talk. Trainers that are considerably stronger than others in the area will have black text icons to warn you before challenging them.
    • This is the first generation where you can run away from Trainer battles. The game treats this as a loss, where you lose some money and end up in the last Pokémon Center you visited, but considering the open world means you can run into very strong Trainers you may have no hope of defeating, this is a good time-saver.
    • There is no longer a Day Care or other dedicated location to leave Pokémon to breed and produce Eggs; instead, they are produced by compatible Pokémon in the active party during picnics.
    • Previous generations always had a Big Bad that leads a villainous team to serve as Climax Boss for each game's story, and you're usually introduced to the Big Bad towards the middle of the game. Here, there aren't really any truly villainous characters. The Team Star story would be the closest analogue, and is just one of three different storylines available. Team Star's Big Bad isn't shown until the end of said storyline, and while Team Star antagonizes you, they're actually Good All Along and were only formed to combat the bullying problem at the academy, hardly making them villainous at all. Even the Final Boss of the game, AI Sada/Turo, is quite benevolent and assists the player, and you only have to fight them because they can't go against their programming and are forced to fight you.
    • There is no fishing in this game, unlike the rest of the games in the series. Since Pokémon can be encountered in the overworld, any Pokémon that would have been a fishing encounter can just be found swimming around in the water.
    • There are no Gentlemannote , Fisher, Lass, or Swimmer trainers for the first time in the main series.
    • Shadow Claw is no longer TM065 which it had been since Generation IV. It is now TM061 with Air Slash now taking its place as TM065.
    • Some of the old item get jingles like the TM get jingle, have been replaced with quicker jingles, likely due to the fact that you can pick up items in quick succession in the overworld now.
    • This is the first Generation where the Fire-Type starter's final form isn't bipedal (Skeledirge being a four-legged crocodile-like creature)note .
  • Break the Badass: The second Koraidon/Miraidon in Area Zero leaves your legendary so scarred that they flee the crater at the beginning of the game, to the point that they refuse to come out of their ball during your first visit of the area due to the trauma they experienced. It's implied by Arven that this trauma was strong enough to be partially responsible for suppressing their battle capabilities, requiring the five Herba Mystica to get them back into shape.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Each of the Titan Pokémon can be found wandering around the area they were previously defeated at as a static encounter, except they have lost their giant size and aura enhancement from the Herba Mystica. They are still at the max size a Pokémon of their species can normally achieve, and capable of being trained to be as strong as any other "normal" member of their kind.
  • But Thou Must!:
    • There are several dialogue options where the game won't proceed until the player gives the response that the game wants. Nemona flat-out says that she'll keep asking to be your rival for life until you say "yes" if you turn her down a couple of times after defeating Geeta and becoming a Champion.
    • The game is also completely full of the other flavor of "But Thou Must!". Almost every single choice you are given has absolutely no bearing on anything except the following dialogue at best, and sometimes it doesn't even do that. Immediately at the start of the game when given the three main quest lines, you are outright given the option to agree or refuse each person who offers, and no matter what they will always leave immediately and tell you to think about it either way. They then meet you outside of the school, give you the quest without asking, and then leave. Various guides were unsure if any of these choices led to alternate routes or game endings, but none of them matter at all except those which you must pick the one answer to progress.
  • Call a Hit Point a "Smeerp": The "barrier" that Tera Raid Battle bosses can use is never called as such — it being put up is referred to as "energy [beginning to] gather around" the boss, and it being broken is the boss "[breaking] its stance".
  • Call-Back: In Pokémon Gold and Silver Professor Elm says that Master Balls are only given to Pokémon Professors though most just give Master Balls to the player as a reward. Professor Sada/Turo use Master Balls directly in their research by sending them through time to capture past/future Pokémon and bring them to the present.
  • The Cameo: Hey, that's the silhouette of Kanto Champion-turned-Gym-Leader Blue on one of the ads on the Pokémon Centers.
  • Cassandra Truth: It's mentioned during history classes that the Scarlet/Violet Book, a written record of the first successful expedition into the deepest parts of the Great Crater, was initially very popular but eventually became disregarded by most as a Lost World fantasy book or even conspiracy nonsense because the reports of bizarre unexplained phenomenon and monstrous unknown Pokémon were just too hard to believe. Come today, and it turns out most if not all the weird creatures and phenomena described in the book are actually real. It's implied that to some extent the belief that the book is a lie is one the Pokémon League and government in general endorse in an effort to avoid motivating unqualified people from entering Area Zero, both to keep normal people safe and to keep the Pokémon there mostly contained. Notably what little information gets officially put out about the Paradox Pokémon the protagonist catch avoids any mention of Area Zero.
  • Central Theme:
    • How much can our past influence us? How much can our future be unpredictable? And most importantly, what can you do now in the present to face your past for a better future?
    • Bullying and the harmful effects it has on people, especially in a school setting. While this is most prominent in the Operation: Starfall path, which reveals that Team Star was formed as a result of this, it also extends to Koraidon and Miraidon, who were attacked by another of its kind in a territorial dispute during their time in Area Zero. The battle was apparently so horrible, that Koraidon/Miraidon refuses to start battling again even after it gets back all of its power. It takes until the tail end of the campaign for them to finally start fighting again.
    • What’s your most precious thing?
    • The importance of food is a major running theme. The various settlements of Paldea have Edible Theme Naming, at least three of the Gyms involve food (Katy and Kofu both have occupations that involve making food, and Larry's Gym Challenge involves you placing a specific order at his favorite restaurant), the mechanic "Meal Power" gives you different boosts depending on the food you eat, several Pokémon introduced in this gen are themed around food (e.g. the bread-themed Fidough line), one of the story paths involves helping Arven find special ingredients for his cooking, and the player bonds with the mascot Legendary by feeding it a sandwich.
    • While the series as a whole has this, this game especially emphasizes the importance of bonds, not just with people and Pokémon, but between people and people. Each of the three main characters are isolated from their peers due to circumstance and social awkwardness. Their bonds with the protagonist allows them to truly bond with someone outside of their own Pokémon and grow as more than what they perceive themselves to be.
  • Chekhov's Gun: At the start of the game, Arven hands you the Poké Ball that belongs to Koraidon/Miraidon's original owner, allowing it to travel with you. At the end of the game, the Paradise Protection Protocol locks every Poké Ball that isn't registered under the game's respective professor, preventing you, Nemona, Arven, or Penny from stopping them... until you realize that the Poké Ball that Arven gave you so long ago actually belongs to said professor, allowing you to bring Koraidon/Miraidon into the fight to stop the opposing Koraidon/Miraidon and save the day.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard: Pokémon fought in Tera Raids are not restricted to the usual 4-move limit. They may also have access to any moves that they could theoretically learn, including TM and egg moves, yet should you catch them they will only have moves learned naturally like any other wild Pokémon.
  • Confusion Fu: This can be invoked with Terastallization, if the Pokémon's Terastal type is completely different from their regular typing. Notably, several Gym Leaders will utilize this mechanic to their advantage by changing a Pokémon to match their signature type.
  • Console Cameo:
    • Continuing a series tradition, a Nintendo home console (the OLED model of the Nintendo Switch in this case) can be seen in the player's bedroom. In any case, the Joy-Con controllers attached will even be the same colors as the ones you're currently using!
    • In Penny's dorm room, there are magazines with a Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS, and Game Boy on the covers.
  • Continuity Nod: There are a few within Naranja/Uva Academy, as well as elsewhere:
    • In the History classroom board, there's a picture of Professor Laventon and the Poké Ball model that was used in Hisui.
    • One of the books you can read in the library is "Galar: A History", the book Sonia was working on over the course of Pokémon Sword and Shield, and the excerpt you read details Bede's destruction of the Stow-on-Side mural and the reveal of the statues behind it from her perspective.
