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From left to right: Smudge, Monica, Jimmy Five, Maggy.
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Monica's Gang, also known as Monica and Friends (originally titled Turma da Mônica) is a hugely popular Brazilian comic book series that has been running since the 1960s. It was created by Brazilian cartoonist Mauricio de Sousa.

The series has countless comic books, strips and almanacs, and is divided in several branches. The main one features four main 7-year-old kids and takes place in São Paulo:

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The other groups created by Maurício include:

  • Chuck Billy 'n' Folks/Turma do Chico Bento: A Brazilian child hillbilly's life.
  • Horacio's World/Turma do Horácio: A vegetarian T. rex who muses about life.
  • Bug-a-Booo/Turma do Penadinho: A ghost and his monster friends. They like to scare people, but usually fail miserably.
  • The Cavern Clan/Turma do Piteco: A caveman dealing with his prehistorical life.
  • Tina's Pals/Turma da Tina: A teenager and her friends, which include her blue-haired best friend, her chubby best female friend and said friend's lazy boyfriend.
  • The Tribe/Turma do Papa-Capim: A group of Brazilian Indians (a word whose Portuguese counterpart is not derogatory at all).
  • The Funnies/Turma do Astronauta: A Brazilian astronaut's journey through the cosmos. Frequently stumbles by classic sci-fi characters (a story had him taking his spaceship to the shop; Kirk and Spock, Darth Vader, E.T. and the crew from Lost in Space were all there awaiting service on their ships as well), and it can be sometimes adventurous, sometimes philosophical (in fact, the first graphic novel of the Graphic MSP seal, which deals with Mauricio's characters as seen by other prominent Brazilian comics artists, stars Bubbly in a study on loneliness).
  • Lionel's Kingdom/Turma da Mata: A group of jungle animals. The English title has the name of the ruler of said jungle (a lion, of course), but the main character is the elephant Thunder (Jotalhão), originally created as the mascot of a tomato sauce (which had a realistic elephant on its cans, but eventually changed to Thunder).

A general rundown on the franchise for English speakers can be found here. The English dub of the series on the Monica Plus YouTube channel can be found here. The playlist of the Japanese dub of the show can be found here.


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Contains examples of:

