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  • Back In 1995 is done in the style of old PS1-era horror games, with blocky graphics, camera angles, and even a screen effect evoking the look of old standard-definition televisions.
  • Aberoth is a 2015 MMO that is nevertheless done entirely in 8-bit graphics.
  • Macbat 64 Journey Of A Nice Chap is a love letter to late 90s-era 3D Platformers like Banjo-Kazooie. As such, it presents itself in that style, from the wacky characters and colourful locales, to the Nintendo 64-era graphics.
  • Mega Man 9 is done entirely as an NES-style game, essentially making it an NES game on high-definition consoles (and WiiWare, where it makes a bit more sense). Up until the game's release, this was busily producing a Broken Base — fortunately, it turned out to be so good, it consolidated Mega Man fandom in enjoyment instead. Capcom produced some fake NES carts for the game and commissioned the ridiculous "box art" picture shown at the top of the article (a homage to the famously So Bad, It's Good North American cover of 1 through 3, which had mostly nothing to do with the character). The game even has an option that lets you relive the glory days of NES sprite limitations by enabling sprites flickering when too many are on the screen at one time.
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    • And it continues on with Mega Man 10, also in faux 8-bit sprites. Its faux box art has more-or-less the same style of Mega Man as 9's, with now-unlocked-from-the-start Proto Man and Bass joining the badly-drawn fun, and boasting "Dual FX Twin Engines" and a "Parallel Hyper-Bit Interface" much like how Mega Man 9 promised an "Ultrasound Graphics Synthesis" and an "8-Bit Fidelity Engine". The "lost" commercial for 10 comes complete with all the attitude of video game ads in the 80s and poor VCR tracking. (The commercial music, though, is an anachronism of sorts for what is supposedly the 80s.)
    • Similar to Mega Man 9 and 10, Street Fighter X Mega Man is also created resembling the old NES Mega Man games, even including a password system resembling the one from Mega Man 2. Even the Street Fighter characters are drawn in NES graphics. (However, unlike MM9 and MM10, SFxMM merely mimics the NES look, as numerous sprites surpass the limits of NES graphics.)
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  • Dragon's Wake is done in a pixel art style which is reminiscent of older systems but doesn't specifically mimic any of them.
  • The penultimate level in Kirby's Adventure mimics the look of the previous installment, Kirby's Dream Land, which was on the Game Boy. What makes this example particularly odd is that Dream Land was only released one year before Adventure. The level returns intact in the Game Boy Advance remake Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land, where it makes more sense, given that the GBA is the direct successor to the Game Boy and is backwards-compatible with its games.
  • Battle Kid: Fortress of Peril is a Metroidvania released in 2010 and it's completely with 8-bit graphics and music. Which makes sense, considering that it's a real NES game, cartridge and all. It got a sequel in 2012.
  • Crusaders Quest: This auto-combat RPG is rather pixelated, resembling 16-bit era graphics.
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  • The graphics style of Duck Game evokes this trope, while the promotional images evoke the style of hand-drawn game covers of the era.
  • The Binding of Isaac Rebirth is a "16-bit makeover" of the original game; Word of God states that it's based on colorized Game Boy games.
  • Doom II: Maps 31 and 32 are a callback to Wolfenstein 3D.
  • else Heart.Break(): The game is 3D, but the textures are pixellated. Perhaps something of a stylistic choice.
  • The Fallout '84 demo by 8 Bit Weapon, running on the Apple IIc.
  • Grand Theft Auto:
    • Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, a game from 2002, mimics the loading screen of a Commodore 64 upon booting up, a reference to the game's 1986 setting.
    • Similarly, on Rockstar Games' website, as a tie-in for Vice City there is a "fanpage" devoted to the Degenatron, a primitive parody of second generation video game consoles, complete with working "emulations" of its three "8-bit" games and a supposedly old scan of a Degenatron magazine ad.
    • Done again with the eXsorbeo in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, a parody of the Game Boy. Like before,
    • Rockstar created a fake eXsorbeo fansite containing another "emulator" for one game from 1991, with monochrome and pixelated graphics not dissimilar to those of classic Game Boy games.
    • Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories features similar aesthetics in some of its fake websites, appearing like those circa 1998. Of note is this one, which parodies the typical poorly designed Geocities-like website common before the abundance of competent graphics and web designers.
  • Homestar Runner RPG, a cancelled RPG running on the Atari 2600.
  • Newcomer, by Protovision, is a C64 game released in 2001.
  • Orange Pixel and Noodlecake Studios make several games which are most pixelated: Bitcoin Billionaire, Random Heroes 1-3, League of Evil, Punch Quest, Devious Dungeon, Groundskeeper, Heroes of Loot, etc.
  • Pier Solar and the Great Architects: A homebrew RPG on the Sega Genesis/Sega CD, with an HD version for newer consoles, including the Sega Dreamcast.
  • Viewtiful Joe, when you run out of VFX.
  • Minecraft has intentionally very low resolution textures to go with the gameplay of moving giant pixels around. Originally the intention was to update to more modern graphics but fans had already become attached to the faux-16-bit textures.
  • Much like Mega Man 9, Sega Racing Classic, an Updated Re-release of the classic racing title Daytona USA, uses graphics that look like they came out of 1994, the year the original game was released to international audiences. The only changes were to the draw distance and resolution. See it in all of its glory here. This is largely due to practicality more than anything else. Arcade operators (they still exist!) continued to place orders to Sega for Daytona USA machines and replacement parts. Unfortunately, Sega no longer produces the hardware and no longer had the Daytona license. The solution was Sega Racing Classic, which solves all three problems.
  • Slayin somewhat resembles a 16-bit portable game, and the game icon resembles a cartridge for a handheld system.
  • Stubbs the Zombie. Retro-future setting and they intentionally put a grainy "filter" of sorts to complete the ensemble.
  • Sword of Xolan: This side scrolling platformer is quite pixelated, somewhat resembling an 8-bit game.
