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Print Long-Runners

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The printed word (or character, pictogram, what-have-you) is one of the oldest forms of passing information or creating entertainment. This listing honors print media that has reached the state of Long Runner. Print media includes books (and e-books), comics, newspapers, and manga. Long running is considered to be a print run of 20 years or more.

For book series that have been going for a long time see Long-Running Book Series.

A No Recent Examples rule applies to this trope and examples shouldn't be added until 20 years after the first book, comic or other item's released. That assumes that it's been active for the full two decades. If there's been a lengthy hiatus or a significant gap between sequels, the minimum time required will be longer.


Examples:

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    Hall of Fame 
To honor those works that will probably remain in print as long as print exists.

  • Lewis Carroll's Alice stories (in print since 1865)
  • The Chronicles of Narnia (in print since 1950)
  • Frankenstein - Mary Shelley (1818-present)
  • Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897-present)
  • The Bible - Available in one readable form or another for more than 1,600 years (in its present form; individual books are much older).
    • The Gutenberg Bible (very first book printed on a press with movable type): 1455.
    • The King James Bible (continuously in print since 1611)
  • The Torah has been "in print" for so long that there is argument over how long. Probably at least 2,500 years, maybe more. Interestingly, the method of "printing" hasn't changed at all in the meantime; it's the only tome left still commonly handwritten on lambskin scrolls.
  • The Analects of Confucius, the Records of the Grand Historian, Laozi's Daodejing, and other fundamental Chinese writings, especially considering the Chinese invented the printing press long before Europeans did.
  • The Qur'an was first officially written down and standardized in 653 AD. As far as printing goes the oldest surviving printing blocks are from the 10th century.
  • The Vedas, Upanishads and other major Hindu religious works.
  • The Lord of the Rings (in print since 1955)
  • On the Origin of Species - Charles Darwin (1859-present)
  • Scriptures of the LDS Church (aka Mormons), in addition to the Bible:
    • The Book of Mormon – In print continuously since 1830.
    • Doctrine and Covenants – Since 1835.
    • Pearl of Great Price – Since 1851, although portions of it date back to 1831, and some material has been added to it since its first publication.
  • The works of:
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh deserves special mention even among epics as it's generally considered to be the oldest concrete "story" humans have to offer. The first versions were written approximately four thousand years ago (2150-2000 BCE) and the most familiar version was codified about a millennium later (1300-1000 BCE). Even the first modern translation was performed in 1873. Yeah, it's pretty old.
  • Robinson Crusoe: It's been published by various people in about 200 editions since 1719, more then 300 years straight.
  • The Last of the Mohicans: America's first "epic novel", in print since 1826, five or six film adaptations.
  • Robin Hood
  • Zorro: The first superhero (and America's only swashbuckler), adapted into dozens of books, films, and TV shows. First appearance in 1919.
  • Moby-Dick: published 1851, in print since the 1920s.
  • The Pilgrim's Progress: in print since 1678.
  • Grays Anatomy of the Human Body: Since 1858, and the show namer for at least one tv show.
  • Peter Pan (in print since 1902)
  • Perry Rhodan: in print since 1961, 2661 weekly installments, 159,600 pages (as of 2012)
  • Nancy Drew: The original series ran from 1930 to 1956, for a total of 56 books; Simon & Schuster bought the rights from Grosset & Dunlap that year and continued the series until 2004, ending with book 175. A spin-off series is still running.
  • Boiler manufacturer Babcock & Wilcox published the first edition of Steam: Its Generation and Use in 1875. It is, as of late 2018, on its 42nd edition, and has been continually in print the entire time. Granted, a lot of both the methods of generation and uses for steam have changed a lot since the first edition, and the modern Babcock & Wilcox makes its bread and butter building boilers for nuclear power plants, but still...
  • The CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, a one-volume reference sourcenote  for research in the stated fields, has been published since 1914. Its current edition, first published in 2022, is its 103rd.
  • Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series: While the series itself achieved Long-Running Book Series status with the release of Foundations Triumph in 1999, the original collections have been republished almost yearly since the early 1950s, and the novels that succeeded them have been faithfully republished as well.
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (in print since 1900)

    Comic Books and Magazine Comics 
  • 2000 AD (1977-present). British.
    • The comic book's flagship IP, Judge Dredd (1977-present), has been present in every issue (sorry, "prog") of the comic, except progs 1 and 1139.
  • 91:an Karlsson (1932-present). Swedish.
  • Die Abrafaxe (1976-present). German.