    Tropes A-M 
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the Superman comics, Mongul is depicted as a cunning tyrant whose strength rivals or outright surpasses the hero's. Here, he is reduced to a Butt-Monkey: The gang refers to him as a "Darkseid rip-off" whose name is not worth remembering, and he goes down in a single hit when Monica bashes him with her stuffed bunny.
  • Adapted Out: In some animated versions of comics, a few characters such as Specs, Junior and Jeremiah never appeared and were replaced by someone else. While Junior and Jeremiah now appear in the cartoons regularly, Specs has been so forgotten he barely even appears in the comic books, let alone in any episode.
  • Advertised Extra: The cover art for "Dimensão Floquiniana"Translation  prominently features Monica's teen version, implying that the story is a crossover between the original comic and the manga spin-off. However, teen Monica's role is reduced to a cameo in a single panel, with no lines or interaction with her original self.
  • All Love Is Unrequited:
    • Tooga towards Pitheco. She wants to marry him, but he doesn't want to date her, or anyone else (though some stories do suggest he's just being Tsundere).
    • Franklin towards Marina. Not helped by how the attempts at winning her heart with inventions or manipulation backfire hard.
  • Alpha Bitch: Cindy Frou-Frou's most common characterization is of a spoiled, snobbish rich girl who belives herself to be above everyone else.
  • Alternate Continuity: The An Adventure in Time special takes place in its own separate continuity, since Tom-Tom and Bubbly are not depicted as living in the present as usual, but in the 1500's and the far future, respectively.
  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife:
    • Thunder is a green elephant (Jotalhão). Lampshaded in one story when a kid wanted his father to get him a green elephant. When the father let him play with Thunder, the kid was disappointed since he wanted Thunder to ripen.
    • The comic has blue, green and yellow dogs: Blu (Bidu), Fluff (Floquinho) and Glu (Bugu), respectively. Played for laughs in one comic, where Monica reveals that Franklin dyes Blu's fur... whose natural colour is purple with avocado-green stripes.
  • Ambiguous Disorder:
    • "O Desafio da Imaginação"Translation  suggests that Denise has some sort of mental disorder that causes hallucinations. Her difficulty to discern reality from fiction is mentioned halfway through the story, when she can't tell whether the Jimmy Five she is interacting with is the real one or an element of her imagination; and the big twist at the end is that virtually all the story's events only happened in her head. When she realizes this, she runs away screaming and the comic ends.
    • "A Volta do Mago Minguado"Translation  has Sunny spending weeks at the top of a mountain as part of a game of hide-and-seek. When Smudge finds him by sheer coincidence, Sunny just laughs and boasts that he is the ultimate "hider", leading the protagonist to conclude that something is not right with the boy's head.
  • Amicably Divorced: Sunny and Crystal's parents are divorced, but are very friendly with each other and are constantly seen hanging out together.
  • Anatomy Anomaly:
    • None of the characters who walk around barefoot have toes (e.g. Monica, Smudge, Maggy, Sunny), except for those in Chuck Billy's stories. The ones who wear shoes (e.g. Jimmy Five and Franklin), however, do. Lampshaded in an 80s story where Monica finds out she has no toes and, along with Smudge, decides to complain to Mauricio about it. He manages to convince them by telling them that this is one of the traits that make them unique characters, and then goes back to his sketching board - and gets horrified upon trying to draw Monica with toes.
    • Glu is the only dog with no nose, and he is shaped like an egg.
  • And Now for Someone Completely Different: Non-gameplay example. The protagonist of "The Power of Imagination" is Mauricio himself, who teams up with a sentient magic pencil to rescue his crew from the the comics' most famous antagonists.
  • Animated Actors: Most notably the Blu stories co-starring his production manager, Manfred. Other times, it happens because the No Fourth Wall nature makes the characters notice what they are playing, the scripts, and talk to the writing crew.
  • Animated Adaptation:
    • As from 2004. There are currently 25 seasons and about 207 episodes. Most of the episodes adapt stories seen in the comics - even the older ones.
    • There are some episodes dubbed in English in this YouTube channel, if you want to check.
    • Before 2004, The first known animated adaptations were a couple of commercials made for Cica between 1969 and 1989, a christmas special made in 1976 and some feature films which were made between 1982 and 1990.note 
  • Apathetic Student: Chuck Billy used to alternate between this and Book Dumb, often to the chagrin of his teacher. But then political correctness changed him into a good student.
  • Art Evolution: The main characters earlier designs had flatter heads with pointier cheeks. The modern designs have round heads and chubbier bodies.
  • Art Shift:
    • One 2009 story was about Jimmy Five and Smudge swiping supporting character Marina's magic pencil and being transported to various comic book worlds. Much Shouting Out ensues.
    • The plot was revisited the following year. This time, it's Captain Fray who steals Marina's pencil in order to pull off yet another of his worldwide pollution plans, and he drags Smudge (whom he considers his disciple) along for the ride.
  • Artistic License – Paleontology: Naturally it happens with The Cavern Clan. Interestingly this was lampshaded in one story set in the present time, when an Archaeology class finds cave paintings left by Pitheco, basically portraying him failing to hunt, and being chased by, a large dinosaur. One of the students notes that humans and dinosaurs did not live during the same period. His professor simply Handwaves it by saying that the drawings contradict such a "theory".
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Monica and Chuck Billy started as minor characters. Both are protagonists now.
    • Smudge and Maggy were secondary characters, and in 1982 and 1989, respectively, gained their own series.
    • Denise was used mainly as a prop character, like when the writers needed another girl in the scene. Thus, she changed her looks and behavior with every appearance. This is explained and lampshaded in her breakout story in 1998, in which the "actress" playing Denise calls it quits after getting sick of all the Mind Screwy changes to the character, and the others decide to hold an audition to find a replacement for her. In the end, she returns and, with the character design having now stuck, later appearances give her a more sketched-out character, making her basically a Genki Valley Girl who loves gossiping.
  • Ascended Fanboy: Subverted in a story about Smudge and Jimmy Five going to a Star Wars convention. Smudge is a dedicated fanboy to the point of being a Geek, while Jimmy is basically the definition of a casual fan and just goes with him to the convention for the ride. And yet Jimmy is the one who ends the story (after getting a picture with George Lucas, a book with cast autographs and Chewbacca’s costume) invited to be in the next Star Wars movie, while Smudge gets... a ticket to the new motion picture. So the actual fanboy doesn't get much (in fact, saying that Smudge was the Butt-Monkey in this particular story is an understatement), but the one who isn't gets everything and more.
  • Ass Shove: Mr. Bill once climbed a cashew tree, only for the children to show up to harvest the fruits. Unaware that the man is hidden among the leaves, Monica forcefully shoves a bamboo pole into the treetop. The next panel is a Hit Flash, followed by Mr. Bill jumping from the tree while screaming and clasping his behind.
  • Author Avatar:
    • Mauricio appears more or less often in the stories, and the rest of the writing staff appears sometimes. He's also a character in-universe, as Marina's dad, along with his wife Alice Takeda. While Monica's father, Mr. Sousa, was also based on Mauricio himself, he is drawn like a young Mauricio (because Monica was created in 1963, when he was 28 years old), while Marina's father looks like the older Mauricio (Marina was created in 1995, when Mauricio was already 60 years old).
    • The parody of The Lord of the Rings has as its antagonist Sousauron, who prior to becoming a Faceless Eye was known as Maurisauron.
    • Up until the publication of Horacio's graphic novel, all of his stories were written exclusively by Mauricio. This is because he viewed Horacio as a representation of himself and as a means to convey his personal philosophies, and therefore felt nobody else would be able to grasp the character's true essence.
  • Back from the Dead:
    • Jimmy Five died and came back twice:
      • In a 1990 story, Jimmy is slated to die and become a angel, and once Angel finds out, he repeatedly saves Jimmy from many accidents that Angel's boss set up (such as falling off a cliff or being crushed by a massive safe), until Jimmy gets killed by being struck with lightning. Fortunately, in the end, at seeing how broken up Angel is by Jimmy's death, God brings him back.
      • In a later story, he accidentally fell off a cliff while trying to flee from Monica. The story was about him accompanying Lady MacDeath to Heaven and Hell before she decides where he should go. However, after seeing him trying to protect Monica from the Devil, Lady MacDeath gets emotional and decides that Jimmy deserves one more shot at living.
    • Chuck Billy has died but came back to life at least twice:
      • After getting another bad grade at school, he decided to never study again and came across a man who persuaded him to just ditch school and have fun the way he wants. Later Chuck decided to swim in a dangerous river (kicking away the warning sign, to boot), but the rapids dragged him under and he woke up in Hell, where the man revealed himsself to be the Devil, who just wanted an opportunity to take his soul. Chuck was ultimately saved by an angel, who carried him out of Hell and back to Earth to have a second chance, as God knew that, as a child, he is still prone to making mistakes (the implicit point being that Chuck could never learn from them if he died).
      • Chuck trips while fleeing from Lau, snapping his neck once he hits the ground. When an angel comes to take his soul to Heaven, Chuck's spirit dives back into his own body, which miraculously comes back to life. The teary-eyed angel then muses to himself that the Lord must have been moved by the boy once again.
  • Bad Date: Played for both laughs and drama when Luca allows Monica to escort him home, which she interprets as him agreeing to date her. After a series of events in which she accidentally injures the boy out of sheer clumsiness, Luca is shown as a Bandage Mummy, with Monica sobbing by his side.
  • Badass Adorable: Monica, who is just a cute five-to-six year old yet can destroy the biggest threats possible without barely breaking a sweat.
  • Baleful Polymorph: Cabeleira Negra exposes Jimmy to a device that will gradually transform him into a rat until someone says her name, which acts as a password to cancel the transformation. Due to Jimmy's speech impediment, he is unable to pronounce her name correctly, and every attempt ends up speeding up the metamorphosis.
  • Balloon Belly:
    • Chuck dives into a river to save Zé Lelé, and comes out of the water with a massive belly. Thinking that he has contracted schistosomiasis, he panics and goes to a doctor, only to find out that his stomach has only gotten larger due to him swallowing a lot of water. His body returns to normal shortly after he goes to the bathroom.
    • In "Day of the Flying Donkey", Maggy overeats until she becomes a literal balloon and floats into the atmosphere. Sunny believes that this is because all the extra mass gave Maggy her own gravitational field, though it's later clarified that she was indeed just gassy.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Crystal's default outfit is a crop top and jeans. Also very common in Tina's stories.
  • The Bard on Board: Jimmy Five and Monica in the World of Romeo and Juliet
  • Beautiful All Along:
    • Chuck Billy's teacher is very attractive without her glasses and taking down her hair.
    • Smudge's mom. One story had several of Smudge's friends falling hard for her because they see her with her hair down and wet as she was coming out of the shower. Smudge himself doesn't recognize her at first. Played for laughs, since she then ends up looking hideous, after styling her hair (badly) and putting on some (bad) make-up.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: A basic description of Monica and Jimmy Five's relationship. Somewhat downplayed in their teen incarnation, when Jimmy - ahem, J - is much less of a Jerkass, but not entirely, since both him and Monica are more accepting of their relationship by then.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Maggy is one of the most unambiguously good characters in the comics, but don't mess with her friends.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Nutty Ned, big time, though it’s rare for him to have a moment of this. He usually just annoys people without meaning harm, most likely without even trying, and definitely regards Jimmy at least as some kind of friend. However there is a story where Jimmy manipulates him into stopping Monica from chasing him. Once Ned realizes this, things get ugly for Jimmy, with Ned using his Reality Warper powers to nearly drive Jimmy insane.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: In "An Adventure in Time", the gang travels to different time periods to retrieve canisters containing essences of the four Elements of Nature, though they soon face opposition in the form of four different villains:
    • Monica has to defeat Pitoco, a caveman who uses the fire element to convince his fellow tribesmen that he is a god and to coerce Thuga into becoming his bride.
    • Jimmy faces Cabeleira Negra, a space pirate who adds the wind canister to her treasure collection.
    • Smudge has to deal with Goldtooth, a degenerate treasure hunter who, seeking to harvest the gold at the bottom of the rivers, uses the water canister to cause a drought in the Amazon rainforest.
    • Maggy has to retrieve the earth element from baby Monica, who clings to it like a toy and creates earthquakes whenever someone tries to separate her from it. While the toddler is not nearly as malicious as the other antagonists, she is still the final obstacle the gang must face in their quest, and is alligned with the villains in the comic book cover.
  • Big Ball of Violence: Every time someone's fighting, it devolves into this. Even if it's one of the typical Curb Stomp Battles Monica has with the boys - and even if it's only Jimmy getting beat up.
  • Big Brother Instinct: Jimmy has this towards Mary Angela, though he can a bit of a Big Brother Bully on occasion (some stories play it for laughs, but even in those he's never portrayed as being on the right when he acts like this). He never wants to take care of her, said she had a "knee-like" face when she was born (which was sort of understandable, since he was around five years-old), and overall tends to see her as a Annoying Younger Sibling. One story takes it to the extreme by having him taking Mary Angela for a walk... in a dog collar. Despite this, he's never outright mean to her on purpose, several stories show that he can take care of her in a extremely competent manner, and often stops her from accidentally hurting herself (once he actually saved her from nearly being ran by a car while crawling close to the street).
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing:
    • Maggy:
      • Although Maggy likes to picture herself as a Nice Girl, her unpleasant side comes up whenever food is involved. She often takes huge bites out of other people's food, invades her neighbour's houses to raid their fridge, and outright swallows her own snacks to avoid sharing.
      • Promotional material consistently describes her as "sweet", though her portrayal in the New '10s is of a snarky, occasionally selfish young girl. In one arc where the four main characters' monthly comics were interconnected, Maggy ends up getting mycosis from a beach trip. In the end, she comes over to her friends and upon hearing their own disastrous tales (Monica ruined her date with the boy she liked, Smudge ran away from home and Jimmy's pet chinchilla died), she immediately starts jumping happily and saying that she feels much better since her friends had it much worse than her. They are less than amused.
      • More than a few stories have put Maggy in Monica's position of power over the block. She outright borders on The Caligula to the point that when Monica seizes back the position, the boys, who are normally scheming against her, welcome her back with open arms.
    • Denise was also this in her old days, Depending on the Writer, before settling down as the Genki Girl Deadpan Snarker with a taste for gossip we know today. It was even lampshaded by her actress in the story which settled her current personality that whenever they needed the girls' group to have a False Friend, they'd go for Denise.
  • Black Comedy:
    • In "The Tenebrous Doll", the eponymous villain plans to explode Maggy's house with a bomb... which she sets up while joyfully singing her own version of "Heigh Ho".
    • Penadinho's stories, especially the ones that were published in newspapers, treat death and other sensitive topics in a satirical manner. One such strip has a young boy innocently asking Lady McDeath to push his kart, which she does until he falls off a cliff.
    • Nico Demo's strips often dwelled in this (just see him feeding an elephant peanuts), if not plain politically incorrect.
  • Blind People Wear Sunglasses: Doreen is blind and is always seen wearing sunglasses to protect her sensitive eyes. However, she jokes that she only wears them because they are fashionable.
  • Blind Without 'Em: Many of Specs' solo stories concern him losing his glasses.
  • Body Horror: In one 1980 story, Jimmy breaks free from the boundaries of the pages to evade Monica and this causes his lineart to unravel. The other kids manage to rescue Jimmy when he's been reduced to just his head and reassemble him into a stickman for an in-universe cartoonist to add the rest of his details.
  • Bowdlerise:
    • Reprints of older comics remove or modify controversial elements in an effort to make the comics more suitable for younger children. Weapons are erased or redrawn as innocuous objects; minor swear words are swapped with generic interjections; and the native Brazilian women are given leaf bras to conceal their exposed breasts.
    • The teen spin-off introduced a character called Sangria, whose superpower is to generate and manipulate blood. When she made an appearance in the original comics, the characters refuse to spell out the true nature of her abilities.
    Ballerina: This is Sangria. Can you guess what her power is?
    Zé Beto: She is attacking us with gooseberry juice!
  • Bratty Half-Pint: Junior's stories usually revolve around him pestering Jimmy, Maggy or Crystal.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: The fourth wall is already barely there, but sometimes it literally gets broken as the characters leave the panel (and sometimes walk on the paper being drawn upon) to interact with Mauricio and other staff members.
  • Breakout Character:
    • Sunny became a popular character at the start of the 21st Century, when stories started to portray him as a kind-hearted Butt-Monkey. Later on, he became much more prominent, with some comics detailing his family life or even having him replace Smudge as Jimmy Five's adventure partner.
    • Denise's popularity exploded after the famous "O Concurso das Denises"note  storyline, in which she finally pointed out how her character had never been properly utilized in previous comics. She became a tritagonist to Monica and Maggy in later stories, and eventually developed into her own independent character, a sassy Deadpan Snarker with a sharp tongue. This culminated in her being upgraded into a member of the main cast in the teen spin-off.
    • The Flying Donkey first appeared in a 2004 comic, in which she played a minor role as part of a corny horror story told by Jimmy Five. The sheer ridiculousness of the character led her to become instantly popular among readers, who took to forming jokey communities of "Flying Donkey worshippers" in many social platforms. The comics would acknowledge her popularity by greatly expanding on her mythos, culminating in her becoming a central character in the "Umbra" arc of the teen spin-off.
  • Breakout Villain: Cabeleira Negra was created exclusively for the "An Adventure in Time" film, but her popularity was such that she soon started making appearances both in the main comic book and the teen spin-off, thus becoming the only member of the Big Bad Ensemble to be officially integrated in the main canon.
  • Bullied into Depression: Penha's hobby is to give The Reason You Suck Speeches to people until they sink into a deep depression. In "The Girls from the Pitangueiras Neighbourhood", Maggy says that six girls were emotionally scarred by her in just a week, and the reader then gets to see Penha in action as she reduces Carminha to tears and insults Monica until the protagonist feels physically ill.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Jimmy and co. know of Monica's strength. They know she has a short fuse. They know they'll get their asses handed to them in platters if they make fun of her. None of that has ever actually stopped them.
  • Butt-Monkey:
    • If Zeca is in a Chuck Billy 'n' Folks story that takes place in the country, setting up a City Mouse plot, he'll almost invariably be this. Made quite apparent since Country Mouse stories, which have Chuck in the city, will usually have the latter confused or at worst, annoyed, but hardly ever a Butt-Monkey, whereas poor Zeca is always in for a painful ride despite the fact that he has been in the farm enough times to know better.
    • Mr. Bill's entire shtick is that he is driven insane by the children's antics, admitted to a sanatorium, cured of his madness, and given a new job, at which point he inevitably comes into contact with Monica's gang again, and the cycle repeats ad infinitum.
  • Canon Immigrant: Nik, a gamer/vlogger introduced in issue #100 of the Teen imprint, is later brought into the kids' universe in order to have another Afro-descendant kid to play Falcon in their Avengers: Age of Ultron parody (which itself is full of nods to the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole), since Jeremiah was already cast as Nick Furynote  This is even lampshaded in dialogue:
    Black Window (Monica): Hmm... Where do I know you from?
    Falconik (Nik): From some Teen Gang, I guess!
  • Can't Stand Them, Can't Live Without Them: Pretty much what Monica feels about the boys: They get to her nerves at every turn, but she would risk her hide for them anyway.
  • The Casanova: Curly, from Tina's Pals. It usually depends on the writer, though, since he's far from an infallible example: several stories also have him being immediately shot down by the women he hits on despite being sure of his charmer skills. Still, in most comics he has a girlfriend (one had Curly dating three girls at the same time) or succeeds in wooing a girl, even if at the end she breaks up with him for some comedic reason.
  • Cat Up a Tree:
    • One by one, while trying to rescue a cat from a tree, all four main members of Monica's Gang got themselves stuck until the branch they were sitting on gave in and they fell. The cat remains stuck to this day.
    • Franklin once scolded his dog for growling at a cat that was up a tree. Then he tried to rescue the cat, only to be scratched by the ungrateful animal. Franklin was now the one growling, to Blu's amusement.
  • Catching Some Z's: Whenever a character is sleeping, a "Z" would appear on a speech bubble.
  • Catchphrase:
    • Whenever Glu sets foot in Blu's stories, he has to shout "Hello, mom!" And say "bye-bye, mom!" whenever Blu literally kicks him out.
    • Crystal says "[Lord] give me strength..." a lot.
    • Jimmy Five has the word "pindarolas" (an old-time interjection which roughly means the same as "Good God" or "Holy mackerel").
  • Cats Are Snarkers: Vanilla, Maggy's cat, is definitely the snarkiest of all the comic's pets, in contrast to the usually-affable dogs.
  • Characterization Marches On:
    • In his debut, Angel was a Fallen Angel who was banished from Heaven because he was too fond of pulling mean-spirited pranks. In later comics, his character is firmly established as an incorruptible, benevolent protector of the children.
    • In Carmem's first story, she is presented as Ms. Five's rival and comes up with a plan to ruin her enemy's school play, only to back down at the last moment after witnessing how happy the children were. In subsequent comics, one of Carmem's main traits is her bitter hatred of children, to the point she reacts to the kids' distress with either amusement or cold apathy.
    • Sofia is much more antagonistic towards Monica in her first two appearances, verbally mocking the protagonist and cruelly smiling as she prepares to bully her. By her third comic, her personality changes completely, as she only minds her own business and refuses to say a single word. The teen spin-off adapts the latter characterization, establishing that Sofia was actually shy to the point of only speaking at age 9, and any misdeeds she performed in the past were the result of Penha pressuring her into committing them.
  • The Chew Toy:
    • Sunny, whose "second-banana" status is frequently mentioned, even by other B-list characters. Weaponized in their parody of The Avengers where Sunny was The Incredible Hulk, Hulking Out whenever his B-list status is mocked (that, and cockroaches).
    • Mr. Bill has to get a different job every time he appears because Monica and her friends just won't leave him alone (unfortunately for Mr. Bill, they happen to be quite fond of him), in a somewhat similar dynamic to Spongebob and Squidward, which puts a lot of strain on his mental health, to the point that he is commitednote ; upon release, he actively looks for some new line of work that will keep him far away from the gang. They eventually always stumble upon him again nonetheless.
  • Chick Magnet:
    • All the girls in the neighbourhood are attracted to Luca, due to his good looks and kind personality, though he is mostly oblivious to their feelings.
    • Nimbus used to be portrayed as a shy kid whom all the girls considered cute, though this trait got phased out throughout the years in favour of making him an enthusiastic practitioner of magic.
  • Child Hater: Due to all the times the kids accidentally ruined Carmem's precious garden, she developed a profound dislike for children, whom she comes to view as misbehaving brats, leading her to getting the reputation of being the meanest lady in the neighbourhood.
  • Child Prodigy: Franklin is very smart for his age.
  • Choosy Beggar: In "Perdidos no Meio do Nada"Translation , Antenor is walking through the desert when he finds a man begging for help. The protagonist immediately offers him some water, though the man complains that the last mirage he saw gave him strawberry milkshakes. Annoyed by the beggar's pickiness, Antenor sarcastically asks if imaginary desserts are better than real water. The man comically ponders for a while before dryly responding "Meh, I guess I'll take this water then".
  • Cinderella Plot: One of Blu's comics parodizes classic fairy tales by replacing the main characters with dogs. One of the protagonists is Cindercadelanote , a stray mutt who is turned into a refined dog so she can court the canine prince. When the spell wears off, her pumpkin carriage reverts into a car driven by a Diabolical Dogcatcher, who takes her to a prison-like pound. Luckily, she is identified by the prince when her lost collar fits her neck, thus enabling her to be set free.
  • Circling Birdies: Whenever a character is dizzy, attacked or hit on the head, stars (or sometimes spirals or planets too, depending on the story) circle the character's head. On rare occasions, the birds themselves make an appearance.
  • City Mouse: Chuck Billy's cousin Zeca, who often suffers culture clash when visiting the countryside. Chuck himself serves as a Country Mouse when he goes his cousing in the city.
    • Tom-Tom occasionally comes across some of these, often to highlight the dichotomy between the beauty of nature and the artificiality of man-made things.
  • Cliffhanger: In the 2001 story "The Tenebrous Doll", the eponymous antagonist pretends to have turned good, but Maggy realizes the façade just as the comic ends. The 2011 sequel reveals that Carlito came to his daughter's aid by removing the toy's batteries and tossing it away.
  • Clingy Jealous Girl:
    • Rosie Lee's reaction to seeing Chuck with another girl is to throw a fit, despite Chuck showing that he only has eyes for her.
    • Isabel's most defining trait is her jealousy, but since Bucky is a shameless flirt, her case is more justified.
    • Puff, from Tina's Pals, is quite the jealous girlfriend, always assuming her boyfriend Steve is checking other women out and/or on the verge of cheating on her. One story exaggerated this greatly by showing that she somehow engraved his name backwards on his shoe soles so that whenever she feels the need to follow him she can tell they're his footsteps. Unlike Isabel, she's completely off the mark, since Steve truly loves her and her suspicions are proven wrong pretty much every timenote .
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander:
    • Nutty Ned, a constant psychiatric hospital escapee who invariably makes Jimmy Five's life a surreal fever dream.
    • Due to operating within his own logic (i.e. a complete reversal of common sense), Nick Nope often falls into this. Notably, he once interacts with Nutty Ned, leaving the latter impressed at how he was somehow out-crazied.
  • Continuity Porn: The Panini years marked the point where the writers would start to dig up villains from old comics or fill the milestone editions with homages to old stories.
  • Cool Big Sis: Sunny's sister Crystal, who along with being a fun and reasonable teenager is also the subject of the other boys' crushes.
  • Covers Always Lie: The cover of the first issue of Cebolinha/Jimmy's solo title showed Captain Fray attacking a hot air balloon Jimmy was in, but Fray didn't even appear in the comic. Lampshaded in issue #500 of Jimmy's title, when Fray reads Cebolinha #1 and gets angry when he notices he's depicted only on the cover, then tries to travel back in time to rewrite that story.
  • Crappy Homemade Gift: One comic has the gang making gifts for each other as they play Secret Santa, with disappointing results: Smudge gives Maggy a painting which he made with objects he found in the garbage; Maggy bakes Franklin a pie, but can't resist eating it first; and Franklin, rather than coming up with an actual gift, devises a trap to give Smudge a bath. Finally, Monica and Jimmy respectively present each other with a poorly-knitted scarf and an insulting caricature, which leaves the girl in tears.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Jimmy once defeated Monica. How? In one page-long comic from the nineties, Monica is shown falling off a cliff while running from a swarm of bees. After painfully crashing through lots of things as she falls, she gets her head stuck in a hole on a fence (which happens to have a target painted around it on it) and is left unconscious. Near the fence, Smudge tells Jimmy that there's no way his latest plan - to sic a swarm of bees on Monica - is going to work.
  • Creepy Crosses: Translucent crosses surround the Flying Donkey whenever she appears, highlighting her ghostly nature. This element of the character has been omitted in the Panini comics, as writers are no longer allowed to display explicit religious imagery in their stories.
  • Crossover:
    • With DC Comics, across all the Gang's titles throughout December 2018:
      • In Monica, Jimmy accidentally gets hold of Green Lantern's Power Battery and decides to take advantage of it for his newest infallible plan, by convincing Hal Jordan that Monica is a tyrant out to rule the world; Monica has to resort to asking Wonder Woman for help.
      • In Jimmy Five, Harley Quinn kidnaps Marina for her magic pencil. Monica, Jimmy and Smudge decide to tag along with Batman to rescue her - all dressed up like different Robins (except for Smudge, who decides to do Nightwing).
      • Smudge ends up paired with none other than Aquaman, who had the Trident of Neptune stolen.
      • Maggy teams up with The Flash to investigate the disappearance of all cats in the neighborhood, orchestrated by none other than Catwoman, who is strangely behaving like she did in the Silver Age.
      • Superman and Wonder Woman, taking a break from the neverending battle, pay a visit to Chuck Billy.
      • Mauricio and the Gang get invited for Superman's birthday at the Fortress of Solitude. Villain-fighting hijinks ensue.
    • In 2019, the Gang had promotional crossover strips with various characters from Cartoon Network, which broadcast Monica's Gang cartoons in Brazil.
    • In 2020, the #DCFandome event had the Gang video getting a video call from the Teen Titans Go!.
    • 2022 had the announcement of a comic between the Gang and Garfield.
  • Cuckoo Clock Gag: In "The Genius", Franklin invents a clock that only goes cuckoo if nobody nearby is expecting it to. Though the device appears to be just a comical display of the boy's ineptitude as a scientist, it turns out to be a Chekhov's Gun, as it reappears later on and starts making loud noises while the heroes are trying to sneak past an Eldritch Abomination.
  • Cut-and-Paste Comic: Stories that depict the characters in mundane situations often resort to copying and pasting panels, with minimal changes in the drawing to accomodate the dialogue. This practice became especially prevalent after the number of pages per comic book was doubled, thus enabling the comics to be published monthly without putting too much pressure on the art crew.
  • Dada Comics: While bizarre comics happen every now and then, Nutty Ned runs on this. And since they rely a lot on wordplay, they are usually a nightmare to translate, when they can be translated at all.
  • Daddy's Girl: Mr. Sousa can be very protective of Monica in any situation her strength can't solve, such as boys making eyes at her.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Given the amount of secondary characters, sometimes the writers just feel the need to center stories around them. And then there's the Graphic MSP line featuring books based on Jeremiah (focusing on him being Black, as opposed to the regular comic hardly ever giving importance to his ethnicity) and Captain Frey (giving him some Sympathetic P.O.V. as a misunderstood Tragic Monster).
  • Deaf Composer: The core of Dorinha and Luca's stories involves them overcoming their own disabilities as they try to achieve their dreams. The former is a blind girl who pursues a career as a fashion designer, and the latter is a wheelchair-bound boy who aims to excel in multiple sports.
  • Demoted to Extra: Specs was a main character when he was created, but appeared less and less over the years. Also, since the 2015 reboot, all of the characters except the main four ones suffer from this.
  • Depending on the Writer: Applies to everyone, which is helped by a team of writers that treats the cast each in their own way. Are the characters Wise Beyond Their Years or not much smarter than the average six-year-old? Do they behave like stereotypical children or do hilariously absurd things?
  • Detail-Hogging Cover: Especially from the late 2010s, where the covers had more elaborate coloring and shading than the inner pages.