    • When Raifort relates the tale of the Treasures of Ruin, those who long ago sealed the monsters are referred to as "Pokémon wielders," the same term used for Volo in Pokémon Legends: Arceus and presumably the term used for any powerful user of Pokémon before the modern concept of a "trainer" became popularized.
    • Upon her defeat, Gym Leader Iono compares the player character's performance to the flashiness of a 10,000,000-volt Thunderbolt, a Pikachu-specific Z-move from Pokémon Sun and Moon.
    • Mega Evolution is referenced, albeit not by name, in descriptions of Roaring Moon, as a phenomenon that occurs in another region.
    • Business logos on various apparel you can buy make a return and in addition to many new ones there are some that return from Pokémon Sword and Shield, in particular the Boltund-inspired Densoku brand on one of the player character's initial hat choices, among other things.
    • In Mesagoza, a child will comment on how they've heard other regions only have one trainer ranked as Champion at a time.
    • Among the works on display throughout Artazon are the Meditative Seat, Heterarchial Loop, and the Paradoxical Popper, which previously appeared as Secret Base decorations in Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.
  • Convenient Weakness Placement: Due to the nature of the open world, and with gyms doable in any order, this can be invoked by the player as most of the dex becomes accessible once the tutorial concludes.
  • Cooking Mechanics: The player has the ability to go picnicking in the overworld, and during this they can experience a minigame that allows them to prepare sandwiches for themselves and their Pokémon to eat, granting them specific powers depending on the ingredients used. The minigame consists of the player dragging and dropping ingredients onto the sandwich, making sure the whole thing doesn't topple over in the process.
  • Cool Bike: Miraidon is able to channel energy into its rings to turn itself into a hoverbike as one of its Modes.
  • Cool Car: Each Team Star squad has their own Starmobile, which are large vehicles powered by the Pokémon Revavroom. Functionally, they're a combination of a glam rock stage and a station wagon, and each leader battles you from atop one. What's more, when the leader runs out of normal Pokémon to use against you, they'll have you face the Starmobile itself; each one having its own typing and signature move at its disposal.
  • Co-Op Multiplayer: The games feature cooperative gameplay with up to four players, both online and using local wireless. Players can run around in the overworld together, or participate in Tera raids.
  • Crazy-Prepared: The professors, or at least the original ones. First, the time machine was locked by their books, something only their AI duplicates would think to try. Then, the machine was allowed to override their credentials should they be used for the emergency shutdown and battle the intruders using the AI professors as proxies. Then, should the battle be lost, the machine's Paradise Protection Protocol locks any Poké Ball that isn't theirs and sics their Legendary on you! One thing they didn't account for was you using the Legendary you got from them.
  • Crystalline Creature: The new transformation ability is the ability to Terastallize Pokémon, a process which covers them in a crystalline skin and a massive crown-like structure representing their Terastal Type, gives them a potential change in their typing, and provides an even more powerful STAB bonus if their Terastal Type matches their original Type.
  • Cuteness Proximity: The club representative in the reveal trailer for Greavard is initially startled by its sudden appearance. Once she calms down, she's quickly struck dumb at the sight of a tiny sheepdog Pokémon with a candle on its head.
    Club Representative: Oh my goodness! It's so CUTE!
  • Cyber Green: The text boxes for all characters communicating via the Rotom Phone are black with bright green text and green scanlines, like an old-fashioned computer monitor.
  • Darker and Edgier: Downplayed. For most of the game, it's the usual standard lighthearted Pokémon affair. However, some moments of the story can lean into less than family friendly affair. Themes such as bullying and their effects, abandonment and loss, and personal trauma can come up frequently. Most notably, the Paradox Pokémon in Area Zero are treated as legitimately dangerous beasts unlike how Pokémon are normally portrayed, and one of them was explicitly mentioned as having killed a human in there.
  • Dead All Along: In the climax of the game, Sada and Turo are revealed to have died long before the events of the game. The professor you have been talking to throughout the game is actually an AI recreated in their image.
  • Decomposite Character: Sada and Turo are nominally the Pokémon Professor of the game, but due to plot reasons they are practically unable to perform the usual role associated with the title. As a result, the role has been split between them (actual holders of the title), Jacq (who developed and manages your progress on the Pokédex), and Clavell (as the old mentor archetype; notably, he's also the one doing the game's introduction). Interestingly, following Jacq's story reveals all of them used to work together in the same lab before Jacq and Clavell joined the Academy.
  • Decon-Recon Switch: Paradox Pokémon deconstruct the usual friendly demeaner willingness to work with humans most Pokémon are shown to have. The Paradox Pokémon in Area Zero will often try to attack the player and their companions while venturing further down into it, and many notes left behind really play up just how dangerous they actually are. One of the Paradox Pokémon is explicitly stated to have killed a human prior to the events of the game, and your box art Legendary is heavily implied to be the exception to the rule. It then gets reconstructed in the post game where you are able to catch Paradox Pokémon and have them listen to you with no issues; though by that point, the player is pretty much stated to have become the strongest champion in all of Paldea.
  • Defeat Means Playable: All five of the Titan Pokémon return to their normal size and can be found and caught near where you defeated them during the Path of Legends storyline. They have a guranteed 30 IVs in each stat, are the maximum size for their species, and have a special mark indicating they were a former Titan.
  • Demoted to Extra: The mechanic of regional forms and counterparts introduced in Generation VII and expanded even as recently as Pokémon Legends: Arceus has been significantly downplayed in Scarlet and Violet, with only three species being Paldean forms/counterparts (Wooper, Clodsire, and the forms of Paldean Tauros). Another phenomenon of similar counterparts, convergent evolution, is introduced, but is similarly minimal in the dex's roster, consisting of two two-stage families.
  • Discard and Draw: Hail, both the move and the weather condition, were removed entirely, replaced with the Snowscape move and the Snowstorm weather condition for the purposes of Ability and move triggers. Instead of Hail's passive damage to non-Ice-type Pokémon, Snowstorm gives Ice-types a Defense boost while active.
  • Disc-One Nuke:
    • Early in the game, you can actually find Terastallized Pokémon in the open area once you leave the tutorial segments. If you can manage to break the Terastallized state of a Terastallized Pokémon (which have higher levels than normal) and catch it, you can fall into this trope.
    • Averted for Pokémon caught above the level your gym badge ranking allows. Unlike previous games, Pokémon both caught and traded will ignore your commands if you don't have enough badges depending on the level they were caught/traded at. For example: you need two badges to command a Pokémon acquired at Levels 26-30, but it will obey after those badges even if it goes above 30. An exception is made for Tera Raid Battles however where all Pokémon obey regardless of level, so as to prevent griefing.
    • Flamigo, a Fighting/Flying Flamingo Pokémon, is one of the many species available before you visit Mesagoza for the first time. Flamigo possesses an impressive base stat total of 500, with its base Attack stat in particular being 115, allowing it to reliably one-shot anything weak to its moves in the early game.
  • Duel Boss: The final battle against the Paradise Protection Protocol has it send out the game's cover legendary out against you, while locking your party members' Pokeballs, forcing you to send out the Koraidon/Miraidon you've been travelling with the entire game. Also functions as a Hopeless Boss Fight, as AI Sada/Turo's legendary is stronger than yours, with yours being capable of nothing more than Scratch Damage against it. That is, until you gain the ability to Terastallize...
  • Dutch Angle: The camera suddenly tilts to the right, stops, then continues tilting slowly to accentuate the creepiness of the professor's voice suddenly glitching out and repeating the last four words they said.