  • Action Comics, with a new issue hitting newsstands almost every single month since 1938, is the second-longest continuously published American comic books, after stablemate Detective Comics. (And actually has put out more issues than Detective, due to a period in the '80s where Action went weekly and Detective remained monthly.) The very first issue introduced Superman, a long-runner in his own right who has been continuously appearing in this and lots of other publications (plus movies, television, video games and practically every other medium) since the late 1930s.
  • Adventure Comics (1935-1983, 2009-2011). American. DC Comics' second anthology comic.
  • Agent 327 (1967-1985, 2000-present). Dutch.
  • Alan Ford (1969-present). Italian.
  • Archie Comics (1941-present. His very first comic book appearance (as a filler story) was in 1941. The newspaper strip was not started until 1947.) American.
  • Aria (1979) (1979-present). Belgian.
  • Astro City (1995-present, with a three-year hiatus from 2010 to 2013). American.
  • Asterix (1959-present), technically a comic, but he follows a schedule more like a book series. 33 comic books in 50+ years, starting in 1959. All by the same two guys (later one guy) until 2013, when the series was taken over by a new team. French.
  • The Avengers (1963-present). American.
  • Bamse (1966-present). Swedish.
  • Batman (1939-present). American.
  • The Beano (1938-present) British anthology comic, contains these long-running strips:
    • The Bash Street Kids (1954-present) .
    • Dennis the Menace (UK) (1951-present).
    • Lord Snooty (1938-49; 1950-90, intermittently until 2000, then again as Lord Snooty the Third 2008-2009, the original has appeared occasionally since).
    • Minnie the Minx (1953-present).
    • Roger the Dodger (1953-present).
    • Billy Whizz (1964-present).
    • Calamity James (1985-present).
    • Ball Boy (1975-2010s).
    • The Numskulls (1962-1993 in The Beezer, then 1993-present in The Beano).
    • Ivy the Terrible (1985-2010s).
    • Biffo the Bear (1948-1986, 1989-1999, intermittent appearances since).
    • Pansy Potter (1938-1947, 1949-1955, 1958, 1989-1993).
    • Little Plum (1953-1986, 1998, 2002-2007, 2011-2010s).
    • The Three Bears (1959-1985, 1988-1995, 1999-2007, 2010-2011).
  • The Beezer (1956-1993; 1,809 issues)
  • Blackhawk (27 years in its original run from 1941 to 1968, plus another 10-odd years in scattered revivals)
  • Blake and Mortimer (1946-present)
  • Bunty (1958-2001)
  • Buster (1960-2000, over 2,000 issues)
  • The Cartoon History of the Universe (1978-2009) Only the first 9 volumes (collected in omnibus volumes 1 and part of 2) were published individually, with the rest published in books with varying sequel gaps. The final two omnibus volumes were titled The Cartoon History of the Modern World.
  • Cerebus the Aardvark (1977-2004)
  • Chick Tracts (1960-2016) note 
  • Condorito (1949-2019). Chilean. First appeared as part of the Okey weekly anthology comic book.
  • Cubitus (1968-present).
  • The Dandy (1937-2012, 3,500 issues)
  • Daredevil (1964-present)
  • Diabolik, monthly since November 1962.
  • Walt Disney's Comics and Stories: 698 monthly issues since 1940, with breaks of varying lengths as the publishers of the title changed. The longest running Disney Comics title.
    • The Swedish Kalle Anka & C:o, fittingly named after Donald Duck's Swedish name, has been ongoing since 1948 - and since 1959, it has been a weekly. It was bi-weekly between 1957 and and 1959, so at the moment of writing this, that means about 2700 issues, give or take a few double-issues during Christmas and the like.
    • Mickey Mouse comics have been around since 1930, first appearing as a daily newspaper comic strip (that lasted until 1990) and then being turned into its own comic book in 1939. Like Walt Disney's Comics and Stories, it's had its fair share of hiatuses and publisher changes. For a while only reprints were being released, but it's made a comeback since then. They were also being produced in other countries even while it was lying dormant in the US.
    • You want no hiatuses? The French Le Journal de Mickey has been publishing since early 1952 without hiatuses, although with some double-issues. It passed 3000 in December 2009 and it's weekly. The Dutch Donald Duck has been publishing since October 25, 1952 without any double-issues or hiatuses. It passed 3000 in April 2010. It had ONE extra count: the 10th issue of 1954 had an extra double. That one's also been counted. Also, the Brazilian, German, Danish, Norwegian and the Finnish (and probably the Spanish too) have published over 2500 issues, all starting 1948-1950. Archive Panic!
  • Detective Comics, with a new issue hitting newsstands almost every single month since 1937, is the longest continuously published American comic book. In addition to this, it was the place of birth of Batman (Detective #27, 1939), a long runner in his own right who has been continuously appearing in this and lots of other publications (plus movies, television, video games and practically every other medium) since the late 1930s.