  • Mass Effect has a film grain screen filter, in order to better emulate the 70s-80s science fiction movies that inspired it, though this can be turned off in the settings. The default setting for Mass Effect 2 has it turned off, probably because of the shift in style - the sequel has more in common with the darker and more serious sci-fi of the The '90s, such as Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Babylon 5.
  • 1942: Joint Strike is designed to look like a World War II movie, complete with film grain, sepia tones, and the projector winding up and down at the start and end of each level.
  • The Timeless River in Kingdom Hearts II, which is Disney Castle in the past (reached through time travel), based on 1920s Disney shorts. The audio for the world is even in mono and the two songs for it are deliberately left in low quality on the game's OST. Everyone switches to their earlier/original designs, except including Sora, who gets a new "old" design with a simplified outfit in a style much like that of Astro Boy-era Osamu Tezuka.
  • Super Smash Bros. has several examples:
    • Most notable is Mr. Game & Watch, a 2-Dimensional stick figure that references an old Nintendo Game and Watch game with almost every move he makes. In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, he even transforms into different Game and Watch characters outright.
    • Several Assist Trophies simply appear as 8-bit or 16-bit sprites, namely the Excite Bikes, Infantry and Tanks, Sheriff, Lakitu, Ghosts, and Color TV Game 15. Additionally, Andross appears in his polygonal 16-bit form rather than his modern design.
      • Ultimate adds Akira to the mix, using his blocky polygonal model from his debut appearance rather than his current design.
    • Every iteration of the series has had at least one Retraux stage:
      • The original has Mushroom Kingdom, modeled after Super Mario Bros.. Melee follows this with Mushroom Kingdom II, which is modeled after the Super Mario All-Stars version of Super Mario Bros. 2, and also includes Flat Zone, a stage taking place inside a Game & Watch.
      • Brawl has 75m, Green Hill Zone, Mario Bros., and Flat Zone 2.
      • 4 has Balloon Fight, Dream Land (complete with a Game Boy startup sequence and border!), Pac-Maze, Mute City, Duck Hunt, and Pac-Land. The Pilotwings stage starts out as a Retraux throwback to the original SNES game, but changes to a representation of Wii Sports Resort halfway through.
    • Stages from the original Nintendo 64 iteration have appeared in every subsequent Smash game (except for Brawl), with the original Sprite/Polygon Mix graphics kept intact each time. Even in Ultimate, where every other stage is given a significant graphical upgrade, the Nintendo 64 stages still use the same primitive-even-for-the-time graphics they did years ago.
  • Saints Row IV features a stage where the Boss has to fight their way through a retro-style 2D Beat 'em Up, replete with Stylistic Suck, from the stilted and heavily digitized voice-acting to models that are pixelated and choppily animated to resemble sprites.
  • The Rhythm Game Donkey Konga 3 includes a version of the theme from the original Donkey Konga done in NES-syle.
  • Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare uses this in two places.
    • The first, and more perplexing occurrence, is in the flashback cutscene to the two Lt. Price sniper missions. These are shown in sepia tones and simulated film graininess... despite being set roughly a decade after the Chernobyl accident (1986).
    • The second is a cheat setting, unlocked through collecting items in-game, that changes the in-game rendering to mimic early Ragtime films, complete with all the sound being replaced with a piano tune.
  • Abobo's Big Adventure. When the developers describe it as "Every NES game ever made put into a blender", you know you have a winner.
  • Faraway Kingdom: This auto-combat RPG appears quite pixelated, with Captain Ersatz heroes of Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy. The spinoff Tap! Tap! Faraway Kingdom follows suit.
  • Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon revels in 80s-style retraux: scanlines, loading screens with a tracking bar ala VHS tapes, Mecha-Mooks that look more like people wearing motorcycle helmets and suits with Tron Lines, cutscenes that would be at home in an NES-era Ninja Gaiden game, and so on...
  • Test Drive: Eve of Destruction has a similar cheat, the description of which claims that it is "newly discovered racing footage from 1912".
  • I Wanna Be the Guy focuses almost exclusively on the difficulty of older games with an occasionally matching graphical and audio style.
  • God Hand has two minigame segments that play 8-bit styled music, as well as referencing Space Invaders in one of them with a randomly appearing UFO worth loads of points.
  • No More Heroes features a number of throwbacks to 8-bit games, including 8-bit music at some points, a pixellated tiger that serves as a timer for your special moves, a high score board that appears after each ranked battle, and even a top-down scrolling shooter minigame. The sequel turned the menial task side missions into 8-bit-style minigames as well.
  • The House of the Dead: OVERKILL takes a page from Grindhouse and manages to turn the franchise into even more of a terrible B-movie game than it already is.
  • La-Mulana is a 2005 indie PC game with a striking resemblance to MSX games, complete with limited boss animations, SSCC channel music, and Flip-Screen Scrolling, the latter of which many MSX platformers, such as Knightmare II: Maze of Galious and Vampire Killer, utilized due to the MSX's poor scrolling capabilities. The 2010 remake acts more like a 'lost' PSX game, with 32-bit graphics.
    • Similarly, GR3, developed by the same people who worked on La-Mulana, is designed to mimic the MSX Gradius games, complete with the graphics, HUD, two-option limit, and jerky scrolling.
  • Baldurs Gate II Throne Of Baal had a quest in the Tower where the player had to let go of the main character, and play a Dialogue Tree driven pen and paper RPG in order to obtain a MacGuffin.
  • Gradius ReBirth is a throwback to older titles in the series, with sound effects from the MSX Gradius arc, remixes of music from lesser-known titles (Gradius II for Famicom, Salamander 2, etc.) using instrument samples from the arcade version of Gradius III, and graphics that look like something out of Gradius II, III, and Nemesis '90 Kai.
  • Bethesda created a browser game based on Fallout 3 that used 8-bit graphics similar to the early Dragon Quest games. It's currently only in Japanese, but it's fascinating.
    • Ironically, that actually looks similar to Wasteland, the original game which inspired Fallout.
