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This is only a small portion from the Loads and Loads of Characters present in the series.
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Monica's Gang, also known as Monica and Friends (originally titled Turma da Mônica) is a hugely popular Brazilian comic book series that has been running since the 1960s. It was created by Brazilian cartoonist Mauricio de Souza.

The series has countless comic books, strips and almanacs, and is divided in several branches. The main one features four main 7-year-old kids and takes place in São Paulo:

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The other groups created by Maurício include:

  • Chuck Billy 'n' Folks (Turma do Chico Bento): A Brazilian child hillbilly's life. It includes a true Five Kid Band, with the protagonist, his girlfriend, his smart best friend, his dumb best friend and the Japanese-descendant friend.
  • Horacio's World (Turma do Horácio): A vegetarian T. rex who muses about life. The only character whose stories are all written by Mauricio.
  • Bug-a-Booo (Turma do Penadinho): A ghost and his monster friends. They like to scare people, and most of the times fail miserably.
  • The Cavern Clan (Turma do Piteco): A caveman dealing with his prehistorical life. There are dinosaurs alongside the giant mammals, of course (protagonist Pitheco was even the one who found Horácio's egg).
  • Tina's Pals (Turma da Tina): A teenager and her friends, which include her blue-haired best friend, her chubby best female friend and said friend's boyfriend.
  • The Tribe (Turma do Papa-Capim): A group of Brazilian native-americans.
  • The Funnies (Turma do Astronauta): A Brazilian astronaut's journey through the cosmos. Frequently stumbles by classic sci-fi characters (a story had him sending his ship to be fixed; Kirk and Spock, Darth Vader, E.T. and the crew from Lost in Space are in the mechanic too), and it can be sometimes adventurous, sometimes philosophical (in fact, the first graphic novel of the Graphic MSP seal, which deals with Mauricio's characters as seen by other prominent Brazilian comics artists, stars Bubbly in a study on loneliness).
  • Lionel's Kingdom (Turma da Mata): A group of jungle animals. The English title has the name of the ruler of said jungle (a lion, of course), but the main character is the elephant Thunder (Jotalhão), originally created for the ads of a tomato sauce (which had a realistic elephant on its cans, but eventually changed to Thunder).

A general rundown on the franchise for English speakers can be found here.


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Contains examples of:

    Tropes A-M 
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the Superman comics, Mongul is depicted as a cunning tyrant whose strength rivals or outright surpasses the hero's. Here, he is reduced to a Butt-Monkey: The gang refers to him as a "Darkseid rip-off" whose name is not worth remembering, and he goes down in a single hit when Monica bashes him with her stuffed bunny.
  • All Love Is Unrequited: Tooga towards Pitheco. She wants to marry him, but he doesn't want to date her or anyone else (though some stories do suggest he's being Tsundere).
  • Alpha Bitch: Carmen's most common characterization is of a spoiled, snobbish rich girl who belives herself to be above everyone else.
  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife:
    • Thunder is a green elephant (Jotalhão). Lampshaded in one story when a kid wanted his father to get him a green elephant. When the father let him play with Thunder, the kid was disappointed since he wanted Thunder to ripen.
    • The comic has blue, green and yellow dogs: Blu (Bidu) and Fluff (Floquinho) and Glu (Bugu), respectively. Played for laughs in one comic, where Monica reveals that Franklin dyes Blu's fur... whose natural colour is purple with avocado green stripes.
  • Amicably Divorced: Sunny and Xabeu's parents are divorced, but are very friendly with each other and are constantly seen hanging out together.
  • Anatomy Anomaly:
    • None of the characters who walk around barefoot have toes (e.g. Monica, Smudge, Maggy, Sunny), except for those in Chuck Billy's stories. The ones who wear shoes (e.g. Jimmy Five and Franklin), however, do. Lampshaded in an 80s story where Monica finds out she has no toes and, along with Smudge, decides to complain to Mauricio about it. He manages to convince them by telling them that this is one of the traits that make them unique characters, and then goes back to his sketching board and gets horrified upon trying to draw Monica with toes.
    • Glu is the only dog with no nose and is shaped like an egg.
    • Smudge apparently wears socks all the time. Which creates an inconsistency as Pitheco is another barefoot, toeless character, from a time before textiles were invented, let alone socks.
  • Animated Actors: Most notably the Blu stories co-starring the production manager Manfred. Other times, it happens because the No Fourth Wall nature makes the characters notice what they are playing, the scripts, and talk to the writing crew.
  • Animated Adaptation:
    • As from 2004. There are currently 25 seasons and about 207 episodes. Most of the episodes adapt stories seen in the comics - even the older ones.
    • There are some episodes dubbed in English in this YouTube channel, if you want to check.
    • Before 2004, The first known animated adaptations were a couple of commercials made for Cica between 1969 and 1989, a christmas special made in 1976 and some feature films which were made between 1982 and 1990.note 
  • Apathetic Student: Chuck Billy used to alternate between this and Book Dumb, often to the chagrin of his teacher. And then political correctness changed him into a good student.
  • Art Evolution: The main characters' earlier designs had flatter heads with pointy cheeks. The modern designs have round heads and chubbier bodies.
  • Art Shift:
    • One 2009 story was about Jimmy Five and Smudge swiping supporting character Marina's magic pencil and being transported to various comic book worlds. Much Shouting Out ensues.
    • The plot was revisited the following year. This time, it's Captain Fray who steals Marina's pencil in order to pull off yet another of his worldwide pollution plans, and he drags Smudge (whom he considers his disciple) along for the ride.
  • Artistic License – Paleontology: Naturally it happens with The Cavern Clan. Interestingly this was lampshaded in one story set in the present time, when an Archaeology class finds cave paintings left by Pitheco, basically portraying him failing to hunt and being chased by a giant dinosaur. One of the students refutes that humans and dinosaurs did not live during the same period. His professor simply handwaves it by saying that the drawings contradict such "theory".
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Monica and Chuck Billy started as minor characters. Both are protagonists now.
    • Smudge and Maggy were secondary characters, and in 1982 and 1989, respectively, gained their own series.
    • Denise was used mainly as a prop character, like when the writers needed another girl in the scene without being able to use some. Thus, she changed her looks and behavior with every appearance. This is explained and lampshaded in her breakout story in 1998, in which the "actress" playing Denise calls it quits after getting sick of all the Mind Screwy changes to the character, and the others decide to hold an audition to find a replacement for her. In the end, she returns and, with the character design having now stuck, later appearances give her a more sketched-out character, making her basically a Genki Valley Girl who loves gossiping.
  • Ascended Fanboy: Subverted in a story about Smudge and Jimmy Five going to a convention of Star Wars. Smudge is a dedicated fanboy to the point of being a Geek, while Jimmy is basically the definition of a casual fan and just goes with him to the convention for the ride. And yet Jimmy is the one who ends the story (after getting a picture with George Lucas, a book with cast autographs and Chewbacca’s costume) invited to be in the next Star Wars movie, while Smudge gets... a ticket to the new motion picture. So the actual fanboy doesn't get much (in fact, saying that Smudge was the Butt-Monkey in this particular story is an understatement), but the one who isn't gets everything and more.
  • Author Avatar:
    • Mauricio appears often in the stories, and the rest of the writing staff appears sometimes.
    • He's also a character in-universe, as Marina's dad, along with his wife Alice Takeda. While Monica's father was also based on Mauricio himself, Mr. Sousa is drawn like a young Mauricio (because Monica was created in 1963, when he was 28 years old), while Marina's father looks like the older Mauricio (Marina was created in 1995, when Mauricio was already 60 years old).
    • The parody of The Lord of the Rings has as its antagonist Sousauron, who prior to becoming a Faceless Eye was known as Maurisauron.
  • Back from the Dead:
    • Jimmy Five died in one story when he accidentally fell off a cliff while trying to flee from Monica. The story was about him accompanying Lady MacDeath to Heaven and Hell before she decides where he should go. However, after seeing him trying to protect Monica from the Devil, Lady MacDeath gets emotional and decides that Jimmy deserves one more shot at living.
    • Chuck Billy has died but came back to life at least twice:
      • After getting another bad grade at school, he decided to never study again and came across a man who persuaded him to just ditch school and have fun the way he wants. Later Chuck decided to swim in a dangerous river (kicking away the warning sign, to boot), but the rapids dragged him under and he woke up in Hell, where the man revealed himsself to be the Devil, who just wanted an opportunity to take his soul. Chuck was ultimately saved by an angel, who carried him out of Hell and back to Earth to have a second chance, as God knew that, as a child, he is still prone to making mistakes (the implicit point being that Chuck could never learn from them if he died).
      • Chuck trips while fleeing from Lau, snapping his neck once he hits the ground. When an angel comes to take his soul to Heaven, Chuck's spirit dives back into his own body, which miraculously comes back to life. The teary-eyed angel then muses to himself that the Lord must have been moved by the boy once again.
  • The Bard on Board: Jimmy Five and Monica in the World of Romeo and Juliet
  • Beautiful All Along:
    • Chuck Billy's teacher is very attractive without her glasses and taking down her hair.
    • Smudge's mom as well. One story had several of Smudge's friends falling hard for her because they see her with her hair down and wet (she was coming out of the shower). Smudge himself doesn't recognize her at first. It's played in the most literal sense ever, since as mentioned before, she's only seen as pretty right after a shower: with her usual kerchief, curly hair and overall housewife look she's never quite seen as such, and in that specific story she ends up looking hideous... after styling her hair (badly) and putting on some (bad) make-up.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: A basic description of Monica and Jimmy Five's relationship. Somewhat downplayed in their teen incarnation, when Jimmy - ahem, J - is much less of a Jerkass, but not entirely since both him and Monica are more accepting of their relationship by then.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Maggy is one of the most unambiguously good characters in the comics, but don't mess with her friends.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Nutty Ned, big time, though it’s rare for him to have a moment of this. He usually just annoys people without meaning harm, most likely without even trying, and definitely regards Jimmy at least as some kind of friend. However there is a story where Jimmy manipulates him into stopping Monica from chasing him. Once Ned realizes this, things get ugly for Jimmy, with Ned using his Reality Warper powers to nearly drive Jimmy insane.
  • Big Ball of Violence: Every time someone's fighting, it devolves into this. Even if it's one of the typical Curb Stomp Battles Monica has with the boys - and even if it's only Jimmy getting beat up.
