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  • In the original novel National Velvet, Velvet is a "thin as famine" blonde with crooked teeth and considered unattractive (until she gets on a horse). Her film counterpart? Elizabeth Taylor.
  • In The Flintstones, Fred's mother-in-law was an overweight old woman with a double-chin, and was usually grouchy and always bossy. In the live-action adaptation, well, she's Elizabeth Taylor and looks far better. (But still grouchy and bossy.)
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  • In the original Casino Royale novel, Le Chiffre is described as an overweight, unattractive man. Averted in the original television adaptation, where he was played by overweight, unattractive Peter Lorre. Subverted in the first movie adaptation, where he was played by overweight but dapper and stylish Orson Welles. Played straight in the 2006 film, in which he's played by trim and handsome Mads Mikkelsen.
  • In a filmed play of Death of a Salesman, Dustin Hoffman plays the character of Willy Loman, who in the play's original script was described as fat and unattractive. The film edits out references to Loman's weight and replaces them with jabs at his intellect and height. Apparently Arthur Miller told Dustin Hoffman his original vision of Willy Loman was a small man, despite how casting for the first play turned out.
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  • Every single film adaptation of one of Roald Dahl's works can come across as this almost automatically, because of the books' art style for the illustrations, which makes everyone seem a notch or two less attractive than they presumably are supposed to be. If you're beautiful or cute, you look average. If you're average, you look ugly, and if you're ugly, you look like a troll. The most extreme example of this would be Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, even with the Uncanny Valley aspects of his makeup. But Wonka has always been prone to having his look toned down in adaptations — in the novel he's a Rummage Sale Reject who appears middle-aged (he still has black hair and a goatee) but is really older than he looks; prior to Quentin Blake, illustrators gave the character a rather leprechaun-esque appearance inspired, perhaps, by the phrase "extraordinary little man". In the public imagination, however, people think of either Depp or, even more often, Gene Wilder (who's also more conventionally attractive than the book description) when you bring the character up.
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  • The White Queen from Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland (2010) goes from this to this.
  • Gerard Butler as the Phantom in the musical The Phantom of the Opera (2004) is an extreme example of this. The nature of the Phantom's deformity is already different from the source novel's in the stage version (in the novel his face resembles a skull, and the stage version it's only half of his face that's affected), but still, he's alarming to look at unmasked. Butler's deformity in the film is commonly described as resembling third-degree sunburn at worst. On top of this, while the Phantom is usually played by middle-aged actors on stage - in part because a key plot thread is Christine seeing him as a father figure - Butler was 34 when the film was shot. Hotter and Sexier, sure, but this is supposed to be one character whose entire point is that he is not at all hot or sexy!
  • Julian Sands played the Phantom in The Phantom of the Opera (1998) with his regular face (though then again, that adaptation did include him having sex with rats, a condition many people would find more repulsive than a disfigured face, so this one may even out).
  • Skin had freakish gray skin and (Depending on the Artist) an unsettling, impish appearance in the Generation X series. In the 90's TV movie, he just looks like a typical Hispanic teenager.
  • Frank Lucas and Ritchie Roberts weren't much to look at, but they were played by Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe in American Gangster.
  • The Chronicles of Narnia. In the books, Lucy Pevensie is described as being not that pretty and a Tomboy, compared to her older sister, Susan. In The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, she also has problems with her self-esteem and constantly desires to be beautiful just like Susan. In the movie, Lucy is played by Georgie Henley, who has grown up to be a really attractive girl and is as beautiful (if not more) as Anna Popplewell. She is also more of a Plucky Girl than a Tomboy.
  • In the Annie Proulx short story Brokeback Mountain, the two protagonists are described to be ordinary-looking, even unattractive. In the movie adaptation they're played by Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger.
  • In Annie Proulx's The Shipping News, the protagonist is described as overweight, sloppy, red-headed (as are his daughters) and with a face wrinkled like a crenshaw melon. In the film adaptation, he is portrayed by Kevin Spacey—not a matinee idol, but handsomer than that.
  • In The Thin Man movies, the main character was changed from an overweight man to handsome Hollywood actor William Powell, although at least in the first film, he is still not the title character.
  • In Louis Sachar's Holes, Stanley is explicitly described as fat on repeated occasions. Shia LaBeouf, the actor playing him in the movie, is quite lanky. A part of the original story was that Stanley would gradually get more fit by all the work at Camp Green Lake, however this had to be dropped for continuity reasons.
  • Ralph Fiennes playing Dolarhyde in Red Dragon. According to the book, Dolarhyde, though plain, is nowhere near as hideous as he thinks he is (certainly not ugly enough for every woman to automatically reject him based on looks), but he still doesn't look like Fiennes. Dolarhyde's insecurity about his looks is (at least according to the movie) rooted in him having a cleft palate, which was corrected later with surgery. Manhunter's Dolarhyde clearly showed the scar from the operation but Ralph Fiennes playing Dolarhyde just looks like--Ralph Fiennes. Not that cleft palate surgery hasn't come a long way since then but Red Dragon is supposed to be a remake, not a reboot.
