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Most tropes are obviously either present or absent in a work, and can be added to a work page immediately after the work is released. Others, particularly Audience Reactions, tropes that involve the passage of real-world time, and those that span a large number of installments, can take a little bit to be sure that they apply. See also: Speculative Troping.

The following is a list of tropes and Audience Reactions that, for one reason or another, have a formal, mandatory waiting period before examples may be added to work pages, YMMV pages, or the main trope page.

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Even where no formal mandatory waiting period is in place, before adding an example of an Audience Reaction, it's a good rule of thumb to ask oneself: "Will this still be relevant in a year? In a month? In a week?" If the answer is "no" or even, "I'm not sure," maybe hold off a little while and see what happens. Fan reaction can often be knee-jerk. It takes time for fan and critical consensus to form. Controversies that burn brightly often burn out quickly. Attempting to catalog every flash-in-pan Audience Reaction often results in pages that are cluttered and/or overly complain-y.

Not to be confused with Examples Are Not Recent.

Note: Entries on this list have been agreed upon by consensus in this thread. Do not add or delete them without first reaching consensus there.


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Pages with a mandatory waiting period:

  • Base-Breaking Character (6 months after the character is introduced or becomes controversial, whichever comes later): Due to being a magnet for knee-jerk reactions whenever a character is disliked by any portion of the fanbase. Cleanup thread here.
  • Box Office Bomb (No films that have not finished their initial theatrical runs): It's impossible to tell whether a film can qualify while it's still in theaters, since some movies take longer to recoup their budgets than others.
  • Broken Base (6 months after release or the issue becomes divisive, whichever comes later): Due to being misused for any disagreement within a fanbase, no matter how minor or short-lived. Cleanup thread here.
  • Complete Monster (2 weeks): Due to frequent misuse; the waiting period allows more people to experience the work so that consensus may be reached on newer examples. Cleanup thread here.
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  • Franchise Killer (5 years or official confirmation): In absence of confirmation, an extended period of inactivity is required to prove it "dead".
  • Magnificent Bastard (2 weeks): Due to frequent misuse; the waiting period allows more people to experience the work so that consensus may be reached on newer examples. Cleanup thread here.
  • NeverLiveItDown.Real Life (25 years): Due to being a magnet for agenda-based editing. Waiting period implemented so that it can be conclusively shown that the example, in fact, never did live it down.
  • NeverLiveItDown.Sports (10 months): Similar to the Real Life section, though it takes much less time to become conclusive.
  • Oppressive States of America (No Real Life Examples past the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s): Due to Rule of Cautious Editing Judgement concerns.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy (6 months after the work is released or becomes controversial, whichever comes later): Controversies often burn bright and then flare out, meaning that controversies that seemed important around release time can be forgotten before too long. Cleanup thread here.
  • Unintentional Period Piece (10 years or exceptional circumstances): Generally takes at least ten years to determine what the period-piece hallmarks of a given time period are. Cleanup thread here.
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