  • Deus ex Machina: Played for laughs in "Are You Thinking What I'm Thinking?" Jimmy regrets his disastrous wish on a shooting star and goes on a long speech about how he has learned his lesson. Annoyed at the futility of his own discourse, he then angrily addresses the writer, demanding him to come up with a way to return things to normal, which is done by having a random "wish-ungranting rising star" pop up in the corner of the panel.
  • The Ditz: Maggy's obsession over food often degrades to a one-track mind state. This tends to annoy the others so much that the Star Warp series, where she plays C-3PO, has a Running Gag with characters asking "Where do you turn her off?" whenever she goes off on a stupid or food-related rant.
  • Did I Just Say That Out Loud?: Smudge seems to have a knack to always say improper things at the wrong time. This is usually what crashes Jimmy's "infallible plans", but he has given himself away many other times.
  • Dinner with the Boss: Maggy's Dad's boss once had dinner with her family and she was told to control herself. Easier said than done. Maggy's Dad was afraid he'd be punished but instead his boss gave him a raise so he'd be able to support her.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: The Flying Donkey is a spirit who protects children and Tupperware. She kidnaps Jimmy's mom, shrinks her until she can fit in a spoon, and hypnotizes the rest of the family in order to replace her... Because the woman dared to store frozen beans in an ice cream box. The Donkey explains that not only was this act disrespectful to the container, but also had the potential to disappoint Jimmy, since nobody wants to find disgusting vegetables where a delicious dessert is supposed to be.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Monica and most of her friends (Jimmy Five being a notable exception) normally walk barefoot, though they do wear shoes every now and then.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: The Monica games for the Sega Master System and Sega Genesis are edited Wonder Boy games.
  • Double Standard:
    • When Bucky mistakenly assumes that Smudge and Maggy are dating, he praises the boy for starting another relationship behind Dustine's back, yet chastises Maggy for cheating on her boyfriend. Maggy responds by chasing Bucky off while calling him a sexist, and breaks the fourth wall by wondering how his character is still allowed to make appearances despite not being politically correct.
    • One comic had Monica, Denise and Maggy give boys scores (Sunny, Jimmy and Smudge getting low scores and Luca getting the highest one). In the last scene, the boys give the girls their scores, and then they get beat up for it.
  • Drunk with Power:
    • Monica, sick of dealing with Jimmy Five's antics, splits the block in two and gives Jimmy Five half of it. It doesn't take long for Jimmy Five to not only start making increasingly totalitarian demands (the boys could only listen to music HE likes, and he was to be fed ice-cream every day during the summer, and popcorn with tea in the winter, for instance) but to start talking about world domination. The other boys quickly defect to Monica's side, and Jimmy, left without subjects, relinquishes the power (and gets beaten up as a consequence, as usual).
    • When Maggy became street ruler during Monica's absence, one of her demands was for the boys to constantly feed her.
  • Dub Name Change: So many names were changed in international localizations that it has its own page.
  • Ear Worm: In "Você Está Pensando o Mesmo que Eu?"Translation , Smudge can't get the "Mocotó Song"note  out of his head. This becomes problematic when Jimmy accidentally establishes a Psychic Link with him, kickstarting an endless loop that prevents both boys from thinking about anything productive.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Milena was already featured in institutional pieces and advertisement throughout 2018 before being introduced properly in the comics, early in 2019 - and her little brother even appeared earlier.
  • Everything Talks: The most notorious aspect of Blu's stories is that every inanimate object is sentient and capable of speech. The most recurring secondary character is a literal rock whom the dog is frequently seen having long talks with.
  • Evil Counterpart: The boys have compared Carminha to Penha on at least one occasion, noting how they are both rich, snobbish girls who never cease to brag about their good looks. The difference is that the former is spoiled, but largely harmless, whereas the latter is actively malicious and feared by everyone as a result.
  • Exact Words: One story features Maggy being left in charge of a bakery by the baker's son. When the baker and his son return, there's no bread left and she claims she sold everything and the buyers will pay the next day. The son believes her but the baker deduces she ate the bread. Maggy's parents show up the next day and pay for the bread, prompting the baker to tell his son the both of them were right.
  • Explosive Breeder: Rabbits are often portrayed as this, as indicated with the massive horde of rabbit siblings from the Lionel's Kingdom stories as well as a Monica Toy short in which Samson and Delilah spawn multiple offspring in a matter of miliseconds.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: Jimmy Five's "infallible plans" to steal Monica's stuffed bunny are always doomed to fail. Even when it seems he has won, a Diabolus ex Machina (usually Smudge accidentally revealing his schemes to Monica) prevents his victory from being permanent.
  • Fake Kill Scare: One story, translated in English as The Icky-Sticky Plan, centers around Jimmy and Smudge pretending to die through Monica's bunny-bashings, "blood" and all. It works almost too well, as Maggy also falls for it and comes up with the idea of having them buried, bringing in Blu to dig in graves for them. After they pretend to have miraculously recovered in order to escape being Buried Alive, Smudge's mom arrives and reprimands them for wasting ketchup, thus blowing their cover.
  • Fallen Hero: The first character Mauricio de Sousa ever conceived was Captain Popsicle, who was the protagonist of the comics he drew as a child. Said hero would become a Canon Immigrant in the late 2000's, but with a radically altered personality, being portrayed as a Green-Eyed Monster who despises Monica for replacing him as Mauricio's greatest creation. In his next appearances, he forms his own Legion of Doom to take over the gang's comic books, going as far as to kidnap the writers to prevent new issues from being published.
  • Family-Friendly Firearms:
    • One story had Jimmy and Smudge doing some Deep-Immersion Gaming of Quake, and to show this trope in action, Jimmy demonstrates that when the rifles are fired, they shoot either pencils or marbles.
    • As of the New '10s, the writers are forbidden from including firearms and toy guns in the stories. Reprints of older comics had the drawings digitally altered to remove any and all weapons, resulting in guns being replaced by unusual objects (such as a lobster, in the parody of The Godfather) or in characters threatening others simply by pointing their fingers at them.
  • Featureless Plane of Disembodied Dialogue: Most stories employ simplistic backgrounds, consisting of solid colours that are changed every panel. This artistic choice is meant to emphasize the characters' actions and dialogue, rather than the setting, as can be seen here.
  • Flanderization:
    • During the first half of the Turn of the Millennium, the kids were much more hyperactive, and had some traits amped up so as to come across as almost negative - for example, having the resident Big Eater flying into a frenzy at the slightest mention of anything food-related, and using Sunny's perceived "lack of notability" to make him the all-around Butt-Monkey (something he was never known for before). Also, they tack in lots of OOC Moments, if only for Rule of Funny.
    • Inverted since The New '10s: the characters are, little by little, losing all of theirs special characteristics and becoming more and more Flat Characters. Monica is much less likely to lose her temper and try to solve her problems by beating up people; Jimmy rarely ever comes up with elaborate plans to defeat Monica; Smudge's crippling fear of water is toned down; and Maggy's gluttony is barely brought up, out of concerns that it may lead to comparisons to compulsive eating. This was done in order to transform the lead characters into role models for young children, given that the comics have since changed their focus from comedic stories to educational ones.
    • Agnes' "weirdness" became increasingly more pronounced with each new story. In her debut, she was just an average nerdy girl, but the next comic amplified her social awkwardness by making her a hypochondriac and implying that she enjoys imprisoning birds. Her next appearance reveals she lives with her undead parents and actually eats the birds she hunts. Finally, the prelude to "Shadows from the Past" has her attempting to eat Maggy's cat, and an offhand comment from her mother strongly suggests that Agnes is also a cannibal.
  • Flat Character:
    • Xaveco/Sunny's most defining trait is the fact he is the most generic, forgettable member of the entire cast - the only trait he had to set himself apart was a ditz phase in the 1980s. Ironically, this also makes him very versatile, as his lack of a defined personality gives the writers much more freedom when utilizing him in the stories. As a result, he soon became one of the most recurring secondary characters come the 21st Century and a major Breakout Character whose popularity almost eclipses that of the protagonists.
    • Jeremiah occasionally gets some exposure in stories that focus on his African descent, or solo stories concerning his Nice Hat, but is otherwise the least developed member of the cast. This is lampshaded in a Christmas special, when Franklin mistakes him for Nimbus and asks him to perform a magic trick. After Jeremiah clears out the confusion, Franklin angrily tells him that "as a character, he is even more worthless than Sunny".
  • Flock of Wolves: One story has Jimmy Five calling a meeting at the boys' club to inform there is a spy among them. One by one, each of the attending boys winds up giving themselves away as being actually the girls in disguise, and they all leave, until Jimmy is left alone in the clubhouse, whereupon he leaves, revealing himself to actually be a disguised Monica.
    Monica: Well. Next time, I'll tell them beforehand.
  • Flower-Pot Drop: Monica once accidentally dropped one from an apartment window and hurried down. She couldn't use the stairs because they were being washed, so she had to wait for an elevator. Despite this, she managed to arrive on time to be hit.
  • Forgets to Eat: Used to be one of Junior's defining characteristics (though he was intentionally neglectful), just so he could act as a foil to Maggy. While he has not lost this one, his role in the stories has shifted deep into Bratty Half-Pint.
  • Free-Range Children: Zigzagged. In most stories the children are wandering around their neighborhood (and we never get to see just how big it is; there have been attempts, but the scale fluctuates from story to story), but several stories show that they all have a limit imposed by their parents of how far they can go by themselves (and it's strange how children that visited other planets and dimensions have limits at all).
  • French Jerk: Penha the Dreaded has a French accent and is a spoiled Alpha Bitch who bullies and belittles the other children.
  • Freudian Slip: Blu and some of his fellow dogs meet a dog who likes to make dog-based puns. They first suspect that the character making the jokes isn't a real dog when he starts a phrase with "You, dogs...". After being called out on that, he tries to restart the phrase with "We, dogs..." but it's too late. They remove his dog mask and find out he's a cat.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: While it's downplayed since they don't always hang with him, most of the gang considers Junior to be a huge pain in the butt. Even Maggy, his own cousin, thinks he's a Bratty Half-Pint (and doesn't shy from saying it to his face), though she's still more willing to play with him than the rest of the kids. In several stories they just play with him because their own parents (particularly their mothers) think Junior is adorable and shouldn't be ignored just for being younger. When Monica's mom once made a comment of the sort, Monica replied that Junior is as cute as he is annoying. The only kid who enjoys Junior's company is Milena's little brother Binho, and even that's because they're in the same age range.
  • The Friends Who Never Hang: Maggy and the boys is a downplayed example. They do interact in the adventures where the four main characters share the spotlight, and she has had stories with them (though usually with either Jimmy or Smudge, less so with both of them at once), but the number of those is quite overshadowed by the number of stories Monica shares with them. It's sort of justified in that Monica just has more reasons to hang out with them, being more of a Tomboy than Maggy, and often target of their provocations, not to mention of course her relationship with Jimmy, which guarantees that they'll have some stories as a duo (however Monica does have plenty of stories with just Smudge too; one almanac had three stories of just Monica and Smudge together). If Maggy's in a story with just one more character and that character is male, it's probably Junior or even Franklin. Or Vanilla.
  • Funny Background Event: In the Justice League of America crossover:
    • Xaveco makes occasional cameos in the background of all comics, pretending to be one of DC's various superheroes and accidentally injuring himself in the process.
    • A panel that depicts Superman duking it out with Doomsday has Lady McDeath standing in the background, impatiently waiting for the two to kill each other, as a reference to their long struggle in The Death of Superman.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: Franklin spends most of his free time in the lab, developing creative (though mostly malfunctioning or useless) inventions. In particular, he is responsible for all the gadgets that improve Luca's mobility, such as helicopter blades that enable the disabled boy to fly, or coils that let him jump.
  • Gender Bender: One comic about Monica's birthday has her and her friends turning into the opposite gender.
  • Gender-Equal Ensemble: Two boys (Jimmy Five and Smudge) and two girls (Monica and Maggy)
  • Gender Flip: The Lord of the Rings parody has Monica as Sam, and the It one has Maggie as Bill.
  • Generation Xerox: One story shows Mr. Five telling Jimmy about a plump, bossy girl from his childhood memories who walked around with a doll in which he loved to make knots in its arms and legs solely to piss the owner off. The girl used to retaliate by running after and hitting him with the doll, and Mr. Five remembers how despite the danger element, he just couldn't stop messing with her, and they were always together as a result while time passed... Jimmy is astounded by the obvious similarity between his father's childhood and his own, and asks what became of that girl. The living room's door is suddenly opened by Mrs. Five coming back from the supermarket, and Mr. Five answers Jimmy with a fond smile "Speak of the devil...". Jimmy doesn't take it too well at the end of the story, but knowing he and Monica are the Official Couple, Generation Xerox was still on point.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: Invoked in "The Mystery of the Models", where one panel has the message "Dear reader: Get ready for a shocking scene that could only be published thanks to the censors being distracted". Maggy is then shown to have fallen into one of Franklin's machines, which proceeds to apparently break her spine. Thankfully, it turns out that the contraption was only stretching her back to make her look taller, and Maggy explains that she only screamed because the process tickled her tummy.
  • Gift-Giving Gaffe: Smudge's uncle innocently presents the boy with a bath-related item every year, completely unaware that Smudge suffers from crippling aquaphobia. Subverted during the protagonist's seventh birthday, when he appears to give Smudge a portable bathtub, but the present turns out to be a ridable toy car that the boy falls in love with.
  • Gonk: Ximbuca is a cross-eyed yellow poodle with prominent front teeth. Monica says he looks like a hell hound, and Jimmy initially mistakes him for an overgrown mosquito.
  • Gosh Dang It to Heck!: In older comics, the verb "feder" ("to stink") was frequently employed in place of a similar, very vulgar swear word.
  • Green Aesop: A considerable amount of Chuck Billy's comics are about the horrors of deforestation, pollution, "how living in a city turns you into a sedentary paranoid" - if his cousin is involved in the comic there is a 99% chance that the story will be about that -, or how "bad men" will hunt innocent animals for money. He has been turned into several kinds of animals and even engaged into conversation with a waterfall and the Sun himself. Parodied in one of Jimmy Five's stories, when the title character says "Wait, do you think I like to live in nature, green and stuff? Who the heck do you think I am? Chuck Billy?"
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Despite being Maggy's best friend, Monica is deathly envious of her singing talents. When Maggy was a child and briefly famous singing, Monica hated it and only reconsidered their friendship because her mom pointed that out. Up to Eleven in the manga, when she nearly destroyed Maggy's short stint on a Girl Group.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: If Monica understands something as an insult to her height/weight/teeth (even if by mistake), everyone around will get beaten up.
  • Hairy Hammerspace: Fluff, Jimmy's dog. It's not uncommon for people to hide there (an entire police troop once got lost in his fur trying to catch a robber who hid in there), or plenty of things to be found in his fur.
  • Handsome Lech: Bucky, at least when his girlfriend is out of sight.
  • Hate Sink:
    • Penha The Feared, the unpleasant and stuck-up girl from the other street (the fake French accent is a bonus).
    • Tina's side character Rubão is a sexist and chauvinistic man who was basically an embodiment of toxic masculinity back when the term didn't even exist. He appeared in seven stories in the 80s, mostly being a Crazy Jealous Guy towards his girlfriend, aside from a story where he complains that other guys are doing unmanly things. While he was never depicted as being in the right (even if one story has the girlfriend deciding she preferred Rubão's Stay in the Kitchen attitude rather than her more acceptive new boyfriend...), the character proved to be so controversial that he eventually stopped appearing.
  • Height Insult: The boys often tease Monica by calling her short, even though they all share the same stature.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: A particularly touching story about friendship uses Jimmy and Smudge's relationship as a Framing Device, showing that theirs is a friendship that will go on with the years, even with the bumps along the way.
  • Hidden Agenda Villain: When Carmem agrees to marry Sunny's father, the boy concludes that she has some ulterior motive, since she normally wouldn't want to live under the same roof with a child. His suspicions seem to be correct, as he soon discovers a secret dungeon in her house with a cage that perfectly matches the size of a small child. At the end of the story, this turns out to be a subversion. The dungeon was only built to protect Carmem's prized flowers from harm, and she genuinely loves Sunny's father.
  • His Name Really Is "Barkeep": Bubbly is an astronaut named Astronaut. It's later explained that his name is a result of his parents, Astrogildo and Natalina, combining their own names.
  • Homemade Inventions: A lot of what Franklin invents looks like a hodgepodge of pieces, though more often than not with plating, covering and otherwise professional-looking presentation.
  • Human Hummingbird: An extreme case of the frightened version... as when presented with the possibility of falling into water, Smudge's arm flapping enables him to start flying.
  • Humiliation Conga: One story has Jimmy get his head stuck in the bathroom sink while trying to wash his hair (or lack thereof). Smudge and Monica try to help him, but only make things worse when he inadvertently slights her, leading her to chase him out of the bathroom by breaking the wall leading out to the street, and completely forgetting about Jimmy, who is left naked and ashamed for everyone to see. It gets worse when the incident makes it to the TV news: even his parents laugh at his misfortune.
  • Hypochondria: Agnes the Tenebrous is a hypochondriac girl who rarely leaves her house out of fear of getting ill. Ironically, her fears are justified, since her parents died while she was still a child, and she herself wouldn't live past her teenage years.
  • Hypocritical Humor:
    • Jimmy Five calling Monica short and fat, when he's just the same height and rather tubby himself (not exactly fat, but he and Monica have a very similar body shape).
    • A story has Monica being harassed by Junior (who is the shortest of the gang), a one-shot boy who is very visibly obese, and Bucky (whose buckteeth are pretty much the same as Monica's). Instead of getting angry, Monica just laughs and takes the time to point out the hypocrisy. In the end, they change their tones to call her tall, skinny and toothless.
  • Idea Bulb: It is common for a lightbulb to appear over the character's head when they have an idea, most prominently whenever Jimmy is shown coming up with a plan to steal Monica's stuffed bunny.
  • Ill Girl: Mariana's debut storyline depicts her birth all the way to her untimely death. Starting out as a sentient star who wants to live among humans, her wish is granted when she is born as Chuck's sister. Mere months later, she contracts a lethal disease, with her loved ones unable to do anything but watch as she slowly withers away. After dying and returning to her star form, Mariana uses all her energy to shine brightly in the sky, trying her best to restore her mourning family's hope.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Monica uses a blue stuffed rabbit to beat up the boys who annoy her, and just about every bad guy that shows up.
  • Informed Poverty: Some stories suggest that Smudge is a tad poorer than his friends, despite his house not being different from the others'. Justified in that we usually see it from his point of view and that this trope shows up almost always in the context of him wanting new toys (instead of the ones he fabricates himself), which is understandable; children will usually feel that others get more gifts than they do. It's also been pointed out that his father does in fact receive a smaller income than the other parents of the comic, but not so little that will have an influence in the family's household.
  • Informed Species: While Fluff does pass as a green lhasa apso, Blu's status as a schnauzer is not so clear. And then there's Glu, a dog that's yellow and shaped like an egg.
  • Insistent Terminology: Nutty Ned will always complain about any synonym of insanity he's given, persisting it's "Nutty".
  • Insufferable Genius: Franklin believes himself to be the smartest kid on the neighbourhood. Though he is abnormally intelligent for his age, all of his inventions go wrong.
  • Internal Homage: The books that marked the franchise's 50th anniversary had updated covers of the first issues.
  • Invincible Hero: Monica's Super Strength is often employed as a Deus ex Machina to defeat whichever villain the gang is currently facing. In the Batman Forever parody, she plays the role of Chase Meridian and is kidnapped by The Riddler (portrayed by Franklin). After being taunted enough, she single-handedly breaks out and beats up everyone in the room.
  • Jekyll & Hyde: Professor Spada transforms into the megalomaniacal supervillain Doctor Spam whenever he is hurt by an electric shock.
  • The Klutz: The main trait of Sunny's father is his clumsiness, which leads him to cause great disasters while trying to perform menial tasks. He manages to short-circuit every device on his house while changing a light bulb, and his first attempt to bake a pizza somehow results in the local mayor declaring state of public calamity.
  • Laughably Evil: Captain Fray, over the years, has become progressively more comical and over-the-top, usually even engaging in small-talk with the kids. This doesn't necessarily equate to Diminishing Villain Threat, however, because his powers over dirt are regarded seriously and he has had some really nefarious plans.
  • Legacy Character: A story acknowledges the fact that Denise's appearance is inconsistent by saying she's just a character played by various animated actresses.
  • Lethal Chef: Zigzagged with Monica. Some stories have her cooking bizarre meals such as okra flan and chicken foot stroganoff, which prove to be so revolting even Maggy refuses to eat them. Other comics present her as a somewhat decent cook, to the point she convinces the boys to accept her on their club by bribing them with her homemade cookies.
  • Lighter and Softer: In the New '10s, the comics adhered to a new set of rules meant to make the work more friendly to a younger demographic. Some of the new limitations include prohibiting the writers from depicting characters naked, forbidding the display of firearms, not having the boys scribble on the neighbourhood's walls, not showing animals trapped inside cages, censoring words that are too similar to certain profanities, abolishing the Black Comedy from Penadinho's stories, and drawing Black characters without their trademark thick lips (although the last one was revoked after receiving significant complaints from fans).
  • Like Father, Like Son: In a story written to celebrate the comics' 35th anniversary, the main four are shown to be married and with children in the future.
    • Monica and Jimmy are parents to Monique, who is a mischievous brat just like her father used to be; and Asparagus, who has inherited his mother's Hair-Trigger Temper and love for stuffed bunnies.
    • Maggy and Smudge are parents to Migali, who hates water just like her father; and Cascof, a gluttonous boy who is frequently seen munching on watermelons much like his mother used to do.
  • Like You Were Dying: A 1987 Lady McDeath comic follows a man named Otavio, who has just found out that he has a terminal disease and will die within three months. Rather than panicking, he decides to spend his last days living life to its fullest: Otavio quits his job, gets drunk at the bar, divorces his abusive wife, and is seen undressing in the company of two beautiful women. When Death finally comes for him, she reveals the disease has regressed and he will live, prompting Otavio to tell her that she will soon need to go after his doctor's soul.
  • Limited Wardrobe: Monica's wardrobe is shown to have nothing but red dresses just like the one she usually wears. She's usually pretty comfortable with this situation, though.
  • Live-Action Adaptation: Mostly at the theater, plus two films (one made for TV, one direct to video), all with adults wearing masks. An adaptation of a graphic novel spin-off, Laços (translation: Bonds), this time with actual children, and featuring Rodrigo Santoro as Louco/Nutty Ned, was made and premiered in June 2019. A sequel, Lições (Lessons), premiered in 2021, with Isabelle Drummond as Tina.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: The fact that Monica's Gang refers to both The 'Verse and the "core" characters shows it's an ample amount. While reprinting the first issues of the "core 5 comics" (the four main Monica's Gang characters and Chuck Billy), they ran for 50 issues, each having a different character in the cover (#50 was Monica's dad, which also serves as an Author Avatar to Mauricio).
  • Long Pants: You see someone wearing social pants and shoes, they're like this. Except in the rare case that the pants and shoes are different colors, or they're drawn in promo artwork (i.e. not within a story). This dates back from Mauricio's old strips, out of a need to simplify the design. It also seems to be the reason for the toeless barefoot characters (Monica wore shoes in her first appearance, but more bits of them were erased at each strip as he had less and less time to get them ready - he worked alone at the time - , until she became barefoot and toeless).
  • Long Runner: Along with the comic itself, which has been running since the late 50s (in magazine form, since the 1970s), the animations have had basically the same voice actors since the 1980s.
  • Long Title: In "Too Complicated", Monica decides to write a book titled "Beyond the Howling Obviousness that Pullulates in Human Minds". The other children are obviously confused by the bizarre name, except Nick Nope, who correctly deduces it's meant to reference Monica's ability to subvert the readers' expectations.
  • Love Makes You Dumb: Or, in a variation, extremely incompetent. Franklin finds out in one comic this is the reason most of his inventions didn't work as planned; his crush on Marina made it hard for him to concentrate. Upon hearing this, Smudge suggests that Jimmy might be in love too, and that's why his plans never work. Jimmy vehemently denies, but in the next (and final) panel he's dreamily thinking about Monica, with hearts drawn around her in the thought bubble.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Captain Fray is Smudge's uncle who either went crazy or got transformed by the dust of his comic collection, but few people remember or care about that. In a Star Wars parody, Fray (as "Dork Frayder") says "I am your father's brother!" to Smudge Skywalker and throws his debut comic (Mônica Vol.1 #31, published in 1972) as proof. Years later Smudge seems to have forgotten about it, as Marina shows him that same comic and he gets shocked, quoting Darth Vader once again.
    This is a bombastic revelation! The readers must be shocked! "Smudge... I... am... your... uncle!"
  • The Magnificent: The three girls from the Pitangueiras Neighbourhood are always referred to by their name, followed by one or more epithets befitting of their reputation.
    • Penha The Dreaded is infamous for her uncanny manipulative skills and detestable personality.
    • Agnes the Tenebrous (sometimes also called "the Shy Weirdo") frightens the other children due to her habit of mistreating animals, her socially awkward personality, and the fact she lives in a haunted house with her undead parents.
    • Sofia the Terrible, the Tractor, the Dragon, the Cannon Fodder, is a perenially angry girl who intimidates the other children with her frown.
  • May the Farce Be with You: The original Star Wars trilogy is parodied in the comics Coelhada nas Estrelas/Star Warp, and the sequels O Feio Contra-Ataca and O Retorno de Jedito. And then the prequel series, with A Trapaça Fantasma, Sotaque dos Clones and A Vingança dos Psithos (which is focused on Smudge!Luke's uncle instead of father).
  • Meat-O-Vision: One story follows Maggy as she tries and fails to find something to eat. At the end, she sees the world as a giant watermelon and dives mouth-first into it, leaving only a patch of land. Towards the end, cut to the studio, and Mauricio orders the story to be rewritten.
  • Meal Ticket: Subverted with Maggy and Toddy. One story showed that she really wasn't dating him only because he was the bakery owner's son and constantly gave her free bread and sweets. It ends with Maggy willingly choosing Toddy over a big basket of bread, which for her is a huge deal.
  • Medium Awareness: The characters are fully aware that they live in a comic book and will often break the fourth wall to lampshade it, sometimes jumping across panels to get to different destinations.
  • Monster Mash: Bug-a-Boo's gang are parodies of monsters from classic horror movies.
  • More Hypnotizable Than He Thinks:
    • Chuck's cousin buys a hypnosis book and Chuck refuses to believe it works. Trying to prove otherwise, Chuck's cousin decides to hypnotize him into believing he's a dog. At first, it seems it doesn't work but then it's revealed the hypnosis doesn't have immediate effects.
    • Done again when Denise hypnotizes Monica into thinking she's a bridge-guarding troll. It has the same delayed effect because Denise used a method to hypnotize dogs. Let that one sink for a moment.
  • More Than Mind Control: What makes Penha so feared is that she can manipulate other people simply by sneering at them. According to Monica, her contempt is so overpowering that the victim can do nothing but mindlessly agree to do her bidding. The only known protection is an unflinching sense of self-worth, with Denise being the one person to resist her power so far.
  • The Movie:1980's "As Aventuras da Turma da Mônica" ("The Adventures of Monica's Gang", the first movie ever releasednote  and the movie where the scene with the mice came from) and 1983's "A Princesa e o Robô" ("The Princess and the Robot"), as well as Cinegibi (literally "Comic Book Movie", and we mean literallynote ) series (currently with nine titles, most of them direct-to-DVD), and one about Time Travel that got released in theaters are noteworthy mentions. Before that, there's been quite a number of direct-to-video releases containing a series of stories, such as 1988's "A Estrelinha Mágica" ("The Magic Little Star").
  • Moving Beyond Bereavement:
    • Chuck is devastated when his dog Fido dies from old age. Tonico thus comforts his grieving son, assuring him that, although death is inevitable, the bond that they shared in life is timeless.
    • In "A Star Called Mariana", Chuck and his family are left grieving after the title character dies, but her spirit returns in the form of a star, whose shine gives them the strength to move on.
  • Mr. Imagination:
    • Smudge lets his imagination run wild whenever he plays make believe, often getting carried away and injuring those around him as a result. When he pretends to go back in time to the Jurassic era, he starts visualizing his parents as two hostile dinosaurs and attacks them, until they eventually manage to snap him back to reality.
    • Denise's creativity is even wilder than Smudge's, since she manages to "outimagine" him when the two compete to see who is better at role playing. "Denise's Mysterious Secret" goes one step further and implies that this also makes her a Reality Warper, since she somehow manages to transform her imaginary friend into a real person.
  • Mugging the Monster: In some occasions, some people who don't know Monica's Super Strength (usually criminals or bullies from another neighborhood) find out the hard way why it's a big mistake to threaten her or her friends, or simply insult her.
  • Multiple Demographic Appeal: It's supposedly made for children, but the occasional moments of Black Comedy and Parental Bonus also earned the franchise many grown-up fans. It helps that the comic often does send-offs to popular media aimed at older audiences, such as a special retelling of Lost and the "Cinema Classics" parodies of RoboCop, The Ring and It (2017). Downplayed since the New '10s, since most of the stories that are not advertised on the comic books' covers are didactic in nature and directed exclusively towards very young kids.
  • The Multiverse: A 2022 story reveals Fluffy was irradiated by one of Franklin's machines in the past, causing his fur to produce an unique form of subatomic particle that distorts the fabric of time and space. This produces microscopic wormholes that act as portals to alternate realities, leading Franklin to conclude that the dog has become the link between all the dimensions that make up the "Monicaverse".
  • Mundane Solution:
    • Carlito tries to defeat the Tenebrous Doll in a fist fight, though the evil toy subdues him by beating him up with a frying pan. When Eliana shows up, he begs her to flee for her life... but the woman saves the day by nonchalantly picking up the doll and removing its batteries.
    • A Running Gag in Dr. Spam's second story is that Jimmy keeps defeating him by performing simplistic actions, such as turning off the computer the villain is using to materialize into the real world.