    • Speaking of Manhunter, Freddy Lounds is played by Stephen Lang, who is most certainly not lumpy, ugly, and short with buck teeth like Lounds is described in the novel.
  • In the book Psycho (yes, there was a book), Norman Bates was fat, bespectacled, and middle-aged, unlike Anthony Perkins in the movie. In fact, he resembles his real-life inspiration, Ed Gein. The change in the film was intentional, because Hitchcock thought that an attractive Norman would be easier to sympathize with.
  • In Jane Eyre, Rochester is downright unattractive and well into middle age. Jane Eyre herself is young, but extremely plain. These are actually important character traits, as they love each other for their inner character and each pass up on a more attractive prospective mate. In adaptations, however, Rochester is usually a rather handsome, if gruff, older gentleman, while Jane Eyre is at worst Hollywood Homely. In the 1983 miniseries, Rochester was played by Timothy Dalton! In the BBC miniseries adaptation (2006), Mr. Rochester is played by Toby Stephens and by Michael Fassbender in the 2011 film. All decidedly good-looking.
    • Debatable, considering that while those actors are attractive according to modern day standards, they might not have been considered attractive according to 19th century standards.
    • As for actresses playing Jane, let's remind ourselves that in the 1944 adaptation, Joan Fontaine played Jane.
  • In the Jonah Hex comics, Tallulah Black is the titular protagonist's Distaff Counterpart, sporting a heavily-scarred face and missing one of her eyes. In the live-action movie, she's played by Megan Fox, has both eyes intact, and is missing her trademark scars.
  • In the comics, Doctor Doom wears a mask to hide the severe burns he suffered as a young man. The first Tim Story Fantastic Four movie keeps the mask, but the explanation is changed from a disfiguring explosion to his new powers gradually turning his body into living metal. The second movie then completely undoes this by having the Silver Surfer accidentally heal his face with an energy blast, which somehow conveniently lets Doom keep his powers and his good looks. This also raises the question of why he even bothers to don the mask during the final act, since he no longer has any reason to cover his face.
  • In the Philip K. Dick short story Minority Report, the first three things we learn about the protagonist are that he's fat, bald and old. The fact that he's reaching retirement age is a plot point in the ending. The movie cast Tom Cruise, though amazingly they allow him to be bald at the end. Also, the mutants in the story were explicitly stated to be hideous. You know, kind of like how you'd expect mutants to look. On screen they're buzzed and pale, but otherwise normal.
  • In the novel of Little Children, the character Ronnie bears very little physical resemblance to Jackie Earle Haley, being an overweight, balding chain-smoker who wears glasses. While Haley is no George Clooney, he brought a far more sympathetic interpretation to the character than what was probably intended. Sarah Peirce was also described as being not very pretty in the book. In the movie they worked over time to make Kate Winslet seem frumpy but their best efforts made her look Hollywood Homely.
  • In The Princess Bride, Prince Humperdink is ridiculously over-muscled, and Vizzini is a hunchback.
  • A number of issues in Watchmen:
    • Some people thought that the overall cast was too young and attractive to portray some of the middle-aged and beaten-down characters. (Although the age issue was out of necessity, to allow the actors to portray their younger selves in flashbacks.) Walter Kovacs in particular, AKA Rorschach, is supposed to be "fascinatingly ugly". Compare comics and movie versions.
    • In the comic, a deconstruction of the superhero genre, the characters' costumes were intended to look somewhat silly to highlight the inherent absurdity of classic superhero costumes. In the movie, however, the costumes are played straight, and look much more stylish. Nite Owl II's was changed from a full body and head robe to a form fitting armor suit with pointier ears.
    • And possibly inverted with Ozymandias. He's supposed to be the model of western perfection: blonde, square-jawed and athletic. In the film, he's lanky and has a thin face - not that this affects his physical prowess.
  • In From Hell, in which Inspector Frederick Abberline is a overweight, middle-aged man typical of the Victorian middle-class. The film casts Johnny Depp as the Inspector. Similarly, the Ripper's victims generally appear more attractive in the film than they did in the comic or in real-life, as late Victorian streetwalkers in their early-to-mid forties, though most of the actresses were close in age to the women they portrayed.
  • In The Neverending Story, Bastian is fat, and it's one of the key problems he experiences in life with teasing by bullies. In the movies, not only is he thin, but in The Neverending Story 2, he's a lithe athletic swimmer. One of the Aesops of the book was Bastian using his Fantastican powers to wish for an athletic body, which was a symptom of him losing his identity.
  • The Film of the Book Twilight
    • James is described in the book as very average and unremarkable in appearance, the producers still cast Cam Gigandet in the role.
    • Bella Swan thinks of herself as rather plain and unfashionable, while Kristen Stewart plays her in the movies. However, some readers infer that Bella is overly hard on her appearance.
    • Alice is never described as ugly but is described as very short, compared to Ashley Green who's 5'6". Transversely Rosalie is described as very tall, but is played by Nikki Reed who is actually the same height.
    • Eric is described as having terrible skin, but Justin Chon is completely blemish free.
  • 21, a movie based on the book about several MIT students gaming casinos in Blackjack. The (actual, still living) MIT students are replaced with vastly more attractive (and all white) actors for the movie.