  • The 1st part of the opening sequence for Power Stone is made to look and sound like a faded film reel from the early 20th century is being run. This is appropriate since the game scenery and characters are throwbacks to that era.
  • Freeware Ninja Senki was made in 2011, yet it's graphics and soundtrack are pure early 90's. The gameplay is considerably more fast-paced, though.
  • Sega's Fantasy Zone Complete Collection in their Sega Ages line includes a reinterpetation of Fantasy Zone II if it had been developed by Sega's AM team on Sega's System 16 arcade board like the first game, instead of the vastly inferior Sega Master System hardware and System E arcade board. For extra authenticity points, they developed this remake on the actual System 16 hardware. The US 3DS release called it Fantasy Zone II DX to destinguish it from the original Fantasy Zone II.
    • In Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing, Opa-Opa's "voice" samples consists of sound effects ripped directly from Super Fantasy Zone. This is in contrast to fellow retro racers Alex Kidd (who's Suddenly Voiced) and the Bonanza Bros. (who have their "he-he", the only speech they ever had in the original game, resampled in multiple variants)
  • Pole's Big Adventure uses this trope to its fullest as it is a Parody of the 8-bit Platformer
  • The Independant Gaming Source's Bootleg Demakes Competition. Name says it all.
  • In The Deadly Tower of Monsters you play through a schlocky sci-fi movie made in the 1970's. Every aspect of the game hearkens back to cheesy B-Movies, from bad special effects to over the top acting.
  • Odallus: The Dark Call looks like an NES game; specifically one that borrows from the Castlevania series.
  • Shovel Knight is done in an 8-bit style as a tribute to 8-bit games, with a few liberties taken to make things a bit prettier. Despite it being an Indie game, the style is actually an entirely deliberate choice done for its own sake, rather than for the cheaper production values. Even the soundtrack gets in on the act, being done with Konami's VRC6 sound chip.
  • Team Fortress 2's art style (including some fake ads on the official website and introductory tutorials shown on grainy projector film) has a 1950s-60s aesthetic. The jazzy spy music helps too.
    • The WAR! Update's Propaganda Contest's honorable mentions includes "Best Attempts at Authentic WWI-Era Propaganda," "Best Attempts at Authentic WWII-Era Propaganda," "Best Use of the Time-Worn Maxim, 'Sex Sells,'" and "Best Ironic Resuscitation of a Long-Dead Genre."
  • Cave Story's graphics were made in a very low resolution with no anti-aliasing to mimic 8-bit era games. The music, similarly, uses a custom-written sound driver whose sound is not unlike that of the TurboGrafx 16.
  • Iji's graphics are done in low resolution to mimic games from the late eighties, and lots of solid colors as though there were a pallete. The animations however, are much more fluid than those of that era.
  • Retro Game Challenge is a collection of faux 8-bit games, presented in-story as having been sent back in time by the host of Game Center CX/Retro Game Master, the Japanese television show it's based on. One of the random events that can take place when you choose a game to play in Story Mode is the cartridge not working and Arino suggesting that you should blow on it. In the second game, you're given a choice to karate chop it instead when it happens and if you don't pick that option, Arino does it himself the next time it happens.
  • The FB Games Directory held a programming competition in 2008, where the task was to create a Retraux game using the FreeBASIC programming language.
  • Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts has a mini-game called "Hero Klungo Sssavesss teh World!" [sic], a parody of 8-bit games, right down to the strange (but awesome) promotional art that has nothing to do with the actual game.
  • Eversion is a very 8-bit-like game released in 2008. The cute, low-res graphics, however, are a facade for the game's much more sinister side. The Steam remake is more modern-looking than the freeware original, however.
  • Ginormo Sword and other Babarageo games tend to resemble Atari graphics.
  • WarioWare: Starting from WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$!, games frequently resemble NES, SNES and Game Boy games. Smooth Moves is full of Retraux, like the 9-Volt retro stages and the Ashley's Theme title cards to the character intros.
  • The flashbacks in the Final Fantasy IV: The After Years (including a playable one in Porom's chapter) are deliberately done in the same style as the the original SNES version of Final Fantasy IV. The rest of the game looks more like Final Fantasy VI, which at first makes it appear as an example, but the game was originally made for cell phones incapable of the graphics of later Final Fantasy games.
  • Final Fantasy Record Keeper and its predecessor Final Fantasy: All the Bravest have pixelation for monsters, characters and combat effects from games released later than the 16-bit generation, and play SNES era music and sound effects. The Record Keeper Final Fantasy I realm, due being on the NES, uses 8-bit music throughout the entirety of the realm, including the victory theme.
  • Castlevania: Symphony of the Night's Prologue uses the HUD from its predecessor, Rondo of Blood, which makes sense as it's a pseudo-flashback to Rondo and the game is a direct sequel to it. Richter and Maria modes also make use of this HUD.
  • The sixth level of PaRappa the Rapper 2 is done with graphics and music resembling old 8-bit video games, and gets progressively less detailed as your performance dips into the "bad" and "awful" levels.
  • Cortex Command is an in-development retraux game which is a 2D side-scroller with a look of the early 90s, though it wasn't even started until the year 2000.
  • The entire Roguelike genre qualifies. Roguelikes, such as NetHack, ADOM and Angband (among others), use primarily ASCII graphics. This style, along with the gameplay, is a deliberate attempt to evoke the feel of the classic game Rogue.
  • The "Void Quest" dungeon in Persona 4 mimics 8-bit graphics and even, during the boss fight, old-style RPG menus - with a twist (you're the monsters being attacked, and the boss is the hero). Golden even gives the boss a chiptune remix of the game's standard boss theme.
  • One of the many Tetris variants on Tetris Friends is Tetris 1989, designed to mimic the Game Boy version as close as possible. In terms of sound, only the Tetris theme is accurate, but who's complaining?