  • Big Brother Instinct: Jimmy has this towards Mary Angela, though he can a bit of a Big Brother Bully on occasion (some stories play it for laughs, but even in those he's never portrayed as being on the right when he acts like this). He never wants to take care of her, said she had a "knee-like" face when she was born (which was sort of understandable, since he was around five years-old), and overall tends to see her as a Annoying Younger Sibling. One story takes it to the extreme by having him taking Mary Angela for a walk... in a dog collar. Despite this, he's never outright mean to her on purpose, several stories show that he can take care of her in a extremely competent manner, and often stops her from accidentally hurting herself (once he actually saved her from nearly being ran by a car while crawling close to the street).
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing:
    • Maggy:
      • Although Maggy likes to picture herself as a Nice Girl, her unpleasant side comes up whenever food is involved. She always takes huge bites out of other people's food, invades her neighbour's houses to raid their fridge, and outright swallows her own snacks to not share with other people.
      • Promotional material consistently describes her as "sweet", though her portrayal in the New '10s is of a snarky, occasionally selfish young girl. In one arc where the four main characters' monthly comics were interconnected, Maggy ends up getting mycosis from a beach trip. In the end, she comes over to her friends and upon hearing their own disastrous tales (Monica ruined her date with the boy she liked, Smudge ran away from home and Jimmy's pet chinchilla died), she immediately starts jumping happily and saying that she feels much better since her friends had it much worse than her. They are less than amused.
      • More than a few stories have put Maggy in Monica's position of power over the block. She outright borders on The Caligula to the point that when Monica seizes back the position, the boys welcome her back with open arms.
    • Denise was also this in her old days, Depending on the Writer, before settling down as the Genki Girl Deadpan Snarker with a taste for gossip we know today. It was even lampshaded by her actress in the story which settled her current personality that whenever they needed the girls' group to have a False Friend, they'd go for Denise.
  • Body Horror: In one 1980 story, Jimmy breaks free from the boundaries of the pages to evade Monica and this causes his lineart to unravel. The other kids manage to rescue Jimmy when he's been reduced to just his head and reassemble him into a stickman for an in-universe cartoonist to add the rest of his details.
  • Bratty Half-Pint: Junior, and how, as demonstrated by the comics where he pesters Jimmy or Maggy.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: In one of the comics, Monica and her friends realize that they don't have visible toes, and go outside of the comic and ask the creator of the series to give them toes. He does so, only to think the result is less than appealing.
  • Breakout Character:
    • Sunny became a popular character at the start of the 21st Century, when stories started to portray him as a kind-hearted Butt-Monkey. Later on, he became much more prominent, with some comics detailing his family life or even having him replace Smudge as Jimmy Five's adventure partner.
    • Denise's popularity exploded after the famous "O Concurso das Denises"note  storyline, in which she finally pointed out how her character had never been properly utilized in previous comics. She became a tritagonist to Monica and Maggy in later stories, and eventually developed into her own independent character, a sassy Deadpan Snarker with a sharp tongue. This culminated in her being upgraded into a member of the main cast in the teen spin-off.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Jimmy and co. know of Monica's strength. They know she has a short fuse. They know they'll get their asses handed to them in platters if they make fun of her. Not that this has ever actually stopped them.
  • Butt-Monkey: If Zeca is in a Chuck Billy 'n' Folks story that takes place in the country, setting up a City Mouse plot, he'll invariably be this with few exceptions. Made quite apparent since Country Mouse stories, which have Chuck in the city, will usually have the latter confused or at worst, annoyed, but hardly ever a Butt-Monkey, whereas poor Zeca is always in for a painful ride despite the fact that he has been in the farm enough times to not have it so bad anymore.
  • Canon Immigrant: Nik, a gamer/vlogger introduced in issue #100 of the Teen imprint, is later brought into the kids' universe in order to have another Afro-descendant kid to play Falcon in their Avengers: Age of Ultron parody (which itself is full of nods to the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole), since Jeremiah was already cast as Nick Furynote  This is even lampshaded in dialogue:
    Black Window (Monica): Hmm... Where do I know you from?
    Falconik (Nik): From some Teen Gang, I guess!
  • Can't Stand Them, Can't Live Without Them: Pretty much what Monica feels about the boys: They get to her nerves at every turn, but she would risk her hide for them anyway.
  • The Casanova: Curly, from Tina's Pals. It usually depends on the writer, though, since he's far from an infallible example: several stories also have him being immediately shot down by the women he hits on despite being sure of his charmer skills. Still, in most comics he has a girlfriend (one had Curly dating three girls at the same time) or succeeds in wooing a girl, even if at the end she breaks up with him for some comedic reason.
  • Cat Up a Tree:
    • One by one, while trying to rescue a cat from a tree, all four main members of Monica's Gang got themselves stuck until the branch they were sitting on gave in and they fell. After that, they left and the cat remained stuck and forgotten.
    • Franklin once scolded his dog for growling at a cat that was up a tree. Then he tried to rescue the cat, only to be scratched by the ungrateful animal. Franklin was now the one growling. The dog smiled at this.
  • Catching Some Z's: Whenever a character is sleeping, a "Z" would appear on a speech bubble.
  • Catchphrase:
    • Whenever Glu sets foot in Blu's stories, he has to shout "Hello, mom!" And say "bye-bye, mom!" whenever Blu literally kicks him out of them.
    • Xabeu says "[Lord] give me strength..." a lot.
    • Jimmy Five has the word "pindarolas" (an old-time interjection which roughly means the same as "Good God" or "Holy mackerel").
  • Characterization Marches On: In his debut, Angel was a Fallen Angel who was banished from Heaven because he was too fond of pulling mean-spirited pranks. In later comics, his character is firmly established as an incorruptible, benevolent protector of the children.
  • The Chew Toy:
    • Sunny, whose "second-banana" status is frequently mentioned, even by other B-list characters. Weaponized in their parody of The Avengers where Sunny was The Incredible Hulk, Hulking Out whenever his B-list status is mocked (that, and cockroaches).
    • Mr. Bill has to get a different job every comic because Monica and her friends just won't leave him alone (unfortunately for Mr. Bill, they happen to be quite fond of him), in a somewhat similar dynamic to Spongebob and Squidward, which has put a lot of strain on his actual mental health (he's actually acquainted with Nutty Ned because they attended the same asylum). Almost no story ends up good for him, although Bill just wants to have a normal job and stay away from the gang so he can live in peace.
  • Child Prodigy: Franklin is very smart for his age.
  • Circling Birdies: Whenever a character is dizzy, attacked or hit on the head, stars (or sometimes spirals or planets too, depending on the story) circle the character's head. On rare occasions, birds will circle their heads.
  • City Mouse: Chuck Billy's cousin Zeca, who often suffers culture clash when visiting the country. Chuck himself serves as a Country Mouse when he goes visiting him.
  • Clingy Jealous Girl:
    • Rosie Lee has her moments to the point where she throws a fit everytime she sees Chuck with another girl, despite Chuck showing that he only has eyes for her. They do have their share of sweet moments, though, and Chuck himself is also capable of displaying jealousy of her.
    • Also Isabel, but since Bucky is a shameless flirt, her case is more justified.
    • Puff, from Tina's Pals, is quite the jealous girlfriend, always assuming her boyfriend Steve is checking other women out and/or on the verge of cheating on her. One story exaggerated this greatly by showing that she somehow engraved his name backwards on his shoe soles so that whenever she feels the need to follow him, she knows they're his footsteps. Unlike Isabel, she's completely off the mark, since Steve truly loves her and her suspicions are proven wrong pretty much every timenote .
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander:
    • Nutty Ned, a psychiatric hospital escapee whose job is making Jimmy Five's life a Big-Lipped Alligator Moment.
    • Due to operating within his own logic (i.e. a complete reversal of common sense), Nick Nope sometimes falls into this.
    • One story has Jimmy get his head stuck in the bathroom sink while trying to wash his hair (or lack thereof). Smudge and Monica try to help him, but only make things worse when he inadvertently slights her, leading her to chase him out of the bathroom by breaking the wall leading out to the street, and completely forgetting about Jimmy, who is left naked and ashamed for everyone to see. It gets worse when the incident makes it to the TV news: even his parents laugh at his misfortune.
  • Covers Always Lie: The cover of the first issue of Cebolinha/Jimmy's solo title showed Captain Fray attacking a hot air balloon Jimmy was in, but Fray didn't appear in the comic. Lampshaded in issue #500 of Jimmy's title, when Fray reads Cebolinha #1 and gets angry when he notices he's depicted only on the cover, then tries to travel back in time to rewrite that story.
  • Crappy Homemade Gift: One comic has the gang making gifts for each other as they play Secret Santa, with disappointing results: Smudge gives Maggie a painting which he made with objects he found in the garbage; Maggie bakes Franklin a pie, but can't resist eating it; and Franklin devises a trap to give Smudge a bath rather than an actual gift. Finally, Monica and Jimmy respectively present each other with a poorly-knitted scarf and an insulting caricature, which leaves the girl in tears.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Jimmy once defeated Monica. How? In one page-long newspaper comic from the nineties, Monica is shown falling off a cliff while running from bees. After painfully crashing through lots of things as she fell, she gets her head stuck on a fence (which has a target on it) and is left unconscious. Near the fence, Smudge tells Jimmy that there's no way his latest plan is going to work.
  • Crossover: With DC Comics, across all the Gang's titles throughout December 2018. No Captain Ersatzes or slight copyright-bending name changes, we're talking the real DC characters here:
    • In Monica, Jimmy accidentally gets a hold of Green Lantern's Power Battery and decides to take advantage of it for his newest infallible plan, by convincing Hal Jordan that Monica is a tyrant out to rule the world; Monica has to resort to asking Wonder Woman for help.
    • In Jimmy Five, Harley Quinn kidnaps Marina for her magic pencil and Monica, Jimmy and Smudge decide to tag along with Batman to save her - all dressed up like different Robins (well, Smudge decides to do Nightwing, but the effect is the same).
    • Smudge ends up paired with none other than Aquaman, who had the Trident of Neptune stolen.
    • Maggy teams up with The Flash to investigate the disappearance of all cats in the neighborhood, orchestrated by none other than Catwoman, who is strangely behaving like she did in the Silver Age.