  • Edible Theme Naming: Every major setting in Paldea is named after food/kitchen terminology. e.g. the first town you visit, "Los Platos", is "The Plates". The academies, in particular, not only are named after orange (Naranja) and grape (Uva) respectively, but even show the fruits on their monuments.
  • Elaborate University High: Naranja/Uva Academy is the oldest school in the Paldea Region and the website states that it "boasts a history that few other schools do". It also takes the "University High" part a bit more literally, as age is not an issue when it comes to enrolment; you can see adults taking classes at the Academy as well. Many schools in Spain (one of Paldea's counterparts) provide both secondary and post-secondary education on the same campus, so this does have some real-world basis.
  • Eldritch Location: Area Zero, inside the Great Crater of Paldea. It's closed off to the public, and the past Paldean Empire constantly tried and failed to get to the bottom. Inside are high-level Pokémon, many of which do not belong in this time period, and it is heavily implied that something lives at the very bottom and is responsible for Terastallization.
  • The Empire: Not in the present, but 2000 years prior there was the Empire of Paldea, which was headed by a tyrant who sought the treasures of the Area Zero to conquer neighboring countries. They failed, and after centuries joined with the rest of the neighboring nations to form what would become the modern Paldea.
  • End of an Age: The Paldean Empire wanted to venture out to Area Zero in hopes that they could plunder the places that had treasure, and it was such a catastrophic failure that they ended up cutting their losses, which took a serious blow and gradually lead to their collapse.
  • Everybody Hates Mathematics: Your first math class opens with Ms. Tyme asking everyone if they like math. The responses are... mixed. She acknowledges that not everyone enjoys the subject and appreciates that they at least answered honestly.
  • Evolving Title Screen: It's subtle, but after completing the game, the Scarlet/Violet book and Poké Ball are no longer on the desk on the title screen. Similar to Legends: Arceus before it, completing the Pokédex will also add cheering and music to the screen as well.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: The Paldea region is directly based on the Iberian Peninsula.
  • Five-Second Foreshadowing: Just before you enter the lower levels of Zero Base, and by extension, the final battle of the story, you can read Professor Sada/Turo's notes where they discuss a Poké Ball ID system they invented, but the details are left sparse. During the final battle, that system is used to lock everyone's Pokémon inside their Poké Balls, necessitating the use of Koraidon/Miraidon, who was originally the professor's Pokémon, and therefore not affected by the lock.
  • Food Porn: All of the menu options at the various restaurants are depicted with beautiful artwork. The player can invoke this while making sandwiches, too, arranging their creations in a manner similar to this trope.
  • Foregone Victory: You can't lose the battle against the Paradise Protection Protocol's Koraidon/Miraidon. You get tips mid-battle on how to win "legitimately", but even if you completely ignore them, your Pokémon in this fight will always "tough out" any attacks that would otherwise knock it out, and will eventually attack (and auto-win) on its own if you waste too much time.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • After asking why you're doing the Gym challenge, Hassel mentions that all paths lead to the Great Crater of Paldea. Indeed, accessing the crater involves completing all three main storylines.
    • Look closely at Larry's design, and you'll notice a cloud pattern on his tie. This hints not only towards his ace Pokémon (the part Flying-type Staraptor), but also his type of choice as a member of the Elite Four.
    • If you check the books at the Academy, you can find a Student Registry which has most of its pages torn out for some reason. "Starfall Street" reveals that there was a massive cover-up by the previous faculty regarding the bullying incidents and Team Star accidentally getting framed as the bullies, so the missing pages were likely done by a former teacher.
    • When you arrive at Casseroya Lake, Arven comments on how it would be easier to find the Titan Pokémon if it was saying "I'm a Titan!". When you find the Titan Tastugiri, it says "Taitan!" when you interact with it.
    • Some of Sada/Turo's dialogue with the player may seem "off", giving the sense that they may be "going through the motions", so to speak. This foreshadows that they are actually an AI.
    • Arven's final team is foreshadowed by the Pokémon he uses against the Titans.
    • If you scrounge the library at the academy, you may find a few Occulture magazines mentioning about strange beasts that slightly resemble actual Pokémon known to the general public. This foreshadows what you may find in Area Zero: Paradox Pokémon that share some characteristics with normal Pokémon found outside but are inherently different.
    • During most of the game, you only interact with Professor Sada/Turo through phone calls. You don't meet them in-person, and are never even told where exactly they are. This is because they literally can't leave Area Zero, a place that's off-limits to most people.
  • Four Is Death: Area Zero has four Research Stations in addition to the Zero Lab, each containing the controls for one of the locks to the main lab. The player’s group will find the first three largely intact, but the fourth and final station is in shambles. It's later revealed that this was where the second Koraidon/Miraidon went on a rampage and unintentionally killed the original Professor (it had been aiming at the other Koraidon/Miraidon).
  • Four Lines, All Waiting: There are various plotlines that the player can pursue at the start of the game, each one providing different benefits:
    • Victory Road, which focuses on the classic eight Gyms and road to becoming a Champion. Obtaining gym badges makes catching stronger Pokémon easier, and they'll obey you as long as you caught them below your current badge level cap as well as unlocking more powerful items for purchase in the shops.
    • ★ Starfall Street ★, which deals with taking down Team Star and their bosses. Progressing through this story earns you TM recipes, TM Materials, and LP (League Points, the currency needed to make TMs)
    • Path of Legends, in which the player helps Arven obtain the "Herba Mystica", mystical herbs that can be used as ingredients and are protected by gigantic Titan Pokémon. Making your way through this story upgrades Koraidon/Miraidon's traversal abilities.
    • Upon completing all of the above you unlock "The Way Home", in which you, Arven, Nemona and Penny explore the Great Crater of Paldea. Completing this unlocks the postgame, your Box Legendary's battle form, a 2nd box legendary, and the ability to catch the rest of the Paradox Pokémon.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: When the pre-battle text is glitching before the fight with the Paradise Protection Protocol, it briefly reads "AI Sada/Turo has no intention of fighting any more!".
  • Frustrated Overhead Scribble: During the mission into the Great Crater, Arven often has scribbles appearing in speech bubbles over his head, as a way of showing his exasperation toward Nemona's antics.
  • Fun with Acronyms: The Herba Mystica's name being in Gratuitous Spanish makes sense since Paldea is the Fantasy Counterpart Culture of the Iberian Peninsula, but it also works as a pun: since getting one also unlocks a new ability for your mount, letting you visit places that you couldn't before, it means the Herba Mystica is this game's equivalent to HMs.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • The game is not joking when it mentions that Paradox Pokémon are legitimately dangerous creatures. Despite being based on Pokémon from current times, all of them have base stat totals of 570 or higher, equivalent to lower rank Legendaries and Ultra Beasts.
    • It's mentioned that Jacq created the Pokédex app for all Rotom Phone users to download and update, and the entries for the Paradox Pokémon are very sparse and draw most information from magazines and the Scarlet/Violet book rather than the player's personal observations. Since Director Clavell stated that he's willing to look over the player violating school rules by entering the Great Crater of Paldea as long as none of their feats or heroics ever reach the public, that also extends to the Pokédex since that's also public record.
    • Shortly before the final story battle, Professor Sada/Turo's dialogue looks very glitchy, with a strange font and occasional numbers in place of letters. This is because they've been taken over by the Paradise Protocol, and they can't handle the excess power.
    • In the Final Boss fight, the Paradise Protection Protocol locks every Pokéball not registered to the professor. The one Pokémon on the player's team that is exempt from this is Koraidon/Miraidon, as they initially belonged to the professor.
    • It's made explicit that your Koraidon/Miraidon is weaker than the one the professor currently has, as prior to the events of the game it was beaten to an inch of its life by it. This isn't just a story element when you have to use it against it in the final battle; the Koraidon/Miraidon in Area Zero actually does have better IVs than yours does (maximum in both attack stats and Speed), and a nature that boosts its respective attacking stat at the expense of the one it doesn't need (Adamant for Koraidon, Modest for Miraidon).