  • The Dark Spire is a close imitation of 1980s Wizardry games, and even has a mode which produces wireframe graphics like in the early 1980s, along with 8 bit style music.
  • The WiiWare game Bit Boy features six levels each based on a different generation of consoles and with graphics to match.
  • Steam Punk game Steel Empire has the levels start with an old sepia-tone video.
  • Ace Attorney:
    • The flashback sequence, within a flashback sequence, in Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Trials & Tribulations is presented in flickering sepia-tone with flickering black lines, suggesting the earliest days of silent film. Despite the fact that, according to the timeline of The ’Verse, it took place in 2003.
    • Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney does it as well for one sequence. When you play as Phoenix Wright in his final trial, all the graphics and music used are from the Phoenix Wright games instead of the new style used by Apollo Justice. Only Klavier, Trucy, Zak, Valant, and Drew Misham appear in a more modern look in graphics during this sequence.
    • Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Dual Destinies gets upgraded to stereoscopic 3D, but it imitates the limited sprite animation of the previous games. Characters fade in and out, and snap from pose to pose.
  • Raidou Kuzunoha vs. The Soulless Army deliberately has no voice acting and uses a 30s style silent film appearance for its dialog windows in order to mimic silents films of the era the game takes place in. Its sequel, Raidou Kuzunoha vs. King Abaddon, maintains this technique.
  • Left 4 Dead has a film grain, though you can disable it if you want. Additionally, the campaign title screens are made to look like movie posters and credits are played at the end of each, essentially making it a 90s Zombie Apocalypse movie in video game form.
  • Pokémon:
    • HeartGold and SoulSilver, already Video Game Remakes themselves, feature the "GB Sounds" key item, which allows you to replace the game's music with an imitation of the chiptune music from the original Game Boy Color games. Notably, this includes the areas new to the remakes, which received all-new chiptunes.
    • Done in the opening sequence of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. Up to a certain point, it appears to be a 1:1 creation of the original games' introductions, complete with the original 16-bit soundtrack. Later, the camera pans up and away to show this as being a video the player character is watching on their PokéNav Plus during the trip to Littleroot Town, as the music seamlessly transitions into the updated version. The localizations take this a step further by putting KEY TERMS in all caps until the reveal, something that had otherwise been abandoned two generations ago. During regular play the DexNav shows every area as it appeared in the original games on the lower screen.
  • Freeware flash game Malstrum's Mansion (from the creator of Zeno Clash) is an Adventure Game in the style of Shadowgate or Uninvited, made in the style of an old black-and-white Apple Macintosh game. You start it up from a "System 1.0" desktop, and it even has manual-based copy protection!
  • Contra 4 is essentially a retraux sequel to the earlier Contra games, particularly Contra III: The Alien Wars, with several Shout Outs to the first three console games in the series. Even the game's manual is written in the same tongue-in-cheek tone as Konami's old localized manuals during the NES era (and unlike the NES games, this carried over to the game itself).
  • "Soundless Mountain 2" is a 2-D fan remake of Silent Hill 2.
    • Also, "Noiseless Mound" is a 2-D fan "remake" of Silent Hill.
    • And when Harry makes a cameo appearance in the Silent Hill 2 UFO ending, he appears in blocky, PS1-era graphics.
  • Whenever Babe Ruth appears in Backyard Baseball, he is drawn in a crude style, unlike everyone else.
  • 3D Dot Game Heroes takes this up another level by turning pixels into voxels.
  • Half-Minute Hero features blocky sprite graphics reminiscent of the old Dragon Quest games, despite being on the PSP.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
  • Used in Alien: Isolation. The game itself is totally modern, but the technology in-game is intentionally designed to look like it was built in the 1970's. Just like the original Alien.
  • Released for Nintendo DSiWare and Steam is Dark Void Zero, which is Dark Void reworked as an 8-bit action side-scrolling platformer. It was even marketed with a fictional development history, saying that it was originally developed for the PlayChoice-10, taking advantage of the technology available. It also supposedly featured "System Zero", a chipset that increased the limitations of the NES. Capcom found the promotional materials for the game and began tracking down a surviving copy of it, and found that a promotional prototype copy of a home version was given away to a young Jimmy Fallon. It was this version of the game that the DSiWare version was supposedly based on. More details are here. Part 2 describes the attempts to get the supposed ROM working.
  • Spanish game creator Locomalito is very fond of NES and arcade games from 80s, and his games show.
    • 8Bit Killer is a Wolfenstein 3D-esque FPS featuring characters drawn with limited pallete on 32*32 sprites (there are bigger entities than that, but no larger than 64*64) in a 3D world comprised of 32*32 textures at right angles to each other, 8-bit sounds and chiptune music in the style of NES.
    • Hydorah is a Gradius style shooter featuring very similar aesthetics, but the music is far from retro, however.
    • L'Abbaye des Morts is a platform game complete with one-colour sprites and Flip-Screen Scrolling in style of ZX Spectrum.
    • Maldita Castilla is a Ghosts 'n Goblins-inspired game with aesthetics of a late 80s arcade game. If the game was asking the player to insert coin, you'd be thinking you're playing an arcade game on an emulator.
  • Samurai Gunn is designed to at least have the look of this, with pixel art graphics for its visual design. Subverted in terms of the sound design which uses occasional speech samples for death sequences.
  • In Super Robot Wars Z, the older super robots such as Baldios, God Sigma and Getter Robo G get some very awesome retro-looking animations in their finisher attacks, complete with choppy animation and trippy retro "laser backgrounds" and pastel-frame explosions! This is a first for the franchise and was the key to grabbing the attention of many people who weren't very excited about the game initially and also demonstrates the degree of love the designers have for the older shows, preserving them in all their glory. Needless to say, many mech-anime fan tears of joy were shed.
  • Nostalgia is an unabashed love letter to old Eastern RPGs.
  • Darwinia has pseudo-retro style graphics with very little textures and many of the characters are 2D sprites. In addition, game intros provide homage to the older times. One is a ZX Spectrum loading screen. Another is a deliberate recreation of Amiga Cracktros which tells how it's been cracked by DMA Crew. The Steam release got delayed by an hour because it was thought to be authentic.