    • By extension, DC's shared universe has been running at least since 1940 (the birth of the Justice Society of America, the first superhero team) and arguably since Superman's debut two years earlier. Connecting every book in DC's main line into one huge, endless narrative, the DCU is one of the largest works of fiction in human history.
  • Doctor Who Magazine (1979-present). British. There's been a new DWM comic in almost every issue since the first, and it passed the original TV series's 26-year run in 2005.
  • ElfQuest (1978-present)
  • Fantastic Four (1961-present). American.
  • De Generaal (1971-2003)
  • Gold Digger (1991-present)
  • Hellblazer (1988-2013). American.
  • Herman Hedning (1988-present). Swedish
  • The Incredible Hulk (1962-present). American.
  • Inspector Canardo (1979-present). Belgian.
  • Jan, Jans en de Kinderen (1970-present). Dutch.
  • Jommeke (1955-present). Flemish/Belgian.
  • El Jueves (1977-present). A Spanish weekly satirical magazine mixing regular strips and political cartoons that has survived numerous fines, bans and censorship for mocking diverse institutions. It had a near-death experience in 2013, when the publisher refused to run an especially harsh front page mocking the monarchy, leading the editor and half the artists to resign.
  • De Kiekeboes (1977-present), Flemish/Belgian
  • Kronblom (1927-present), Swedish.
  • Looney Tunes (1941-1984, 1990, 1993, 1994-present). American. Originally known as Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, also comprising series featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd and other characters. Only remaining DC Comics humor title.
  • MAD Magazine (1952-2018, 2018-present, now mostly reprints). American. Created in retaliation to The Comics Code, contains parodies and satire of popular culture, as well as some recurring series.
  • Mandy (1967-1991)
  • Memin Pinguin (1943-2016) Mexican.
  • Millie the Model (1945-1973)
  • Monica's Gang (1959-present)
  • Mortadelo y Filemón (1958-present). Creator Francisco Ibáńez has worked in the comic for over 60 years, with only a brief interruption in the 80s due to legal issues with his publisher.
  • Mosaik, featuring Die Digedags (1955-1975) and then Die Abrafaxe (1975-present). German (originally East German).
  • The Phantom (1936-present). It is the most popular comic book in Australia, where it first began running in 1948, and now has more than 2000 issues, with no end in sight.
  • Pierre Tombal (1986-present)
  • Piet Pienter en Bert Bibber (44 years, 1951-1995)
  • PS Magazine (In continuous publication since 1951, 700+ issues so far)
  • The Punisher (1974-present)
  • Red Ears (1989-present)
  • De Rode Ridder (1959 - present, over 238 issues as of 2013)
  • Spawn (1992-present, over 320 issues at present) American
  • Sgt. Rock (30 years from 1958-1988, plus additional special projects)
  • Sonic the Hedgehog (Archie Comics) (1992-2017, 290 issues) American.
  • Spider-Man (1962-present)
  • Spirou and Fantasio (1938-present)
  • Supergirl: (1972-present) with breaks of varying lengths.
  • Superman (1938-present)
  • Suske en Wiske (1946–present, 234 issues)
  • Tex, a western Italian comic still running monthly since 1948 with 590 issues.
  • Tintin: Although Hergé, the author, died in 1983 and forbade in his will that anybody else publish new stories, it's always been in print since its debut in 1929, and probably should be considered Hall of Fame material—it'll obviously stay in print for a loooong time to come (in its original French version, anyway).
  • Topaze (1931-1970; 1989-1996). Chilean satirical weekly featuring political comic strips and panels.
  • The Topper (1953-1990, 1963 issues)
  • Transformers (1984-present)
  • Treasure Chest (1946-1972, 502 issues)
  • Urbanus (1982-present), Flemish
  • Usagi Yojimbo (first appearance 1984; title is 1987-present)
  • Valhalla (1979-2009)
  • Whizzer and Chips (1969-1990, 1,092 issues)
  • Wonder Woman (1942-present)
  • X-Men (1963-present)

    Manga and Manga Magazines 
Manga

Manga Magazines

    Newspaper Comic Strips 
  • Abbie an' Slats (1937-1971). American.
  • Adam@home (1984-present). American.
  • Aggie Mack (1946-1972). American.
  • Agnes (2002-present). American.
  • Alec the Great (1931-1969). American.
  • Alley Oop (1932-present). American.
  • Andy Capp (1957-present). British.
  • Angus Og (1959-1989). Scottish.
  • Animal Crackers (1967-present). American.
  • Apartment 3-G (1961-2015). American.
  • Åsa-Nisse (1944-present). Swedish.