    • During the Duel Boss at the end of the game, there's a good chance that your Koraidon/Miraidon will be hanging on by a thread by the time you're prompted to Terastallize. Turns out all that adventuring with you naturally forged a strong bond, and surviving a knockout blow like that is one of the perks of having high friendship in-game.
    • Arven mentions that his last visit to Area Zero involved him escaping the place via Flying Taxi, even though the place is off-limits to the public, because they'll always pick you up if you have a good enough sob story. Sure enough, subsequent visits to the area allow you to call a Taxi to leave while inside of it.
  • Gameplay Automation: Any Pokémon in your party can enter "Let's Go" mode, in which they automatically battle nearby Pokémon on the map until exhausted or recalled. The outcome is simulated, based on typing and stats. The Pokémon you use gets a decent amount of experience, while the rest of the team gets a little bit. Wild Pokémon will not be caught, and shiny Pokémon will not be fought at all; however, rare spawns will be battled and dispensed with, so it must be used with caution.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: One of the Titan Pokémon fought in the Path of Legends questline is a massive Klawf, a crablike Pokémon debuting in the games.
  • Global Currency Exception: Scarlet and Violet has League Points or LP, which is used to pay for TMs alongside materials obtained from defeating wild Pokémon, and has a 1:1 conversion rate with the usual Pokédollars/Yen. It can also be obtained from interacting with Tera Raid dens, with the amount given depending on the rating of the Den.
  • The Greatest Story Never Told: After the player's heroics in Area Zero by preventing a region-wide disaster, Clavell notes that while the heroes did violate school rules by going into the Great Crater of Paldea, he's willing to completely overlook that and notes that it can't be made public.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: Arven, Penny, and Nemona join you at various points of the game, both as travel companions and as battle partners.
  • Guide Dang It!: As is par for the course for a new Pokémon generation, some new evolution mechanics are particularly obtuse.
    • Pawmo, Rellor, and Bramblin all evolve upon being leveled up after being walking alongside their trainer for at least 1,000 steps using Let's Go and then leveling up, much more tedious to do if you have all 3 in the party as you can only do one at a time. Not helping matters is that there's no way to see how many steps your Pokémon have accumulated, making it more tedious than it needs to be due to not knowing if your Pokémon has reached 1,000 steps or not. The only hint for Pawmo's evolution is an optional Trainer who declares herself as a Pawmi line fan, and talking to her afterwards has her vaguely mention that something happens if you take Pawmo out in Let's Go mode for a while.
    • Primeape evolves into Annihilape after using the new move Rage Fist 20 times and then leveling up. Jacq hints at this in one of the biology class sessions, but he gets cut off by the bell after only getting far enough to mention that the evolution has something to do with a move.
    • Finizen can only evolve into Palafin when two players are in the same world via Union Circle.
    • Bisharp can only evolve by defeating three other Bisharp holding the Leader's Crest, which specifically must be leading a pack of Pawniard. This is considered to be one of the more difficult to acquire evolutions in the game as not all Bisharps will carry Leader's Crest even if they're surrounded by their Pawniard minions.
    • Pokémon will not evolve if they level up via auto-battle. This is explained once in-game, in a single box of dialogue during one of the optional classes at the Academy that only becomes available in the mid-to-late game. This led many players to wonder if it was a bug that their Pokémon would not evolve even after reaching the proper level.
    H-Z 
  • Harder Than Hard: Tera Raid Dens have different difficulty levels, symbolized by a star system ranging from 1 to 5. The more story progress you earn, the higher chance you get of spawning higher difficulty dens with better Pokémon and prizes. Only unlocked after the Academy Ace Tournament quest in the post-game, however, are six star dens, represented by black crystals with red energy, which are much harder and have highly coveted rewards as a result. It goes even further with seven star dens, although those are currently event-only, but promise to be even harder than six star dens in exchange for very rare Pokémon with a unique mark if you catch it. The difficulty is accomplished by the Pokémon not only being high level but having HP many times greater than is otherwise possible, in addition to them being able to create special barriers that further reduce damage, a dangerous combination given the raids have a time limit that results in an automatic loss if exceeded.
  • Hard Mode Perks: Not only higher-level Tera Raids give you better spoils, Pokémon you catch from higher-rating Tera Raids are guaranteed to have perfect IV on more stats than those you catch from easier raids, with those from 7-star Raids guaranteed to have perfect IV on all their stats.
  • Hoist by Their Own Petard: The Protocol, after its Ancient/Future Pokémon are defeated, locks all Poké Balls not registered to the professor. Fortunately, your ever-present Korai/Miraidon is the professor's, and enters battle form to face the Protocol's.
  • Hold Your Hippogriffs: Hassel says "All paths lead to the Great Crater of Paldeanote , as they say" to the player after they get the Gym Badge in Artazon.
  • Horse of a Different Color: Koraidon and Miraidon have the appearance of motorcycles, and they act the part as well, being able to be ridden on and transform into different Builds/Forms to facilitate land, water, and air travel. Cyclizar likewise is a popular ride Pokémon in the Paldea region, and several towns have "bike stands" where travellers can leave theirs. As it turns out, these two facts are related. Koraidon and Miraidon are, respectively, species from the past and future that originated and descended from Cyclizar.
  • I Hate Past Me: Not really hate, but the AI Sada/Turo are incredulous at how determined the original professors were to sustain the Zero Lab time machine's operating cycle, saying they were indifferent to the risks of a containment breach in Area Zero destroying Paldea's ecology.
  • Interface Spoiler: Minor case. Holding ZL and looking at field Pokémon shows their name and whether or not the player has caught that particular species. This has the side effect of seeing right through the disguise of a Ditto, Zorua or Zoroark, all of which take the shape of other species as an illusion that normally doesn’t drop until a battle is initiated.
  • In-Universe Game Clock: While some game mechanics are tied to real-world time such as the daily Tera Raids and Mass Outbreaks, the games use an in-game clock for their day/night cycle like Pokémon Legends: Arceus. One full cycle lasts 72 minutes: 3 for morning, 33, for day, 3 for evening, and 33 for night. This affects the kinds of spawns you encounter and when you can evolve certain Pokémon. However, unlike in PLA, you can't fast-forward time to the next morning, day, or night.
  • Item Crafting: TMs are once again one-use, but can now be crafted using materials obtained from Pokémon battles. Obtaining a TM separately from crafting provides the player with the recipe to craft more of that TM.
  • It's Up to You: Ultimately, everything in the game ends up being the responsibility of the new kid in school (your character/you). You become champion and beat the gym leaders, you help take down the titans and help Arven heal his Mabostiff, you defeat the likes of Team Star and help Clavell reveal the truth behind their "evil", and, most importantly, you defeat an entire security system protecting an extremely dangerous time machine and the beasts spawned from it.
  • King Mook: Titan Pokémon are massive versions of Pokémon who serve as the bosses of the "Path of Legends" storyline. They are fought in two phases and get powered up for the second one.
  • Late to the Tragedy: By the time the player character and friends arrive in Area Zero, the entire research team that worked there, Arven's mother/father included, have left or are dead. Nobody who worked on this project is left except for an AI explicitly designed to carry on the project, but decides to help you shut it down instead.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • An NPC in Alfornada comments on the Pokémon mosaics on the observatory which are the generic party sprites from the Game Boy era titles, saying they remind them of an old video game.
    • When the main character and their companions learn that unlocking the Zero Lab requires deactivating four locks in four separate locations, Nemona says the sequence sounds "video-gamey" without technically breaking the fourth wall.