    • Superman and Wonder Woman, taking a break from the neverending battle, pay a visit to Chuck Billy.
    • Mauricio and the Gang get invited for Superman's birthday at the Fortress of Solitude. Villain-fighting hijinks ensue.
    • In 2019, the Gang had promotional crossover strips with various characters from Cartoon Network, which broadcast Monica's Gang cartoons in Brazil.
    • In 2020, the #DCFandome event had the Gang video getting a video call from the Teen Titans Go!.
  • Dada Comics: While bizarre comics happen every now and then, Nutty Ned runs on this. And since they rely a lot on wordplay, they are usually a nightmare to translate (when they are translatable).
  • Daddy's Girl: Mr. Sousa can be very protective of Monica in any situation her strength can't solve, such as boys making eyes at her.
  • Deadpan Snarker:
    • The four main characters have all played this part, though in comics where the whole gang is together (especially if Monica is the one who's in charge of the adventure), the boys are usually the ones who stand out.
    • As a good portion of the comic's humor comes from characters being this trope, nearly every character who isn't too much of The Ditz or Cloudcuckoolander has been this to some extent.
    • Lady MacDeath is probably the most recognizable Deadpan Snarker of the whole series.
  • Demoted to Extra: Specs was a main character when he was created, but appeared less and less during the years. Also, since the 2015 reboot, all of the characters except the main four ones suffers from this.
  • The Ditz: Maggy's obsession over food often degrades to a one-track mind state. This tends to annoy the others so much that the Star Warp series where she plays C-3PO, has a Running Gag with characters asking "Where do you turn her off?" whenever she goes off on a stupid or food-related rant.
  • Double Standard: One comic had Monica, Denise and Maggy give boys scores (Sunny, Jimmy and Smudge getting low scores and Luca getting the highest one). In the last scene, the boys give the girls their scores, and then they get beat up for it.
  • Did I Just Say That Out Loud?: Smudge seems to have a knack to always say improper things at the wrong time. This is usually what crashes Jimmy's "infallible plans", but he has given himself away many other times.
  • Dinner with the Boss: Maggy's Dad's boss once had dinner with her family and she was told to control herself. Easier said than done. Maggy's Dad was afraid he'd be punished but instead his boss gave him a raise so he'd be able to support her.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Monica and most of her friends (Jimmy Five notwithstanding) walk barefoot, though they wear shoes every now and then.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: The Monica games for the Sega Master System and Sega Genesis are edited Wonder Boy games.
  • Drunk with Power: There was a story where Monica, sick of dealing with Jimmy Five's antics, splits the block in two and gives Jimmy Five half of it. It doesn't take long for Jimmy Five to not only start making increasingly totalitarian demands (the boys could only listen to music HE likes, and he was to be fed ice-cream every day during the summer, and popcorn with tea in the winter, for instance), and to also talk about world domination. It doesn't take long for the boys to defect to Monica's side and Jimmy, left without subjects, relinquishes the power (and gets beaten up as a consequence, as usual).
  • Dub Name Change: Several names were change in the English localization, like changing typical Brazilian names to similar ones in English.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Milena was already featured in institutional pieces and advertisement throughout 2018 before being introduced properly in the comics, early in 2019 - and her little brother even appeared earlier.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Smudge may be a filthy, stinky little kid, but even he has limits for how much dirt he can take, which is why he often finds himself opposite Captain Fray, who is basically the only person in the comic that's filthier than him.
  • Everything Talks: The most notorious aspect of Blu's stories is that every inanimate object is sentient and capable of speech. The most recurring secondary character is a literal rock whom the dog is frequently seen having long talks with.
  • Explosive Breeder: Rabbits are often portrayed as this, as indicated with the massive horde of rabbit siblings from the Lionel's Kingdom stories as well as a Monica Toy short in which Samson and Delilah spawn multiple offspring in a matter of miliseconds.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: Jimmy Five's "infallible plans" to steal Monica's stuffed bunny are always doomed to fail. Even when it seems he has won, a Diabolus ex Machina (usually Smudge accidentally revealing his schemes to Monica) prevents his victory from being permanent.
  • Fake Kill Scare: One story, translated in English as The Icky-Sticky Plan, centers around Jimmy and Smudge pretending to die through Monica's bunny-bashings, "blood" and all. It works almost too well, as Maggy also falls for it and comes up with the idea of having them buried, bringing in Blu to dig in graves for them. After they pretend to have miraculously recovered in order to escape being accidentally Buried Alive, Smudge's mom arrives and reprimands them for wasting ketchup, thus blowing their cover.
  • Flanderization:
    • During the first half of the Turn of the Millennium, the kids were much more hyperactive and have some traits amped up so as to come across as almost negative - for example, having the resident Big Eater flying into a frenzy at the slightest mention of anything food-related, and using Sunny's perceived "lack of notability" to make him the all-around Butt-Monkey (something he was never known for before). Also, they tack in lots of OOC Moments, if only for Rule of Funny.
    • Inverted since The New '10s: the characters are, little by little, losing all of theirs special characteristics and becoming more and more Flat Characters.
  • Flat Character:
    • Xaveco/Sunny's most defining trait is the fact he is the most generic, forgettable member of the entire cast. Ironically, this also makes him very versatile, as his lack of a defined personality gives the writers much more freedom when utilizing him in the stories. As a result, he soon became one of the most recurring secondary characters come the 21st Century and a major Breakout Character whose popularity almost eclipses that of the protagonists.
    • Jeremias occasionally gets some exposure in stories that focus on his African descent, but is otherwise the least developed member of the cast. This is lampshaded in a Christmas special, when Franklin mistakes him for Nimbus and asks him to perform a magic trick. After Jeremias clears out the confusion, Franklin angrily tells him that "as a character, he is even more worthless than Sunny".
  • Flower-Pot Drop: Monica once accidentally dropped one from an apartment window and hurried down. She couldn't use the stairs because they were being washed back then so she had to wait for an elevator. Despite this, she managed to arrive on time to be hit.
  • Forgets to Eat: Used to be one of Junior's defining characteristics (though he was intentionally neglectful), just so he could act as a foil to Maggy. While he has not lost this one, his role in the stories has shifted deep into Bratty Half-Pint.
  • Free-Range Children: Zigzagged. In most stories the children are wandering around their neighborhood (and we never get to see just how big it is; there have been attempts, but the scale fluctuates from story to story), but several stories show that they all have a limit imposed by their parents of how far they can go by themselves (and it's strange how children that visited other planets and dimensions have limits at all).
  • Freudian Slip: Blu and some of his fellow dogs meet a dog who likes to make dog-based puns. They first suspect that the character making the jokes isn't a real dog when he starts a phrase with "You, dogs...". After being called out on that, he tries to restart the phrase with "We, dogs..." but it's too late. They remove his dog mask and find out he's a cat.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: While it's downplayed since they don't always hang with him, most of the gang considers Junior to be a huge pain in the butt. Even Maggy, his own cousin, thinks he's a Bratty Half-Pint (and doesn't shy from saying it to his face), though she's still more willing to play with him than the rest of the kids. In several stories they just play with him because their own parents (particularly their mothers) think Junior is adorable and shouldn't be ignored just for being younger. When Monica's mom once made a comment of the sort, Monica replied that Junior is as cute as he is annoying. The only kid who enjoys Junior's company is Milena's little brother Binho, and even that's because they're in the same age range.
  • The Friends Who Never Hang: Maggy and the boys is a downplayed example. They do interact in the adventures where the four main characters share the spotlight, and she has had stories with them (though usually with either Jimmy or Smudge, less so with both of them at once), but the number of those is quite overshadowed by the number of stories Monica shares with them. It's sort of justified in that Monica just has more reasons to hang out with them, being more of a Tomboy than Maggy, and often target of their provocations, not to mention of course her relationship with Jimmy, which guarantees that they'll have some stories as a duo (however Monica does have plenty of stories with just Smudge too; one almanac had three stories of just Monica and Smudge together). If Maggy's in a story with just one more character and that character is male, it's probably Junior or even Franklin. Or Vanilla.
  • Funny Background Event: In the Justice League of America crossover:
    • Xaveco makes occasional cameos in the background of all comics, pretending to be one of DC's various superheroes and accidentally injuring himself in the process.
    • A panel that depicts Superman duking it out with Doomsday has Lady Death standing in the background, impatiently waiting for the two to kill each other, as a reference to their long struggle in The Death of Superman.
  • Gender Bender: One comic about Monica's birthday has her and her friends turning into the opposite gender.
  • Gender-Equal Ensemble: Two boys (Jimmy Five and Smudge) and two girls (Monica and Maggy)
  • Generation Xerox: One story shows Mr. Five telling Jimmy about a plump, bossy girl from his childhood memories who walked around with a doll in which he loved to make knots in its arms and legs solely to piss the owner off. The girl used to retaliate by running after and hitting him with the doll, and Mr. Five remembers how despite the danger element, he just couldn't stop messing with her, and they were always together as a result while time passed... Jimmy is astounded by the obvious similarity between his father's childhood and his own, and asks what became of that girl. The living room's door is suddenly opened by Mrs. Five coming back from the supermarket, and Mr. Five answers Jimmy with a fond smile "Speak of the devil...". Jimmy doesn't take it too well at the end of the story, but knowing he and Monica are the Official Couple, Generation Xerox was still on point.
  • Green Aesop:
    • A considerable amount of Chuck Billy's comics are all about that. Deforestation, pollution, "how living in a city turns you into a sedentary paranoid" - if his cousin is involved in the comic there is a 99% chance that the story will be about that -, or how the "bad men" will hunt innocent animals for money. He has been turned into several kinds of animals and even engaged into conversation with a waterfall and the Sun himself.
    • Parodied in one of Jimmy Five's stories, when the title character says "Wait, do you think I like to live in nature, green and stuff? Who the heck do you think I am? Chuck Billy?"
    • Though it should be noted that environmental protection is a rather huge deal in Brazil (giving that most part of the Amazon rainforest is contained there and the country is known for having a varied and often threatened biodiversity), especially when it comes to teaching it to children. Chuck Billy and the Tribe just take more of the teaching part because they live close or right in nature itself.