  • Arlo and Janis (1985-present). American.
  • Barney Google and Snuffy Smith (1918-present). American.
  • B.C. (1958-present). American.
  • Bécassine (1905-1962). French.
  • Beetle Bailey (1950-present). American.
  • Belvedere (1962-1995). American.
  • Berry's World (1963-2003). American.
  • Beryl the Peril (1953-2012). British. (in The Topper until 1993, then in The Dandy)
  • The Better Half (1956-2014). American.
  • Betty (1920-1943). American.
  • Big Nate (1991-present). American.
  • Blake and Mortimer (1946-present). Belgian.
  • Blondie (1930-present). American.
  • Boner's Ark (1968-2000). American.
  • Boots and Her Buddies (daily 1924-1960, Sunday 1926-1969). American.
  • The Born Loser (1965-present). American.
  • Brenda Starr (1940-2011). American.
  • Brick Bradford (1933-1987). American.
  • Bringing Up Father (1913-2000). American. Also commonly called "Maggie and Jiggs".
  • Bristow (1961-present). British.
  • Broom-Hilda (1970-present). American.
  • The Broons (1936-present). Scottish.
  • Brother Juniper (1958-1989). American.
  • Buck Ryan (1937-1962). British.
  • The Bungle Family (1918-1945). American.
  • Bunky (1926-1949). American. Initially known as "Bedroom, Parlor and Sink".
  • Buz Sawyer (1943-1989). American.
  • Cap Stubbs and Tippie (1918-1966). American.
  • Cappy Dick (1939-1987). American.
  • Cathy (1976-2010). American.
  • Le Chat (1983-2013). Belgian.
  • Crankshaft (1987-present). American.
  • Crock (1975-2012). American.
  • Curtis (1988-present). American.
  • Dennis the Menace (UK) (1951-present). British. (in The Beano)
  • Dennis the Menace (US) (1951-present). American.
  • Desperate Dan (1937-2012). British. (in The Dandy)
  • Dick Tracy (1931-present). American.
  • Dickie Dare (1933-1957). American.
  • Dilbert (1989-2023). American.
  • Dinglehoofer und his Dog (1926-1951). American.
  • Dixie Dugan (1929-1966). American.
  • Dondi (1955-1986). American.
  • Doonesbury (1970-present). American.
  • Drabble (1979-present). American.
  • Dykes to Watch Out For (1983-2008). American.
  • Eek & Meek (1965-2000). American.
  • Ella Cinders (1925-1961). American.
  • Emmy Lou (1944-1979). American. Originally titled "Bobby Sox".
  • Eric De Noorman (1946-1964). Dutch.
  • Etta Kett (1925-1974). American.
  • Elvis (2000-present). Swedish.
  • La Familia Burron (1948-2010). Mexican.
  • De Familie Doorzon (1989-2010). Dutch
  • The Family Circus (1960-present). American.
  • Fatty Finn (1923-1977). Australian.
  • Felix the Cat (1923-1966). American.
  • Ferd'nand (1937-2012). Danish.
  • Flash Gordon (1934-2003). American.
  • FoxTrot (1988-present; dailies until 2006, Sundays only 2007-). American.
  • Frank and Ernest (1972-present). American.
  • Freckles and His Friends (1915-1971). American.
  • Fred Basset (1963-present). British.
  • For Better or for Worse (1979-2008). Canadian.. Touched-up reruns running since.
  • Fred Basset (1963-present). British.
  • Funky Winkerbean (1972-present). American.
  • The Gambols (1950-present). British.
  • Garfield (1978-present). American.
  • Garth (1943-1997). British.
  • Gasoline Alley (1918-present). American.
  • Geech (1982-2003). American.
  • George and Lynne (1976-2010). British.
  • Gil Thorp (1958-present). American.
  • Ginger Meggs (1921-present). Australian.
  • Gordo (1941-1985). American.
  • Grandma (1947-1969). American.
  • Grin and Bear It (1932-40, 1942-2015). American.
  • The Gumps (1917-1959). American.
  • Hägar the Horrible (1973-present). American.
  • Hälge (1991-present). Swedish
  • Happy Hooligan (1900-1932). American. Also known as "Down in the Farm" and "Mr. Dough and Mr. Dubb".
  • Harold Teen (1919-1959). American.
  • Hazel (1943-1993). American. Appeared weekly in The Saturday Evening Post until 1969, then in daily newspaper syndication. Currently in reprints.
  • The Heart of Juliet Jones (1953-2001). American.
  • Heathcliff (1973-present). American.
  • Henry (daily 1932-1990, Sunday until 1995; currently in reruns). American.
  • Herman (1975-present, although it's mostly been in reruns since 1992). American.