    Tropes N-Z 
  • Naked People Are Funny:
    • In "Como Atravessar a Sala"Translation , Jimmy's mother retrieves his clothes while he is taking a shower, leaving him with nothing to cover his body with after he is done. Unfortunately, Monica, Maggy and his crush show up for a visit just as he steps out of the bathroom, forcing him to figure out a way to make it to his bedroom without being seen by them. The animated adaptation has the same plot, but swaps Monica and Jimmy's roles.
    • Jimmy takes a picture of Monica while she is taking a bath and threatens to show it to her friends to embarrass her. She furiously chases him throughout the neighbourhood, but when she finally catches him, she realizes she forgot to put on her clothes and everyone is staring at her in shock or confusion. To add insult to injury, the epilogue then reveals Jimmy had forgotten to remove the lens cap before he took the photo.
    • In "Monico", Jimmy gets Monica's hair style after being exposed to Franklin's prototype hair gel. His mother mistakes him for the girl while he is getting out of the shower, but before he can clear out the confusion, the towel around his waist falls, causing his mother to scream in shock.
    • One comic has Jimmy somehow getting his head stuck in a sink drain while he is completely naked, and he refuses to let Smudge call anyone for help because he feels it will ruin his image. The story concludes with the firemen coming to his aid, and the rescue is broadcasted on national television, much to his embarrassment and every other viewer's amusement.
    • At least three stories have Chuck Billy's clothes being stolen while he is skinny-dipping. Hilarity Ensues as he tries to return home without being seen by anyone.
  • Narrating the Obvious: A Nimbus story follows the young boy as he repeatedly hypnotizes his friends as part of his magic show. Each performance is accompanied by the narrator explaining that "Nimbus performs a hypnotic gesture!". The obviousness of this statement is lampshaded at the end of the comic, when the sentence is replaced with "Nimbus... oh, you know the rest!".
  • Negative Continuity: Characters from Bug-a-boo's gang are given different backstories every now and then to explore different scenarios that led to them becoming monsters.
  • Never Trust a Title: In "Panterelas versus Pitangueiras", it's implied that Monica, Maggy and Denise will don their Panterela outfits (a Running Gag that parodizes Charlie's Angels (2000)) and confront the girls from the Pitangueiras neighbourhood. This never happens in the actual comic, as Monica's plan to use spy paraphernalia to infiltrate her enemies' territory is immediately shattered by Denise, who proposes they simply jump over the neighbourhood's brick wall. The rest of the story doesn't follow a detective theme either, turning the first half of the title into a two-page gag.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Some situations escalate because of one character's good intentions. One good example is a 1994 story in which Monica "borrows" Angel's halo and puts it on Jimmy Five to see if he will stop messing with her. While it does give him Incorruptible Pure Pureness, it also leaves Angel open to being brainwashed into evil by a devil.
  • No Biological Sex: Played with. All the angels consider themselves to be genderless, but only the adult ones are implied to not have reproductive organs. The gang's guardian angel has been confirmed to have a boy's anatomy after he undresses in one comic, but when Junior mischievously pulls down the pants of an archangel, he is shocked to find out the entity "looks like a girl".
  • No Challenge Equals No Satisfaction:
    • The boys suffer from this when it comes to stealing Samson. One time a friend of Monica's actually gave it to them since Monica had just bought a doll, and despite rejoicing at first, they got tired pretty quickly, until Monica found out. They like stealing Samson specifically to get Monica angry, so just getting it too easily and without her knowing won't do.
    • It's quite similar to what happens between Chuck Billy and his friends and Mr. Lau. According to them, the guavas just don't taste the same if Lau isn't running after them yelling and cursing. In one story in the 80s, Chuck decided to plant his own guava tree, but once it started bearing fruit, he didn't like the taste, for this specific reason.
  • No Fourth Wall: Characters frequently mention panels, the writing staff, the reader, and lampshade facts such as the barefoot characters not having toes.
    • One amusing 3 letter panel had Jimmy and Smudge running away from Monica only for Jimmy to smile and suddenly stop after seeing the "End" graphic at the corner... of the second panel. The third panel shows a beat up Jimmy berating whoever made that mistake.
    • One Chuck Billy story had him racing Zeke in many occasions, with Zeke always failing to beat Chuck. Then, at the last page, Zeke proposes to see who could get to the end of the story faster. After Chuck zips out of the panel, Zeke simply pulls a pencil out from his pocket and writes "END" at the corner of the frame he's in. Only half a page later, Chuck is still running, and looks up and sees how Zeke managed to fool him.
    • A 1990s Smudge story which parodies the Sinbad the Sailor stories, much to his disgust (since he has to, you see, sail the seas of water), ends with him cutting off the narrator just as he starts going on about Smudge's next adventure (which would be Sinbad's third travel) and writting "End" at the bottom of the panel (with only one extra panel for denouement).
  • No Waterproofing in the Future: In a Terminator parody, Jimmy, Smudge and Monica are ancestors of the rebels that give robots trouble and three robots are sent to out time to kill the kids. When the robots attack Jimmy, he scares them away with a water pistol.
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up: Zigzagged and occasionally lampshaded.
    • The main cast is always six, nevermind the fact the series has been running for over 40 years. Every year there's a special edition featuring one of the main characters' 7th birthday. However, they always return to being six years old again. This is lampshaded when someone asks Jimmy how old he's turning. "Seven," he replies, "just like evewy other year."
    • In one of the late-2009 issues, it is implied that all of the birthday stories are actually about THE ONE AND ONLY BIRTHDAY PARTY they will ever experience - the 7th birthday party. This means, for example, that every Jimmy's birthday-themed story reveals one of the events that happened in his 7th birthday party. Again, the main character of this story is... Jimmy Five.
    • Notoriously averted with the Spinoff Teens manga, which was first released in 2008. "They grew up!" even became the franchise's tagline for the first few issues.
    • The Sliding Timescale is alluded to in a special issue released by the time of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, in which Maggy's mother was stated to be pregnant of her in 2002, while Monica and Jimmy appear as babies in 2006 (complete with rewriting the infamous Zidane headbutt into one of her first bunny-bashings gone wrong: she tried to hit Jimmy, but the bunny slipped off her hand all the way to Berlin) which, considering they're all about the same age, would be quite inaccurate (they'd have to be three to four years old by the latter point).
    • It's referenced again in a story involving a Creepy Doll made in 2010, where Maggy recounts its first appearance. She begins with "It all started in March 2001..." only for Jimmy to stop her and point out that, if Maggy is seven years old, she shouldn't even be born yet by that time.
    • Downplayed with Tina and her pals, who do age, but only by a few years after a couple of real-life decades. Tina was 12 when she was created in 1970, but turned 16 in the '80s. In the late 2000's, Word of God confirmed that she had turned 18, and her 2019 graphic novel portrayed her as 22-year-old woman. Depending on the Writer, her and her friends are either still on college or working office jobs.
  • Not Big Enough for the Two of Us: One story features Jimmy's father telling a joke where an elephant tells an ant the town where they are isn't big enough for the both of them. Jimmy's father is the only character to find the joke funny.
  • Not Me This Time: Occasionally, it's really not Jimmy who stole Samson. Many one-page/short stories will have Smudge as being the culprit just for the sake of a quick subversion (since Monica will always go for Jimmy first), but sometimes it's not the main boys at all.
    • In one comic, not only Samson but all the girls' dolls are stolen, and Monica, who had listened to Jimmy talking to Sunny about how "the plan will work, and we're finishing her this time" earlier that day, immediately blames him. One could forgive her for the misunderstanding, but she beats him up before even asking any questions, which prompts a battered Jimmy to explain that he was talking about a football coach's plan to defeat another team (which in Portuguese has a female pronoun). Monica doesn't even believe it till Sunny vouches for him and says he's been with Jimmy all day. An embarrassed Monica and the girls quickly say sorry and leave, while Sunny remarks to Jimmy that he has grown a rather unfortunate fame for himself.
    • Another story had this done quite creatively: Monica finds Samson missing and goes to interrogate the boys, one by one, only to find they all have perfectly reasonable alibis. She then has a flash and notices the artists had used Samson to stylize the title of the story, so she goes back and picks it up.
    Monica: These artists have some ideas!
  • Off-Model: Downplayed. In 1998, Emerson Abreu wrote a story in which Jimmy and Smudge enter the world of Quake. Jimmy warns Smudge about an enemy called Shambler, which he specifically describes as a white monster, though when they eventually find the creature, it's instead depicted as orange with red spots on its arms. Emerson would later poke fun at this coloring oversight in his blog.
  • Off to See the Wizard: Made in graphic novel format, although it's not so much a parody as it is a retelling with the Monica's Gang flavor, complete with the musical numbers and all other tropes the format entails.
  • One Steve Limit:
    • This omnipresent trope is averted by the existence of two secondary characters who share the same name: Both the local snobbish rich girl and the woman who is obsessed with her flower garden are named Carmem.
    • There are 20 different characters called José. Unsurprisingly, said name is also very common in Brazil, with one story even implying that Mauricio can't come up with a different name for his secondary characters because virtually everyone he interacts with on a daily basis is called José.
  • The One Who Wears Shoes: Jimmy Five is the only one among the four main characters. Shoes are much more frequent with background characters, with only Sunny and Hummer consistently appearing barefoot.
  • Only Six Faces:
    • Lampshaded. The series often jokes about this with characters commenting about "how they can't tell each other apart when they're bald because everyone looks alike". Most of the child characters have the same facial features (the only tell-tale difference being nose shapes aside from other facial nuances - like the dirt strokes on Smudge's cheeks) and the differences between their body types are subtle.
    • This was even lampshaded by Sunny in one story: "That's the good thing on Mauricio's characters all having the same face... No one can tell them apart!" (as Jimmy was wearing a bushy blonde wig to look like Sunny, who wanted to sneak out of his room despite being bedridden)
  • Orwellian Retcon:
    • Whenever an older story is republished showing wall scribbles, a pasted-on paper is added around the scribble.
    • Firearms are not allowed to be shown in the comics anymore (even toy guns - one instance had Junior appparently shooting water from his finger, and another infamous one had a mobster's tommy gun replaced with a lobster).
    • Reprints changed the dialogue to replace objectionable terms and mild cursing with softer synonyms (such as "azar" - bad luck - and "droga" - darn it), removing physical punishment from the kids' parents, even if implied (slippers and belts are removed altogether when a parent threatens the child with them), and rewriting Jimmy's thought bubbles so they don't contain the misspellings of when he talks. Also, some dialogue in Chuck Billy's stories is also rewritten to keep the accent consistent.
  • Our Ghosts Are Different: Exaggerated in the Ghostbusters parody. Teveluisão tells Jimmy that all ghosts look alike, but is proven wrong when he is surrounded by phantoms that defy the traditional idea of what spirits look like. Among the cameos, one can spot Danny Phantom, the twins from The Shining, No-Face and Ghost Rider.
  • Out-of-Character Moment: Zé Beto and Crispiano made their debut in the teen manga as two dim-witted, immature rednecks. When their child selves first showed up, they were instead portrayed as cultured and sophisticated boys. By their next appearance, however, they reverted into a duo of mischievous hillbillies.
  • Out of Focus:
    • Specs was a major character in the 1960's newspaper strips, but quickly faded into obscurity once Franklin took his place as the gang's smart guy. His lack of prominence is lampshaded and mocked on occasion, such as when Monica says there is a rumour he had been trying to save his career by acting as a rock's stunt double in a Blu comic strip.
    • Bloggy vanished from the comics at the start of the New '20s. One comic book has Junior bring up his sudden disappearance, only for Maggy to reply that she had seen Bloggy in Jimmy's yard a while ago, implying that she has forgotten who he is and is mistaking him for Fluffy the dog.
  • Parental Bonus: Stories of both Jimmy Five and Chuck Billy have them enter their parents' bedroom and acting as a Moment Killer, and thus the folks do their best to drive the children away.
  • Parental Hypocrisy: In one story, Chuck Billy and Rosie try to secretly meet after dinner and her father caught them. When Rosie's Mom says it sounds like someone she knows, Rosie's Dad says it's different because his secret signal sounded like a bird other than the one chosen by Chuck.
  • Parody Names: Celebrity or licensed character/series often make cameos in the strips, but their names are slightly changed to something that creates a pun and is close enough to the original to avoid copyright infringement. Examples include: Pokemão instead of Pokemon, Darti Vesgo instead of Darth Vader, Superomão instead of Superman, Ton Cruzes instead of Tom Cruise... However, the jokes make more sense and are funnier in Portuguese. This, invariably, sometimes ends up leading to Bland-Name Product and Lawyer-Friendly Cameo.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Monica was always looking angry in the '60s strips.
  • A Pig Named "Porkchop": Chuck Billy owns a pig named Porkchop. In the Brazilian original, the pig is called Torresmo (which means "pork rind" in Portuguese).
  • Pintsized Powerhouse: The first few comics justified the boys feeling pain when struck by Monica's stuffed bunny by revealing she had hidden a brick inside the toy, but later stories retconned this by giving the five-year old girl super-strength. Some of her feats include punching down walls and lifting trucks with minimal effort.
  • Political Overcorrectness: The writer of the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice parody snuck in a few jokes to criticize the comics' new stance on political correctness. All weapons are purposefully redrawn as ridiculous objects, such as ponies, popsicles or literal censor bars, much to the characters' confusion. Chuck then explains that these changes were a demand from the Associação Super Corretinha Organizada Translation , whose abbreviation, "ASCO", is Portuguese for "repugnant".
  • Postmodernism: The lack of Fourth Wall leads to this. The original Marina story had the real Marina (Maurício's eponymous daughter) invading the comic, only for dad to reveal at the end of the story that he created a character based on her.note 
  • Power Trio:
    • For the girls: Monica, Maggy, and either Marina or Denise (with Marina as the third member, they even formed their own Lovely Angels team in a few stories).
    • For the boys: Jimmy Five, Smudge, and usually Sunny.
  • Prehensile Hair: Jimmy Five's pointy hair injures people, pops balloons/balls, and at least once became a Helicopter Hair.
  • Progressively Prettier: Whenever we'd see Monica and Maggy as teenagers, the earlier comics tend to make them stretched out versions of their regular selves. Later comics tend to make them much more feminine and traditionally attractive in appearance, and much less cartoonish. Jovem tends to split the difference, with its manga style.
  • The Promise: In "Deus Cebola", Jimmy has gained godly powers after climbing the Stairs to Heaven and needs to be brought back to Earth. Smudge ties a rope around his waist and asks Angel to pull him back when he asks, before climbing the Stairs to retrieve his friend. After the mission is accomplished, Smudge is revealed to actually be Satan in disguise, who wanted to prevent the birth of another god. The evil entity begs Angel to pull the rope before the heavenly forces purify him, and the protagonist, after much deliberation, complies, saying that, as much as he would have liked his biggest enemy to be defeated, fulfilling a promise is what differentiates angels from demons.
  • Redemption Rejection: When Maggy, along with Denise, tries to change Agnes' ways. Since her parents are two phantoms who keep her paranoid and maintaining animals imprisioned, Agnes rejects Maggy's words and sides with her cruel Abusive Parents, who keep saying they only want the best for her.
  • Reality Warper:
    • Due to Author Powers, Marina's magic pencil allows its wielder to bring whatever they draw to life, as well as create doors to alternate universes.
    • Due to Rule of Funny, Reality Is Out to Lunch whenever Nutty Ned gets involved, and he can change his surroundings in the craziest ways.
  • Recursive Canon: The Gang's comics exist in-universe as well as out. No one really comments on this.
  • Reed Richards Is Useless:
    • Some of Franklin’s inventions could literally change history. He has been able to create functioning time machines, multitask robots, size shifting potions and several, several others. Justified since Status Quo Is God, naturally, and also most of his creations are infamously far from flawless (though, of course, just the fact that he's able to make something close to the real thing would be world-changing).
    • One story came close to subvert this trope. Franklin managed to build a machine at Maggy’s request that could multiply food, and came to realize that, since with one sandwich he could make thousands, he had ended world hunger. Cue some merchants understandably pissed, since now they were probably going bankrupt. Before Franklin can figure out a solution, the rest of the gang finds out that the machine’s food copies have actually no nutritional value, not satisfying hunger whatsoever.
    • Another from Franklin involves a time machine, which he worries about falling in the wrong hands in a conversation with Smudge. As soon as he says this, a lot of people show up trying to use their machine for their own purposes (even, hilariously enough, an ice cream man who wants to use it to Take Over the World). Franklin's solution to this is to travel back in time to keep them from taking the machine, thus creating a Stable Time Loop, which is even acknowledged by the final caption:
      The end? Nope! Go back to the beginning and read the story again!
  • Reference Overdosed:
    • Each of the Cinema Classics specials feature at least one large panel in which characters from various media make cameo appearances. Said cameos often tie in to the general theme of the current setting, such as Link, Finn and Etrigan showing up in the parody of The Lord of the Rings because they all hail from old-fashioned worlds that resemble the Middle Ages.
    • This trope is turned into a game in "Paul Is Dead". The final panel notes that there are 28 references to The Beatles' songs spread throughout the comic and dares the reader to spot them all.
    • The famous "Escape from the Infinite Comic Books" storyline follows Jimmy and Smudge as they jump through multiple comic book worlds as they try to return to their own universe. The duo is transported to the worlds of The Fairly OddParents, The Simpsons, Peanuts and many others before finally making their way home.
  • Reincarnation:
    • The ghosts from Penadinho's comics are all fated to be reborn as new living people. This gets Played for Laughs in an old newspaper strip, in which one of the souls that was about to reincarnate loses his chance when his would-be mother decides to take a morning-after pill at the last minute.
    • In "A Star Named Mariana", the title character is Chuck's deceased baby sister. In her second appearance, she is reborn as Chuck and Rosie's daughter.
  • Relax-o-Vision: Jimmy befriends an elephant that goes Ax-Crazy whenever it hears a certain keyword. When Junior accidentally says it, the story cuts away to a panel explaining that the ensuing violence is unsuitable for a kids-friendly comic book, and comically replaces the carnage with the image of a random anthropomorphic bee reciting poetry. When the plot resumes, the elephant is shown returning to its normal friendly self, while Jimmy is horrified at the injuries Junior suffered off-screen.
  • Retcon:
    • Originally, Monica was Spec's sister.
    • Chuck Billy's dog, Fido, died in a story written in The '80s, only to be resurrected some years later, with no explanation given.
    • In one story, Fluff is said not to be a lhasa apso, but a puli.
  • Rich Bitch: Penha is the daughter of a corrupt politician and often takes advantage of her family's affluence to antagonize the other children. At one point, she buys Monica's neighbourhood just so she could feel she had some sort of control over the protagonist.
  • Roger Rabbit Effect: Some of their films have the animated characters interacting with real performers, including Mauricio de Sousa in their cinematic debut; and singer Tetê Espíndola in "A Sereia do Rio"note .
  • Rolling Pin of Doom:
  • Satellite Love Interest:
    • Dustine has no personality other than being Smudge's girlfriend.
    • Deconstructed with Isabel, Bucky's girlfriend. Though she used to be mostly defined by her love for her boyfriend, she grows out of it once the two break up in the teen spin-off.
  • Schemer: Jimmy Five loves to scheme against all the other three main characters, to defeat Monica (or at least steal her plush bunny), give Smudge a bath, and make Maggy eat less.
  • Self-Deprecation: In "The Power of Imagination":
    • Captain Popsicle is infuriated when Mauricio's writers can't tell the difference between him and Horacio. Emerson retorts by criticizing the comics' art style, saying that all characters look the same anyways.
    • Captain Popsicle's refusal to approve Emerson Abreu's scripts are a jab at some of the writer's personal flaws, such as his tendency to let his imagination run wild and write overly long stories, as well as his propensity to pepper the dialogue with LGBT slangs that fly over the heads of general audiences.
  • Serious Business:
    • Stealing Monica's stuffed rabbit is no joking matter for a lot of the boys in the block (mostly Jimmy Five and Smudge). The plans to try and steal it away from her have included time traveling.
    • Carmem takes gardening very seriously. She builds a dungeon in her house and fills it with traps to ensure that nobody can harm her beloved flowers.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: In "The Power of the Bad Mood", Monica's temper leads her to beat up Jimmy after he pulls a harmless prank on her. This starts a chain reaction of people becoming irritated, which escalates until Earth is destroyed by a fleet of angry aliens. Horrified by the fact that a petty squabble led to the end of the world, Monica requests the narrator to send her back to the start of the comic. This time, she laughs at Jimmy's prank, kickstarting another chain reaction that leads to an "Everybody Laughs" Ending.
  • Shades of Conflict: Slice of Life comics are usually Grey-and-Gray Morality (the reader can sympathize with Jimmy because Monica's so bossy, for instance), as are those with a Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain added. Harsher bad guys earn Black-and-White Morality.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: In "Observadores de Pássaros" ("Birdwatchers"), Mr. Bill undergoes Character Development, loses his dislike for children, and befriends Monica. He also finds a sanctuary filled with rare and endangered species, which he hopes to present to the scientific community in order to finally be acknowledged professionally. Unfortunately, when he recounts the adventure to a policewoman, she is convinced that he is insane, and Monica refuses to corroborate his claims out of fear that the sanctuary would be devastated by anthropic actions. With his chance at happiness taken from him at the last second, Mr. Bill descends into insanity, thus restoring the status quo.
  • Ship Tease: Tina and Curly have had several subtle moments of this, but since both are often dating other people, Status Quo Is God usually stops them for going any further than being just good friends. One comic had Tina hearing from a clairvoyance that she'd soon meet the man of her life. On the same day she crashes into her father in a street corner, and when he jokes that he is the man of her life, Tina shakes off the clairvoyance's prediction by thinking it's not real. The story then cuts to nighttime, when Curly arrives at the same spot because a fortune-teller told him he'd meet the woman of his life there, but since there's no one he mutters that he probably missed her...