    • Most of Tom-Tom's comics are also like this, with emphasis on pollution. That, or how teamwork is important.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Despite being Maggy's best friend, Monica is deathly envious of her singing talents. When Maggy was a child and briefly famous singing, Monica hated it and only reconsidered their friendship because her mom pointed that out. Up to Eleven in the manga, when she nearly destroyed Maggy's short stint on a Girl Group.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Again, Monica. If she understands something as an insult to her height/weight/teeth (even if by mistake), everyone around will get beaten up.
  • Hairy Hammerspace: Fluff, Jimmy's dog. It's not uncommon for people to hide there (an entire police troop once got lost in his fur trying to catch a robber who hid in there), or plenty of things to be found in his fur.
  • Handsome Lech: Bucky, at least when his girlfriend is out of sight.
  • Hate Sink: Penha The Feared, the unpleasant and stuck-up girl from the other street (the fake French accent is a bonus).
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: A particularly touching story about friendship uses Jimmy and Smudge's relationship as a Framing Device, showing that theirs is a friendship that will go on with the years, even with the bumps along the way.
  • Homemade Inventions: A lot of what Franklin invents is like this.
  • Hypocritical Humor: One of the occasional plot devices, especially in short stories.
    • Of note, any stories where we can see Vanilla's point of view.
    • Also of note is Jimmy Five calling Monica short and fat, when you consider he's just the same height and rather tubby himself (not exactly fat, but he and Monica have a very similar body shape).
    • A story has Monica being harassed by Junior (who is the shortest of the gang), a one-shot boy who is very visibly obese, and Bucky (whose buckteeth are pretty much the same as Monica's). Instead of getting angry, Monica just laughs and takes the time to point out the hypocrisy. In the end, they change their tones to call her tall, skinny and toothless.
  • Idea Bulb: It is common for a lightbulb to appear over the character's head when they have an idea, most prominently whenever Jimmy is shown coming up with a plan to steal Monica's stuffed bunny.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Monica uses a blue stuffed rabbit to beat up the boys who annoy her, and just about every bad guy that shows up.
  • Informed Poverty: Some stories suggest that Smudge is a tad poorer than his friends, despite his house not being different from the others'. Justified in that we usually see it from his point of view and that this trope shows up almost always in the context of him wanting new toys (instead of the ones he fabricates himself), which is understandable; children will usually feel that others get more gifts than they do. It's also been pointed out that his father does in fact receive a smaller income than the other parents of the comic, but not so little that will have an influence in the family's household.
  • Informed Species: While Fluff does pass as a green lhasa apso, Blu's status as a schnauzer is not so clear. And then there's Glu, a dog that's yellow and shaped like an egg.
  • Insistent Terminology: Nutty Ned will always complain about any synonym of insanity he's given, persisting it's "Nutty".
  • Insufferable Genius: Franklin believes himself to be the smartest kid on the neighbourhood. Though he is abnormally intelligent for his age, all of his inventions go wrong.
  • Internal Homage: The comic books that marked the franchise's 50th anniversary had updated covers of the first issues.
  • Invincible Hero: Monica's Super Strength is often employed as a Deus ex Machina to defeat whichever villain the gang is currently facing. In the Batman Forever parody, she plays the role of Chase Meridian and is kidnapped by The Riddler (portrayed by Franklin). After being taunted enough, she single-handedly breaks out and beats up everyone in the room.
  • Laughably Evil: Captain Fray, over the years, has become progressively more comical and over-the-top, usually even engaging in small-talk with the kids. This doesn't necessarily equate to Diminishing Villain Threat, however, because his powers over dirt are regarded seriously and he has had some really nefarious plans.
  • Legacy Character: A story acknowledges the fact that Denise's appearance is inconsistent by saying she's just a character played by various animated actresses.
  • Lethal Chef: Zigzagged with Monica. Some stories have her cooking bizarre meals such as okra flan and chicken foot stroganoff, which prove to be so revolting even Maggy refuses to eat them. Other comics present her as a somewhat decent cook, to the point she convinces the boys to accept her on their club by bribing them with her homemade cookies.
  • Limited Wardrobe: Monica's wardrobe is shown to have nothing but red dresses just like the one she usually wears. She's usually pretty comfortable with this situation, though.
  • Live-Action Adaptation: Mostly at the theater, plus two films (one made for TV, one direct to video), all with adults wearing masks. An adaptation of a graphic novel spin-off, Laços (translation: Bonds), this time with actual children, and featuring Rodrigo Santoro as Louco/Nutty Ned, was made and premiered in June 2019. It has a trailer.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: The fact that Monica's Gang refers to both The 'Verse and the "core" characters shows it's an ample amount. While reprinting the first issues of the "core 5 comics" (the four main Monica's Gang characters and Chuck Billy), they ran for 50 issues, each having a different character in the cover (#50 was Monica's dad, which also serves as an Author Avatar to Mauricio).
  • Long Pants: You see someone wearing social pants and shoes, they're like this. Except in the rare case that the pants and shoes are different colors, or they're drawn in promo artwork (i.e. not within a story). This dates back from Mauricio's old strips, out of a need to simplify the design. It also seems to be the reason for the toeless barefoot characters (Monica wore shoes in her first appearance, but more bits of them were erased at each strip as he had less and less time to get them ready - he worked alone at the time - , until she became barefoot and toeless).
  • Long Runner: Along with the comic itself, which has been running since the late 50s (in magazine form, since the 1970s), the animations have had basically the same voice actors since the 1980s.
  • Love Makes You Dumb: Or, in a variation, extremely incompetent. Franklin finds out in one comic this is the reason most of his inventions didn't work as planned; his crush on Marina made it hard for him to concentrate. Upon hearing this, Smudge suggests that Jimmy might be in love too, and that's why his plans never work. Jimmy vehemently denies, but in the next (and final) panel he's dreamily thinking about Monica, with hearts drawn around her in the thought bubble.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Captain Fray is Smudge's uncle who either went crazy or got transformed by the dust of his comic collection, but few people remember or care about that. In a Star Wars parody, Fray (as "Dork Frayder") says "I am your father's brother!" to Smudge Skywalker and throws his debut comic (Mônica Vol.1 #31, published in 1972) as proof. Years later Smudge seems to have forgotten about it, as Marina shows him that same comic and he gets shocked, quoting Darth Vader once again.
    This is a bombastic revelation! The readers must be shocked! "Smudge... I... am... your... uncle!"
  • May the Farce Be with You: The original Star Wars trilogy is parodied in the comics Coelhada nas Estrelas/Star Warp, and the sequels O Feio Contra-Ataca and O Retorno de Jedito. And then the prequel series, with A Trapaça Fantasma, Sotaque dos Clones and A Vingança dos Psithos (which is focused on Smudge!Luke's uncle instead of father).
  • Meat-O-Vision: One story follows Maggy as she tries and fails to find something to eat. At the end, she sees the world as a giant watermelon and dives mouth-first into it, leaving only a patch of land. Towards the end, cut to the studio, and Mauricio orders the story to be rewritten.
  • Meal Ticket: Subverted with Maggy and Toddy. One story showed that she really wasn't dating him only because he was the bakery owner's son and constantly gave her free bread and sweets. It ends with Maggy willingly choosing Toddy over a big basket of bread, which for her is a huge deal.
  • Medium Awareness: The characters are fully aware that they live in a comic book and will often break the fourth wall to lampshade it, sometimes jumping across panels to get to different destinations.
  • Monster Mash: Bug-a-Boo's gang are parodies of monsters from classic horror movies.
  • More Hypnotizable Than He Thinks:
    • Chuck's cousin buys a hypnosis book and Chuck refuses to believe it works. Trying to prove otherwise, Chuck's cousin decides to hypnotize him into believing he's a dog. At first, it seems it doesn't work but then it's revealed the hypnosis doesn't have immediate effects.
    • Done again when Denise hypnotizes Monica into thinking she's a bridge-guarding troll. It has the same delayed effect because Denise used a method to hypnotize dogs. Let that one sink for a moment.
  • The Movie:1980's "As Aventuras da Turma da Mônica" ("The Adventures of Monica's Gang", the first movie ever releasednote  and the movie where the scene with the mice came from) and 1983's "A Princesa e o Robô" ("The Princess and the Robot"), as well as the more recent Cinegibi (literally "Comic Book Movie", and we mean literallynote ) series (currently with nine titles, most of them direct-to-DVD), and one about Time Travel that got released in theaters are noteworthy mentions. Before that, there's been quite a number of direct-to-video releases containing a series of stories, such as 1988's "A Estrelinha Mágica" ("The Magic Little Star").
  • Mugging the Monster: In some occasions, some people who don't know Monica's Super Strength (usually criminals or bullies from another neighborhood) find out the hard way why it's a big mistake to threaten her or her friends, or simply insult her.

    Tropes N-Z 
  • Narrating the Obvious: A Nimbus story follows the young boy as he repeatedly hypnotizes his friends as part of his magic show. Each performance is accompanied by the narrator explaining that "Nimbus performs a hypnotic gesture!". The obviousness of this statement is lampshaded at the end of the comic, when the sentence is replaced with "Nimbus... oh, you know the rest!".
  • Negative Continuity: Characters from Bug-a-boo's gang are given different backstories every now and then to explore different scenarios that led to them becoming monsters.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Some situations escalate because of one character's good intentions. One good example is a 1994 story in which Monica "borrows" Angel's halo and puts it on Jimmy Five to see if he will stop messing with her. While it does give him Incorruptible Pure Pureness, it also leaves Angel open to being brainwashed into evil by a devil.
  • No Challenge Equals No Satisfaction:
    • The boys suffer from this when it comes to stealing Samson. One time a friend of Monica's actually gave it to them since Monica had just bought a doll, and despite rejoicing at first, they got tired pretty quickly, until Monica found out. They like stealing Samson specifically to get Monica angry, so just getting it too easily and without her knowing won't do.
    • It's quite similar to what happens between Chuck Billy and his friends and Mr. Lau. According to them, the guavas just don't taste the same if Lau isn't running after them yelling and cursing. In one story in the 80s, Chuck decided to plant his own guava tree, but once it started bearing fruit, he didn't like the taste, for this specific reason.
  • No Fourth Wall: Characters frequently mention panels, the writing staff, the reader, and lampshade facts such as the barefoot characters not having toes.
    • One amusing 3 letter panel had Jimmy and Smudge running away from Monica only for Jimmy to smile and suddenly stop after seeing the "End" graphic at the corner... of the second panel. The third panel shows a beat up Jimmy berating whoever made that mistake.