  • From the same developer as Darwinia, Defcon's game board is a monochromatic vector graphic map of the world, obviously chosen as an homage to the game's inspiration.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • Game Land Zone from Sonic Colors. The layout of the levels are basic replicas of the levels from the classic Sonic games, and the music played in the levels are a 8-bit chiptune-styled remix of the music from the main game.
    • Sonic Mania is a 2017 Sonic the Hedgehog game designed to look as if it came out on the Sega Saturn. As such, it has Sonic, Tails & Knuckles as the only playable characters (that is, until the Plus update, which added Ray and Mighty from SegaSonic the Hedgehog), graphics designed after the Genesis games but with the higher resolution and brighter colors of Sonic the Hedgehog CD, a jazzy CD-quality soundtrack also inspired by Sonic CD, and many classic sound effects from the Genesis days. It also has an animated intro and ending, and even low-poly 3D models in some places, in the style of what you'd see on the Saturn!
  • In Ōkami: The song during the narrator's closing words. If you actually sit and wait after the music pauses, an 8-bit remix of the song "Ida Race" starts to play.
    • There were also official renditions of some of the game's areas as NES RPG style maps.
  • Evil Genius has a very 60s style to it, meant to evoke the campy spy movies it's based on.
  • Any games by Spiderweb Software are about ten years behind normal games in both their style and their engines, although they advance at the same rate as the rest of the industry. There is a very good reason for this: they have a development team of three people, and if they tried to make modern-style games they wouldn't be able to finish them at a reasonable pace.
  • VVVVVV feels like some lost computer game from the 1980s, with monochromatic sprites, screen-by-screen gameplay à la Jet Set Willy and Monty on the Run, and even an authentic Commodore 64 font for in-game text.
  • Team Meat, the developers behind Super Meat Boy, released an iOS tie-in game designed to invoke LCD gaming like Game & Watch and Tiger Handheld.
  • Retro City Rampage
  • Halo 2600. Out now in your favorite web browser.
  • During Act 4 of Metal Gear Solid 4, Old Snake starts dreaming on the way to Shadow Moses Island (the setting to Metal Gear Solid). The game scales back to PS1 standards. Original music, graphics, Guard stupidity, and even the Game Over screen is retraux. As Snake wakes up, his head is still PS1-style for a split second. This also unlocks facial camoflage that allows you to keep the PS1-Snake head (which makes him look like the eraser sitting on the top of a pencil in comparison to the rest of his body).
    • Also, in the boss fight against Liquid Ocelot, the appropriate music and health gauges regress back through the series for each stage of the fight, including changing the combatant's names and replacing Psyche with Hunger/Stamina or O2 (for chokeholds).
  • Eggy, a game made using Game Maker, in which you take control of a sixteen-by-sixteen-pixel egg trying to defeat an apparently French chef.
  • Ultima Underworld II: An area in the Ethereal Void is a Call-Back to the earlier vector line dungeon graphics of Ultima and Akalabeth.
  • Wizardry 8: Attempted with the retro dungeons of cubic rooms with bold highlighted lines, but the textured walls don't convey the older games so well.
  • The opening credits of Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s features an Atari-era Activision logo, and a retro Harmonix logo.
  • A Chinese developer known as Waixing, known for its notorious RPG conversions, actually remade the original Resident Evil for famiclones. Don't get your hopes up, though; it plays identically to one of the worst-received games in the series and has horribly screechy music. There is another fan-made demake that's more faithful in execution.
  • Disgaea 4 allows you to use either detailed high definition sprites or the standard definition sprites utilized by the past three games.
  • The logos for Aperture Laboratories in "The Fall" in Portal 2. In the earliest section built in the 1950s, it's called "Aperture Science Innovators" with a symbol for an atom. For the 1970s, it's a very typical 70s yellow logo. The items in each test are also designed to look like older versions of the main testing rooms and equipment from Portal and the first part of Portal 2.
  • The Nintendo 3DS's Virtual Console allows you to play Game Boy and Game Boy Color games, and added a few Retraux touches to enhance the experience: for example, on original Game Boy games it's possible to swap between a grayscale screen and a green screen that emulates the look of the original Game Boy, even including a motion blur similar to that in the old system. This is done by holding both the L and R buttons and then pressing Y to swap between them. It's also possible to view the games in their original resolution, with a border representing the original system surrounding the screen- the 3DS's 3D effect is used to give the appearance of the screen being set back from the border, and they even emulated the battery light dimming as the 3DS's battery runs low and even includes the Classic Game Boy's "DOT MATRIX WITH STEREO SOUND" label on the front. This is achieved by holding START and SELECT while selecting a title (software has to be closed first).
    • Both the Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo DSi have this in their sound app when playing music from an SD card, either the "Radio" filter that simulates an old AM radio, complete with graininess and pops and the "8-bit" filter but that tends to sound really bad on many songs.
  • In Zettai Hero Project, the main character had just taken over the mantle of the Unlosing Ranger; since no one believes in him, he has no sponsors. So for the first few times he goes up against Dark Death Evil Man, it's set to an 8-bit RPG system akin to Dragon Quest or Final Fantasy. It progressively improves to 16-bit before settling on visuals more akin to Valkyrie Profile.
  • A few My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic Web Games: The Hub's official Platform Game Adventure Ponies! as well as Donitz's fangames Story of the Blanks and Hoofball.
  • The whole Etrian Odyssey series more or less came about because a certain game designer really wanted there to be Dungeon Master for the DS. Every aspect is lovingly oldschool, even down to the music, which was actually entirely composed on a PC-88. It even creeps into the meta level: an in-game map would be too modern, so the bottom screen is basically a piece of digital graph paper to draw your own.
  • Marvel Ultimate Alliance allowed you to play Pitfall with your active hero after the boss fight with Phoenix. While the hero still appears in 3D, the rest of the stage (save for the end point) is entirely made like in the Atari 2600.