  • Spider-Man movies:
    • In the comics, Harry Osborn is drawn with the same hairdo as his father, and never drawn particularly attractively. Somehow that translated to both film series casting attractive actors - James Franco in the Sam Raimi trilogy and Dane deHaan in The Amazing Spider Man 2.
    • As mentioned in the Western Animation section, Alistair Smythe was originally a fat, hairy slob in the comics, at least until he was transformed into the Ultimate Spider-Slayer. In The Amazing Spider Man 2, he's played by B.J. Novak and depicted as a thin and clean shaven man.
    • As detailed in the MCU section below, both the Vulture and Aunt May are more attractive in Spider-Man: Homecoming by virtue of Age Lift.
    • Doc Ock in the comics is a pudgy man with a rather stout stature but Alfred Molina’s depiction in Spider-Man 2 is lean and relatively fit.
  • In The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit:
    • Hobbits are generally portly, but with the exception of Sean Astin, who is already stocky and gained some weight for the role of Sam, the producers hired slender actors for the Fellowship hobbits. Director Peter Jackson didn't want the characters to look like midgets by being overly stocky. Frodo in the books is described as "stout," and, while he's supposed to look younger than his actual age (fifty), teenage Elijah Wood is definitely stretching it. Then again, hobbits do age more slowly than humans. Hobbits in the books are also said to look friendly, not handsome or beautiful, which cannot be said for the Fellowship hobbits.
    • Goes back and forth with the dwarfs as they tend to be on the broad side but are usually more wide than they are heavy (except Bombur), and have various facial prosthetic such as bulbous noses, oversized jowls, etc; then there's Fíli and Kíli as well as Thorin, who not only is easily the most handsome dwarf, but also has his driving motivation changed from reclaiming the lost gold and treasure from Erebor to reclaiming a proper homeland for his scattered, wandering people.
  • In Isaac Asimov's robot stories, Susan Calvin is described as middle-aged and unattractive. In the movie, she was portrayed by a former model, Bridget Moynahan (although that film was only very, very loosely based on Asimov's work).
  • A minor, strange case in V for Vendetta: in the comic, V's mask has a round face and an upturned nose, making him look sort of like a doll with a mustache and a goatee, making some of his panels look more inappropriately cute than usual in especially serious scenes. In the film, he has a longer face and a long, straight nose, making him look more masculine.
  • To quote Miles Kreuger on the film adaptations of Show Boat: "Cap'n Andy's three tarts in the 1936 version are gaudily dressed and made up for their profession: in this (1951) film they are three wholesome extra girls who might be expected at Lady Astor's in their chic finery." Kreuger made similar observations about Helen Morgan (who appeared in the 1936 film) vs. Ava Gardner (of the 1951 film) as Julie in the scene where she sings "Bill".
  • The Last Airbender:
    • Prince Zuko's scar has changed from covering half his face to a barely noticeable sunburn like red blotch over his eye.
    • Uncle Iroh in Avatar: The Last Airbender is fat and a bit bald. In the movie, he is played by Shaun Toub, who is... not.
  • In the novel of Children of Men, the descriptions of Theo do not exactly call to mind a Clive Owen. Then again, about the only thing the two of them have in common is their name and a few backstory elements, the film being a very loose adaptation.
  • In the film adaptation of Let the Right One In, Oskar is played by a reasonably cute and thin child. In the book, however, he is overweight and has major problems with food. Despite being a generally lauded film, the film rather confusingly still has the bullies call Oskar "piggy". The American remake includes his obsession with candy, but also keeps him as a skinny, scrawny kid.
  • In Camp Nowhere, Melody Kay plays Gaby, a girl who is sent to fat camp and whose extra weight is mentioned by love interest, Mud ... except that the girl is average-to-thin. She's the same size as the movie's hot girl.
  • In Jane Campion's Bright Star, incredibly gorgeous Ben Whishaw plays John Keats, who really wasn't as gorgeous as Whishaw. He was also only five feet tall, while Wishaw is 5'9".
  • Ben Whishaw plays Grenouille in the film adaptation of Patrick Süskind's Perfume. While in both the novel and the film, he's filthy, malnourished and disfigured by scars from the tannery, in the novel he's described as ugly even before receiving these maladies.
  • Leslie Burke in the book Bridge to Terabithia was described as looking more like a boy than a girl and wearing plain clothing. In the film, she was played by AnnaSophia Robb, who wore bright, colourful clothes at every opportunity. According to the filmmakers, this was because the book's standards of an un-normal girl had changed by the present.
  • The play Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune originally starred Kathy Bates and Kenneth Welsh, and was revived with Stanley Tucci and Edie Falco. The 1991 film version, Frankie and Johnny, starred Al Pacino and Michelle Pfeiffer. Yes, that's right, a young Michelle Pfeiffer in a role originated by Kathy Bates.
  • In the book Jurassic Park, protagonist Alan Grant is described as short, pot bellied, and bearded. A tall, thin, and clean shaven Sam Neill dashingly plays him in the movie. Similarly, Ian Malcolm is described as a "thin, balding man". Who plays him in the movie? A studly, and very not-bald Jeff Goldblum.