    • One Chuck Billy story had him racing Zeke in many occasions, with Zeke always failing to beat Chuck. Then, at the last page, Zeke proposes to see who could get to the end of the story faster. After Chuck zips out of the panel, Zeke simply pulls a pencil out from his pocket and writes "END" at the corner of the frame he's in. Only half a page later, Chuck is still running, and looks up and sees how Zeke managed to fool him.
    • A 1990s Smudge story which parodies the Sinbad the Sailor stories, much to his disgust (since he has to, you see, sail the seas of water), ends with him cutting off the narrator just as he starts going on about Smudge's next adventure (which would be Sinbad's third travel) and writting "End" at the bottom of the panel (with only one extra panel for denouement).
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up:
    • The main cast is always six, nevermind the fact the series has been running for over 40 years. Every year there's a special edition featuring one of the main characters' 7th birthday. However, they always return to being six years old again. This is lampshaded when someone asks Jimmy how old he's turning. "Seven," he replies, "just like evewy other year."
    • In one of the late-2009 issues, it is implied that all of the birthday stories are actually about THE ONE AND ONLY BIRTHDAY PARTY they will ever experience - the 7th birthday party. This means, for example, that every Jimmy's birthday-themed story reveals one of the events that happened in his 7th birthday party. Again, the main character of this story is... Jimmy Five.
    • Notoriously averted with the Spinoff Teens manga, which was first released in 2008. "They grew up!" even became the franchise's tagline for the first few issues.
    • The Sliding Timescale is alluded to in a special issue released by the time of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, in which Maggy's mother was stated to be pregnant of her in 2002, while Monica and Jimmy appear as babies in 2006 (complete with rewriting the infamous Zidane headbutt into one of her first bunny-bashings gone wrong: she tried to hit Jimmy, but the bunny slipped off her hand all the way to Berlin) which, considering they're all about the same age, would be quite inaccurate (they'd have to be three to four years old by the latter point).
    • It's referenced again in a story involving a Creepy Doll made in 2010, where Maggy recounts its first appearance. She begins with "It all started in March 2001..." only for Jimmy to stop her and point out that, if Maggy is seven years old, she shouldn't even be born yet by that time.
  • Not Me This Time: Occasionally, it's really not Jimmy who stole Samson. Many one-page/short stories will have Smudge as being the culprit just for the sake of a quick subversion (since Monica will always go for Jimmy first), but sometimes it's not the main boys at all.
    • In one comic, not only Samson but all the girls' dolls are stolen, and Monica, who had listened to Jimmy talking to Sunny about how "the plan will work, and we're finishing her this time" earlier that day, immediately blames him. One could forgive her for the misunderstanding, but she beats him up before even asking any questions, which prompts a battered Jimmy to explain that he was talking about a football coach's plan to defeat another team (which in Portuguese has a female pronoun). Monica doesn't even believe it till Sunny vouches for him and says he's been with Jimmy all day. An embarrassed Monica and the girls quickly say sorry and leave, while Sunny remarks to Jimmy that he has grown a rather unfortunate fame for himself.
    • Another story had this done quite creatively: Monica finds Samson missing and goes to interrogate the boys, one by one, only to find they all have perfectly reasonable alibis. She then has a flash and notices the artists had used Samson to stylize the title of the story, so she goes back and picks it up.
    Monica: These artists have some ideas!
  • Off to See the Wizard: Made in graphic novel format, although it's not so much a parody as it is a retelling with the Monica's Gang flavor, complete with the musical numbers and all other tropes the format entails.
  • The One Who Wears Shoes: Jimmy Five is the only one among the four main characters. Shoes are much more frequent with background characters, with only Sunny and Hummer consistently appearing barefoot.
  • Only Six Faces:
    • Lampshaded. The series often jokes about this with characters commenting about "how they can't tell each other apart when they're bald because everyone looks alike". Most of the child characters have the same facial features (the only tell-tale difference being nose shapes aside from other facial nuances - like the dirt strokes on Smudge's cheeks) and the differences between their body types are subtle.
    • This was even lampshaded by Sunny in one story: "That's the good thing on Mauricio's characters all having the same face... No one can tell them apart!" (as Jimmy was wearing a bushy blonde wig to look like Sunny, who wanted to sneak out of his room despite being bedridden)
  • Orwellian Retcon: Whenever an older story is republished showing wall scribbles, a pasted-on paper is added around the scribble.
    • Several stories are modified in some form on more recent republishings, with such modification as removing firearms (even toy guns - one instance had Junior appparently shooting water from his finger, and another infamous one had a mobster's tommy gun replaced with a lobster), changing dialogue to replace objectionable terms and mild cursing with softer synonyms (such as "azar" - bad luck - and "droga" - darn it), removing physical punishment from the kids' parents, even if implied (slippers and belts are removed altogether when a parent threatens the child with them), and rewriting Jimmy's thought bubbles so they don't contain the misspellings of when he talks. Also, some dialogue in Chuck Billy's stories is also rewritten to keep the accent consistent.
  • Parental Bonus: Stories of both Jimmy Five and Chuck Billy have them enter their parents' bedroom and acting as a Moment Killer, and thus the folks do their best to drive the children away.
  • Parental Hypocrisy: In one story, Chuck Billy and Rosie try to secretly meet after dinner and her father caught them. When Rosie's Mom says it sounds like someone she knows, Rosie's Dad says it's different because his secret signal sounded like a bird other than the one chosen by Chuck.
  • Parody Names: Celebrity or licensed character/series often make cameos in the strips, but their names are slightly changed to something that creates a pun and is close enough to the original to avoid copyright infringement. Examples include: Pokemão instead of Pokemon, Darti Vesgo instead of Darth Vader, Superomão instead of Superman, Ton Cruzes instead of Tom Cruise... However, the jokes make more sense and are funnier in Portuguese. This, invariably, sometimes ends up leading to Bland-Name Product and Lawyer-Friendly Cameo.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Monica was always looking angry in the '60s strips.
  • Pintsized Powerhouse: The first few comics justified the boys feeling pain when struck by Monica's stuffed bunny by revealing she had hidden a brick inside the toy, but later stories retconned this by giving the five-year old girl super-strength. Some of her feats include punching down walls and lifting trucks with minimal effort.
  • Postmodernism: The lack of Fourth Wall leads to this. The original Marina story had the real Marina (Maurício's homonymous daughter) invading the comic, only for dad to reveal at the end of the story that he created a character based on her.note 
  • Power Trio:
    • For the girls: Monica, Maggy, and either Marina or Denise (with Marina as the third member, they even formed their own Lovely Angels team in a few stories).
    • For the boys: Jimmy Five, Smudge, and usually Sunny.
  • Prehensile Hair: Jimmy Five's pointy hair injures people, pops balloons/balls, and at least once became a Helicopter Hair.
  • Progressively Prettier: Whenever we'd see Monica and Maggy as teenagers, the earlier comics tend to make them stretched out versions of their regular selves. Later comics tend to make them much more feminine and traditionally attractive in appearance, and much less cartoonish. Jovem tends to split the difference, with its manga style.
  • Redemption Rejection: When Maggy, along with Denise, tries to change Agnes' ways. Since her parents are two phantoms who keep her paranoid and maintaining animals imprisioned, Agnes rejects Maggy's words and sides with her cruel Abusive Parents, who keep saying they only want the best for her.
  • Reality Warper: Marina's magic pencil allows its wielder to bring whatever they draw to life, as well as create doors to alternate universes.
  • Recursive Canon: The Gang's comics exist in-universe as well as out. No one really comments on this.
  • Reed Richards Is Useless:
    • Some of Franklin’s inventions could literally change history. He has been able to create functioning time machines, multitask robots, size shifting potions and several, several others. Justified since Status Quo Is God, naturally, and also most of his creations are infamously far from flawless (though, of course, just the fact that he's able to make something close to the real thing would be world-changing).
    • One story came close to subvert this trope. Franklin managed to build a machine at Maggy’s request that could multiply food, and came to realize that, since with one sandwich he could make thousands, he had ended world hunger. Cue some merchants understandably pissed, since now they were probably going bankrupt, suggesting Reality Ensues. Before Franklin can figure out a solution, the rest of the gang finds out that the machine’s food copies have actually no nutritional value, not satisfying hunger whatsoever.
    • Another from Franklin involves a time machine, which he worries about falling in the wrong hands in a conversation with Smudge. As soon as he says this, a lot of people show up trying to use their machine for their own purposes (even, hilariously enough, an ice cream man who wants to use it to Take Over the World). Franklin's solution to this is to travel back in time to keep them from taking the machine, thus creating a Stable Time Loop, which is even acknowledged by the final caption:
      The end? Nope! Go back to the beginning and read the story again!
  • Retcon:
    • Originally, Monica was Spec's sister.
    • Chuck Billy's dog, Fido, died in a story written in The '80s, only to be resurrected some years later, with no explanation given.
    • In one story, Fluff is said not to be a lhasa apso, but a puli.
  • Roger Rabbit Effect: Some of their films have the animated characters interacting with real performers, including Mauricio de Sousa in their cinematic debut; and singer Tetê Espíndola in "A Sereia do Rio"note .
  • Rolling Pin of Doom: There was a Romeo and Juliet parody featuring Jimmy Five as Romeo and Monica as Juliet. Friar Smudge told Romeo Jimmy the marriage would be so Monicapulet would stop hitting them with that bunny. Jimmy was interested until Smudge showed a rolling pin and told Jimmy that's what wives hit their husbands with.
  • Room 101: The prospect of getting wet is this for Smudge.
  • Satellite Love Interest:
    • Dustine has no personality other than being Smudge's girlfriend.
    • Deconstructed with Isabel, Bucky's girlfriend. Though she used to be mostly defined by her love for her boyfriend, she grows out of it once the two break up in the teen spin-off.
  • Self-Deprecation: Comic book writers are a common butt of jokes in the stories. If a character is particularly unlucky, it can double as Rage Against the Author.
  • Serious Business: Stealing Monica's stuffed rabbit is no joking matter for a lot of the boys in the block (mostly Jimmy Five and Smudge). The plans to try and steal it away from her have included time traveling.