  • Hi and Lois (1954-present). American.
  • The Jackson Twins (1950-1979). American.
  • Jane (1933-1959). British.
  • Jane Arden (1927-1968). American.
  • Jeff Cobb (1955-1978). American.
  • Jerry on the Job (1913-1932, 1946-1949). American.
  • Joe Palooka (1930-1984). American.
  • Judge Parker (1952-present). American.
  • Just Kids (1923-1957; known as "Mush Stebbins and Sister" from 1950).
  • The Katzenjammer Kids (1897-2006). American. Yes you read that right; more than a century of continuous production. note 
  • Kerry Drake (1943-1983). American.
  • Korky the Cat (1937-present). British. (in The Dandy)
  • Krazy Kat (1913-1944). American.
  • Kudzu (1981-2007). American.
  • Life in Hell (1977-2012). American.
  • Li'l Abner (1934-1977). American.
  • Lilla Fridolf (1955-present). Swedish.
  • Little Annie Rooney (1927-1966). American.
  • Little Iodine (1943-1985). American.
  • Little Jimmy (1904-1941, Sunday-only 1945-1958). American.
  • The Little King (1933-1975). American. The newspaper strip in 1933-34 was titled "The Ambassador".
  • Little Mary Mixup (1917-1956). American.
  • Little Orphan Annie (1924-2010). American.
  • The Lockhorns (1968-present). American.
  • Love Is... (1970-present). New Zealander.
  • Luann (1985-present). American.
  • Madam & Eve (1992-present). South African.
  • Mallard Fillmore (1994-present). American.
  • Mandrake the Magician (1934-present). American.
  • Mark Trail (1946-present). American.
  • Marmaduke (1954-present). American.
  • Marvin (1982-present). American.
  • Mary Perkins, On Stage (1957-1979). American.
  • Mary Worth (1932-present). American.
  • Mickey Finn (1936-1976). American.
  • Miss Peach (1957-2002). American.
  • Mr. and Mrs. (1919-1963). American.
  • Modesty Blaise (1963-2002). British.
  • Momma (1970-present). American.
  • Moon Mullins (1923-1991). American. Fun Fact 
  • Moose & Molly (1965-2020). American. Previously titled "Moose" and "Moose Miller".
  • Mopsy (1939-1965). American.
  • Mother Goose and Grimm (1984-present). American.
  • Muggs and Skeeter (1927-1974). American.
  • Mutt and Jeff (1907-1983). American.
  • Nancy (1938-present). American. note 
  • The Nebbs (1923-1947). American. In 1947 the family became supporting characters on The Toodle Family (1940-1961).
  • The Neighbors (1939-1976). American.
  • Nero (1947-2002). Flemish. note 
  • Oaky Doaks (1935-1963). American.
  • On the Fastrack (1984-present). American.
  • One Big Happy (1988-present). American.
  • The Opus saga: Bloom County (1980-1989), Outland (1989-1995), and Opus (2002-2008), followed by a web-only revival of Bloom County (2016-present). American.
  • Oor Wullie (1936-present). Scottish.
  • Our Boarding House (1921-1984). American. Also commonly called "Major Hoople".
  • Out Our Way (1922-1977). American. Also known as "The Willets", who were the stars of the Sunday page.
  • Panda (1946-1991). Dutch.
  • Paulus de Boskabouter (1946-1984). Dutch.
  • Peanuts (1950-2000). American.
  • Penny (1943-1970). American.
  • Pepe Antártico (1947-2016). Chilean.
  • The Perishers (1959-2006). British. Currently in reprints.
  • Pete the Tramp (1932-1963). American.
  • Piranha Club (1988-2018). American. Known as "Ernie" until 1998.
  • Pluggers (1993-present). American.
  • Pogo (1948-1975). American. There was also an unsuccessful revival strip that ran from 1989-93.
  • Polly and Her Pals (1912-1958). American.
  • Popeye (1929-present). American. The strip began in 1919 as Thimble Theatre. Daily strips have been in reprints since 1994, while Sunday strips are still being produced.
  • Prince Valiant (1937-present). American.
  • Priscilla's Pop (1946-1983). American.
  • Pugad Baboy (1988-2013, 2018-2019). Filipino. Web-based from 2013-2018 and 2019-present.
  • Rasmus Klump (1951-present). Danish.
  • De Rechter (1993-present). Dutch.
  • Redeye (1967-2008). American.
  • Red Ryder (1938-1964). American.
  • Reg'lar Fellers (1917-1949). American.
  • Rex Morgan, M.D. (1948-present). American.
  • Rick O'Shay (1958-1981). American.
  • Right Around Home (1937-1964). American.