  • In the book The Little White Horse, Sir Benjamin Merriweather is described as fat, bowlegged, and past his prime. In its film adaptation, The Secret of Moonacre, he's played by the lean, sinewy Ioan Gruffudd, who's also considerably younger than the character.
  • The novel The Hotel New Hampshire makes it clear that Susie the Bear really is ugly; she has major acne scars. In the movie she is played by Nastassja Kinski (with no fake scars or anything) who only thinks she is ugly. This ruins a major plot point, changes the character (instead of being ugly and knowing it, she is beautiful and thinks she is ugly), and ruins An Aesop about beauty.
  • In the Master and Commander adaptation of the Aubrey-Maturin series, both Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin are far more attractive than their book counterparts. Something of a Pragmatic Adaptation, however, because in the books Stephen is 5'6" and "indefinably odd-looking" or "pitifully small and distorted", and Jack more than 6 feet tall, but Paul Bettany is, at 6'3", four inches taller than Russell Crowe. Jack in the books is usually more than 16 stone, but Crowe only gained a little for the role.
  • Sleepy Hollow. The original description of Ichabod Crane is nothing like Johnny Depp. However, virtually nothing about Crane is the same as his original character in the short story. Originally, they did a few test runs with Depp wearing facial prosthetics, but Tim Burton ended up changing his mind, saying that in this case, it was Crane's personality quirks that made him unattractive.
  • In the Tom Ripley novels, Tom's housekeeper/Morality Pet Madame Antoinette is a middle aged-elderly Frenchwoman of friendly but average appearance. In the film Ripley Under Ground, which is a somewhat Lighter and Softer Pragmatic Adaptation, Antoinette is a pretty young woman who is the maid (not a French Maid though except in a literal sense) of Tom's future wife, but is also friendly with her/likes Tom as in the novels.
  • In The Dark Knight Saga, typically scrawny, geeky Scarecrow is played by Cillian Murphy. He goes from this to this. Inverted with Detective Flass, who went from a tall, well-built blond jock ex Green-Beret to a fat, ugly, unkempt slob.
  • In War and Peace, Pierre Bezukhov is overweight and in the beginning, a socially awkward delinquent. In the 1956 version of the movie, he's played by Henry Fonda and is anything but overweight and socially awkward.
  • In the novel They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Gloria is described as blonde, short, looking older than she is and not really pretty. In the movie, she's played by Jane Fonda, who fits none of those qualifications.
  • In Ooku, the shogun's best friend and right-hand woman is plain and pudgy with a sort of rectangular face. The live-action movie cast Wakui Emi, who bears little resemblance.
  • While the original Clash of the Titans ups Medusa's hideousness by making her a Snake Woman, the remake has a snakelike Gorgeous Gorgon. Until she gets her Game Face on that is. However, the original Medusa was a very beautiful temple maiden, before being turned into a monster. This is probably a compromise of the conflicting myths about her appearance.
  • The novel Thirteen Women has a pair of twin sisters named May and June, who work as sideshow attractions due to their obesity. In the 1932 film adaptation, May and June are still circus performers, but are changed to lovely, thin acrobats.
  • In Sense and Sensibility, Colonel Brandon is described as being not nearly as handsome as Willoughby. He's described as the 18th century version of "okay looking," and someone that Marianne became attached to because he was kind to her when she was ill. In the 1995 film, he's played by Alan Rickman. Willoughby who? Plenty of women would have snapped up the movie version of Colonel Brandon without a second glance at Willoughby. Kind, honorable and Alan Rickman sexy? Sign us up!
  • Velma in the first live action Scooby-Doo film goes from this to this
  • It's difficult to claim this trope for adaptations of theatre productions, because the characters are played by so many different actors it's hard to claim which actor is the "right" amount of attractive. However, comparing the original castings of Sweeney Todd and Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street with the versions shown in movie, and it's hard to claim Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham-Carter are accurate, especially given Todd's backstory, and while Benjamin Barker was supposedly attractive before he was exiled at least to Mrs. Lovett, after his ordeal he'd probably look a little more messed up than Johnny Depp with a skunk stripe.
  • In the novel Taffin, the title character is overweight and unattractive. In the movie, he's played by Pierce Brosnan.
  • Partially lampshaded in American Splendor, when Joyce talks about how Harvey is depicted in his comic:
    Joyce: You know, I don't really know what to expect. Sometimes you look like a younger Brando... but then the way Crumb draws you, you look... like a hairy ape, with all these wavy, stinky lines undulating off your body. I don't really know what to expect.
  • In the novel Running with Scissors, Natalie is described as being plain and significantly overweight. In the movie, she's played by Evan Rachel Wood.
  • Dracula. In the book Dracula was old and ugly, with hairy palms, whilst most of the films make him younger, suave, and Tall, Dark, and Handsome. The most extreme example must be the 1979 version, which makes Dracula look like this and have a voice that could melt butter. Same often goes for his personality; in the book he was an old man, tired with immortality, who wanted to take over the world, whose bite seems to be a metaphor for rape and sexually transmitted disease. In the movies, he seduces Mina and/or Lucy, with plenty of angst over the loneliness of living forever and being a vampire. Luke Evans who plays him in Dracula Untold is a similar example.