    • Later, after hearing about your box legendary's origins, Penny comments that "These plot twists really tug at the heartstrings, don't they?"
  • Leitmotif: The music for the Raid Battles and the music used in Area Zero is mixed together and used as the battle theme for the first round against the AI Professor, which makes sense given the Pokémon from the Raid Battles come from Area Zero.
  • Long Song, Short Scene: Poco Path and the Inlet Grotto are the only areas to feature traditional wild encounter music; all other areas use Variable Mixed variants of their respective overworld themes instead. Unfortunately, Inlet Grotto is Paldea's resident Noob Cave and Poco Path the short path before it, so you'll likely only ever hear the first few bars of their encounter theme as you catch your first couple Com Mons (and perhaps briefly later on as you stumble upon some Com Mon by accident and immediately leave or OHKO it). Averted if you play Battle Stadium and you select this song ("Wild Pokémon"), or you have the song set to Random and it happens to be the one that plays, as PvP matches take much longer due to involving multiple Pokémon per side.
  • Loophole Abuse: The "Let's Go" mode will bypass any ability nullifying a weakness, like Paldean Wooper's Water Absorb or Orthworm's Earth Eater. This is best shown when using a Ground-Type Pokémon against an Orthworm: just quit the normal battle and send the Ground-Type Pokémon in "Let's Go" mode against the Orthworm, the super-effective sound will play and the Ground-Type Pokémon will be victorious. This also works even when a Pokémon doesn't know any offensive moves at all, so even a Pokémon like Magikarp can win autobattles even if it only knows Splash at the time.
  • Lost in Translation: The academics who granted the player their first Pokémon were given the title of "sensei" (Doctor or Teacher) in the original Japanese, which was translated as Professor. But with this game taking place at an actual academy, this leads to the peculiar situation of the Professor (Sada or Turo depending on version) to be the only major academic in game to not teach at the academy.
  • Lost World: Area Zero is this. Found within the Great Crater of Paldea (which formed one million years in the past), very little is known about it other than that it is exceedingly dangerous, and in fact so little is known about it because it's so dangerous. An Ancient Empire bankrupted itself funding expeditions into Area Zero over centuries, with it being said none of the explorers ever succeeding in reaching its depths. In the modern day, what little is known about Area Zero is compiled in the Scarlet Book or Violet Book, depending on which version you play; an account of the first successful research trip to the depths two hundred years prior. Among the myriad of wonders present in Area Zero are the Herba Mystica that can heal Pokémon from death's door that even Pokémon Centers are unable to help, the crystals that Tera Orbs are made from, and many exceedingly powerful and dangerous Pokémon. However, perhaps the most mysterious of all are the Paradox Pokémon, Pokémon seemingly from the distant past or future. What makes them so incredibly mysterious is that not all of them are present in the crater as a result of the professor's experiments with time travel, as the Scarlet/Violet Book contains records of all known Paradox Pokémon and the book records events from some two centuries before their experiments.
  • Lucky Charms Title:
    • One of the game's three main campaigns, which has you battle against Team Star, is titled "★ Starfall Street ★".
    • Iono is known in Paldea as the エレキトリカル★ストリーマー (lit. "Electrical ★ Streamer") in Japanese, which is translated into English as "The Supercharged Streamer" (without the star).
  • Macabre Moth Motif: Adding to its eerie atmosphere, Area Zero features nearly every fully-evolved moth-based Pokémon up to that point.note 
  • Match Cut:
    • The trailer cuts from the Nintendo Switch in the player's bedroom in-game to a real one in the live-action footage, both of which are docked and have white JoyCons.
    • The trailer called "Jump into a Paldean Journey" does this twice: dissolving from the Starmobile's carburetor to the back of the Technical Machine Machine, then again as part of a tracking shot from the windmill in Artazon to the side of a barbershop/salon.
  • Magikarp Power: The Trope Namer returns yet again, but it's got a new aquatic rival in town: Finizen. At first glance, it's an adorable but weak dolphin Pokémon whose strongest move is Dive for eighteen levels, but once you get it to Level 38 while standing in the Union Circle with another player, it evolves into Palafin, who... looks almost exactly like Finizen. Once it switches out, however...
  • Meaningful Name:
    • The professors are named Sada and Turo, which are short for the Spanish words "pasada" (past) and "futuro" (future), tying into the games' theme of past and future.
    • The main legendaries are named Koraidon and Miraidon, containing the Japanese words "korai" (from time immemorial, ancient), and "mirai" (future), representing the past/future theme of the game. And the second half of their name is just a phonetic "ride-on", since that's what you'll be doing for most of the game.
  • Mechanical Horse: The Violet-exclusive Miraidon is a Horse of a Different Color with a metallic body and LED eyes.
  • Morton's Fork: Some Tera Raid battles can become this when the raid boss' Tera type is weak to types that are in turn weak against the boss' original typing: Either you capitalize on STAB bonus to quickly finish the raid but putting your Pokémon at risk of being KO-ed by super effective attacks, or forgo STAB bonus to avoid getting hit by super effective attacks at the cost of taking longer to beat the raid and possibly timing out. A stand-out example is the 7-star Poison-Tera Greninja: Poison is weak to Ground and Psychic, but those two types are respectively weak against Water and Dark, Greninja's original typing.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The crown for the Ghost-type Terastallization is modeled after the old generic ghost sprite from the original Pokémon Red and Blue.
    • The feature that lets your Pokémon walk around with you on the overworld is called "Let's Go".
    • The Pika-Vee phone case you can get as an Old Save Bonus shows a battle between Pikachu and Eevee in their Pokémon Yellow sprites.
    • A building in Alfornada is decorated with mosaics depicting the generic sprites that are used to represent Pokémon in Pokémon Red and Blue.
    • The Iron Thorns mon is a reference to the Mecha-Tyranitar from the Poke Star Studios in Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, as well, as a Shout-Out to Mechagodzilla.
    • The Roaring Moon mon bears some resemblace to Mega Salamence, which is even called the "blood-soaked crescent" in one of its PokéDex entries.
    • One of the in-game trades is a trainer trading her Haunter to you in exchange for a Pinchurchin, referencing an in-game trade back in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. However, unlike the Troll NPC who gave her Haunter an Everstone to prevent it from evolving, this Haunter isn't and will evolve into Gengar afterwards.
    • In one of your biology classes, Jacq askes you how you can increase your chances of catching a Pokémon. One of your potential responses is to give the Pokémon a berry, which you can do in Pokémon GO.
    • Another Pokémon GO reference is in the shape of the giant sign atop Pokémon Centers, which is very reminiscent of a PokéStop.
    • History teacher Raifort using a Gengar and Scream Tail being an ancient Jigglypuff may remind anime watchers of an episode where the two Pokemon had a significant impact in the past.
  • Nerf:
    • After the overwhelming presence that Zacian had in the Generation VIII metagame, it got hit with a double nerf: its regular form lost 10 points in Attack, with Crowned form losing another 10 (for a total of 20), while also having Intrepid Sword nerfed to only work once per a whole match. Unfortunately, Zamazenta had to follow in suit with the stat and Ability nerfs (with Crowned form losing 5 in both Defense stats instead of further 10 Attack).
    • Similarly, Cresselia lost 10 points in each of her Defense stat.
    • Battle Bond Greninja loses its ability to turn into Ash-Greninja, with Battle Bond instead giving an Attack, Special Attack, and Speed buff each time it knocks out an enemy. This results in a huge loss in Special Attack and loses Water Shurkien's power and three hit minimum buffs.
    • Protean and Libero now work only once for each time the user enters the battle.
    • Wicked Blow lost 5 points of power while Grassy Glide and Glacial Lance lost 10 points each.
    • Scald can no longer be used by any Water Pokémon except Volcanion.