  • Dwarf Fortress is a very detailed civilization building and exploration simulator set in a High Fantasy world... that happens to be illustrated entirely in ASCII. It's a great example of the "doing it for practical reasons" variant of this trope as well; the sheer complexity of what's being simulated in-game would be nigh-impossible to represent visually so the developer decided "less is more" and let the player's imagination fill in the blanks.
    • Donators can ask for "ASCII Art" that depicts part of a story in Dwarf Fortress style Ascii. Donators who continue to donate get to continue this story.
  • The Flash game Tower Of Heaven has graphics in shades of green that would look at home on the original Game Boy.
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. The World looks, sounds, and feels like a beat-em-up game from the 1990s— quite fittingly for a game based on a graphic novel that was heavily inspired by video games of the '90s. Indeed, Ubisoft specifically hired rock band Anamanaguchi and graphic artist Paul Robertson for the game because of their previous Retraux work!
  • Soulcaster and Soulcaster II have 8-bit-style graphics.
  • The Nintendo 3DS game Mutant Mudds has graphics somewhere between an NES and SNES in fidelity (the game advertises itself as "12-bit") and authentic NES chiptunes for music. Taken even further, there are hidden levels that mimic some iconic color schemes of older hardware; the pea-green grayscale of the Game Boy ("G-Land"), the red-and-black monochrome of the Virtual Boy ("V-Land") and the cyan/fuchsia/white/black of early IBM Personal Computers ("CGA-Land").
  • The Indie Game Wretcher is an attempt to mimic old horror adventure games, and uses a 16-bit style remniscent of the Clock Tower games.
  • Zeboyd Games makes tributes to (and parodies of) 8-bit and 16-bit Role Playing Games. Breath of Death VII homages Dragon Quest games for the NES with a slightly larger graphics pallete. Cthulhu Saves the World is similar but with aesthetics more in line with SNES games. Cosmic Star Heroine is a homage to Chrono Trigger, Phantasy Star and several other 16-bit J-RPGs made for PC and PlayStation 4. The music in these games, however, is anything but retro.
  • The text-based adventure sequence in the Sam & Max Season 1 episode "Reality 2.0".
  • Oniken is a Nintendo Hard tribute to Platform Games like Ninja Gaiden and Shatterhand, advertised with NES-style cover art including a Seal of Quality.
  • BLOODCRUSHER II looks and plays like a mid-90s shooter in the style of Doom and Quake, complete with low resolution textures, blocky character models, and pixely effects.
  • 70's Robot Anime - Geppy X - The Super Booster Armor is purely what could have been if the early Getter Robo anime would be interactive. Starting with a lot of FMV cutscenes done a-la the intended time period (all of which occupy four discs!), going on with the slightly cheesy vocal themes, title cards before every stage loads up... God, it even includes fake commercial breaks inbetween the "episodes"!
    • Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser is a Spiritual Successor of the above, homaging several other Super Robot shows such as Mazinger Z, Voltes V and Voltron. It also has a sequel of sorts in the form of Witch-bot Meglilo, which this time homages and parodies 70s Magical Girl shows instead of giant robots.
  • McPixel is done in the style of late 70's / early 80's pixel point-and-click games.
  • Organ Trail is a zombie apocalypse survival simulation in the style of, as the name suggests, The Oregon Trail.
  • Thule Trail was a Flash-based remake of Oregon Trail taking place in the modern day, with the goal of arriving in time to a music festival from Chicago to LA, in a car equipped with a Thule luggage rack.
  • Super Retro Squad is a game featuring nine characters inspired by Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Mega Man, Castlevania, Ninja Gaiden, Contra, and Blaster Master. It invokes the look and feel of an Super Nintendo Entertainment System game, but Downloadable Content is planned to include 8-bit and handheld versions of the game, soundtrack and all. Since this is made by the same team behind Super Mario Bros. Crossover, you'd know where it is all coming from.
  • The Adventure Time videogame for DS/3DS, "Hey Ice King! Why'd you steal our garbage!?" is essentially a love letter to old school videogames, uses NES style graphics (except for the character portraits) and chiptune music. Even the overworld map you can't deny it wasn't inspired by Zelda II.
  • Star Command is made with pixel graphics in a deliberate attempt to mimic Game Dev Story and recall older games. On the other hands, the backgrounds are spectacular.
  • The Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is made in the style of an 8-bit platformer, and uses NES chiptune sounds for its soundtrack.
  • Snailiad is another 8-bit style game.
  • The Last Door is an 8-bit horror made in the style of a LucasArts Point-and-Click adventure game. Aside from the sound department, the game looks like it would run on a Sega 32X with no issues.
  • Space Quest IV revolves around time travel. Though it was produced in the 256-color VGA era, you can travel back to Space Quest I (and Space Quest III in an Easter Egg)... complete with lo-res 16-color EGA graphics. This (comically) extends to the smells as attempting to smell the force field generators around Uelence Flats results in the narrator saying it's supposed to smell like it but there's only 16 smells in EGA, therefore it smells like the time pod.
  • Space Quest V: The Next Mutation: In the Eureka's maintenance tunnel, you can disconnect a fuse labelled "EGA-to-VGA", doing so results in the colors reverting to a 16-bit pallette until you put it back in.
  • In Robopon, the GBA games' music sometimes uses sounds from the GBC games.
  • Pot of Legend, a mobile game about Rewarding Vandalism, is done in a pixelated 8-bit style.
  • Lyle in Cube Sector has sprites and backgrounds that would not look out of place in a Nintendo Entertainment System game.
  • In MOTHER 3, the theme for the fight against the Porky bots is a 8-bit remix of one of the first battle themes in the game.
  • Katamari Damacy:
    • The intro for "Shine! Mr. Sunshine" from Me and My Katamari is a chiptune version of "Katamari on the Rocks", the theme song from the first game.