    • Also applicable to Renfield in one known adaptation of the novel. While he's normally interpreted by older-looking men, more similar in appearance to the character in the books; he was played by the handsome Dwight Frye in the 1931 version.
  • In Stephen King's Carrie, the title character is overweight, has thinning dark hair, acne in her face and chest and back, and possibly hirsutism (she seems to have all the signs of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome- hence explaining her late puberty). In the movie, she is played by Sissy Spacek, who is slender, has thick shiny blonde hair, and clear skin- and thus her late puberty is likely due to something else! Though the filmmakers did at least acknowledge this by having the gym teacher tell Carrie that she is a pretty girl but just needs to work on her appearance. In the 2013 re-adaptation, Carrie is portrayed by Chloë Moretz, filmed in 2012 when this was how she looked on an average day. The 2002 film cast Angela Bettis who went down the Beauty Inversion route but at the same time was still much thinner than the book counterpart.
    • Inverted with the character Helen Shyres. Although a background character in the book, she's nominated for Prom Queen - implying she's attractive. The 1976 film cast Edie McClurg who is chubby and the character is presented as a Butt-Monkey for the popular girls - also not appearing to have a date at the prom. Though in the 2002 film Helen is played by the very pretty Chelan Simmons.
    • Something of an inversion in the 2013 film with Portia Doubleday as Alpha Bitch Chris. Previous adaptations had the character as attractive but this one presented Chris as a ratchet spray-tanned Snooki/J-Woww wannabe, compared to Carrie and Sue's more natural beauty.
  • The movie adaptation of Diary of a Wimpy Kid is a great example. In the books, Greg's brother Rodrick was portrayed as a noodle person with a perpetual frown. So... why is he played by Survival of the Dead's Devon Bostick in the movie?
  • The novel of True Grit describes Mattie as ugly on multiple occasions, as well as describing Rooster as old and fat. Neither film adaptation really held to this. The 2010 adaptation made it even more jarring by keeping all the dialogue about ugliness and fatness. Hailee Steinfeld wasn't made up like a beauty pageant entry or anything, but has flawless skin and shiny hair; she's at worst Hollywood Homely. Jeff Bridges had something like a visible gut, but was hardly fat.
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe:
  • In Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, Gumshoe is played by Shunsuke Daito. That's right, Dick Gumshoe is played by Ohtori Kyoya from the live-action Ouran High School Host Club.
  • In Silent Hill: Revelation 3D, Vincent is being played by Kit Harrington.
  • In the Agent Pendergast novel The Relic, the character of police lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta was portrayed as overweight and near middle age. In the film adaptation, he was played by Tom Sizemore.
  • Happens frequently in adaptations of Sherlock Holmes, described in the stories as pale, gaunt and hooknosed. In this case the prettification started with the original illustrations — Arthur Conan Doyle remarked that he had always imagined Sherlock as "uglier" than the rather dashing figure depicted by illustrator Sidney Paget; but that "perhaps from the point of view of my lady readers it was as well". In films, Holmes is often played by handsome leading men such as Christopher Lee, Rupert Everett, and Robert Downey Jr.. Interestingly, the reverse is often true of Watson, who in the books is contrasted against Holmes for his skill with the ladies, but is portrayed in many adaptations as a rotund little man (except the one with Downey Jr., where he's Jude Law, and the one with Cumberbatch, where he's the definitely middle-aged but otherwise reasonably good-looking Martin Freeman). Mocked nicely by Kate Beaton here.
  • In the Stephanie Plum books by Janet Evanovich, Stephanie is supposed to be a fairly average Jersey girl with Italian and Hungarian heritage. In One for the Money, the film adaptation of the first book in the series, she's played by Katherine Heigl, who, despite whatever else one may think of her, is generally agreed to be physically gorgeous.
  • Several cases in Les Misérables (2012).
    • In the novel, Mme. Thenardier is a massive, muscular woman with highly masculine features, and is frequently compared to an ogress, and the stage version, while upgrading her appearance slightly, generally goes out of its way to make her relatively unattractive. In the film of the musical, however, she's played by Helena Bonham-Carter, who is made-up to look blowsy-looking but otherwise has no change in her appearance.
    • M. Thenardier is described as a sickly-looking "runt" who is not at all good-looking. Performances of the musical tend to cast actors whose physical appearance along with make-up more or less fit that description. However, in the film he's played by Sacha Baron Cohen, who, while showing a bit of Thenardier's creepy vibe, is probably the best looking and most stylishly dressed incarnation of the character.
    • In the book and to a lesser extent in adaptations, Valjean looks like an old man by time he rescues Cosette (and in the book has stark white hair after being Locked into Strangeness). In the film, he's Hugh Jackman.
    • Eponine in the book is scrawny, dirty, and not attractive at all, but in the film she is portrayed by the lovely Samantha Barks. Same goes for several of the barricade boys, who are invariably attractive onscreen.