  • Shades of Conflict: Slice of Life comics are usually Grey-and-Gray Morality (the reader can sympathize with Jimmy because Monica's so bossy, for instance), as are those with a Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain added. Harsher bad guys earn Black-and-White Morality.
  • Ship Tease: Tina and Curly have had several subtle moments of this, but since both are often dating other people, Status Quo Is God usually stops them for going any further than being just good friends. One comic had Tina hearing from a clairvoyance that she'd soon meet the man of her life. On the same day she crashes into her father in a street corner, and when he jokes that he is the man of her life, Tina shakes off the clairvoyance's prediction by thinking it's not real. The story then cuts to nighttime, when Curly arrives at the same spot because a fortune-teller told him he'd meet the woman of his life there, but since there's no one he mutters that he probably missed her...
  • Shout-Out:
  • Silence Is Golden: Some stories in each book are completely silent, and rely solely on visual gags as a source of humour.
  • Sinister Suffocation: A 1994 comic follows Astronaut as his suit is invaded by an oxygen-eating alien, who is implied to have committed genocide on a global scale after consuming its home world's atmosphere and causing all other life forms to suffocate. Despite only appearing in this one storyline, the alien is portrayed as a thoroughly sinister villain that poses a serious threat to Earth, sharply contrasting the franchise's other antagonists, who are Laughably Evil at worst.
  • Slapstick Knows No Gender: Nor does it know social boundaries, as Luca (who is wheelchair-bound, need we remind you) has been on the receiving end of Monica's needy abuse at least once.
  • Soft Reboot: Even if the Panini comics would become more and more Continuity Porn, down to counting the output of all three publishers to celebrate 500th or 600th overall issues of a character, in 2015, just after the 100th issue of the core comics, the numbering was reverted back to #1.
  • Speak of the Devil:
    • Sometimes, whenever a Mauricio character mention death or the verb "die", Lady MacDeath (a female and comedic Grim Reaper from Bug-a-boo's stories) appears.
    • Also Nutty Ned: whenever someone speaks of being "nutty", "nuts" or something along these lines (e.g. "who would be nutty enough to do X?", where X may be something like testing out one of Franklin's inventions), he shows up.
  • The Speechless: Hummer only speaks in "hmmmm".
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: At first the protagonist was Jimmy Five. Once he stumbled upon a girl who hit him, and she later turned into the main character. (probably due to being the first female one, and based on the creator's daughter, no less)
  • String-on-Finger Reminder: Used in a short Chuck Billy story. It starts with Chuck failing to remember why he tied a string around his finger in the first place, spending the whole day asking people if they had anything to do with it. He finally remembers what he had to do during bedtime, which was to save his best friend, who was in a Literal Cliffhanger the entire time.
  • Super Strength:
    • Monica, sometimes to hilarious extents (in one single-page comic she literally blew the world away from her with a sneeze). Maybe that's why the bunny bashings hurt so much.
    • In the early issues, it was revealed that she used to keep a brick inside Samson. Nowadays she really possesses super-human strength, and her mother revealed that some of her family members also have the power.
  • Standard Hero Reward: Subverted in one old episode, in which Monica portrays a princess that is kidnapped by an ogre and eventually rescued by Jimmy Five. When Monica's father as the king tells Jimmy he'll be rewarded for saving her, Jimmy already imagines himself being forced to marry Monica, only to find out his reward is actually a bejewelled sword.
  • Sticky Situation: The 154th issue of Globo's run of the Monica comic had a story titled "Chiclete, NÃO!", which had Monica get stuck when she sits on a bench where gum was left on the seat. Her attempts to free herself result in slipping out of her panties, which remain stuck to the bench. She tries to pull her panties from the bench, only to humiliate herself further when other people see her bare bottom and the panties are ultimately torn. After rushing home to get a new pair of panties while using a bush to cover herself, Monica finds out who it was who left the gum on the bench and has her revenge by using gum to stick the boy to a trash can by the seat of his pants.
  • Thought Bubble Speech:
    • Played straight with Vanilla, but averted with Blu and his friends, and also Lionel's Kingdom crew, who all use normal speaking bubbles. However, Vanilla can use the speaking bubbles as well, usually when interacting with other animals (though sometimes he uses the thinking bubbles even when interacting with other cats. It really depends on the writer). He once lampshaded this when talking to a human, saying that he only does it when it's necessary.
    • Ditto, Fluffy and Chauvy (Monica's, Jimmy's and Smudge's pets respectively) will usually play it straight too, though it's very rare for them to show any thinking animal tendencies at all.
  • Time Machine: Franklin builds so many of them that many times characters lampshade how it's basically the only thing he does (Smudge makes fun of it in this episode). In fact, one of these is what triggers the events of the aforementioned Time Travel movie.
  • Token Minority:
    • Jeremiah is the standard "token black boy", but there's also Doreen (blind girl), Luca (boy in a wheelchair), Hummer (who was initially only mute, but was retconned as deaf as well) and some others.
    • The fact Jeremiah is a semi-regular character was enough to warrant calls for representation. In response, Milena, a new African-Brazilian character, was created in 2018 (although her formal comics debut, along with her family's, only came in January 2019) and immediately integrated to the main cast.
  • Took a Level in Dumbass: Maggy, strangely enough, is portrayed as a total dumbass when she's not eating in some of early 2000s stories written by Flavio. The reason behind this is unknown and a complete Out-of-Character Moment, since Maggy is commonly portrayed as one of the smartest characters of the gang.
  • Trademark Favorite Food:
    • Maggy eats everything, but watermelon is explicitly her favourite food. It's completely normal to see her gobbling an entire one down.
    • Lettuce is Horacio's favourite food, which is ironic, considering he is a baby T. rex.
    • Chuck Billy has a great love for guavas, especially those stolen from Mr. Lau's orchard.
  • True Companions: The main four, regardless of all the pranking and alienating negative traits. One of the main themes of the Gang is friendship, after all, and it's been stated more than once that children's friendship is the strongest kind - even when they argue and drive themselves away from each other, it's always temporary, and the next day they're back together.
  • Tsundere: Monica is Type A; she may beat Jimmy Five (and Smudge) up in most of the comics, but they are also good friends, and in some stories set in the future, they are married with children (not to mention them becoming a full-fledged Official Couple in the Teen Gang imprint). Even as kids, there are hints of affection between them (mostly on her side; Jimmy, for the most part, has a Girls Have Cooties attitude towards her in this regard).
  • Tuckerization: Considering most characters are based on people Mauricio knew, common. Maggy, Monica, Nimbus (Mauro in real life), Nick Nope (also called Maurício in real life) and Marina are his children (also Jimmy Five's baby sister, Mary Angela, whose English version name matches her real life one), Smudge and Jimmy Five are childhood friends, Chuck Billy and Zeke were brothers of his grandma (he didn't know them, but the grandma always told stories), Tina is a school acquaintance and Horacio, a childhood friend who became a teacher.
  • Uncatty Resemblance: Invoked with Ditto, Monica's pet dog. Jimmy and Smudge gave it to her as a gift just to get a quick laugh on this trope, but she ended up loving the pet.
  • Universal-Adaptor Cast: With both "characters in other settings" and "Whole Plot Reference stories". Thanks to this, Jimmy Five's been Batman, Iron Man and Wolverine, and Chuck Billy's been Superman and Captain America.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: Smudge's pet pig is named "Chovinista" (Chauvy in the English translation).
  • Violence Is the Only Option:
    • Monica, particularly in the newspaper comics, where it's easy to make quick joke with either a beating or threatening to do so.
    • It used to be worse in the original strips. Once, Maggy suggested that, if Monica were to fight, she might as well do it like a girl, hair tugging and everything. She proceeded to tear all the hair off Maggy's head. It even got to the point where, in-universe, no one would want to be in the same strip as her.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds:
    • Jimmy Five devotes his existence to annoy and mess with Monica. In return, she beats him up to a pulp. Never stopped either of them of referring to each other first and foremost as "friends", and they will come to each other's aid whenever necessary.
    • Maggy and her Non-Human Sidekick Vanilla, also have a bit of this going on. While she adores the cat and spoils him rotten, and Vanilla does care for her a lot more than he lets out (in fact, he's shown several times that he's secretly afraid that she'll grow tired of him eventually), most of their stories together are about them going at each other like sitcom arch-nemesises, and when not being lovable they are decidedly snarky towards each other.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: As much of a Nice Girl Tsundere that Monica is, she can sometimes be really bossy and irrational and when she wants to do something, she's not above using violence to convince the boys to do as she wants when they're minding their own business.note . Granted, Jimmy does call her out on this in the Manga.
  • When All You Have Is a Hammer...: Whenever the gang comes across a complex problem, the solution is usually using Monica's Super Strength to simply brute-force their way through.
    • In a storyline based on Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, the gang is captured by the thieves and imprisoned in an underground cell in the middle of the desert. Jimmy comes up with a convoluted plan, which involves sending Smudge's pet flies across the ocean to retrieve items to aid in their escape, but then realizes Monica has just punched a hole through the wall. He disheartedly laments that, once again, they had to rely on "the same old cliché of Monica's strength".
    • A Running Gag in the Justice League of America crossover is someone posing a difficult problem for the gang, only for Monica to solve it by throwing her bunny at someone. This includes freeing Superman from a parasite, restoring the Flash's memory, and defeating the likes of Black Manta, Mxyzptlk and Mongul.
  • When I Was Your Age...: Jimmy Five's father once told Jimmy that, with Jimmy's allowances, he once bought stuff for home. Jimmy then asked how his parents did to live off ice cream and sweets.
  • When the Clock Strikes Twelve: The Grim Reaper must reap the old year before the year's last day's midnight or the new year won't be born and last year's events will happen all over again.
  • Where No Parody Has Gone Before: They made one too, basically parodying the 2009 film, but making nods to the original series here and there.
  • Whole Plot Reference:
    • Occurs sometimes - the Star Wars, Batman Forever and Star Trek parodies, a Romeo and Juliet retelling (in which Monica disagrees with Shakespeare's ending and forces the Prince of Verona - Sunny - to give them a happy one)... - with a recent series even compilating old ones and creating a few new ones.