    • All recovery moves that recover fixed amount of health have their base PP reduced to 5.
    • A day one patch hit the Treasures of Ruin quartet with a minor nerf, dropping their base stat totals by 10 points each.Specifically...  Notably, this is the first time a Pokémon has ever had its stats changed via a game patch.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The official website claims that Nemona uses Lechonk and Smoliv, but she never uses them in the actual games.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: Area Zero. The place is crawling with Paradox Pokémon, but they're not even remotely the scary part. The real horror lies the fact a eldritch legendary Pokémon crashed into the Paldea region a million years ago, which was described by the book written by Heath, and we don't even see this thing face to face. We know what it's capable of, but the main source of information on it has been dead for around two hundred years. All we know in the present is that it's somewhere in Area Zero.
  • Older Is Better: Either played straight or inverted, depending on which version you play. Scarlet features ancient ancestors of present day Pokémon. Violet features futuristic descendants of present day Pokémon. In either case, they're for the most part massively more powerful than their present day counterparts.
  • Old Save Bonus: Your player character can get a custom phone case for their phone if their system has save data for Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu! and Eevee!, Pokémon Sword and Shield, Pokémon Brilliant Diamond & Shining Pearl, or Pokémon Legends: Arceus.
  • Only Shop in Town: Excluding Mesogoza's repeating similar restaurants, every town has exactly one store by any one name, and as such that store is the only place you can get those specific items.
  • Overly Generous Time Limit: All of the Star Barrage fights that take place before fighting the Team Star Bosses require you to knock out 30 Pokémon within 10 minutes. What makes this rather trivial is that you can only fight using the new Let's Go! feature to auto battle all of the Pokémon the grunts send out, which take only a matter of seconds for each mon. Even a new player learning the ropes of the mechanic will take at most 3-4 minutes to knock out 30 Pokémon, and both the amount of Pokémon and time allotted are the same across all bases, even the much higher leveled ones.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Director Clavell as Clive, played deliberately for laughs. A master of subterfuge he ain't. You are regularly given dialogue options where you see through the disguise.
  • Peninsula of Power Leveling: Area Zero has a few areas with a high rate of wild Chansey spawns, making it an excellent place for endgame/postgame Level Grinding.
    • North Providence Three is also has a higher rate of Chansey appearing, and also a rare chance of Blissey, and it can be reached the moment the player is able to travel freely from Mesagoza.
  • Post-Final Boss: The final battle of the game follows the battle against AI Sada/Turo, as they control another copy of the game's cover Legendary, and you have to use your own that you've been riding around with the whole game. The battle is pretty much there to show off your cover Legendary having finally regained its strength to battle again and stop the Paradise Protection Protocol.
  • Power-Up Food: Unlike the Curry in Sword and Shield, which was strictly for restorative purposes and raising Friendship, the Sandwiches in this game actually grant bonuses for 30 minutes of real time. These can range from increasing the catch rate of specific Pokémon types, increasing the chances of getting a Pokémon Egg from a Picnic and accelerating the hatch rate, increasing the chances of encountering certain types of Pokémon, and even increasing the odds of encountering Shiny Pokémon.
  • Power Up Letdown: Terastallizing a Pokémon can make their moves relatively powerful. However, depending on what you evolved them from, it's a very high possibility they could inherit a Tera Type that isn't relevant to their movepool, for instance, the Eeveelutions or Azumarill getting a Normal Tera type when they could benefit more from another type.
  • Pre-existing Encounters: Wild Pokémon are visible on the overworld before they are battled, instead of being encountered via Random Encounters.
  • Prehistoric Monster: The Paradox Pokémon in Scarlet resemble current day Pokémon like Misdreavus and Amoonguss, but are far larger and more feral in appearance, and are speculated to be the ancestors of existing Pokémon.
  • Protective Charm: A new item is introduced called the Clear Amulet. It protects the holder from stat debuffs by enemy moves or abilities.
  • Pun: The town of Artazon is filled with statues and other forms of art, and is home to the artisan Gym Leader, Brassius.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: During the first postgame quest with Penny checking in on the other Team Star members, she reacts like this when Giacomo tries hyping up the students like an MC.
    Penny: What. On. Earth.
  • Red Herring: One of the first things Koraidon/Miraidon does after meeting the player and temporarily restoring its power is break a rock blocking their path. While eating Herba Mystica restores its powers later, such as gliding or swimming, breaking rocks is not one of them.
  • Repetitive Audio Glitch: At launch, the Elite Four battle themes could suffer a massive glitch which left them stuck looping on the intro theme. Some people have even reported that Geeta's theme suffered a similar glitch which would only loop the intro part of the theme as well. This was fixed with the v.1.1 update.
  • Repetitive Name:
    • The TM Machine. Since TM stands for Technical Machine, the TM Machine would be Technical Machine Machine, and is even referred to as such when you're introduced to it.
    • Dunsparce's new evolution is named Dudunsparce.
  • Reverse Escort Mission: A variation near the beginning of the game. After feeding Koraidon/Miraidon a sandwich to briefly rejuvenate their battle prowess, you follow behind them through a cave connecting the beach and Poco Path. They'll destroy a boulder in the way, scare off a pack of Houndour and save the player from a much stronger Houndoom, but the player can engage with wild Pokémon along the way and it won't do anything to help them there.
  • Ruins for Ruins' Sake: Paldea is absolutely littered with the remains of small, stone structures with no immediately clear purpose due to their wear and decay. Various Pokémon like Ghost-types, Falinks, the Tinkaton family, and Gimmighoul populate them and can be most easily be found here. There's also a bunch of tall stone watchtowers with the Chest Form of Gimmighoul often waiting at the top. The history classes the player can take tell of the Paldean Empire that originally populated the region 2,000 years ago, making them likely responsible for these structures, but their purpose and original design are ultimately left inconclusive.
  • Sadistic Choice: Played for Laughs at the expense of the Team Star grunt who's forced to do the choosing. After taking down one Team Star grunt in the player's very first encounter with Team Star, Nemona appears and, once she learns what had led to the confrontation, gives a Tera Orb to the playable protagonist and suggests using it in the battle against the remaining Team Star grunt to learn how Terastallizing works. When the grunt protests about being used as a training dummy, Nemona threatens him by basically saying it's either the playable protagonist or Nemona herself that he'd have to battle against. The grunt, knowing that he stands no chance against a Champion-ranked Pokémon trainer that Nemona is, challenges the playable protagonist... and gets beaten anyway.
    Team Star grunt: Wait, what? You want this kid to practice whaling on us with his/her Tera Pokémon, is that it?
    Nemona: Got a problem? You wanna battle me instead?
  • Schizophrenic Difficulty: Due to the game's open world nature, every objective having set levels, the placement of said objectives and the game only telling you what objectives are nearby rather than which ones are closest to your level when asked for help, a lot of first time players can experience this if they don't look up the intended order to fight every Gym Leader, Team Star Base and Titan ahead of time. While the descriptions of the different Team Star and Gym Leaders usually give some indication of their level by mentioning how difficult/easy they are, the descriptions can be somewhat vague and no such hints are given for the Titans. The best you can gauge while guessing blindly is that wild and trained Pokémon levels increase the farther away you go from Mesagoza, up to around mid-50s in the farthest reaches of the region.
  • Schmuck Bait: The Elite Four battles are preceded by an interview which kicks the player out of the building if they fail certain questions. The final question is "Do you like Pokémon?" and answering "No" is an instant fail. Unlike the other insta-fail questions this is one that players would have to intentionally choose: The default response is "Yes" so mashing through the text would still be correct and one would have to actively select "No", and while most other incorrect answers could be excused as a memory lapse, the message that Pokémon enrich the lives of humans is so ingrained into the franchise that it's unlikely the player would genuinely believe the opposite is the right answer. It's pretty much only there to waste time if chosen and see some alternate dialogue from the interviewer.