    • One of those 'barricade boys' Grantaire is described by Hugo who says "He was frightfully ugly; the prettiest shoe-binder of that period, Irma Boissy, revolting at his ugliness, had uttered this sentence: "Grantaire is impossible."" George Blagden is far from ugly.
    • Gavroche in the movie and the plays is adorable and woobified, while in the book he is a starving son of the already ugly Thenardiers, and is portrayed in the author's pen and ink drawings as having wild, tangled hair and a slightly hideous wide mouth and jutting chin.
    • Child Cosette was ugly and wretched from years of starvation, neglect and abuse, but she's portrayed as a cute girl.
  • Misery is a partial example. While Kathy Bates is no supermodel, she's still leaps and bounds above the way Annie Wilkes was described in the book. In the movie, Wilkes was at least clean and well-groomed. However, in the book, Annie was described as a shapeless blob of a woman who was always dressed dumpily and reeked of dirt and cheap makeup.
  • Mary Poppins looks prettier in the movie than her counterpart from the books did, at least by the author's standards. However, Mary in the books had a worse habit of admiring her own reflection.
  • Grease:
    • Cha-Cha DiGregorio is a tall, shapely, attractive dancer and said to be Danny's ex-girlfriend. This is a far cry from the original musical, where she's meant to be slovenly, plain-faced, and was usually played by a much heavier actress (who'd be made up to look far from attractive). She also has no past connection to Danny, and is played off as an aggressive Brawn Hilda type.
    • Jan is meant to be visibly overweight and not seen as particularly attractive. While the film tries to assert that Jan is "fat" and she's shown dressed in frumpy clothing compared to the other girls, she's actually on the thinner side and her final appearance shows that she has no problem with fitting into a tight dress (although her actress claims the intent was for the character to lose weight over the course of the story).
  • In Lord of the Flies, Jack Merridew is described as having an ugly face and bad teeth and his mere presence frightened the younger children. In both movie adaptations, the child actor is more attractive than the book's description.
  • This is the effect of having Woodward and Bernstein in the film version of All the President's Men be played by, respectively, Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman.
  • Pride and Prejudice:
    • Adaptations are a borderline example. While Elizabeth IS beautiful, her older sister Jane is supposed to be the prettiest. Precious few adaptations acknowledge this however, likely because Elizabeth is the main character. This crosses over with Values Dissonance in the 1995 miniseries; Susannah Harker fits the ideal of Regency beauty perfectly, while Jennifer Ehle doesn't, but most modern viewers find Ehle more attractive. The 2005 film comes the closest to the original book; Jane is played by the classically, traditionally beautiful Rosamund Pike, while the much more ethereally striking (but still gorgeous) Keira Knightley plays Elizabethnote .
    • A big part of Charlotte's decision to marry Mr Collins in the book is because she's not pretty enough to attract anyone else. In the BBC miniseries and Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, she's just as cute as the other girls.
    • Mary is supposed to be the plain sister - though partly down to her unattractive personality. But most adaptations cast a cute girl. Joe Wright's version has a compromise, where Mary is a Perpetual Frowner who dresses in drab grey clothes - but looks just as pretty as the others when she's dressed up for the balls.
  • The movie version of Beastly is a pretty egregious offender—in the book, Kyle becomes a hairy animal, much like in a certain other adaptation that it mimics. In the movie, he's clearly human, but with no hair, some scars and some tattoo-like markings...which means that he looks less like a "beast" and more like a hardcore punk. Depending on one's tastes, his cursed form may be more attractive than he is normally! The makeup actually is rather elaborate (67 pieces, taking three hours to prepare each day) but it's clear that the filmmakers didn't want their YA romance star to be "ugly," even if that's the whole premise of the story.
    • In the book, Kendra is originally overweight and pimply, despite being able to take on a more attractive. In the movie, her "ugly" form is basically just Mary-Kate Olsen as a Goth.
  • Mother Malkin, an ugly old witch in The Spook's Apprentice, is played by Julianne Moore in Seventh Son with little change on her appearance.
  • While not much of a difference due to prosthetics and makeup, Gargamel as played by Hank Azaria in The Smurfs and The Smurfs 2 has a full set of teeth compared to his comic book and animated counterparts.
  • Catherine Hubscher (1753-1835), better known as Madame Sans-Gêne, was famous for being ugly but with a heart of gold. So of course, in the 1961 movie made after a play centred around her life, she's played by Sofia Loren.
  • Here's Gein in Rurouni Kenshin. Now, here's Go Ayano, who portrays Gein in the live-action film. The movie gives him some facial scars to compensate, but he still ends up looking quite handsome in comparison to his manga counterpart.
  • In the comic Asterix and Cleopatra, Cleopatra is extremely attractive but has a Gag Nose which other characters constantly make backhanded compliments about, and her ostentatiousness is expressed through what she surrounds herself with. In the film adaptation she is played by Monica Bellucci in just the most impossibly Gorgeous Period Dresses ever.
    • The Other Darrin playing Asterix in the film set in Britain is very much a Pretty Boy compared to the comics version.