  • Shout-Out:
    • Smudge is a diehard "Star Warp" fan, and frequently references the original franchise either by quoting its characters or dressing up as them.
    • The parody of Avatar has the gang exploring a world inhabited by fictional blue characters, which includes cameos of Sonic the Hedgehog, Dr. Manhattan, Squirtle and the Genie, among many others. It's even the page image of Reference Overdosed!
    • A storyline that parodizes Indiana Jones has Jimmy pushing Smudge into a pool of water, which causes the latter to scream "Look what you've done! I'm melting!", mimicking the death and last words of the Wicked Witch of the West.
    • In "Perdidos no Meio do Quarto"Translation , Sunny loses his way while exploring Smudge's dirty bedroom and decides to wait for someone to show up and rescue him. After several days, Jimmy and Smudge find him, but he has lost his sanity, proclaiming everything to be an illusion except his beloved soccer ball, which he now refers to as Wilsa. This is a parody of Cast Away, in which the protagonist tries to survive in a deserted island alongside his inanimate companion, a volleyball called Wilson.
    • Luca is occasionally called "Paralaminha" ("Little Paralama"), which is a reference to how the frontman of band Paralamas do Sucesso, Herbert Vianna, became wheelchair-bound after an airplane accident in 2001.
  • Silence Is Golden: Some stories in each book are completely silent, and rely solely on visual gags as a source of humour.
  • Simultaneous Arcs:
    • The December 2005 comic books feature a continuous narrative. In Smudge's book, he decides to run away from home and shows up at Jimmy's place, but his friend is too focused on his pet chinchilla to pay attention to him. Said pet dies in Jimmy's story, and he is comforted by Monica at the end of her comic book. Finally, Maggy returns from a trip to the beach and finds her desolated friends at the end of her own story.
    • The covers for the May 2006 comic books can be connected to make one big artwork, hinting that their stories are also linked. In Monica's book, she notices her stuffed bunny has gone missing and suspects Jimmy of stealing it. However, Denise points out Jimmy is at Sunny's farm (which is the focus of his own story), leading Monica to investigate Junior instead. Upon arriving at his place, she is greeted by Crystal, who is in a bad mood due to having to put up with Junior's antics (as shown in Maggy's comic book). Finally, Smudge's story has him growing jealous of Jimmy and Sunny's friendship and trying to find a new best friend.
    • The June 2007 comic books show the main four getting ready for Denise's birthday party. Monica helps Denise set up the decorations, Jimmy tries to clean his party clothes after a last minute accident, Smudge tries to find Denise the perfect gift, and Maggy comes into conflict with an evil witch while searching for a cake.
  • Sinister Suffocation: A 1994 comic follows Astronaut as his suit is invaded by an oxygen-eating alien, who is implied to have committed genocide on a global scale after consuming its home world's atmosphere and causing all other life forms to suffocate. Despite only appearing in this one storyline, the alien is portrayed as a thoroughly sinister villain that poses a serious threat to Earth, sharply contrasting the franchise's other antagonists, who are Laughably Evil at worst.
  • Slapstick Knows No Gender: Nor does it know social boundaries, as Luca (who is wheelchair-bound, need we remind you) has been on the receiving end of Monica's needy abuse at least once.
  • Soft Reboot: Even if the Panini comics would become more and more Continuity Porn, down to counting the output of all three publishers to celebrate 500th or 600th overall issues of a character, in 2015, just after the 100th issue of the core comics, the numbering was reverted back to #1. And they did it again after just 70 issues in 2021!
  • Speak of the Devil:
    • Sometimes, whenever a Mauricio character mention death or the verb "die", Lady MacDeath (a female and comedic Grim Reaper from Bug-a-boo's stories) appears.
    • Also Nutty Ned: whenever someone speaks of being "nutty", "nuts" or something along these lines (e.g. "who would be nutty enough to do X?", where X may be something like testing out one of Franklin's inventions), he shows up.
  • The Speechless: Hummer only speaks in "hmmmm".
  • Spoiled Brat: Monica is one on her worst days, using her strength and 'street ruler' status to force others into doing her bidding.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad:
    • At first the protagonist was Jimmy Five. Once he stumbled upon a girl who hit him, and she later turned into the main character. (probably due to being the first female one, and based on the creator's daughter, no less) And even in being the main character, at times she'll hog the spotlight some more (a blatant example being the Pirates of the Caribbean comic, where Monica played Tia Dalma, and thus every time she appeared there were lampshades of "you're not supposed to be here" as the character only showed up in the sequel).
    • Due to Denise's rising popularity, she soon started usurping the roles of other secondary characters, most notably by replacing Marina as the voice of reason to Monica and Maggy.
  • Stern Teacher: Chuck Billy's teacher, specially because Chuck is often in her nerves. But she has Cool Teacher moments too.
  • String-on-Finger Reminder: Used in a short Chuck Billy story. It starts with Chuck failing to remember why he tied a string around his finger in the first place, spending the whole day asking people if they had anything to do with it. He finally remembers what he had to do during bedtime, which was to save his best friend, who was in a Literal Cliffhanger the entire time.
  • Sudden Name Change: "Perfeição" introduces a recurring antagonist called Creuza, whose name is inexplicably changed to Carmem by her next appearance.
  • Super Strength:
    • Monica, sometimes to hilarious extents (in one single-page comic she literally blew the world away from her with a sneeze). Maybe that's why the bunny bashings hurt so much.
    • In the early issues, it was revealed that she used to keep a brick inside Samson. Nowadays she really possesses super-human strength, and her mother revealed that some of her family members also have the power.
  • Standard Hero Reward: Subverted in one old episode, in which Monica portrays a princess that is kidnapped by an ogre and eventually rescued by Jimmy Five. When Monica's father as the king tells Jimmy he'll be rewarded for saving her, Jimmy already imagines himself being forced to marry Monica, only to find out his reward is actually a bejewelled sword.
  • Sticky Situation: The 154th issue of Globo's run of the Monica comic had a story titled "Chiclete, NÃO!", which had Monica get stuck when she sits on a bench where gum was left on the seat. Her attempts to free herself result in slipping out of her panties, which remain stuck to the bench. She tries to pull her panties from the bench, only to humiliate herself further when other people see her bare bottom and the panties are ultimately torn. After rushing home to get a new pair of panties while using a bush to cover herself, Monica finds out who it was who left the gum on the bench and has her revenge by using gum to stick the boy to a trash can by the seat of his pants.
  • Tagalong Kid: Junior, and occasionally Jimmy Five's little sister. Though Mary Angela at least is a harmless baby, while Junior just has to make things more difficult\annoying whenever he's around.
  • Take That!:
    • The Crossover with the Justice League of America has the gang traveling across multiple famous DC issues and recruiting superheroes to help Superman overcome his rogues gallery. When Sunny suggests they recruit the Golden Age Aquaman next, everyone responds with uproarious laughter (including Hush-era Batman, which Sunny points out to be incredibly Out of Character). They then warp to the New 52 universe to enlist the help of the modern version of Aquaman.
    • The parody of The Lord of the Rings pokes fun at the much-maligned wizard battle from the first film. As the Captain Ersatzes of Gandalf and Saruman hurl invisible spells at each other, Sauron comments that the duel is boring him and leaves.
    • The parody of The Avengers (2012) pokes fun at many of the criticisms leveled against the Marvel Cinematic Universe, such as Hawkeye being rather weak compared to the rest of the heroes,note  the reliance on post-credit scenes to set up future filmsnote  and the excessive number of scenarios in which superheroes fight each other for contrived reasons.
    Asthornaut: We are heroes! Why are we even fighting?
    Iron Bunny: Industry tradition!
    • In at least two stories, Emerson Abreu has ridiculized "The Ketchup Song", a song that went viral in Brazil during the 2000's despite mostly negative reviews from critics. In "Perfeição", Mrs. Five immediately shoots down Jimmy's proposal to perform the song's choreography during the school play; and in "Desconectados", its lyrics are used to represent the sound of dying computers.
  • Teen Genius: Specs used to be The Smart Guy. Downplayed to Older and Wiser as Franklin became cemented as the gang's resident Boy Genius.
  • Temporal Paradox: The main source of conflict in An Adventure in Time. Franklin explains that, if an object from a given timeline is sent into the past or future, its absence will gradually cause distortions that result in time freezing in that reality. Monica and the gang must thus venture into other time periods to retrieve the MacGuffins from their era before the time flow is damaged.
  • Thought Bubble Speech:
    • Played straight with Vanilla, but averted with Blu and his friends, and also Lionel's Kingdom crew, who all use normal speaking bubbles. However, Vanilla can use the speaking bubbles as well, usually when interacting with other animals (though sometimes he uses the thinking bubbles even when interacting with other cats. It really depends on the writer). He once lampshaded this when talking to a human, saying that he only does it when it's necessary.
    • Ditto, Fluffy and Chauvy (Monica's, Jimmy's and Smudge's pets respectively) will usually play it straight too, though it's very rare for them to show any thinking animal tendencies at all.
  • Time Machine: Franklin builds so many of them that many times characters lampshade how it's basically the only thing he does (Smudge makes fun of it in this episode). In fact, one of these is what triggers the events of the Time Travel movie.
  • Token Good Teammate: Sofia is largely harmless compared to the other girls from the Pitangueiras neighbourhood. While Penha is a Hate Sink with no sympathetic qualities whatsoever, and Agnes became cold and cruel after years of her parents' emotional abuse; Sofia never goes out of her way to antagonize the other children, often doing little more than standing in one place licking her lollipop. In the teen spin-off, she ultimately pulls a Heel–Face Turn and befriends the heroes.
  • Token Minority:
    • Jeremiah is the standard "token black boy", but there's also Doreen (blind girl), Luca (boy in a wheelchair) and Hummer (who was initially only mute, but was retconned as deaf as well) and some others.
    • The fact Jeremiah is a semi-regular character was enough to warrant calls for representation. In response, two graphic novels starring Jeremiah and focusing on his ethnicity have been written; and Milena, a new African-Brazilian character, was created in 2018 (although her formal comics debut, along with her family's, only came in January 2019) and immediately integrated to the main cast.
    • In Chuck Billy's gang, there has always been the Japanese-Brazilian Taka.
  • Tomboy and Girly Girl: Monica, who loves physical activities and to beat up boys, and Maggy, who is just plain girly. The latter even attempts to make Monica less masculine at times.
  • Took a Level in Dumbass: Maggy, strangely enough, is portrayed as a total dumbass when she's not eating in some of early 2000s stories written by Flavio. The reason behind this is unknown and a complete Out-of-Character Moment, since Maggy is commonly portrayed as one of the smartest characters of the gang.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Dustine used to be little more than Smudge's Satellite Love Interest and lacked defining characteristics of her own, but her personality eventually shifted into that of a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing. In a story where Denise spreads a rumour that Smudge and Maggy are dating, Dustine immediately believes the lie and starts revenge dating in response. She also proudly states that she is shallow and vindictive and was only dating Smudge because he is a main character, something that Maggy herself calls a low blow.
  • Trademark Favorite Food:
    • Maggy eats everything, but watermelon is explicitly her favourite food. It's completely normal to see her gobbling an entire one down.
    • Lettuce is Horacio's favourite food, which is ironic, considering he is a baby T. rex.
    • Chuck Billy has a great love for guavas, especially those stolen from Mr. Lau's orchard.
  • True Companions: The main four, regardless of all the pranking and alienating negative traits. One of the main themes of the Gang is friendship, after all, and it's been stated more than once that children's friendship is the strongest kind - even when they argue and drive themselves away from each other, it's always temporary, and the next day they're back together.
  • Tsundere: Monica is Type A; she may beat Jimmy Five (and Smudge) up in most of the comics, but they are also good friends, and in some stories set in the future, they are married with children (not to mention them becoming a full-fledged Official Couple in the Teen Gang imprint). Even as kids, there are hints of affection between them (mostly on her side; Jimmy, for the most part, has a Girls Have Cooties attitude towards her in this regard).
  • Tuckerization: Considering most characters are based on people Mauricio knew, common. Maggy, Monica, Nimbus (Mauro in real life), Nick Nope (also called Maurício in real life) and Marina are his children (also Jimmy Five's baby sister, Mary Angela, whose English version name matches her real life one), Smudge and Jimmy Five are childhood friends, Chuck Billy and Zeke were brothers of his grandma (he didn't know them, but the grandma always told stories), Tina is a school acquaintance and Horacio, a childhood friend who became a teacher. For another person's case, Penha is named after writer Emerson Abreu's mother.
  • Uncatty Resemblance: Invoked with Ditto, Monica's pet dog. Jimmy and Smudge gave it to her as a gift just to get a quick laugh on this trope, but she ended up loving the pet.
  • Universal-Adaptor Cast: With both "characters in other settings" and "Whole Plot Reference stories". Thanks to this, Jimmy Five's been Batman, Iron Man and Wolverine, and Chuck Billy's been Superman and Captain America.
  • Verbal Tic: The Tenebrous Doll is unable to prevent herself from constantly shouting "Fear! Terror! Darkness!" In her debut storyline, the doll blurts this out while pretending to have turned over a new leaf, giving away that she is still evil; and in Monica's 500th comic book special, Cumulus Nimbus screaming the three words makes Monica realize that the doll is the one who had brainwashed him.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: Smudge's pet pig is named "Chovinista" (Chauvy in the English translation).
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show:
    • In a world where most villains are Laughably Evil, Agnes stands out as a thoroughly sinister antagonist. Monica calls her heartless for torturing animals, and Maggy points out that her repressed hatred and loneliness have made her unable to feel empathy. Her growing resentment ultimately transforms her into a malevolent spirit, whom Angel has to personally drag into the afterlife to save Monica's life.
    • The Tenebrous Doll is unlike other antagonists in that she has no goal other than to terrorize and murder her victims. In her debut storyline, she plots to explode Maggy's house with a bundle of dynamite while the protagonist is still inside.
  • Villain Decay: Dr. Spam is introduced as a fairly effective villain who outsmarts the entire gang, requiring Bloguinho to intervene and program an antivirus specifically to deal with him. However, in his second appearance, he is treated as a complete joke, as Jimmy repeatedly defeats him through banal means (turning off the computer which Dr. Spam is using to materialize into the real world, for example). He is also much less powerful, since his electricity blasts are retconned into mostly harmless bolt-shaped spikes.
  • Violence Is the Only Option:
    • Monica, particularly in the newspaper comics, where it's easy to make quick joke with either a beating or threatening to do so.
    • It used to be worse in the original strips. Once, Maggy suggested that, if Monica were to fight, she might as well do it like a girl, hair tugging and everything. She proceeded to tear all the hair off Maggy's head. It even got to the point where, in-universe, no one would want to be in the same strip as her.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds:
    • Jimmy Five devotes his existence to annoy and mess with Monica. In return, she beats him up to a pulp. Never stopped either of them of referring to each other first and foremost as "friends", and they will come to each other's aid whenever necessary.
    • Maggy and her Non-Human Sidekick Vanilla, also have a bit of this going on. While she adores the cat and spoils him rotten, and Vanilla does care for her a lot more than he lets out (in fact, he's shown several times that he's secretly afraid that she'll grow tired of him eventually), most of their stories together are about them going at each other like sitcom arch-nemesises, and when not being lovable they are decidedly snarky towards each other.
  • Wasteful Wishing: In "Shooting Stars and Boiled Eggs", most of the children are transformed into monsters when their wishes upon a meteor shower backfire. Smudge gets the chance to save his friends by using the last shooting star, but absent-mindedly wishes for a boiled egg instead. The comic ends with the gang, now irreversibly mutated, chasing after him.
  • Werewolves Are Dogs: Lobi from the Bug-a-Boo stories — which parody many classical cinema monsters — is a werewolf who, Depending on the Writer, often has the behavior of a stereotypical friendly dog, such as going after bones, barking and running away from baths.
  • Wham Line: Denise used to have a rarely seen sister called Sonia. In 2015, their relationship is turned upside down when Denise says Sonia "is not really her sister", but her imaginary friend who has somehow materialized as a real person. Subsequent stories depict Sonia as a malicious entity who deeply resents Denise and vows to torment her for her troubled existence.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: As much of a Nice Girl Tsundere that Monica is, she can sometimes be really bossy and irrational and when she wants to do something, she's not above using violence to convince the boys to do as she wants when they're minding their own business.note . Granted, Jimmy does call her out on this in the Manga.
  • When All You Have is a Hammer…: Whenever the gang comes across a complex problem, the solution is usually using Monica's Super Strength to simply brute-force their way through.
    • In a storyline based on Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, the gang is captured by the thieves and imprisoned in an underground cell in the middle of the desert. Jimmy comes up with a convoluted plan, which involves sending Smudge's pet flies across the ocean to retrieve items to aid in their escape, but then realizes Monica has just punched a hole through the wall. He disheartedly laments that, once again, they had to rely on "the same old cliché of Monica's strength".
    • A Running Gag in the Justice League of America crossover is someone posing a difficult problem for the gang, only for Monica to solve it by throwing her bunny at someone. This includes freeing Superman from a parasite, restoring the Flash's memory, and defeating the likes of Black Manta, Mxyzptlk and Mongul.
  • When I Was Your Age...: Jimmy Five's father once told Jimmy that, with Jimmy's allowances, he once bought stuff for home. Jimmy then asked how his parents did to live off ice cream and sweets.
  • When the Clock Strikes Twelve: The Grim Reaper must reap the old year before the year's last day's midnight or the new year won't be born and last year's events will happen all over again.
  • Where No Parody Has Gone Before: They made one too, basically parodying the 2009 film, but making nods to the original series here and there.
  • Whole Plot Reference:
    • The "Cinema Classics" series are parodies of blockbuster films and follow their plots rather closely, though the darker elements are obviously sugarcoated in order to maintain the comic's humorous tone. Some of the films that have been referenced include the Star Wars, Jurassic Park and The Lord of the Rings trilogies, which were divided in three parts just like the originals.
    • In the Romeo and Juliet retelling, Monica disagrees with Shakespeare's ending and forces the Prince of Verona - Sunny - to give them a happy one.
    • One comic has Monica play the role of Hercules' daughter and do a variant of his 12 works.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?:
    • Smudge is aquaphobic, to the point even a glass of water can make him shiver. His fear is such that he can spontaneously come up with wild ways to avoid getting wet, such as flapping his arms like wings to avoid falling into a lake. Though his teen version has overcome his fear to a certain degree, he is still not very fond of the idea of bathingnote .
    • Monica, while superstrong and brave, has her own girly fears (like pretty much every other girl in the gang): she will shriek and cower at the sight of any mouse, bug, worm or what have you. Needless to say, Jimmy has used it to his advantage more than once.
    • Marina is abnormally afraid of dogs. A comic that explores her phobia has her crawling up an air vent to avoid Monica's dog, and it's played as a homage to Alien.
  • Wicked Stepmother: Carmem almost becomes Sunny's stepmother and threatens to enforce strict methods to discipline him, including feeding him nothing but scarlet eggplant soup. Luckily, Sunny's father realizes how much she hates children and ends their relationship.
  • Wild Take: Became pervasive since the 2000s, especially when Sidnei Salustre is drawing.
  • Willing Suspension of Disbelief: Lampshaded in a story where Maggy is telling Junior the Jack and the Beanstalk story and putting her spin on it at every step. Better yet, it's lampshaded by the giant in the story:
    If he's accepted that I live on the clouds and that you came up here on a beanstalk... Why can't I be a sculptor and use hairspray?
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: When Jimmy accidentally finds and climbs the Stairs to Heaven, he is imbued with godly powers and knowledge, which drive him insane and cause him to distort reality with his thoughts.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Agnes becomes an orphan at a young age, though the spirits of her evil parents remain bound to the Earth. Their abusive treatment cause her to become shy, lonely and sadistic, until she too is filled with so much hatred that she transforms into an incredibly powerful evil spirit.
    Agnes: If I can't have friends... If I can't be happy... Then no one can! One day, you will all pay!
  • Written Sound Effect: In both the comic book and the animated versions, moments where characters beat up each other are replaced with simple panels/frames containing a single onomatopoeia. This is deliberately done to avoid depicting acts of violence and discourage bullying.
  • You Are Fat: In Emerson de Abreu's "A Origem da Mônica"note  storyline, several jokes come at the expense of Monica's pudginess. Her weight almost causes a boat to sink, triggers a rock slide when she stands at the edge of a cliff, leads a group of elephants to believe that she is one of their calves, and makes a plane lose altitude. As it turns out, all these events were actually part of a fake backstory that Jimmy came up with in order to tease her.
  • You Meddling Kids: In a particularly Troperiffic story in which Nutty Ned and Jimmy Five disguise themselves as Sherlock Holmes and Watson respectively in order to solve Samson's disappearance and find that The Butler Did It, the guilty butler says this line, prompting Jimmy to lampshade the shout-out, since there are no meddling kids in the case.
  • You No Take Candle: In "Paul in Roça", Chuck requests the letterer to translate Paul McCartney's dialogue to Portuguese so the readers and himself can understand what he is saying. Though the request is granted, the Beatle's lines are childlike and with mangled grammar, highlighting both his innocence and the fact he is a foreigner.
  • Zany Scheme: Jimmy Five's Infallible Plans. One comic had him developing a over-the-top one relying on random factors (such as having Monica attacked by a passing alien ship), only for Smudge to convince him on giving up by saying it was too implausible. Cue Monica saying she had just went through all of what had been described in the plan...