  • Ripley's Believe It or Not! (1918-present). American.
  • Rupert Bear (1920-present). British.
  • Safe Havens (1988-present). American.
  • Sally Forth (1982-present). American.
  • Sam And Silo (1977-present). American. A retool of Sam's Strip (1961-1963).
  • Scorchy Smith (1930-1961). American.
  • Secret Agent X-9 (1934-1996). American.
  • Sherman's Lagoon (1991-present). American.
  • Shoe (1977-present). American.
  • Silent Sam (1920-1964). Swedish. Also published as "Adamson's Adventures".
  • Sjors en Sjimmie (1938-2005). Dutch. note 
  • Skippy (1923-1945). American.
  • Slylock Fox (1987-present). American.
  • Smilin' Jack (1933-1973). American.
  • Smitty (1922-1973). American.
  • Smokey Stover (1935-1973). American.
  • Spy vs. Spy (1962-present). Cuban, then American. Mainstay of MAD Magazine.
  • Steve Canyon (1947-1988). American.
  • Steve Roper and Mike Nomad (1936-2004). American. Originally called "Big Chief Wahoo". Steve Roper first appeared in 1940, while Mike Nomad turned up in 1956, almost a decade after Wahoo was written out.
  • Stone Soup (1995-2020). American.
  • Tank McNamara (1974-present). American.
  • Terry and the Pirates (1934-1973). American.
  • There Oughta Be a Law! (1948-1984). American.
  • They'll Do It Every Time (1929-2008). American.
  • Tiger (1965-2005). American.
  • Tillie the Toiler (1921-1959). American.
  • Tim Tyler's Luck (1928-1996). American.
  • The Timid Soul (1924-1953). American.
  • Tom Poes (1938 or 1941-1986. The ambiguity over how old this strip is, is due to the fact that it made its very first appearance in Argentina and Czechoslovakia as a weekly gag strip in 1938. In 1941, it replaced Mickey Mouse as a daily in the newspaper De Telegraaf.)
  • Toonerville Folks (1908-1955). American.
  • Toots and Casper (daily 1918-1951, Sunday 1920-1956). American.
  • Tumbleweeds (1965-2007). American.
  • The Wacky Adventures of Pedro (1990-2022). American. Mainstay of Boys' Life magazine. Title character created in 1947.
  • Wash Tubbs/Captain Easy (1924-1988). American. note 
  • Wee Pals (1965-2024). American.
  • Winnie Winkle (1920-1996). American.
  • Winthrop (1956-1993). American. Originally titled "Morty Meekle".
  • The Wizard of Id (1964-present). American.
  • Ziggy (1968-present). American. First appearance in book collection, in newspapers since 1971.
  • Zippy the Pinhead (1971-present). American. First appearance in underground comix. Nationally syndicated since 1976, first as a weekly and then as a daily King Features newspaper strip starting in 1986.
  • Zits (1997-present). American.

    Newspapers, Magazines, and Academic Journals 
Due to the exceptional shelf-life of many publications, long-runners in this category are those that reach 150 years in print.
  • 24 heures (Lausanne) (1762–present; claims to be the world's oldest newspaper with uninterrupted publication, although it only adopted its current name in 1972)
  • Åbo Underrättelser (Turku/Åbonote ) (1824–present)
  • Açoriano Oriental (Azores) (1835–present)
  • Aftonbladet (Stockholm) (1830–present, though it had 25 different names before adopting the current one in 1852)
  • The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (c. 900-1150)
  • Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (Little Rock) (1819–present; spent most of the period from 1819–1991 as the Arkansas Gazette and was merged with the Arkansas Democrat in 1991)
  • The Atlanta Constitution (1868-ongoing; known as the Journal-Constitution since 2001)
  • The Atlantic Monthly (1857-ongoing; the word "Monthly" was removed from the cover in 2004, three years after it stopped publishing in every month.note  The name was officially changed to The Atlantic in 2007.)
  • The Augusta Chronicle (1785-ongoing)
  • Baltimore American (1773-1964, then the News-American until 1986)
  • The Baltimore Sun (1837-ongoing)
  • Berlingske (Copenhagen) (1749–present under several different names)
  • Berrow's Worcester Journal (England) (1690–present)
  • Le Bien Public (Dijon) (1868–present)
  • Boletín Oficial del Estado (1661–2008; official legislative newspaper of Spain. Known as Gaceta de Madrid until 1936; went online-only effective 1 January 2009.)