    • There's a bi-monthly title focused on Film Fics, featuring reprints of stories done before (like their take on the original Jurassic Park), compilations on a common film theme (like comedy movies or Spider-Man-related stories) or completely original stories (like those based on The Terminator, Back to the Future or Avatar, which is the source of the Reference Overdosed image). One of them has a heck of an Adaptation Distillation to the entirety of Batman's cinema career, except for the aforementioned Batman Forever, which had been done before (and reprinted in an earlier issue) - the plot just skips from Batman Returns to Batman & Robin, and later includes the 1966 movie as well!
    • One even has Monica, Hercules' daughter doing a variant of his 12 works.
    • And then there's the aforementioned Death Note parody issue on the Teen Monica manga...
    • Now there's one (with the kids' version of the characters) to The Lord of the Rings, which will be divided in three parts like the original, involving an ink brush in lieu of the One Ring.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?:
    • Smudge is aquaphobic, to the point even a glass of water can make him shiver. His fear is such that he can spontaneously come up with wild ways to avoid getting wet, such as flapping his arms like wings to avoid falling into a lake. Though his teen version has overcome his fear to a certain degree, he is still not very fond of the idea of bathingnote .
    • Monica, while superstrong and brave, has her own girly fears (like pretty much every other girl in the gang): she will shriek and cower at the sight of any mouse, bug, worm or what have you. Needless to say, Jimmy has used it to his advantage more than once.
    • Marina is abnormally afraid of dogs. A comic that explores her phobia has her crawling up an air vent to avoid Monica's dog, and it's played as a homage to Alien.
  • Wild Take: Became pervasive since the 2000s, especially when Sidnei Salustre is drawing.
  • Willing Suspension of Disbelief: Lampshaded in a story where Maggy is telling Junior the Jack and the Beanstalk story and putting her spin on it at every step. Better yet, it's lampshaded by the giant in the story:
    If he's accepted that I live on the clouds and that you came up here on a beanstalk... Why can't I be a sculptor and use hairspray?
  • Written Sound Effect: In both the comic book and the animated versions, moments where characters beat up each other are replaced with simple panels/frames containing a single onomatopoeia. This is deliberately done to avoid depicting acts of violence and discourage bullying.
  • You Are Fat: In Emerson de Abreu's "A Origem da Mônica"note  storyline, several jokes come at the expense of Monica's pudginess. Her weight almost causes a boat to sink, triggers a rock slide when she stands at the edge of a cliff, leads a group of elephants to believe that she is one of their calves, and makes a plane lose altitude. As it turns out, all these events were actually part of a fake backstory that Jimmy came up with in order to tease her.
  • You Meddling Kids: In a particularly Troperiffic story in which Nutty Ned and Jimmy Five disguise themselves as Sherlock Holmes and Watson respectively in order to solve Samson's disappearance and find that The Butler Did It, the guilty butler says this line, prompting Jimmy to lampshade the shout-out, since there are no meddling kids in the case.
  • Zany Scheme: Jimmy Five's Infallible Plans. One comic had him developing a over-the-top one relying on random factors (such as having Monica attacked by a passing alien ship), only for Smudge to convince him on giving up by saying it was too implausible. Cue Monica saying she had just went through all of what had been described in the plan...

Tropes exclusive to the Teen Spinoff Manga:

    Tropes A-M 
  • Alternate Universe:
    • While the manga itself is considered one to the kids' gang (even according to Word of God), its issue #36 adds in another AU, a Crapsack World in which Jimmy, who didn't care about getting better from his speech impediment, does indeed rule the street by being a gigantic asshole to everybody, asserting his authority through threats of exposing their secrets. Even the teachers at the school don't get any respect from him. He only grows out of it when the rest of the gang decides to not care about the blackmail and come clean with each other, thus breaking the hold he had over them. Plus, when Smudge's uncle (a powerless, Corrupt Corporate Executive version of Captain Fray) tried to get a hold of Franklin's world domination machine, built at Jimmy's behest, he was sent to an uninhabited planet because, since it was built in such a hurry, there was nothing in it to specify which world the user wanted to rule. Seeing it could have happened to him, Jimmy loses his jerkiness. The reason for all this? Monica had moved away from the neighborhood while they were still children, essentially leaving a vacuum in her friends' lives. When she came back all grown up, no one recognized her.
    • Other differences in this AU: Maggy didn't learn to put her appetite in check, so she grew fat; Bucky is shy and insecure, while Sunny is more outgoing and confident; Franklin is a nebbish geek who can't find it in him to approach Marina; Nutty Ned is still a teacher, but has a lot more composure (despite being apparently aware of the AU), and he's the target of Maggy's juvenile crush; Nimbus is a failure at magic; and Sunny's sister didn't make the cut for the space program, working at a fast food joint instead.
    • Another AU gets created in the "Flying Donkey" arc, where the main four are possessed and taken over by evil entities under the Flying Donkey's bidding, Maggy's latent magic saves her, Monica and Smudge, but Jim decides to keep the entitie within himself because of the powers it gave him, to use them for his ambitions. The 3 turn on him and warn the others against him, but Jim convinces most of the boys to join him with the promise of making a better world, Smudge obtains Captain Fray's powers and turns evil, Maggy isolates herself out of fear people are only using her for her magic, leaving Monica, Sunny, Denise and the rest to lead a resistance against them after Jim takes over the world with Franklin's help and turns everything into a Crapsack World.
  • Animated Adaptation: A first attempt was made in 2015 with only 1 episode along with some promotional videos, but due to how the animation was too non-anime, an actual version was made, which was released in 2019.
  • Anti-Hero: Monica and Jim both shift down the scale to UnscrupulousHero in the manga, especially Jim. Although Monica can be a Nominal Hero as far as Irene is concerned.
  • Art Evolution: Compare the covers of the manga version to the inside. Has gotten more consistent lately, but the difference is still pretty glaring.
  • Bad Future: The manga has not one, but TWO, all caused by Jim.
  • Breather Episode: Issue #88 is this, a light episode featuring the classic gang's misadventures on Comic Book Experience 2015 (a stand-in for the Comic Con Experience in São Paulo).
  • The Cameo: Gregory House as a school doctor. Yes, you read it right. Sure, he does look fairly older than Hugh Laurie, but everything else is still there.
  • Canon Foreigner: Several minor characters, including the Hot Teacher whom Maggy has a crush on and the weight-conscious Maria Mello.
  • Cerebus Retcon: The "Tomba" aliens, the "flying donkey" and several elements from the classic series (up to and including Captain Fray's origins) are painted here on a much, much darker light.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Pretty much any story written by Emerson de Abreu.
    • The "Flying Donkey" arc introduces us to the biggest horrors in this series' history, Jim stayed dead for most of it, Sunny's Future self comes back to the present timeline to stop Jim from turning the world into a Crapsack World as he did in Future!Sunny's original timeline. By exorcising the spirit of the Flying Donkey, the protagonists may have played Unwitting Pawn to the Children of Umbra that they thought were victims at first but are hinted to have become evil after 20 years in limbo, and if Future!Denise's words at the end of Issue #79 are any indication, it's not over yet.
    • The Reversed Tower arc (#90-92) is this as well, by making Captain Fray an agent of the pestilence which threatens to corrode the world and reshape it to their own notion of order. The gang has to resort to Maggy's innate magic to guide them, but it falls upon Smudge, the closest person to Captain Fray, to save everyone from the growing madness of the titular place - a series of underground levels designed in the fashion of Dante's Inferno by an elite group to assume control over humankind, and upon which an orphanage was built as a front, to which a child Fray was sent after his parents died from a landslide. It turns out that he made a pact with the Serpent, the leader of the insects, to have his life saved in the event, and in return they gave him powers that cause corrosion and decay. Once he reaches adulthood, the Serpent comes to demand he becomes the bearer of the Curse of Pestilence, for if he refuses, it will pass on to the person he loves the most - his nephew, Smudge. And that is how he became the Captain Fray we know.
  • Characterization Marches On: Bucky's first appearance in this spin-off was about his break-up with Isabel because all Isabel wanted to do was go out and party, while Bucky needed to prepare for the inter-school baseball tournament. After that Bucky starts acting like a controlling jealous boyfriend.
  • Chickification: Maggy in the manga, as if she wasn't enough of a chick.
  • Cool Teacher: Nutty Ned of all people. He's still a nutjob (don't let him hear you say that, though), but damn if he isn't awesome.
  • Crossover:
    • Issues #43 and #44 cross the characters over with many Osamu Tezuka characters. Mauricio and Tezuka had been close friends when the latter was alive, and the idea had been in the works for quite some time, even before Tezuka's passing.
    • Like their kids' version, the teens cross over with the Justice League (issues #25 and #26 of Volume 2) However, unlike the stories in the kids' books which are akin to Silver Age stories, this one plays more like a conventional Crisis Crossover, with the Legion of Doom using a "Sisterbox" (a modified Motherbox) to dump the heroes (and Harley Quinn) in the Teen Gang's universe, just as the Gang's own Rogues Gallery starts attacking the city. Next issue continues the crossover, only this time with the Gang sent into the DC Universe thanks to one of Franklin's teleporters; there, they end up helping the League fight off a gigantic creature made of ocean garbage, result of a battle between Superman and Captain Fray.
  • Fanservice:
    • In the first issue of his teen spinoff, Chuck Billy spends three gratuitous panels shirtless after jumping into a creek to escape a swarm of bees.
    • Sunny's future self. Like Teen Chuck, but blond and with a Badass Beard.
  • Forgotten Aesop: Many plots have Monica acknowledging the harm in her wanting everything her way and that she is aware she is The Dreaded to her friends, as well as accepting Irene as a friend...but the actual change never shows in-story. She also keeps saying that she matured and isn't a quarrelsome girl anymore...but she still will hit a boy at the slightest thing that angers her.
  • Hate Sink: Gene grew up from a Spoiled Brat to a Smug Snake Dirty Coward who got an american girl pregnant during his time in the United States and refused to take responsibility for the child when she came to him with the news, tried to get Fran drunk for his own amusement, faked his death to search for a treasure and outright refuses to be a responsible, decent human being and blows off every opportunity and responsiblity his father gives him to serve his own interests.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: Carmem. Alpha Bitch Spoiled Brat by every definition who, in gratitude to Dustine for the grade she got for both of them allowing Carmem to pass the semester, helped her fix her relationship with Smudge through a very elaborate plan. Monica put it best:
    Monica: Carmen. Thanks for what you did for them. Looks like you're not mean or dumb all the time. Just mostly.