  • School Bullying Is Harmless: Averted. It turns out that Team Star was born as result of a bunch of students who retaliated against their bullies, because the teachers and previous principal were either ignorant of the situation or tried to cover it up. Unfortunately, when they confronted their bullies, they are mistaken as the bullies themselves by other students, sparking rumors at the academy and being worsened by said staff erasing records of the incident instead of fixing it..
  • School of No Studying: Downplayed, as the main plot of the game happens when the protagonist is sent on an independent study assignment to find their own 'treasure'. While this gives a reason for the protagonist to be gallivanting around Paldea defeating gyms, it is notable that classes can be started anytime no matter where in the game you are, and will always start as if it is the first lesson the protagonist has ever taken. This gives off the impression of this trope.
  • School Uniforms are the New Black: Unlike previous games with customization options, you can't change out of your uniform. Justified, as the Treasure Hunt is technically a school project/outing.
  • Seemingly Hopeless Boss Fight: After the first battle at the Zero Lab, the Paradise Protection Protocol locks any Poké Ball that isn't the Professor's and sics the game's box Legendary on you. When you find yourself in the following battle, you're unable to do anything because you have no usable Pokémon. After a few turns, it comes up that the Poké Ball of your Legendary is still usable because it belonged to the Professor. The Koraidon/Miraidon not only regains its battle form, but Dragon-type Terastallizes, allowing you to win the battle.
  • Sequel Hook:
    • In one of the research stations within Area Zero, there are notes detailing a Pokémon with a hexagonal shell being responsible for Terastallization, the name being censored. No such Pokémon exists in previous generations or in Scarlet and Violet’s base game, serving as a possible hint for a new Pokémon or Pokémon form and add-on content.
    • The player can read the Scarlet/Violet book in the school's library, which not only mentions a Pokémon similar to the one described above (with the entire page being for some reason nigh-unreadable), but also another one that resembles a Fusion Dance between the Legendary Beasts (in Scarlet)/Swords of Justice sans Keldeo (in Violet) and is explicitly stated to have been "imagined" by the artist rather than actually seen. None of these are encountered in the base game. In a post-game scene, Arven even directly brings up an issue regarding the book: if the Paradox Pokémon were brought to modern Paldea by the Professor's time machine ten years ago or so, then why were they already around when the book was written 200 years ago? A lot of the book is dedicated to hooks for a sequel/DLC.
    • The local legendaries known as the Treasures of Ruin stand out from the Spain/Portugal-inspired setting as they're based on the Four Perils complete with very Chinese-sounding names as well as the designs of the shrines they're sealed in. Raifort's fourth history lesson has her mention a Paldean fairy tale about a merchant from the East bringing four treasures to the king of Paldea, hinting at a future region based on China.
  • Shop Fodder: Defeating wild Pokémon nets you some materials, usually the Pokémon's body parts, that you can sell for LP or Pokédollars, or use up to make TMs. Paradox Pokémon in Area Zero are an exception; they drop nothing no matter how many of them you defeat, but as a compensation they give generous amount of Exp compared to most other wild Pokémon you find there.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Iono renames her hide-and-seek challenge "Where in Levincia is Mr. Walkabout?"
    • The yellow and gold variants of the Cool Helmet resemble Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo's helmet.
    • One of the Titan Pokémon is a giant Orthworm making holes in the desert. You even find it buried to the neck in the ground with its mouth open like the Sarlaac pit.
    • A book or DVD set in Penny's dorm has a visible Ultraman-esque figure on the side.
    • The endgame plot revolving the Great Crater of Paldea can be seen as a kid-friendly version of Made in Abyss, from Arven receiving a message from his long-lost parent currently deep within the crater, to the crater itself being filled with wildlife that gets more and more hostile as Arven and his friends go down.
  • Stealth Pun: There are a few spaced throughout the game.
    • Fidough is a puppy Pokémon with a doughy texture. It's also a pure Fairy type, and its Violet PokéDex entry states its breath contains yeast. In other words, it's a pure-bread (purebred) dog.
    • The Bug type Gym Leader has a Teddiursa as her ace, which Terastallizes into the Bug type. It's a bugbear.
    • Penny, revealed to be Cassiopeia of Team Star and the one who created Operation Starfall tries to make amends by taking the fall for everything.
    • Koraidon and Miraidon gain new abilities, such as swimming or gliding, every time they eat one of the Herba Mystica. What's the initial for "Herba Mystica"? HM, as in Hidden Machine.
    • Larry is your average joe and a white-collared worker that has at least three different jobs. His name isn't a pun off of the Normal or Flying type he specializes in, like older Gym Leaders or Elite 4 members. He's a sal-larry-man.
  • Superboss: The 7-star Tera Raids, while Temporary Online Content, provide for the hardest fights in the game (even moreso than the already Harder Than Hard 6-star raids) and can only be unlocked once said 6-star raids are made available. The game's first 7-star raid, for instance, available in December 2022, was against a Lv. 100 Charizardnote  that Terastallizes into a Dragon-type and comes packing extremely powerful coverage moves.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: When you meet Nemona at your second gym, she goes on about what an amazing coincidence it is that she met you at that gym.
    "I swear I'm not just sneaking ahead of you so I can lie in wait and go, 'Oh wow, weird, might as well battle now that you're here!'"
  • Techno Wreckage: Area Zero's remains. Some of it is still perfectly fine, but many areas are completely ruined, and a lot of the remaining human-built structures are coated in large crystals.
  • Temporary Online Content: Inverted - all Spewpa in this game evolve into the formerly event-only Fancy Pattern Vivillon.
  • Thematic Sequel Logo Change:
    • The Japanese logo for Scarlet and Violet has the Terastallization symbol in the "Pokémon" portion, the game's primary mechanic. The logos for both the Japanese and international versions have the "Scarlet" lettering resemble Koraidon's scales, while the "Violet" lettering is pixelated like Miraidon's eyes, the two box legends.
    • The borders around the Scarlet and Violet logos proper are formed from Koraidon and Miraidon's heads respectively, with the upper inner portions being bordered by their wheels. The symbols on the outer border include that of Zero Base, the site of the game's climax, and the Tera Orb symbol, all of which are also the borders inside the Scarlet/Violet Book that details Heath's expedition to the Great Crater of Paldea 200 years before the story began.
  • Theme Naming: Each of the major storylines are named after synonyms for roads, fitting with Hassel's comment of "All paths lead to the Great Crater of Paldea". The storyline dealing with the Pokemon Gyms and League is called "Victory Road", named after the titular path in previous Pokemon games that served as the final obstacle to the Pokemon League of their respective regions. The storyline focusing on the Titans and Herba Mystica is called "Path of Legends". The storyline that has you take down the bosses of Team Star is called "Starfall Street". After all three of these stories have been finished, a final fourth story line that wraps up all the mysteries of Koraidon/Miraidon is opened, called "The Way Home".
  • Theme Table: Between the eight Gym Leadersnote , the five Team Star bossesnote , and the five titans of the Path of Legendsnote , every one of the standard eighteen types of Pokémon is covered by a Boss Battle. And in case the Titan fights aren't to your liking, the Elite Four cover the same types in regular trainer battles (with the Champion's strongest being a Rock-type to complete the set).
  • Thememobile: Each Team Star boss drives a custom car called a Starmobile with a special Revavroom attached that has a unique type matching the boss's specialty as well as a different ability. Their Pokémon fight you from atop it, with their special Revavroom fighting you last and packing a Secret Art that weaponizes the whole vehicle. For example, Mela's Starmobile is decorated with flames and her Revavroom is pure Fire with the signature move Blazing Torque.