  • Boston Herald (1846-ongoing)
  • Der Bund (Bern) (1850–present)
  • Cape Argus (Cape Town) (1857–present)
  • La Capital (Rosario, Argentina) (1867–present)
  • Charleston Gazette-Mail (West Virginia) (1873–present; spent most of the period from 1873–2015 as the Charleston Gazette and was merged with the Charleston Daily Mail in 2015)
  • Chicago Tribune (1847-ongoing; its parent company also owns other publications such as the Hartford Courant, below)
  • The Cincinnati Enquirer (1849–present under current name, but...)
    • Its first issue under the Enquirer name (as the Daily Cincinnati Enquirer) was in 1841, and predecessor newspapers date to 1828.
  • Congressional Record (1873–present) — the record of the proceedings of the US Congress (equivalent to the Hansard of the UK and several Commonwealth countries)
  • The Courier-Journal (Louisville) (1868–present under current name, but...)
    • Its earliest predecessor, The Focus of Politics, Commerce and Literature, was first published in 1826. The Louisville Daily Journal was established in 1830 and absorbed The Focus two years later. In 1844, the Louisville Morning Courier began publication. The current name was adopted when the Courier and Journal merged in 1868.
  • Le Courrier (Geneva) (1868–present)
  • Le Courrier du pays de Retz (Pomic, France) (1844–1944, 1946–present, although it didn't get its current name until 1996)
  • Dagbladet (Oslo) (1869–present)
  • Dagens Nyheter (Stockholm) (1864–present)
  • The Daily Hampshire Gazette (1786-ongoing) serves Hampshire county in Massachusetts (it hasn't been daily its whole run, though).
  • The Daily Telegraph (1820-ongoing)
  • The Texas edition of The Daily News is Texas' oldest newspaper and has been serving the city of Galveston and Galveston county since 1842.
  • La Dépeche (1870–present) – Applies only to the paper's original Toulouse edition. Sixteen other local editions are published throughout the paper's home region of Occitanie.
  • Detroit Free Press (1831-ongoing)
  • Diário de Noticias (Lisbon) (1864–present)
  • Diário de Pernambuco (Recife, Brazil) (1825–present)
  • Diário dos Açores (Azores) (1870–present)
  • Drammens Tidende (Drammen, Norway) (1832–present)
  • The Economist (1843–present)
  • Evening Standard (1827–present)
  • L'Express (Neuchâtel) (1738-2018)
  • The Farmer's Almanac (1818–present)
  • Le Figaro (1826–present)
  • Gazeta de Barcelona (1641-1808)
  • Gazzetta di Mantova (Mantua) (1664–present; the world's oldest newspaper currently published under its original name)
  • La Gazette (French weekly) (1631-1915)
  • The Globe and Mail (1844-ongoing)
  • Göteborgs-Posten (Gothenburg) (1813–1822, 1850–present; daily since 1939)
  • The Guardian (1821-ongoing; known as The Manchester Guardian until 1959.)
  • The Hansard, the record of the proceedings of the Parliament of Canada, published since 1868.
  • The British Hansard has been published continuously since 1802 (though they weren't called Hansard until 1829).
  • Haarlems Dagblad, a regional newspaper from the Netherlands, claims a founding date of 1656. The original newspaper that had been in print since 1656, Opregte Haarlemsche Courant, was forced to merge with the then bi-weekly Haarlems Dagblad by the occupying Germans in 1942. The merged publication assumed the younger newspaper's name but still claimed the older newspaper's publishing history.
  • Harper's (US) (1850-ongoing)
  • Hartford Courant (1764-ongoing; the self-proclaimed oldest newspaper in America. Just how old is it? Old enough to author an apology to Thomas Jefferson almost 200 years after saying, among other, less flattering things, that should he have won the election of 1800 (which he did, in fact, win), "the air will be rent with the cries of distress, the soil soaked with blood, and the nation black with crimes.")
  • L'Indépendant (Perpignan, France) (1846–present)
  • Irish Examiner (Cork) (1841–present; originally The Cork Examiner and later The Examiner)
  • The Irish Times (1859-ongoing; still considered the country's newspaper of record)
  • The Journal (Newcastle) (1832-ongoing)
  • Journal de la Corse (Corsica) (1817–present)
  • Le Journal de Saône-et-Loire (Chalon-sur-Saône) (1826–present)
  • The Lancet (1823–present)
  • Ledger-Enquirer (Columbus, Georgia) (1826–present) – Originally a weekly as the Columbus Enquirer. Merged with the Daily Sun in 1874, creating the Columbus Enquirer-Sun, later reverting to the Enquirer name. The current name was adopted in 1988, when the Enquirer and Columbus Ledger (founded in 1886), which had previously published a joint Sunday paper, merged their daily editions.
  • Lexington Herald-Leader (Kentucky) (1870–present) – Adopted its current name in 1983 with the merger of the Lexington Herald and Lexington Leader; the 1870 date reflects the founding of the Herald as the Lexington Daily Press.