    • One of the music tracks in Katamari Forever is a chiptune remix of "A Crimson Rose and a Gin Tonic" from the first game, done by Japanese chiptune band YMCK.
  • The Pachinko minigame in Nintendo Land uses low-res graphics and an NES-style remix of the main theme.
  • Much of Rumblesushi3D's games, particularly their racing ones, heavily resemble arcade racing games of the 90s, what with their low-poly graphics and pixellated textures, as well as exaggerated physics.
  • Cuphead takes on the visual aesthetic of 1930's cartoons ala Felix the Cat and the works of Max and Dave Fleischer. The backgrounds are painted and every frame of animation is hand-drawn, and it's just as beautiful as it sounds.
  • Factorio uses the aesthetic of an late 1990s RTS - typically compared to StarCraft - dabbed with some Diesel Punk touches. All assets are created as high-definition 3D models, which are then converted to 2D sprites to give it the classic RTS appearance.
  • The Double Fine prototype Autonomous is set in a TRON-like computer world where you go around building robots. It's a digital game but you could have had it boxed and the cover is suitably retro; take a look.
  • Games by Kairo Soft ie Game Dev Story and Pocket Stables have sprite designs similar to those from early SNES games- pixelated, but makes full use of the 16-bit colors.
  • In Five Nights at Freddy's 2, occasionally when the player dies, Atari 2600-style minigames show up, telling stories of past events in the pizzeria. Given that the game takes place in the 80's and is a parody of Chuck E. Cheese, this seems fitting.
    • Done again in Five Nights at Freddy's 3, with between-night mini games that reveal Springtrap's true identity and hidden ones that may seem like random Easter eggs at first, but actually need to be found and played correctly to unlock the good ending.
  • Dot Arcade takes this to an extreme, with games done in the style of an 8x8 matrix of colored lights to simulate extremely primitive video games (though even Pong was played on a TV screen). To complement the style, the pillarboxes are filled in with equally old-looking artwork that look like they might have adorned the side of an arcade machine in the early 80's. The default artwork for "Mr. Snake" looks like a comic book from that period, while the alternate artwork is drawn in a style similar to that of Namco's 8-bit era.
  • Life of Pixel is in the style of many 8-bit and 16-bit systems, from consoles to computers.
  • Realm of the Mad God is a very pixelated game.
  • The Room: The Game: Resembling a hybrid Game Boy Advance game and mid-90's adventure.
  • Siren: "Kunitoris" in Siren 2, with gameplay and a title screen resembling a Famicom game, and the JOYLiNK Ultra Network King in Siren: Blood Curse, resembling Game & Watch LCD games.
  • Star Trek: Trexels attempts this with pixelated graphics, but not with the in-game menus.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • Super Mario Maker is a Mario game maker with four styles: the NES Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 3, the SNES Super Mario World, and the Wii U New Super Mario Bros. U. For the former three, most graphics are directly taken from the game of origin with little modification; however, when new elements are required, they have new sprites that match the visual style of the selected game. For example, Thwomps and Wigglers in Super Mario Bros. mimic the off-model and poorly-animated graphics of the original game, while Super Mario World has more on-model depictions of Hammer Bros. and Bowser available. This goes even further with amiibo compatibility, with characters never seen in 8-bit (such as the Wii Fit Trainer and Isabelle) gaining new sprites in their playable depiction.
    • At one point in Paper Mario: Color Splash, Mario enters an alternate world inspired by Super Mario Bros. 3, complete with 8-bit graphics and music. Taking a page from Super Paper Mario, Mario can use paint to change the perspective from a 2D perspective for an isometric one, however this is only active for ten seconds at a time.
    • The Bitlands in Super Paper Mario are a throwback to 8-bit games. The doors in Fort Francis even make retro sound effects when opened. Additionally a few of the power-ups create 8-bit characters. The mega star turns your character into a giant 8-bit sprite and the pal pill makes little 8-bit versions of the character surround them.
    • The Thousand Year Door has this too - in addition to the traditional ability to turn Mario into an 8-bit sprite (as seen in most of the other Paper Mario games and Super Mario RPG), you can do the same for Mario's various partners - they'll take on edited forms of the sprites of the basic enemy type they are generally, though some like Flurry and Ms. Mowz get totally new sprites due to not being based on any preexisting enemies.
    • Bowser Memory M and Bowser Memory L, in Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story, are pixelated entities resembling (but clearly distinct from) Mario and Luigi, respectively. Bowser Memory M's attacks are based on what Mario and Luigi could do in Super Mario Bros., and Bowser Memory L's is based on what Mario and Luigi could do in Super Mario Bros. 3.
    • Being something of a celebration of Mario's history, Super Mario Odyssey uses this trope in several places:
      • Several areas feature "pixelated" pipes that turn Mario into his Super Mario Bros. sprite upon entrance and allow him to travel along the wall a la The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds. While in this form, the regular background music will be muffled while a chiptune arrangement plays over it. When Mario climbs into one while Capturing Bowser, he comes out as the "Big Mushroom" Bowser sprite from Super Mario Maker.
      • One of Mario's many purchasable outfits turns him into his older, polygonal self from Super Mario 64. Talking to a certain Toad while wearing this outfit would allow you to access a recreation of Peach's courtyard from the same game, flat trees and all. A later update added an even blockier "8-bit" model based on the 30th Anniversary amiibo, permanently stuck in a jumping pose.
      • While they can't be heard during normal gameplay, chiptune arrangements of "Jump Up, Super Star" and "Break Free (Lead the Way)" can be unlocked and played in the in-game music player.
  • Mobile Phone Game Timing Hero has graphics, music and sound effects reminiscent of a Game Boy game.
  • Mobile Phone Game Tiny Dangerous Dungeon looks, sounds and plays like an old Game Boy game.
  • Muri is a 2D shooter very reminiscent of old DOS platformers. It even has the option to turn on choppy scrolling.