  • Two Girls to a Team: Granted, you wouldn't know unless you caught them, but the Titan Pokemon consist of two female Pokemon (Klawf and Bombirdier), three male Pokemon (Orthworm, Dondozo and Tatsugiri) and one genderless Pokemon (Great Tusk in Scarlet/Iron Treads in Violet).
  • Underground Monkey:
    • Regional variants return, albeit more downplayed compared to the previous two generations with only a grand total of two Pokémon receiving regional variants:
      • Paldean Wooper is a Poison/Ground type that evolves into Clodsire instead of Quagsire like the Johtonian variant.
      • Tauros has a grand total of three variants with the normal one being a pure Fighting type, the Blaze Breed exclusive in Scarlet being a Fighting/Fire type, and the Aqua Breed exclusive in Violet being a Fighting/Water type.
    • Convergent evolutions are unrelated species of Pokémon that have developed similar appearances and names to previously discovered species:
      • Wiglett is a garden eel-like Pokémon that was initially thought to be a Paldean form of Diglett, before it was determined to be something else entirely. It evolves into Wugtrio, which resembles Dugtrio.
      • Toedscool and its evolution Toadscruel are based on woodear fungi, and the way they walk on their mycelium makes them the spitting images of the Tentacool line.
  • Variable Mix: Each overworld theme has at least four variants crossfading between each other depending on what you're doing; a calm version while on foot, a more upbeat version while in certain towns, one or more energetic variants while riding your mount, and an even more energetic one during encounters with wild Pokémon (except in the Poco Path area, which uses a more traditional encounter theme instead).
  • Version-Exclusive Content:
    • The school uniform the player character and various NPCs wear is different based on the game you play. Scarlet players wear orange while Violet players wear purple.
    • Depending on the game, you interact with a different Professor. In Scarlet, you meet Professor Sada, and in Violet, you meet Professor Turo.
    • The school you attend differs depending on the version. Naranja Academy is attended in Scarlet and Uva Academy is attended in Violet, with their director Clavell having a differently colored suit based on the version you play.
    • You can get version-exclusive items to evolve Charcadet into Armarouge, a Fire/Psychic-type exclusive to Scarlet, and Ceruledge, a Fire/Ghost-type exclusive to Violet.
    • Arven has the Scarlet Book in Scarlet and the Violet Book in Violet. In each book is documentation and sketches of its own version-exclusive Pokémon, with Great Tusk described in the Scarlet Book and Iron Treads described in the Violet Book.
    • What type of Paradox Pokémon coming from the time machine created by the Professor in Area Zero depends on the version. Scarlet has Ancient Pokémon that are ancestors from the distant past, while Violet has Future Pokémon that are robotic descendants.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: Area Zero, deep within the one million year old Great Crater of Paldea, is home to some very dangerous Pokémon that seemingly don't even hail from the present day, either coming from an age long past or from the distant future. It serves as the final area of the game, where you must rescue Professor Sada or Turo from the depths.
  • Video Game Caring Potential:
    • You can come back to the school anytime once you start the Treasure Hunt and if you have done your classes, you have the chance to get to know the Staff of the Academy better as you take classes and interact with the staff, thus forming an Intergenerational Friendship with them.
    • After completing the Academy Ace Tournament for the first time, you can resolve the storylines for Nemona, Penny, and Arven. Doing so will have them be comfortable enough to let the player into their dorm rooms.
  • Video Game Delegation Penalty: ZigZagged. Using the Let's Go! feature to knock out wild Pokémon will give much less EXP than usual, and won't trigger evolutions that require leveling up. However, doing so also won't give the Pokémon any EVs from the Pokémon they knock out, making for a decently efficient method of gathering EXP for a Pokémon without affecting their EV spread or resorting to Rare/EXP Candies.
  • Violation of Common Sense: Contrary to popular belief, the top bun of the sandwich has no effect on the final result regardless of whether or not it's present. Savvy players often drop the bun as far away as possible from the rest of the sandwich so it simply hits the plate and vanishes, as attempting to drop the bun on top of the rest of the ingredients has a high chance of causing it to topple over, wasting precious food and decreasing the potency of the sandwich's effects.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss:
    • Katy, ostensibly the first Gym Leader you're supposed to challenge and the one easiest to find first, has three Pokémon of roughly equal levels (14, 14 and 15) while most prior first Gyms had one weak Lv 10-12 and a Lv 14 ace, and her "ace" is a Bug Tera Teddiursa that spams a boosted Fury Cutter, a move that gets stronger with every use. If you haven't leveled up or don't have an answer to Bug, she'll steamroll you.
      • Similarly, the ace of Brassius, the second intended gym leader, is a Grass Tera Sudowoodo with Rock Throw, a move that is super effective to FOUR of Grass's weaknesses. If you thought you could steamroll him with a Fire type like you did Katy, you're in for a nasty surprise.
    • Iono, the third gym leader (assuming you're taking the correct route) can be a little tricky depending on how you prepare your team. Specializing in Electric types, two of her Pokémon are completely immune to Ground types...including her Tera Electric Mismagius, who emulates the Eelektross family from Unova in having no weaknesses thanks to its Levitate ability. While you won't be able to steamroll her team with a single Ground type move, her Pokémon fortunately don't have any coverage moves other than her Bellibolt. Even so, make sure you have a reliably strong team that isn't dependent on exploiting weaknesses before taking her on.
      • Iono repeats this during the post-game Gym Challenge. While she's not excessively powerful, she goes out of her way to become as frustrating as possible with stalling and mitigating strategies like using Magnet Rise to No-Sell the Ground type moves or members you likely brought to the fight, forcing players to adapt to the idea that, no, they can't just brute force their way through the final fights anymore.
  • Warp Whistle:
    • The Flying Taxis will take you to any Pokémon Center, shrine, watchtower, or Sight of Paldea that you've been to before from virtually anywhere on the map.
    • The teleporters within Area Zero will take you between the Zero Gate and any of the Research Stations that you've already visited. Unlike the Flying Taxis, they can only be used from one of the teleporter sites.
  • Wham Line:
    • A small example, but during the Elite Four battles, we have Poppy calling out "It's your turn, Mr. Larry!" revealing a first for the franchise: A Gym Leader who's also an Elite Four member in the same game.
    • This line from the Professor, confirming that they're not what they seem:
    "Deactivating sleep mode."
  • Welcome to Corneria:
    • Some NPCs in the background may repeat their lines if the player hangs around them a lot.
    • When the player and their friends reach the fourth research station, Sada/Turo will repeat their lines. This is a hint that something is wrong.
  • Wide-Open Sandbox: Building on the Wild Area and DLC locations from Pokémon Sword and Shield, and the segmented open world in Pokémon Legends: Arceus, Scarlet and Violet are the first true open world RPGs for the Pokémon franchise, to the point where Pokémon Gyms have no set order and can be fought in any order the player chooses. That said, if you go off of how the levels progress, there is an "intended" order that the gyms and other story beats are recommended to be completed in. The order, based on levels: 
  • Wreaking Havok: A few game elements seem to exist purely to demonstrate the game's physics, which have otherwise not been a major highlight of a mainline Pokémon title. These include the Cortondo Gym Test, which involves kicking a giant olive through an obstacle course, and the sandwich making minigame, which involves dropping sandwich ingredients onto a bun and watching them bounce around (much to the player's annoyance).
  • Zerg Rush: In the ★ Starfall Street ★ storyline, which has you battle against the delinquent Team Star, its grunts will hammer you with one Pokémon after another until you beat them within a set time frame.

 
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Alternative Title(s): Pokemon Scarlet, Pokemon Violet

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Tera Raid Pokemon Capture

Capturing Tera Raid Pokemon has its own unique animation.

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