  • Liverpool Daily Post (1855-ongoing)
  • London Gazette (1665-ongoing). This is the official government paper-of-record of the UK and does not function like a standard newspaper.
  • Magyar Közlöny (1848-ongoing; official legislative newspaper of Hungary. Between 1849 and 1867 its legal predecessor functioned as a government newspaper only since legislature was suspended.)
  • El Mercurio de Valparaíso (1827-ongoing)
  • The Montreal Gazette (1778-ongoing)
  • La Nación (Buenos Aires) (1870–present)
  • Nature (1869–present)
  • Neue Zürcher Zeitung (1780–present; originally Zürcher Zeitung, with Neue added in 1821)
  • The New Hampshire Gazette (on-and-off since 1756; also claims to be America's oldest paper)
  • New York Post (1801-ongoing; claims to be America's longest continuously-published newspaper)
  • The New York Times (1851-ongoing)
  • The New Zealand Herald (Auckland) (1863-present)
  • The News & Observer (1865-ongoing; though it only changed to the current name in 1880)
  • The News Letter (Belfast) (1737-ongoing; claims to be the world's oldest continuously published English-language daily newspaper.)
  • News of the World (1843-2011)
  • The Observer (1791-ongoing)
  • The Old Farmer's Almanac (1792-ongoing; 2017 declairs it as the 225 issue this year. Famous quote: Usefull with a degree of humor.)
  • The Oregonian (Portland) (1850–present)
  • L'Osservatore Romano (Vatican City) (1861–present) – Applies only to the daily Italian-language edition. Since 1949, weekly editions have been added in Italian and six other languages, plus a monthly edition in Polish.
  • Otago Daily Times (Dunedin) (1861–present)
  • Philadelphia Inquirer (1829-ongoing)
  • Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (1786-ongoing; originally a weekly simply called The Gazette, it became a daily in 1844 and acquired its present name, following several additional changes, in 1927.)
  • The Plain Dealer (Cleveland) (1842-ongoing)
  • Post & Inrikes Tidningar (1645-ongoing). This is the government newspaper of Sweden, and the oldest currently published newspaper in the world. It has basically been online-only since 2007, but four physical copies of each new issue are still printed, in order to maintain its status as a "print" publication.
  • La Prensa (Buenos Aires) (1869–present)
  • The Press (Christchurch) (1861-present). Though founded six months before the Otago Daily Times, The Press was a weekly until March 1863, while the ODT has been a daily since its establishment.
  • Le Progrès (Lyon) (1859–present)
  • The Providence Journal (1829-ongoing; Another claimant to the "oldest newspaper in the US" title. They claim to be the "oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the United States", as the Hartford Courant didn't become a daily until 1837, and a few strikes in the 1950's and 1970's have caused the New York Post not to publish a daily paper).
  • Punch (1841-2002)
  • Rocky Mountain News (Denver) (1859-2009)
  • St. Galler Tagblatt (St. Gallen, Switzerland) (1789–present; originally Tagblatt der Stadt St. Gallen and adopted current name in 1910)
  • Sankt-Peterburgskie Vedomosti (1702–1917, revived in 1991 and claims the older paper's history)
  • The Saturday Evening Post (1821-ongoing). The original run ended in 1969. The magazine changed ownership and restarted in 1971.
  • Scientific American (1845-ongoing). The oldest continuously published magazine in the United States.
  • The Sunday Times (1821–present; originally The New Observer, adopted its current name on 20 October 1822, but was not under the same ownership as The Times until 1966)
  • The Sydney Morning Herald (1831 (when it was founded; changed its name to current 10 years later) - present) Longest running newspaper in Australia. In fact, it was founded 70 years before Australia even existed as a country.
  • Sydsvenskan (Malmö) (1870–present)
  • Thurgauer Zeitung (St. Gallen, Switzerland) (1798–present)
  • The Times (1785–present; originally The Daily Universal Register, it adopted its current name on 1 January 1788)
  • Toledo Blade (1835-ongoing; known simply as The Blade since 1960)
  • Victoria Times-Colonist - debatable. The "Colonist" bit has been going since 1854, when it was The British Colonist; it merged with the Victoria Daily Times (established 1884) in 1980.
  • Wiener Zeitung (1703-ongoing; official government newspaper of Austria, Ended its daily print edition on 30 June 2023; continues as an online publication, and plans to distribute a monthly print edition.)
  • Zürcher Oberländer (Wetzikon, near Zürich) (1852–present under three different names)
  • Zürichsee Zeitung (Stäfa, near Zürich) (1845–present under three different names)

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