Tropes exclusive to Monica Adventures:

    Tropes A-M 
  • Aborted Arc:
    • The "End of the World Saga" was put on an indefinite hiatus in 2016, when Emerson Abreu left the writing staff of the teen spin-off. Though the writer has continuously teased the series' return since then, no further stories have been published.
    • Wagner Bonilla's "Savert Saga" was the focus of four issues of Chuck Billy's book in 2015, but the plotline was dropped afterwards. Though it seemed to be making a comeback in 2021 with the "Village of Nightmares" arc, the manga was cancelled immediately afterwards, leaving it with no official ending.
  • An Aesop:
    • Being prideful will end up very badly for you if you don't realize the harm it causes to the people around you, a lesson that is made very clear with Monica and Jimmy's characters, especially in the manga where their pride has more often than not caused a bad situation for those around them and for themselves as well.
    • Don't waste the opportunities that are given to you. This is made clear by Genesinho's actions in the Chucky Billy manga, where he blows the opportunity his father gave to him to study abroad in a partying life and ended up not only losing that opportunity, but also leaving a girl pregnant and losing all the trust and respect his father had for him.
    • Nothing is set in stone. If you want something, you HAVE to work for it. Jim believed he and Monica were destined to be together and at one point he began to take her for granted and believed that Monica was only trying to get him to chase her again when Monica kissed Nick Nope and started debating who she truly loved. It wasn't until Maggy gave him a Breaking Speech that he realized how much of a tool he was and how he's lost Monica forever.
    • Ambition will lead to evil if carried for the wrong reasons. Jimmy's ambition to be the king of the block and later change the world was revealed to be a product of a need to prove his worth to Monica rather than a desire to make things better. In the manga, Jim's ambition resulted in not one Bad Future, but TWO, along with an Alternate Universe where Jim is a bully that has dirt on everyone. And in the manga present proper, his ambition actually results in Monica, Smudge and Maggy being killed.
    • The entirety of the romantic sub-plot with Monica and Jim shows that despite how much you love someone, if you end with more grief and stress than actual good feelings, it's not worth to keep pining for that person and while moving on is difficult, it will ultimately end well for you.
    • It's ok to be different, but it shouldn't be something or you to force on yourself just because you want to be unique. This is pretty much the core of Nick Nope's character and Denise eventually tells him that hating something because everyone likes or does it is as bad as liking or doing something just because everyone else likes or does it. Like and dislike what you will based on YOUR individual opinion.
    • Don't go against the norm just for the sake of going against the norm. Nick Nope always did it to the point of trying to impose this on his dates with Monica and going as far as projecting into her the need of going against the norm in regards to her refusal of braces with little regard to her health in Issue #94 and it ended up blowing up in his face when he put his Commander Contrarian tendencies before Monica's feelings.
    • While you generally mean well, it pays well to listen to your children. Viviane kept trying to force her daughter Ramona to be a witch and to "be like everyone" and it ultimately backfired when Ramona decided enough was enough.
    • Be respectful of your parents and listen to what they have to say. They were in your shoes before too. In one manga issue where Jim made a bet with Toni that he could survive being in a dangerous forest area for a night, Jim paid no heed to his father when he tried to enroll him in the Boy Scouts for survival lessons because he thought Boy Scouts were for wimps and took it as an insult and tried to go to the forest by himself. His lack of survival knowledge got him lost and he would have been stranded there for a good time had his father not come to save his hide with the knowledge HE picked up from his time with the scouts.
  • All According to Plan: When the possessed Smudge declares that he will shroud the Earth in darkness in preparation for the Serpent's arrival, Denise objects that the Serpent cannot be alive, since the heroes exploded her homeworld a while ago. However, the villain smugly reveals that planet Tomb wasn't his master's homeworld, but her prison, and the heroes were lured there specifically so they would destroy it and set the monster free.
  • Alternate Universe:
    • While the manga itself is considered one to the kids' gang (even according to Word of God), its issue #36 adds in another AU, a Crapsack World in which Jimmy, who didn't care about getting better from his speech impediment, does indeed rule the street by being a gigantic asshole to everybody, asserting his authority through threats of exposing their secrets. Even the teachers at the school don't get any respect from him. He only grows out of it when the rest of the gang decides to not care about the blackmail and come clean with each other, thus breaking the hold he had over them. Plus, when Smudge's uncle (a powerless, Corrupt Corporate Executive version of Captain Fray) tried to get a hold of Franklin's world domination machine, built at Jimmy's behest, he was sent to an uninhabited planet because, since it was built in such a hurry, there was nothing in it to specify which world the user wanted to rule. Seeing it could have happened to him, Jimmy loses his jerkiness. The reason for all this? Monica had moved away from the neighborhood while they were still children, essentially leaving a vacuum in her friends' lives. When she came back all grown up, no one recognized her.
    • Other differences in this AU: Maggy didn't learn to put her appetite in check, so she grew fat; Bucky is shy and insecure, while Sunny is more outgoing and confident; Franklin is a nebbish geek who can't find it in him to approach Marina; Nutty Ned is still a teacher, but has a lot more composure (despite being apparently aware of the AU), and he's the target of Maggy's juvenile crush; Nimbus is a failure at magic; and Sunny's sister didn't make the cut for the space program, working at a fast food joint instead.
    • Another AU gets created in the "Flying Donkey" arc, where the main four are possessed and taken over by evil entities under the Flying Donkey's bidding, Maggy's latent magic saves her, Monica and Smudge, but Jim decides to keep the entitie within himself because of the powers it gave him, to use them for his ambitions. The 3 turn on him and warn the others against him, but Jim convinces most of the boys to join him with the promise of making a better world, Smudge obtains Captain Fray's powers and turns evil, Maggy isolates herself out of fear people are only using her for her magic, leaving Monica, Sunny, Denise and the rest to lead a resistance against them after Jim takes over the world with Franklin's help and turns everything into a Crapsack World.
    • The twist of "The Portal of Darkness" is that the dark world to which the heroes' souls had been sent is actually identical to the main reality, but their version of Smudge succumbed to the Malevolence's influence and became its messiah.
  • And I Must Scream: Penha's first defeat results in a brain injury that leaves her in a coma. It's later revealed that she was conscious the whole time and spent an entire year as a prisoner of her own body, abandoned in a hospital bed with only Sofia to keep her company. Jim himself expresses pity for her, and Maggy casts a spell in the hopes of helping her regain mobility eventually.
  • Animate Dead: The Widow can raise the dead and place them under her control, making her one of the most dangerous members of the Umbra Chidren.
  • Animated Adaptation: A first attempt was made in 2015 with only 1 episode along with some promotional videos, but due to how the animation was too non-anime, an actual version was made, which was released in 2019.
  • Anti-Hero: Monica and Jim both shift down the scale to UnscrupulousHero in the manga, especially Jim. Although Monica can be a Nominal Hero as far as Irene is concerned.
  • Arc Words: "The Serpent is coming back" is said by multiple characters during the "End of the World Saga", foreshadowing the arrival of a creature that is said to bring about the apocalypse.
  • Art Evolution: Compare the covers of the manga version to the inside. Has gotten more consistent lately, but the difference is still pretty glaring.
  • Atrocious Alias:
    • The adult version of Angel originally went by "Céuboy"note . In response to fan backlash, he changes his name to Angelo at the end of the first arc, but not before Denise mercilessly mocks his alias.
    • Captain Fray changes his codename to Dark Dust in the first arc. When he returns as the main antagonist of "The Reversed Tower", he embraces his original designation, acknowledges that "Dark Dust" was an overly edgy name, and blames this poor decision on him having a middle-age crisis.
  • Bad Future: The manga has not one, but TWO, all caused by Jim.
  • Baleful Polymorph: Anyone who enters the House Outside of Time is doomed to transform into a cuckoo bird, though the spell can be broken by living 7 years in the outside world, drinking a glass of water inside the House, or by touching a sufficiently powerful magic user.
  • Big Good: Creuzodete and Future Denise both act as the main forces of good during the "End of the World Saga", since they are some of the few characters who are aware of the Serpent's imminent return and have actually devised plans to counter the creature.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The conclusion to "The Reversed Tower" has Monica being brought back to normal and everyone escaping the Nine Circles alive. However, Smudge is unable to prevent his uncle from becoming Captain Fray, Dr. Stavros is left traumatized by the visions of his sister, and Maggy loses her powers.
  • Bloody Murder: Sangria can transform water into blood, which she can then manipulate at will.
  • Body Horror:
    • When the fake Nick Nope succumbs to the Serpent's influence, a pair of insect legs erupts from his back as he mutates into his combat form.
    • The Horseman of Pestilence can manipulate organic matter, producing grotesque results.
      • He is the host of the Serpent's insects, which crawl under his skin.
      • Though he initially looks like a feeble old man, he shapeshifts into a centipede-like monster. When Sofia tears his body in two, he reorganizes his cells into the shape of a giant cockroach.
      • One of his first actions is to transform the lower half of Monica's body into a slug.
      • To grant himself protection against Penha's dominating sneer, the Horseman removes his own eyes, leaving two lumps of skin where his eye sockets were supposed to be.
  • Breather Episode: Issue #88 is this, a light episode featuring the classic gang's misadventures on Comic Book Experience 2015 (a stand-in for the Comic Con Experience in São Paulo).
  • Brought Down to Normal: Maggy loses her magic powers at the end of "The Reversed Tower", as the possessed Smudge uses his newfound biokinetic abilities to mess with her brain cells and transform her into a regular human.
  • The Cameo: Gregory House as a school doctor. He does look fairly older than Hugh Laurie, but everything else is still there.
  • Call-Back: The Tombanian that impersonated Nick Nope calls its species a group of "shadows from the past", which is a reference to the first arc of the "End of the World Saga".
  • Canon Foreigner: Several minor characters, including the Hot Teacher whom Maggy has a crush on and the weight-conscious Maria Mello.
  • Cerebus Retcon: The "Tomba" aliens, the "flying donkey" and several elements from the classic series (up to and including Captain Fray's origins) are painted here on a much, much darker light.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Pretty much any story written by Emerson de Abreu.
    • The "Flying Donkey" arc introduces us to the biggest horrors in this series' history, Jim stayed dead for most of it, Sunny's Future self comes back to the present timeline to stop Jim from turning the world into a Crapsack World as he did in Future!Sunny's original timeline. By exorcising the spirit of the Flying Donkey, the protagonists may have played Unwitting Pawn to the Children of Umbra that they thought were victims at first but are hinted to have become evil after 20 years in limbo, and if Future!Denise's words at the end of Issue #79 are any indication, it's not over yet.
    • The Reversed Tower arc (#90-92) is this as well, by making Captain Fray an agent of the pestilence which threatens to corrode the world and reshape it to their own notion of order. The gang has to resort to Maggy's innate magic to guide them, but it falls upon Smudge, the closest person to Captain Fray, to save everyone from the growing madness of the titular place - a series of underground levels designed in the fashion of Dante's Inferno by an elite group to assume control over humankind, and upon which an orphanage was built as a front, to which a child Fray was sent after his parents died from a landslide. It turns out that he made a pact with the Serpent, the leader of the insects, to have his life saved in the event, and in return they gave him powers that cause corrosion and decay. Once he reaches adulthood, the Serpent comes to demand he becomes the bearer of the Curse of Pestilence, for if he refuses, it will pass on to the person he loves the most - his nephew, Smudge. And that is how he became the Captain Fray we know.
  • Characterization Marches On: Bucky's first appearance in this spin-off was about his break-up with Isabel because all Isabel wanted to do was go out and party, while Bucky needed to prepare for the inter-school baseball tournament. After that Bucky starts acting like a controlling jealous boyfriend.
  • Continuity Snarl: The Flying Donkey is reimagined as a vindictive practitioner of black magic who has murdered many children, and her status as a benevolent ghost is established to be just a marketing ploy designed to sell toys. However, this contradicts the events of the original comics, in which the children have many positive interactions with the spirit.
  • Cool Teacher: Nutty Ned of all people. He's still a nutjob (don't let him hear you say that, though), but damn if he isn't awesome.
  • The Corruption: The black liquid from planet Tomb transforms whoever comes into contact with it into one of the Serpent's followers. Shub-Sogoth refers to it as the Serpent's blood, a physical manifestation of the pain and suffering of the living.
  • Crossover:
    • Issues #43 and #44 cross the characters over with many Osamu Tezuka characters. Mauricio and Tezuka had been close friends when the latter was alive, and the idea had been in the works for quite some time, even before Tezuka's passing.
    • Like their kids' version, the teens cross over with the Justice League (issues #25 and #26 of Volume 2) However, unlike the stories in the kids' books which are akin to Silver Age stories, this one plays more like a conventional Crisis Crossover, with the Legion of Doom using a "Sisterbox" (a modified Motherbox) to dump the heroes (and Harley Quinn) in the Teen Gang's universe, just as the Gang's own Rogues Gallery starts attacking the city. The second issue takes place in an Alternate Continuity where the Gang and the Justice League coexist, only this time it's Monica and friends who are sent into famous locations from the DC Universe thanks to one of Franklin's teleporters. They end up helping the superheroes fight off a gigantic creature made of ocean garbage, result of a battle between Superman and Captain Fray.
  • Darker and Edgier: Emerson de Abreu's "End of the World Saga" is an outright horror story, with explicit violence, death and references to the occult. As such, even if it still has moments of the author's trademark humour, it's considerably more frightening and depressing than both the original comics and the other issues of the manga.
  • Deal with the Devil:
    • The Flying Donkey sells her soul to the Serpent in exchange for a spell designed to bring her daughter back to life.
    • After the child who would become Captain Fray is trapped under rubble, he agrees to be saved by the Serpent, though he is cursed into becoming the Horseman of Pestilence in return.
  • Demonic Possession:
    • Spokesperson can take over other people's bodies, although his powers have three limitations: he cannot take over more than one person at once; his victims' faces are replaced with his own mask; and he cannot influence those whose magic powers are more advanced than his. By the end of the "Umbra" arc, the first restriction turns out to be a lie, since he successfully places the entire city of Sococó da Ema under his control.
    • The liquid shadows take over whoever makes contact with the substance. At the end of "The Reversed Tower", they forcefully possess Smudge, turning him into Captain Fray's successor. Though Cumulus manages to purify the boy, he too is overwhelmed by the fluid, going mad due to hearing "voices in his head" and flying away screaming in agony.
  • Downer Ending: The "Umbra" arc ends with the gang losing their trust in Jim, especially Monica, who stops talking to him altogether. Also, although the Big Bad is defeated, it's implied that the heroes unleashed something far worse in the process.
  • Easter Egg: In the "End of the World Saga", car plates make direct references to Bible verses that allude to the Apocalypse or are relevant to the current issue's themes. For example, in the "Heirs of the Earth" storyline, which is about aliens plotting to return the Earth to its original lightless state, a vehicle's registration number is shown to be GEN0102, whose corresponding Bible verse states "the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep".
  • Evil Versus Evil: "The Reversed Tower" storyline culminates in a final battle between Cumulus, who is a lecherous, megalomaniacal criminal; and Smudge, who has been corrupted into serving the Serpent.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Out of the four main characters, Monica is the only one who does not become a supervillain in the Bad Future seen in "Shadows from the Future".
    • Jim embraces the curse placed on him by the Flying Donkey and becomes an undead, megalomaniacal tyrant. He converts the male members of the gang into a robotic army and, with Franklin's help, develops a computer virus that puts all electronics under his control as part of his quest for world domination.
    • Smudge becomes Captain Fray's successor, an agent of pestilence who plots to pollute the Earth.
    • Maggy loses her sanity after being overwhelmed by her latent magic powers. Paranoid that the rest of the world intends to exploit her, she isolates herself in a tower and violently attacks anyone who intrudes her domain.
  • Fanservice:
    • In the first issue of his teen spinoff, Chuck Billy spends three gratuitous panels shirtless after jumping into a creek to escape a swarm of bees.
    • Sunny's future self is muscular, has Manly Facial Hair and is a Walking Shirtless Scene for most of his second appearance. All these characteristics are further emphasized by the characters pointing out how attractive he looks compared to his wimpy counterpart from the present.
    • The "Vacation at the Beach" arc contains many moments in which the characters admire each other's bodies. In particular, the very first panel shows Denise from the back while she is wearing a revealing bikini.
    • In "The Portal of Darkness", Sunny has a seizure and starts accidentally scratching and bruising himself. In response, Denise tears Jeremias' shirt apart so she can have something to tie Sunny's arms with, leaving the boy's muscular torso exposed for the rest of the arc. Lampshaded when Jeremias complains that the readers will have to see his chest until the story ends, to which Denise replies that nobody is going to mind.
  • Forgotten Aesop: Many plots have Monica acknowledging the harm in her wanting everything her way and that she is aware she is The Dreaded to her friends, as well as accepting Irene as a friend...but the actual change never shows in-story. She also keeps saying that she matured and isn't a quarrelsome girl anymore...but she still will hit a boy at the slightest thing that angers her.
  • Fusion Dance: The Flying Donkey fuses with her own daughter to become the Horseman of Death.
  • Glamour: The Flying Donkey's bottom half is replaced with a pair of horse legs after she makes a pact with the Serpent. She is able to disguise her true appearance with a simple glamour spell, though Madam Creuzodete is able to immediately see through it.
  • Good All Along: Played with in "Umbra". The seven ghost children are originally stated to be evil spirits that haunt the city of Sococó da Ema. Then it's revealed that this was all a lie, and they were actually trying to protect everyone from the real Big Bad. After the gang succeeds in bringing them back to life, Smudge starts finding flaws in their backstory, causing him to speculate that maybe they really were evil after all. His theory is correct, as the seven children start using their powers to take over the city as soon as the heroes leave.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: The Serpent is a primordial being of pure evil. Its presence is felt in each chapter of the "End of the World Saga", as it preys on the other antagonists' negative emotions:
    • Though not outright stated, Agnes made a pact with the Serpent shortly after her death in order to become one of the Shadow People. This is subtly suggested when Rosie is corrupted into a form similar to Agnes' ghost in "Heirs of the Earth", and confirmed by Emerson Abreu.
    • It exploits the Flying Donkey's grief to teach her how to perform black magic, setting the events of "Umbra" in motion.
    • In "Heirs of the Earth", it manipulates the heroes into destroying planet Tomb, thus setting it free from its prison.
    • It takes advantage of Captain Fray's despair to give him the power to control pollution, leading to the events of "The Reversed Tower".
  • Groin Attack: Denise delivers a flying kick to Future Sunny's crotch when she believes he is flirting with Bia, as a reminder that he is already in a committed relationship. The next few panels show him pressing his groin with an ice bag as he complains that she got too carried away with her jealousy.
  • Hate Sink: Gene grew up from a Spoiled Brat to a Smug Snake Dirty Coward who got an american girl pregnant during his time in the United States and refused to take responsibility for the child when she came to him with the news, tried to get Fran drunk for his own amusement, faked his death to search for a treasure and outright refuses to be a responsible, decent human being and blows off every opportunity and responsiblity his father gives him to serve his own interests.
  • Hazy Feel Turn: In "The Reversed Tower", Penha is considerably nicer to the heroes and actively helps them defeat the Horseman of Pestilence. However, she never stops being a morally repugnant person, and the fact she is one of the Horsemen of Apocalypse herself casts some doubt on whether she is really becoming an ally or only helped the gang for her own personal ends.
  • Heel–Face Door-Slam: The Tombanian who replaces Nick Nope assimilates some of the boy's personality traits and becomes genuinely friendly. However, when he is taken back to his homeworld, he succumbs to the Serpent's influence and tries to kill the heroes once more. Though Franklin begs him to remember his good side, the alien is too far gone and has to be incinerated by Astronaut.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Sofia was originally a declared enemy of Monica's gang. When she returns in "Shadows from the Past", she becomes an ally of the heroes after Maggy and Denise show her kindness for the first time in her life. The fact that her former friend Penha has devolved into an abusive Alpha Bitch also helps.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: Carmem. Alpha Bitch Spoiled Brat by every definition who, in gratitude to Dustine for the grade she got for both of them allowing Carmem to pass the semester, helped her fix her relationship with Smudge through a very elaborate plan. Monica put it best:
    Monica: Carmen. Thanks for what you did for them. Looks like you're not mean or dumb all the time. Just mostly.
    Carmem: (Beat) ...Bite me.
    • Bucky. Of course, it requires a DEEP digging through the crust that is formed by his sexism and massive ego. But despite these bad qualities, this was the guy that was willing to help Irene make friends with the gang and willingly put his relationship with Isabel at risk when she found out the mesasges Irene left him because he didn't want her to get in trouble because of his mistake.
  • Hypocrite: Monica hates when people tell her what to do, yet she's the bossiest character in the series.
  • I Just Want to Have Friends: Irene. All she wants is to be part of the gang, but Monica is an absolute bitch to her all because she is friends with Jim. And the only reason she's always interacting with Jim in the first place, or any boy for that matter, is because Monica won't let anyone else befriend her.
  • In Medias Res: The prelude to "The Portal of Darkness" shows Smudge jumping from a skyscrapper to save Monica. This only happens at the very end of the following issue.
  • Inspector Javert: Monica to Irene. No matter how good intentioned Irene is about anything, Monica will always think the worst of her. All because Jim is the only person that talks to her because Monica won't let anyone else befriend her because she thinks Irene is a temptress, all because her first appearance was asking Jim to help her with english.
  • Informed Attribute: Maggy is often regarded as the sweetest, kindest person there is and the embodiment of Incorruptible Pure Pureness by many people, but anyone who reads the manga will be able to notice that it's definitely not that way, seeing how she became a Stalker with a Crush towards Rubens and continues to crush on him, sometimes in front of her actual boyfriend without thinking of the consequences and thinks it's totally ok to do so despite how much trouble it caused her and how it's going beyond an actual crush, didn't bother telling Smudge on issue #49 why everyone was always busy and avoiding him and very cowardly backed out of the conversation after he saved her life and how quickly she is to point out the boys' flaws but ignore the girls' fault at any given situation, aside from one occasion on Issue #59.
  • It's All About Me: Bucky and Jim are prime examples, but Monica really stands out. To name one instance, when Jim was late to a rehearsal with her for the school play because he was busy with a school project whose deadline was the day afterwards and he needed to hand out a part of his projects at the same day of the rehearsal, Monica says that what he did was thinking only of himself. Because being a good student is absolutely selfish, isn't it?
  • Jerkass:
    • Even in that continuity Jimmy still has his moments. In issue #47, where the gang travels to Japan, Jimmy behaves like a total tool, complaining all the time and voluntarily getting himself lost because he was tired of being told what to do.
    • Although he pales in comparison to Toni. To put in perspective, Jim never plotted to crush Monica's heart for a decade just because he got beaten up by her and made fun of by it. And Toni goes as low as bullying Luca and saying that not bullying him just because he's crippled would be "special treatment" and "prejudice".
    • Denise also sometimes displays an appalling lack of tact, openly making fun of everyone around her.
  • Konami Code: Rosie finds an Incan artifact adorned with gemstones that act as buttons. She fidgets with it, saying she is going to press the stones in an "up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, red stone, yellow stone" pattern, which ends up activating the device.
  • Lighter and Softer:
    • The teen spin-off was originally conceived as a means to combine the franchise's signature comedy with adventures that had higher stakes, typical teen drama, and occasionally some horror elements. However, the second season drops most of these ideas in favour of mundane stories that appeal to a much younger demographic, as exemplified by an issue which focuses entirely on Nick Nope's bad odor. The only exception to this Tone Shift is the "Portal of Darkness" two-parter, a horror story that is about as dark as the first season's "End of the World Saga".
    • In-Universe, the legend of the Flying Donkey was sugarcoated in order to turn it into a profittable brand. She is not a benevolent spirit who guards over children, but an insane old woman who killed several innocents in a ritual designed to bring her daughter Back from the Dead.
  • Magitek: In "The Portal of Darkness", the spirit of light who assists Smudge manifests into the human world through an app in the protagonist's phone.
  • Making a Splash: Cumulus, the human cloud, can manipulate any liquid at will, an ability which he mainly uses to conjure up wicked tempests.
  • Mark of the Beast: The runic letter ior is the symbol of the Serpent and represents the inevitability of evil. Jim is branded with it during the "Umbra" arc, suggesting that the evil entity intends to use him for its own ends at some point in the future.
  • Manchild: Zé Beto and Crispiano are mischievous, immature pranksters, even in their teenage years. Future Sunny annoyedly remarks that they haven't grown at all since the last time he met them.
  • Manipulative Bitch:
    • Penha sends the ghost of Agnes to terrorize Monica, who responds by breaking into the spirit's house. Penha records the protagonist's actions and shows it to Jim, threatening to get Monica arrested for invasion and property damage unless he agrees to date her. Finally, she convinces Sofia to spy on Monica, to ensure that the heroine's heart has been broken.
    • Madam Creuzodete refers to the Lake Girl as the most manipulative and dangerous spirit in the city of Sococó da Ema, since its only goal is to fool someone into setting it free from the afterlife so it can bring about the end of the world.
    • Future Denise approaches the mentally unstable Maggy with the specific purpose of obtaining a spell capable of saving the world, though she comes to sympathize with the latter. Regardless, when the mission is concluded, Maggy feels used and betrayed, developing a deep hatred for her former friend.
  • Master of Illusion: The Ballerina can create incredibly realistic illusions, which she uses to make her foes "dance between madness and sanity".
  • Meaningful Name: Maggy's original name, Magali, contains the word "maga", meaning "witch". She is later revealed to descend from a long lineage of witches and possess incredible powers herself.
  • Mind Virus: According to the Silent, all the robots in Future Jim's army are actually normal men in cybernetic suits. Their consciousnesses are subsumed by a computer virus, which spread through the internet and put all electronics under the tyrant's control.
  • Mood Whiplash: Bathos is frequently employed during the "End of the World Saga" to provide some levity to otherwise serious moments, most often by having Denise blurt out something irrelevant while others are faced with the prospect of imminent danger. In "Heirs of the Earth", the reveal of Rosie's monstrous corrupted form is followed up by Denise geeking out over the villainess' goth-inspired dress.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Chuck is shown shirtless in several panels during the "Heirs of the Earth" arc, be it when he is plowing the field, swimming or changing into a space suit. Denise lampshades his muscled appearance by calling him a "hot bumpkin".
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Jim has a spetacular one in issue #69. He tells Monica that they had nothing special and that he didn't care if she kissed Nick Nope and is seeing him. He does so because he thought it was all a plan Monica crafted to make him crawl back to her and wanted to turn the tables on her because he believed their relationship was set in stone...Only it wasn't a plan. At all. And then the following takes place:
    Maggy: We tried to help you all get together. Tried to do everything to help you. You could have apologized. Could have tried being with her. But you messed everything up. Again. Because are only ''plans'' on that hard head of yours. You thought Monica was acting, faking, and said a lot of stupid things to her. I'm sorry Jim...I really am. But Monica deserves more. Someone that doesn't only think about playing, compete, win. Someone that makes her happy. Someone that-
    Maggy: Jim?
    Jim: I said...I said to Monica...I said that..that I don't care about her...that there's nothing special between us! I...I...I DUMPED MONICA! And now she's with Nick Nope...she is with him for real! It wasn't a plan!
    Maggy: Jim...so...finally, you understand...but it's too late!
    Jim: How could I not notice? How could I be so stupid!? I lost Monica! Forever!