    Carmem: (Beat) ...Bite me.
    • Bucky. Of course, it requires a DEEP digging through the crust that is formed by his sexism and massive ego. But despite these bad qualities, this was the guy that was willing to help Irene make friends with the gang and willingly put his relationship with Isabel at risk when she found out the mesasges Irene left him because he didn't want her to get in trouble because of his mistake.
  • Hypocrite: Monica hates when people tell her what to do, yet she's the bossiest character in the series.
  • I Just Want to Have Friends: Irene. All she wants is to be part of the gang, but Monica is an absolute bitch to her all because she is friends with Jim. And the only reason she's always interacting with Jim in the first place, or any boy for that matter, is because Monica won't let anyone else befriend her.
  • Inspector Javert: Monica to Irene. No matter how good intentioned Irene is about anything, Monica will always think the worst of her. All because Jim is the only person that talks to her because Monica won't let anyone else befriend her because she thinks Irene is a temptress, all because her first appearance was asking Jim to help her with english.
  • Informed Attribute: Maggy is often regarded as the sweetest, kindest person there is and the embodiment of Incorruptible Pure Pureness by many people, but anyone who reads the manga will be able to notice that it's definitely not that way, seeing how she became a Stalker with a Crush towards Rubens and continues to crush on him, sometimes in front of her actual boyfriend without thinking of the consequences and thinks it's totally ok to do so despite how much trouble it caused her and how it's going beyond an actual crush, didn't bother telling Smudge on issue #49 why everyone was always busy and avoiding him and very cowardly backed out of the conversation after he saved her life and how quickly she is to point out the boys' flaws but ignore the girls' fault at any given situation, aside from one occasion on Issue #59.
  • It's All About Me: Bucky and Jim are prime examples, but Monica really stands out. To name one instance, when Jim was late to a rehearsal with her for the school play because he was busy with a school project whose deadline was the day afterwards and he needed to hand out a part of his projects at the same day of the rehearsal, Monica says that what he did was thinking only of himself. Because being a good student is absolutely selfish, isn't it?
  • Jerkass:
    • Even in that continuity Jimmy still has his momentsnote .
    • Although he pales in comparison to Toni. To put in perspective, Jim never plotted to crush Monica's heart for a decade just because he got beaten up by her and made fun of by it. And Toni goes as low as bullying Luca and saying that not bullying him just because he's crippled would be "special treatment" and "prejudice".
    • Denise also sometimes displays an appalling lack of tact, openly making fun of everyone around her.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Jim has a spetacular one in issue #69. He tells Monica that they had nothing special and that he didn't care if she kissed Nick Nope and is seeing him. He does so because he thought it was all a plan Monica crafted to make him crawl back to her and wanted to turn the tables on her because he believed their relationship was set in stone...Only it wasn't a plan. At all. And then the following takes place:
    Maggy: We tried to help you all get together. Tried to do everything to help you. You could have apologized. Could have tried being with her. But you messed everything up. Again. Because are only ''plans'' on that hard head of yours. You thought Monica was acting, faking, and said a lot of stupid things to her. I'm sorry Jim...I really am. But Monica deserves more. Someone that doesn't only think about playing, compete, win. Someone that makes her happy. Someone that-
    Maggy: Jim?
    Jim: I said...I said to Monica...I said that..that I don't care about her...that there's nothing special between us! I...I...I DUMPED MONICA! And now she's with Nick Nope...she is with him for real! It wasn't a plan!
    Maggy: Jim...so...finally, you understand...but it's too late!
    Jim: How could I not notice? How could I be so stupid!? I lost Monica! Forever!

    Tropes N-Z 
  • Outgambitted: In issue #35, Jim somehow managed to outgambit himself, by creating another persona to attend to a costume party held by 3 rich people (One of them being Carmen's aunt), so he could spend a romantic night with Monica without needing to defeat her first. Naturally this creates a 5th competition for Monica's affections. May double as a case of Love Makes You Dumb. However, said persona is never brought up again.
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality: Monica can sometimes act like a self-centered harpy in a way that Bella could never achieve to be, and a bully on top of that, as her treatment of Irene and Sofia shows, and she never accepts anyone disagreeing with her. ever. But she somehow ends up always being in the right, not being called out on any of her bad deeds or getting away with it with nothing but a slap-on-the-wrist.
  • Serious Business: Smudge with his hobbies, Monica with the school play that took place on Issue #9.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Manga Issue #35 had a lot of them. A costume party with the characters dressed as many famous figures such as: Franklin as Sherlock Holmes, Sunny as Kratos, Todd as Mario, Marina as Dorothy from Oz, Jeremiah as Mace Windu, Tikara as Samurai Jack, Denise as Harley Quinn (a character she has come to be strongly associated with) and many others.
    • There was also a two-issue story that was entirely a shoutout to Death Note.
    • The "Id Monsters" saga is about the main quartet facing their dark side and once they're overcome, they're trapped within cards that gives them powers when activated. Does that sound familiar?
    • There's also an issue which Jim plays Chess with Death. Just like The Seventh Seal.
  • The Beautiful Elite: Sometimes you may think that the manga was drawn by CLAMP.
  • Time Skip: A good chunk of issue #50 of Monica Teen took place ten years into the future, showing, among other things, Jimmy and Monica's wedding and married life. The Manga itself counts as a whole.
  • Token Evil Teammate: Jim. His ambition to prove his worth and change the world not only leads to TWO Bad Future timelines as well as an Alternate Universe where he controls the whole street through being a gigantic douche and blackmailing people with their secrets, but it also leads him to be a direct cause of Monica, Smudge and Maggy's deaths in the Flying Donkey arc.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Jim grows a backbone and starts to call out Monica on her violent tendencies and bossy attitude.
      • In issues #23 and #24, which have a Whole Plot Reference to Death Note, Jim takes on the identity of "The Great Clown", who can send people into laughing fits by writing their names into his magical "Laughter Note". Smudge says that, since Monica is so hotheaded, she could be a potential target of the Clown. When Monica protests that she doesn't deserve to have a laughing attack, Jim angrily tells her that he's had enough of her constant bad mood.
      Jim: You know what, Monica? Smiling wouldn't kill you! It's a pain in the ass to put up with someone who is always stressed! You may feel comfortable with that big temper of yours... But we're the ones who suffer to put up with your fretfulness!
      • In issue #26, where two brothers who are professional rollerbladers, note  are bullying everyone around their city and acting like colossal pricks, Monica gets fed up with their attitude, challenges them to a rollerblading contest, and forces Maggy, Smudge and Jim to participate alongside her despite none of them knowing how to skate. After she repeatedly berates Jim for his lack of skill and accuses him of not putting enough effort into this training, he retaliates with a "The Reason You Suck" Speech.
      Jim: So you want to know if you can count on me? I NEVER said I knew how to skate! I don't! And still, I'm here! Wearing this stupid outfit! Scraping my hutt on the floor! And all because someone made a rollerblading challenge, when said person doesn't even know how to skate! And still, she got her friends on a stupid contest! Without even asking them! And NOW you wanna know if you can count on me?
    • Captain Fray becomes quite The Chessmaster in the later issues, as his powers have evolved, making him able to cause erosion. It is later revealed that these powers came from a Deal with the Devil in return from being saved from a landslide that demolished his home and killed his parents.
    • Todd, who grew some major cajones not only as he grew up, but as the manga itself progressed. Unlike most of the male cast (save for minor exceptions, such as Nick Nope), Todd takes none of the girls' Double Standard bullcrap, often pointing out that he doesn't take well to Maggy's crush on the science teacher and yet getting fussy when he looks at other girls with the faintest hint of interest. There's also the way he handled his bullying in later issues, with no need whatsoever to get violent, and still coming out on top.
    • Maggy has incredible magical powers as a descendant of the Coven of Hecate, but they needed to be sealed inside her mind due to their highly destructive potential and the eventual toll it would take on her sanity. As such, they can only be triggered through a code phrase, and locked again with another. It is implied that she loses these powers for good at the end of the Reversed Tower arc.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass:
    • Monica, who is basically a Brazilian Bella Swan. Up to Eleven in #94, in which the character jumps to disgusting levels of jerkassery, especially in the ending.
    • There's also Bucky, who became a massive sexist, controlling asshat, even after his break-up with Isabel.
    • Jimmy, whose ambition led him to basically become the Token Evil Teammate. He's starting to mellow out though, especially after he unwittingly nearly causes Monica to become Ret-Gone due to his sorrow over losing her to Nick Nope.
  • The Unfair Sex:
    • While Jim was a Jerkass and had problems, both personal and in his relationship with Monica, In #69 he's shown as the only one responsible for their relationship going wrong. It didn't show Monica responsible or commissioned for it at any point, despite that clearly she was equally wrong in many of their arguments over the long run and, if anything, slowly changing for the worse.
    • Really, the whole manga is about this. Bucky was flanderized into a sexist, controlling, bitter ex to make Isabel's empowering Character Development more positive (Compare to his manga debut where they broke up because she wanted to do nothing but party but Bucky wanted to dedicate himself to his baseball career), the following chapters after "Shadows of the Past" treat Jimmy's The Beard with Penha as intentional two-timing when he was actually being blackmailed into going out with her and even Monica seemed to regard that as such at the end of the arc, Maggy thinks it's totally fine to droll over the Hot Teacher in front of her boyfriend but she won't accept people calling her out on it or Todd glancing at another girl with the faintest hint of interest, although Todd at least calls her out on it herself and she's upset... Because he found out and didn't think he had noticed.
  • Will They or Won't They?: There is also some argument as to Monica and Jimmy's relationship over this (pretty much since they are the only main characters without any kind of engagement). While, as kids, they never get together due to him not seeing her as more than just a friend (and, in the worst-case scenarios, he deems her too ugly to be date-able — she had made advances on him before), as teenagers, they go one step further, even though he is still too shy to admit it once and for all. So much so, that in one issue, it's Monica who takes it upon herself to have the initiative, by stealing a kiss from Jim. Though he runs away flustered (with her chasing him, "just like the old times"), one can see that deep down he liked it. However, Monica eventually grew tired of Jim's arrogant claims of "having to defeat her to date her"note  and she hitches up with Nick Nope, causing Jim to realize that it was his behavior that pushed Monica away from him (in spite of her not helping matters sometimes; see The Unfair Sex).

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