    • Gérard Depardieu is hardly pretty, but it's basically impossible for any human to be anywhere near as fat and funny-looking as Obelix.
  • The Blade Trilogy movies:
    • Blade: Deacon Frost is made into a Generation X hipster played by Stephen Dorff. In the comics, he was an old white haired guy with a German accent from the 1860s.
    • Blade: Trinity: Hannibal King also gets a similar treatment. In the comics, he's a reserved, mature man of average build who appears to be in his early forties. Not unattractive, but he has the shifty, seedy look that was appropriate for the Hard Boiled Private Eye that he was. Ryan Reynolds played King in Trinity and they made a point of showing off the muscles that he put on for the role. Reynolds essentially injected his Van Wilder character onto King.
  • Nick Prugo, real-life member of the Hollywood Hills Burglar Bunch, had this to say about the casting of The Bling Ring:
    Nick Prugo: The character that Claire Julien plays, based on Courtney I believe — Claire did an amazing job and she's way hotter than [Courtney is] in real life.
  • A rare inversion in the Hammer film The Devil Rides Out; the character of Marie Eaton in the original novel is a young, glamorous Russian emigre, while in the movie she's a conventionally attractive middle-aged Englishwoman. The villain Mocata is a straight example, going from rather weird-looking and overweight, to being played by Charles Gray.
  • Into the Woods:
  • Maleficent: Played with. Maleficent here is played by Angelina Jolie, but the original animated character wasn't exactly hideous (and was herself a case of Adaptational Attractiveness compared to the traditionally ugly Evil Fairy). Simultaneously inverted with Aurora, but only to a point: Aurora in the original film was modeled after actresses in their twenties, despite being sixteen at most. For this film, Aurora is portrayed by Elle Fanning, who, while by no means ugly, is noticeably more childlike in terms of appearance. This was due to Fanning being only fourteen/fifteen during filming, but this does have the advantage of her portrayal of Aurora looking like an actual teen (despite detractors saying she looked too young).
  • Peter van Houten is played by Willem Dafoe in The Fault in Our Stars, and, unsurprisingly, he's more attractive than the fat and spindly Peter in the book.
  • In Vampire Academy, Headmistress Ellen Kirova is given an unflattering depiction. Rose thinks of her as an "old hag", and describes her as sharp-nosed, gray-haired, tall, slim, and reminiscent of a vulture. In the film, Kirova is played by the famously attractive Olga Kurylenko. Kurylenko has had a notable modelling career, including photo shoots for Vogue, Elle, Madame Figaro, Marie Claire, and Victoria's Secret catalogues. Far from looking like a hag. It's lampshaded, when Kirova comments that she "could have been a model".
  • Cinderella (2015):
    • While Lady Tremaine's ugliness is never addressed, in the 1950 animated film she definitely looks like a senior widow (old looking, plain clothing), here she's younger, stylish and played by Cate Blanchett.
    • The "ugly" stepsisters (who were genuinely unsightly in the animated film) here just wear ghastly clothes with bad make-up choices, although the film's narration comments that they aren't ugly on the outside, but on the inside.
    • The Fairy Godmother. First she appears as an emaciated, hunchbacked old woman, contrasting with the healthier sweet-granny character of the animated film, but then she transforms into Helena Bonham-Carter with a beautiful Pimped-Out Dress.
    • The King in the animated film was short and tubby, but in the live action is played by the tall and slender Derek Jacobi.
  • Divergent:
    • In the novel, Tris is described as average looking, slim, and short teenager. She's also described as not having much of a chest and having a long nose. In the film, she is played by the gorgeous Shailene Woodley. She is a developed adult, and more physically attractive than described.
    • In the novel, Eric is described as having a frightening and repugnant appearance. In the film, he certainly still has an intimidating presence, but is actually pretty good looking.
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events: The movie makes them appear much more "pretty" then they look in illustrations (excepting Violet, who was described as being pretty in the books), making Klaus look much older than he probably should, and making him no longer need glasses, which would be a vital plot point in the fourth book.
  • DC Extended Universe:
    • In the comics, Batman's butler, Alfred is a balding man who is often stick thin. This version of Alfred is played by Jeremy Irons, who still has a full head of hair and is in better shape.
    • Suicide Squad (2016) once again sees Amanda Waller get this treatment, as she's played by Viola Davis. While still more slender and attractive than the original heavy-set Waller, she is still closer to her classic appearance compared to her appearances in Arrow and the New 52. Also, even though he's very scruffy and grungy, Captain Boomerang is still handsomer and more youthful-looking than his comic counterpart, who is usually depicted as a very scrawny middle-aged man with a receding hairline.
    • Aside from the metal caps, tattoos and lack of eyebrows, The Joker is played by the youthful-looking Pretty Boy Jared Leto. This, especially compared to the creepy old man with a botched facelift in Batman (1989) and the filthy Glasgow Grin-sporting vagrant in The Dark Knight.
    • Shazam has the formerly creepy and diminutive Doctor Sivana played by the tall and ruggedly handsome Mark Strong.
  • Speaking of Amanda Waller, she was portrayed by Angela Bassett in the Green Lantern movie, despite Bassett not being nearly as short or overweight as Waller's classic depiction.