    Tropes N-Z 
  • Naked People Are Funny: Chuck, Zé Beto and Crispiano were raised in the interior region of Brazil, where Skinny Dipping is seen as mundane. Unaware that public nudity is a taboo in the big cities, they inadvertently cause the other characters to feel uncomfortable when they undress to go swimming.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted. Sofia is the name of Monica's childhood bully, who is introduced in "Shadows from the Past", and of a major character in Chuck Billy's "Contagion Zone" arc.
  • Outgambitted: In issue #35, Jim somehow managed to outgambit himself, by creating another persona to attend to a costume party held by 3 rich people (One of them being Carmen's aunt), so he could spend a romantic night with Monica without needing to defeat her first. Naturally this creates a 5th competition for Monica's affections. May double as a case of Love Makes You Dumb. However, said persona is never brought up again.
  • Playing with Fire:
    • Absinthe is a pyrokinetic who has an asteroid for a head. He commonly fights by igniting the planetoid and launching it at his foes.
    • Future Denise specializes in flame spells, which she perfected while working as a fire breather in a carnival.
  • Plot Hole: It's a major plot point in "Shadows from the Past" that spirits cannot be caught on tape. However, in "Umbra", which follows up on the events of said arc, the gang is only able to see the ghosts and other mystical elements by watching them through the lens of a camera.
  • Power Incontinence: Maggy gains access to her ancestors' vast magic powers when she hears the sentence "The Moon cries tonight". However, all this information overwhelms her brain and causes her great agony. Smudge compares Maggy's condition to someone trying to contain an entire ocean within a dropper.
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality: Monica can sometimes act like a self-centered harpy in a way that Bella could never achieve to be, and a bully on top of that, as her treatment of Irene and Sofia shows, and she never accepts anyone disagreeing with her. ever. But she somehow ends up always being in the right, not being called out on any of her bad deeds or getting away with it with nothing but a slap-on-the-wrist.
  • Race Lift: In Emerson Abreu's blog, he comments that he always envisioned Madam Creuzodete as a Black woman, and expresses annoyance that the art crew started depicting her as Caucasian past her first appearance.
  • Red Herring: The Horseman of Pestilence is initially identified as Samir, which is a reference to an obscure, One-Shot Character who only appeared in a 2008 Smudge comic book. This is meant to dissuade the reader from figuring out the villain's true identity: He is a horrifically mutated Captain Fray.
  • Sdrawkcab Name: Wagner Bonilla's "Savert Saga" is about the eponymous evil corporation, whose name is "trevas" ("darkness") written backwards
  • Seers:
    • Madam Creuzodete, the "famous yet obscure" seer the heroes used to visit when they were younger, returns as a major ally in the "End of the World Saga", providing them with cryptic clues that ultimately prove vital in their battles against the Horsemen of Apocalypse.
    • The Violinist is the Umbra Child who can see into the future. The fact he abstains from sharing his knowledge for most of the "Umbra" arc is what makes Smudge realize that the seven ghosts are not as benign as they appear to be.
  • Self-Deprecation:
    • Captain Fray is ashamed of his portrayal in the first story arc and flies into a rage whenever someone brings up that he used to go by Dark Dust.
    • In "Contagion Zone", Chuck takes care of a young girl, who requests him to tell her a bedtime story. He recounts how he saved a horse called Brave in a previous story arc, so she asks him if the horse was given that name due to its personality. After Chuck confirms it, the girl disdainfully groans "Urgh, that's so cliché!", much to his annoyance.
  • Serious Business: Smudge with his hobbies, Monica with the school play that took place on Issue #9.
  • Ship Tease: In "The Reversed Tower", Penha and Sofia begin to ship Jim and Denise after noticing their similar personalities, namely in terms of their ambition and cunning. Later on, the two heroes surprisingly fall for each other and start making out in front of everyone. However, their unusual behaviour is then explained to be due to the Nine Circles' corrupting influence, which amplified the duo's lust. As soon as Jim and Denise leave the Reversed Tower, their passion vanishes, with them awkwardly agreeing to forget what happened and go back to being just friends.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Manga Issue #35 had a lot of them. A costume party with the characters dressed as many famous figures such as: Franklin as Sherlock Holmes, Sunny as Kratos, Todd as Mario, Marina as Dorothy from Oz, Jeremiah as Mace Windu, Tikara as Samurai Jack, Denise as Harley Quinn (a character she has come to be strongly associated with) and many others.
    • There was also a two-issue story that was entirely a shoutout to Death Note.
    • The "Id Monsters" saga is about the main quartet facing their dark side and once they're overcome, they're trapped within cards that gives them powers when activated. Does that sound familiar?
    • There's also an issue which Jim plays Chess with Death. Just like The Seventh Seal.
    • Each of the flying pigs in the "Shadows from the Past" arc borrows design elements from certain Pokémon.
    • The "Shadows From the Future" arc borrows some plot elements from Days of Future Past, since it deals with characters going back in time to prevent a dystopic future where the world has been devastated by a robotic army. One of the chapters even pays homage to said comic, being titled "Nights of Future Past".
    • The aliens from "Heirs of the Earth" identify themselves as "Engineers", are an old species that was worshipped by many ancient human cultures, and aim to destroy all life on Earth with a black fluid that corrupts and mutates whoever comes into contact with it. All these elements are straight references to the main antagonist of Prometheus.
    • "The Haunted Carnival" has homages both to Five Nights at Freddy's, since it takes place in an abandoned facility overrun by violent, defective animatronics; and Pokémon GO, since Sunny and Denise are obsessed with a fictional app called "Bilumon Go".
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: Subverted. When the future versions of Sunny and Denise travel to the current timeline, they are separated in the time stream, with the latter being flung seventeen years into the past. When they finally reunite, Denise confesses that she no longer loves him and ends their relationship, though this is really a lie and she is actually trying to protect him from an undisclosed threat.
  • Time Skip: A good chunk of issue #50 of Monica Teen took place ten years into the future, showing, among other things, Jimmy and Monica's wedding and married life. The Manga itself counts as a whole.
  • Toilet Humour: Denise falls sick after gorging herself with expired candy in "The Haunted Carnival". She spends the majority of the comic loudly farting, which grosses Sunny out.
  • Token Evil Teammate:
    • Jim. His ambition to prove his worth and change the world not only leads to TWO Bad Future timelines as well as an Alternate Universe where he controls the whole street through being a gigantic douche and blackmailing people with their secrets, but it also leads him to be a direct cause of Monica, Smudge and Maggy's deaths in the Flying Donkey arc.
    • Penha accompanies the heroes as they journey through the Nine Circles in "The Reversed Tower" and plays a pivotal role helping them defeat the Horseman of Pestilence. However, she is still an abhorrent person whom the others openly despise, as they make it clear that they still haven't forgiven her for her previous crimes.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Jim grows a backbone and starts to call out Monica on her violent tendencies and bossy attitude.
      • In issues #23 and #24, which have a Whole Plot Reference to Death Note, Jim takes on the identity of "The Great Clown", who can send people into laughing fits by writing their names into his magical "Laughter Note". Smudge says that, since Monica is so hotheaded, she could be a potential target of the Clown. When Monica protests that she doesn't deserve to have a laughing attack, Jim angrily tells her that he's had enough of her constant bad mood.
      Jim: You know what, Monica? Smiling wouldn't kill you! It's a pain in the ass to put up with someone who is always stressed! You may feel comfortable with that big temper of yours... But we're the ones who suffer to put up with your fretfulness!
      • In issue #26, where two brothers who are professional rollerbladers, note  are bullying everyone around their city and acting like colossal pricks, Monica gets fed up with their attitude, challenges them to a rollerblading contest, and forces Maggy, Smudge and Jim to participate alongside her despite none of them knowing how to skate. After she repeatedly berates Jim for his lack of skill and accuses him of not putting enough effort into this training, he retaliates with a "The Reason You Suck" Speech.
      Jim: So you want to know if you can count on me? I NEVER said I knew how to skate! I don't! And still, I'm here! Wearing this stupid outfit! Scraping my hutt on the floor! And all because someone made a rollerblading challenge, when said person doesn't even know how to skate! And still, she got her friends on a stupid contest! Without even asking them! And NOW you wanna know if you can count on me?
    • Captain Fray becomes quite The Chessmaster in the later issues, as his powers have evolved, making him able to cause erosion. It is later revealed that these powers came from a Deal with the Devil in return from being saved from a landslide that demolished his home and killed his parents.
    • Todd, who grew some major cajones not only as he grew up, but as the manga itself progressed. Unlike most of the male cast (save for minor exceptions, such as Nick Nope), Todd takes none of the girls' Double Standard bullcrap, often pointing out that he doesn't take well to Maggy's crush on the science teacher and yet getting fussy when he looks at other girls with the faintest hint of interest. There's also the way he handled his bullying in later issues, with no need whatsoever to get violent, and still coming out on top.
    • Maggy has incredible magical powers as a descendant of the Coven of Hecate, but they needed to be sealed inside her mind due to their highly destructive potential and the eventual toll it would take on her sanity. As such, they can only be triggered through a code phrase, and locked again with another. It is implied that she loses these powers for good at the end of the Reversed Tower arc.
    • Humbert is deaf and mute, which often led others to ignore him when he was a child. In the Bad Future seen in "Shadows from the Future", Jim takes advantage of how silent Humbert is to transform him into a fearsome spy.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass:
    • Monica, who is basically a Brazilian Bella Swan. Up to Eleven in #94, in which the character jumps to disgusting levels of jerkassery, especially in the ending.
    • Bucky became a massive sexist, controlling asshat, even after his break-up with Isabel.
    • Jimmy, whose ambition led him to basically become the Token Evil Teammate. He's starting to mellow out though, especially after he unwittingly nearly causes Monica to become Ret-Gone due to his sorrow over losing her to Nick Nope.
    • In the original comics, Penha was just a snobbish Spoiled Brat; but her teenage self is considerably more dangerous, as she devises a complex plot to get Monica arrested. When that fails, she personally tries to kill the protagonist by running her over with Angelo's sword. Her ruthlessness ultimately transforms her into one of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse, representing War.
    • Zeca in the original comics was just an average city boy who had difficulty adjusting to the rural lifestyle. His teen version is a pretentious show-off who cannot go six months without asking his parents for a new car. His sexist comments drive Denise up the wall, and Monica herself calls him an insufferable person.
  • Uncertain Doom: Cumulus' fate at the end of "The Reversed Tower" is ambiguous. Though he supposedly died after absorbing the liquid shadows and being exposed to sunlight, Rosie went through the same ordeal in a previous arc and survived without any lingering ailments.
  • The Unfair Sex:
    • While Jim was a Jerkass and had problems, both personal and in his relationship with Monica, In #69 he's shown as the only one responsible for their relationship going wrong. It didn't show Monica responsible or commissioned for it at any point, despite that clearly she was equally wrong in many of their arguments over the long run and, if anything, slowly changing for the worse.
    • Bucky was flanderized into a sexist, controlling, bitter ex to make Isabel's empowering Character Development more positive (Compare to his manga debut where they broke up because she wanted to do nothing but party but Bucky wanted to dedicate himself to his baseball career), the following chapters after "Shadows of the Past" treat Jimmy's The Beard with Penha as intentional two-timing when he was actually being blackmailed into going out with her and even Monica seemed to regard that as such at the end of the arc, Maggy thinks it's totally fine to droll over the Hot Teacher in front of her boyfriend but she won't accept people calling her out on it or Todd glancing at another girl with the faintest hint of interest, although Todd at least calls her out on it herself and she's upset... Because he found out and didn't think he had noticed.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: The Tombanians are living shadows and can take on the appearance of whatever they desire. One of them perfectly poses as Nick Nope for two issues, though the species as a whole tend to favour arthropodous forms for most occasions.
  • Voodoo Doll: Wooden Leg is described as a living voodoo doll, since any pain he feels is redirected to his enemies and amplified.
  • Weakened by the Light: The Tombanians are made from solid shadows and instantly combust when exposed to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation. They have taken measures to circumvent this weakness, such as developing suits that shield them from the light, invading Earth only at night, or trying to shroud the planet in clouds of darkness with the aid of the Horseman of Pestilence.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Monica refuses to talk with Sofia and forbids the rest of the gang from befriending her. Maggy eventually gets fed up with Monica's stubborn behaviour, calls her shallow for mistreating the new girl due to a childhood rivalry, and ultimately leaves her friend to sit by Sofia's side in the classroom. Thankfully, this causes Monica to acknowledge she was the villain of the story and prompts her to make an effort to help Sofia feel included.
  • Will They or Won't They?: There is also some argument as to Monica and Jimmy's relationship over this (pretty much since they are the only main characters without any kind of engagement). While, as kids, they never get together due to him not seeing her as more than just a friend (and, in the worst-case scenarios, he deems her too ugly to be date-able — she had made advances on him before), as teenagers, they go one step further, even though he is still too shy to admit it once and for all. So much so, that in one issue, it's Monica who takes it upon herself to have the initiative, by stealing a kiss from Jim. Though he runs away flustered (with her chasing him, "just like the old times"), one can see that deep down he liked it. However, Monica eventually grew tired of Jim's arrogant claims of "having to defeat her to date her"note  and she hitches up with Nick Nope, causing Jim to realize that it was his behavior that pushed Monica away from him.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Zeca has no problem getting into a fight with Denise, as the two are shown repeatedly going at each other's throats due to Unresolved Sexual Tension, their conflicting political opinions, and his sexist remarks.
  • Would Hurt a Child: The Lake Girl died while pulling a malicious prank on the city children. Her mother, blinded by grief, blamed the innocent kids for the accident and sold her soul for a magic spell meant to bring her daughter back to life. To perform it, she drugs seven children, kidnaps them and sacrifices them in a satanic ritual.