  • Assistant Director Janson in The Maze Runner books is nicknamed the "Rat Man" because of his ugly rat-like appearance. In the films, he's played by Silver Fox Aidan Gillen.
  • In Oliver Twist, Nancy is described as "not exactly pretty, perhaps," and was portrayed in George Cruikshank's original illustrations as very plain and heavyset. Most of the actresses who've played her in the various screen adaptations - Kay Walsh, Shani Wallis, Leanne Rowe, Sophie Okonedo, and others – are much more conventionally attractive, as are most who play the role in the stage musical Oliver!
  • In the book Dr. No, Honey Rider had a broken nose, which Bond was kind enough to pay for plastic surgery to fix in the epilogue. In the film Dr. No, Honey Rider had no such deformity.
  • Katniss Everdeen does not describe herself too flatteringly in the (first person narrative) book of The Hunger Games but Jennifer Lawrence is... well, something of a red hot babe!
    • ...As well as Jena Malone cast as Johanna Mason in Catching Fire!
  • The Tarot Witch of Something Wicked This Way Comes is described as a wrinkled, half-blind crone. The film adaptation makes her a youthful, gorgeous seductress by combining her role with a minor character's from the book.
  • She repeatedly mentions how ugly Horace Holly is, with people making "Beauty and the Beast" jokes and giving him ape-related nicknames. In film adaptations (including the 1935 film, where he's played by Nigel Bruce, and the 1965 film, where he's played by Peter Cushing), he's never worse than ordinary-looking.
  • 30 Days of Night: The paunchy, late-thirties, happily married main couple of the comics become buff, mid-twenties, and sexily divorced.
  • In Billie Letts' novel Where the Heart Is, Novalee Nation is described on the first page as "seventeen years old, seven months pregnant, and thirty-seven pounds overweight," and her friend Lexie is described as morbidly obese. Naturally, the film has them played by Natalie Portman and Ashley Judd.
  • The book Ready Player One describes Wade Watts as a pudgy young man with acne and messy hair. The 2018 film adaptation of Ready Player One (2018) has him played by a slender, clear-skinned, fair-haired Tye Sheridan.
  • Cloud Atlas:
    • Inverted with Isaac and Zachry (both played by Tom Hanks), who are significantly less attractive in the film than in the novel.
    • In-Universe: The movie adaptation of The Ghastly Ordeal of Timothy Cavendish as watched by Sonmi. Tom Hanks plays the look-alike of Cavendish, looking much differently, delivers his famous "criminal abuse" line much more eloquently, and writes his biopic with a early 2000s laptop, while the real Cavendish wrote his with an old-fashioned typewriter.
  • Parker: In the novel Flashfire, Leslie is a middle-aged blonde Caucasian, running towards plumpness. In the film, she is Jennifer Lopez.
  • Fat Kid Rules the World:
    • Troy's actor in the film is fat but he's not nearly as unattractive as Troy makes himself out to be. It is, however, possible that Troy is an Unreliable Narrator due to his depression and poor self-esteem.
    • Curt's actor looks messy and skinny but he's not on the level of Curt in the book. In the book Curt has long, Messy Hair, is emaciated, and looks like crap most of the time.
  • While Hester Shaw in Mortal Engines does still have a large and nasty scar on her face, it's nowhere near as disfiguring as that of her book counterpart, who is missing one eye and most of her nose.
  • In A Study in Terror, the victims of Jack the Ripper are all much younger (with the exception of Mary Kelly, the Ripper's victims were all their 40s) and prettier than they were in real life.
  • In Frank Herbert's novel Dune, Gurney Halleck is repeatedly described as "an ugly lump of a man" with a hideously scarred face. In the 1984 film version, he's played by future Sexiest Man Alive Patrick Stewart, with no trace of scars to be found.
  • The novel White Fang has Beauty Smith, who's described as short and ugly and is even more so the more he abuses White Fang. In the 1991 Disney movie, though, he's played by James Remar, who's definitely a more good-looking guy than Beauty Smith in the novel.
  • In the original Gunnm manga, Yugo/Hugo is a teen of 15 at most, kinda scrawny and with a boyish face. In the Live-Action Adaptation Alita: Battle Angel, he's played by Keean Johnson, who's considerably more built and has a certain '90s heartthrob look to him, not too dissimilar from the likes of Jonathan Taylor Thomas. It's particularly evident given this version of Hugo gets a brief Shirtless Scene whereas the original didn't.
  • Thirteen Women: In the novel, May and June Raskob are twin sisters who work in a circus, but in the book they are overweight side show attractions, rather than photogenic trapeze artists as in the film.
  • Hellboy (2019):
    • In a very unconventional way with Daimio's beast mode: in the comics he looked like a viscerally red Animalistic Abomination, while he looks like an average jaguar hybrid man in the movie, who is far less monstrous in comparison. Downplayed with Daimio in his normal self who retains his facial scar, but it's nowhere near as massively disfiguring as in the comics.
    • Professor Bruttenholm is usually a plain man even in his youth, here he is played by the more Robust and devilishly handsome Ian McShane.

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