Tropes exclusive to the MSP graphic novels

    Tropes A-M 
  • Ambiguous Ending: In "Tina: Respeito", it's unclear whether Jairo faced any comeuppance for sexually harassing 23 women throughout his career. Though Tina succeeds in publishing a report detailing his numerous crimes, and his co-workers are seen glaring at him, he plainly states that he is far too influential to face any repercussions for his actions. Regardless, the novel ends on a hopeful note, with Márcia saying that, in the event that Jairo loses his job, she will gladly re-hire Tina.
  • Anachronic Order: In "Horácio: Mãe", the narrative constantly jumps across three different time periods: the earliest one shows Horácio's mother caring for the protagonist's egg; the main one is about Horácio's quest to reunite with his mom; and the final one takes place in modern times, as a paleontologist discovers a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton in Brazil.
  • The Bus Came Back: Gerson, Smudge's uncle who is oblivious to his nephew's aquaphobia, returns as a main character in "Cascão: Temporal", thus making his first appearance since his sole 1998 story.
  • The Cameo: Don Ramón from El Chavo del ocho makes a surprise appearance at the end of the Bonds graphic novel, where he is seen selling Maggy a churro and tamarind juice.
  • Casting Couch: Jairo threatens to fire Tina if she refuses to go out with him. Distraught, the protagonist considers subjecting herself to the harasser in order to keep her job, though she ultimately decides to fight for her rights.
  • Continuity Nod: Dita's worsening health reminds Chuck Billy of Mariana, his baby sister who died in a 1990 story.
  • Curse Cut Short: Tina reminisces about the conversation she had with Pipa the previous night. When Pipa finds out that the protagonist's co-workers have taken to calling her "Cris" (a nickname which Tina hates), she teasingly threatens to start doing the same. Tina responds by playfully swearing at her friend, though the last line in her flashback is interrupted when her boss snaps her back to reality.
    Tina: Oh, Janaina, go f-
    Márcia: Cris! Are you deaf?
  • Darker and Edgier: The graphic novels aim to please older readers and deal with mature themes that would not be allowed in the regular comic book. "Magnetar" shows Astronaut slowly descending into insanity; "Tina: Respeito" builds its narrative around the topic of sexual harrassment; and "Jeremias: Pele" realistically depicts the racism suffered by Afro-Brazilian children.
  • A Day in the Limelight:
    • In the main comics, Nutty Ned is a strictly secondary character whose relevance is restricted to a couple of Jimmy Five's stories. He is the protagonist of the tenth graphic novel, in which the reader gets to see the world from his point of view for the first time.
    • Jeremias doesn't have much presence in the main comics, with some of his friends Breaking the Fourth Wall by calling him a "filler character". He got his first graphic novel in 2020, preceding the likes of Jimmy, Smudge and Maggy, something that surprised even Mauricio himself.
  • Despair Event Horizon: "Chico Bento: Arvorada" climaxes with Chuck attacking Boitatá, Curupira and Saci with a rake in a desperate attempt to keep them from reaching his dying grandmother. When the three monsters are joined by a werewolf, he loses all hope and screams in anguish as the creatures invade the house. His horror turns into surprise upon realizing that the monsters were there to pay their respects to the old lady.
  • Desperate Plea for Home: In "Magnetar", Astronaut spends months isolated in the orbit of a dying star after his space ship is damaged, and begins suffering from paranoia-induced hallucinations that make him reflect on how much his profession has alienated him from his friends and family. The rescue team manages to reach him before his air supply runs out and informs him that he will be able to return to his mission in no time. Astronaut's reaction is to feebly reply that he wants to go home.
  • Former Teen Rebel: Tina's mother was a rebellious hippie during her teen years. She recalls participating in many movements to advocate for freedom (referencing how the rise of the hippie movement in Brazil coincided with the period of military dictatorship), though many people labeled her as a fool for preaching about love and peace.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Nutty Ned states that his real name is Licurgo Orival Umbelino Cafiaspirino de Oliveira. Take the first letter from each word and you get his original Brazilian name, Louco, which literally means "crazy".
  • Innocently Insensitive: Played with in "Jeremias: Pele". Jeremias' teacher tasks the students to pretend to have a certain job and write an essay on what they do for a living, then assigns a prestigious profession to every child except the Black protagonist, who is told to write a text about being a construction worker. When Jeremias brings this up at the end of the story, the teacher cringes in embarrassment as she realizes the unfortunate implications of her request, but the big twist is that Jeremias has come to the conclusion that his own negative feelings towards low-paying jobs are just as damaging as the racism that is ingrained in our society, and proudly states that he would never be ashamed to be a construction worker.
  • Mind Screw: One of the criteria Mauricio established for a Nutty Ned graphic novel is that the plot embraces surreal elements that enable the character to explore his own nonsensical universe. In "Louco: Fuga", by Rogério Coelho, the narrative follows the titular character as he ventures into a bizarre world to save a bird that represents mankind's creativity. While the premise is a clear criticism of general censorship, all other elements are left up to the reader's interpretation, including whether the adventure indeed happened or was just part of Ned's imagination.
  • The Multiverse: Nutty Ned visits the Imagination World, in which he sees multiple images that represent different artists' interpretations of Monica's gang throughout the years, including Mauricio's newspaper strips, the teen spin-off, and every previous graphic novel. It's implied that each image is a portal to a separate continuity, which Ned can access and explore at will.

    Tropes N-Z 
  • New Friend Envy: Pipa immediately takes a dislike to Katia, mumbling to herself that Tina shouldn't forget who her best friends really are.
  • Origins Episode:
    • "Bidu: Caminhos" details Blu's early life, when he lived as a stray dog before being adopted by Franklin.
    • "Horácio: Mãe" shows Horacio's birth, details how he befriended Tecodonte and finally reveals what happened to his mother.
    • "Penadinho: Vida" is a stealth prequel that shows the beginning of Penadinho and Alminha's relationship, as well as how the gang came to know Lobi.
  • Reincarnation:
    • In "Penadinho: Alma", the protagonist finds out that Alminha is about to be reborn, and decides to spend as much time as possible with her before her time comes. At the end of the book, the stork notices how Alminha doesn't want to be separated from Penadinho yet, and agrees to let her remain as a ghost for a little longer.
    • In "Horácio: Mãe", it's implied that the boy who is shown to be fascinated by the T. rex skeleton is in fact a reincarnated Horácio, who is instinctively drawn to the last remains of the mother he so desperately sought in a previous life.
  • Shout-Out: In "Temporal", Gerson tries to get his nephew Smudge to open up by talking about comic books. He asks the boy whether he likes older comics or "the New 22", a reference to the 2011 DC event that rebooted the company's entire continuity.
  • Token Minority: "Tina: Respeito" introduces Katia, the first openly LGBT character in an MSP publication. After Tina witnesses a fellow co-worker calling Katia "a waste" for not being attracted to men, she laments that some people will do whatever they can to make you feel ashamed of who you are.

Tropes exclusive to Turma da Mônica: Geração 12

  • Age Lift: All of the kids of Lemon Tree Street, including the main four are aged up to twelve-year-olds.
  • Animesque: Even more so than its predecessor, Monica Teen. With it being the flagship series of Manga MSP, there are even more manga aspects to it, including chibified versions of the main cast appearing from time to time.
  • Meaningful Name: The manga series is named after the characters now being twelve years old.
  • Spiritual Sequel: To Monica Teen.

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