  • Gemini Rue is a point-and-click adventure game that actually looks like an old DOS-based adventure game, running at 640x480 with 8-bit colour. Even the save/load screen is reminiscent of old games.
  • Freedom Planet is a game with 2D sprite-based graphics which resemble a Sega Saturn or Playstation era game, with gameplay similar to a 2D Sonic the Hedgehog game and some gameplay elements recognizable from other games like Mega Man and Gunstar Heroes in the mix.
  • The Lady Cupid Endless Game in Rhythm Heaven Fever uses pixelated graphics and chiptune music.
    • The Super Samurai Slice game in Rhythm Heaven Megamix is made to resemble a side-scrolling action game. However, almost all of the sound effects are modern.
  • Hotline Miami is set in 1989 and has the graphics you'd expect from an arcade game of that era.
  • The bonus video in the extras section of Dark Parables 9: Queen of Sands is an 8-bit version of the introduction, complete with authentically tinny music and sound effects.
  • In Jaleco's self-referential Arcade Game The Game Paradise: Master of Shooting, there is a warning message early in Stage 5: "32bit-CPU Captured by 8bit-CPU." The enemies start turning pixelated and jerky, and pastiches of ancient video games like Space Invaders and Head On ensue.
  • Carrie's Order Up! is an indie homage to Japanese arcade games that looks and sounds like it was pulled straight from an early '90s arcade cabinet.
  • Killer Queen wears its homages to Joust and Mario Bros. on its sleeve, with pixelated 8-bit sprites for all the characters, and music composed in Famitracker.
  • The arcade game Fix It Felix Jr., inspired by the animated movie Wreck-It Ralph, has the look and feel of a late 1970s or early 1980s game.
  • In the original DS version of Meteos, the Falling Blocks on Gigagush take on the appearance of pixelated, solid-color creatures resembling those found in Space Invaders. The music is also a bare bassline meant to evoke the Atari 5200, as are the sound effects. Together, the sound package is titled "Aliens."
  • Like many RPG Maker games, Jimmy and the Pulsating Mass uses this aesthetic. The graphics have a grainier and more retro style than most RPG Maker VX games, the aesthetic is very obviously Earthbound-inspired, and the world map uses the same style as Chrono Trigger.
  • Axiom Verge is a game designed with Metroidvania style games in mind, complete with 16-bit graphics and a soundtrack.
  • Evoland and its sequel Evoland 2 both invoke this heavily. The first has you go through various graphical and gaming adjustments. The second has three distinct time periods, each with a different art style to depict different eras of gaming and in each part there's showcases of different genres of play.
  • Eschatos takes this trope in a different direction. Rather than mimic graphics seen in 8 or 16-bit systems, ESCHATOS goes for full 3D graphics reminiscent to that of Sega NAOMI arcade games such as Triggerheart Exelica and Under Defeat, while its FM synth soundtrack composed by Yousuke Yasui gives off a Sega Genesis vibe.
  • Super Rad Raygun is a new run & gun style platformer from the folks at Screwattack.com which takes on the look of an old Game Boy game.
  • Tattletail takes place in 1998 and focuses on Furby-esque toys, and so much of the game and its marketing is done in the style of home-recorded VHS tapes, including the loading screens and one section where the player watches a VHS tape.
  • Guild Wars 2 has the Super Adventure Box special event. The art style for the event is designed to evoke a classic NES game with voxel-based graphics decorated with low-res textures and an 8-bit soundtrack.
  • Diablo III runs the annual "Darkening of Tristram" event to celebrate the first game in the trilogy. On entering the special event dungeon the game is switched to a UI based on the original game, as is the text, sound, and music. A filter is applied to the game itself, creating the illusion of a game from the original Diablo generation. This is further reinforced by all models being restricted to face in only eight directions and the player model being restricted to their walking animation.
  • Alwa's Awakening is done entirely in 8-bit graphics.
  • Double Dragon IV is a direct follow up to the second game in the series that has graphics done in the style of the NES ports of the previous three games. It even includes the head-to-head mode of the NES games as well as the main story mode.
  • From the same developers as Pier Solar above is Paprium, a homebrew beat 'em up for the Sega Genesis styled after genre entries from the 80s and 90s, like Streets of Rage and Final Fight. As an added touch, there is a full-fledged video ad for the game, done as if it were a 90s game commercial.
  • The Doom Game Mod Shadow of the Wool Ball is deliberately created as a throwback to the Wolfenstein 3D era, with everything being the same height, all floors and ceilings being featureless, and all walls under orthogonal angles only. The sequel, Rise of the Wool Ball, is analogously a homage to Rise of the Triad and makes use of that game's technical limitations.
  • Kingsway takes Retraux one step further by being a throwback to old-school PC Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game by building an entire fake operating system around it, modelled after older versions of Windows.
  • In Miitopia, when it's the protagonist's turn to attack, the battle music's main melody and some accompanying sounds become an NES chiptune version of itself, though the bass remains the same.
  • Protect Me Knight and its sequel would not look out of place if they had released on NES, being an homage to tower defense games of the era. They also include an option for an FM soundtrack similar to the Sega Genesis. The games even got a spin-off which actually did release as an NES cart.
  • Octopath Traveler takes retraux to a unique style because the graphics are pixel art but environments are rendered in 3D, a style the developers call HD-2D.
  • Blaster Master Zero, produced by Inti Creates, the co-developers of Mega Man 9 and 10, is a reboot in the style of the original NES game.
  • The 25th Anniversary Edition of Night Trap lets you choose between upscaled versions of the Sega CD, 3DO, and MS-DOS interfaces. Even better is that developer Tyler Hogle of Screaming Villains took the game's three deleted Game Over scenes from backup VHS tapes, recropped these scenes to widescreen, and modified their video processors, graphic sprites, displays, and audio to fit their respective retro interfaces so it would look like the entire game is played uncut on any 1990s console version.
  • The Nintendo Wii's controller, the Wii Remote, has a design consciously modeled after that of the original Famicom/NES controller. When held horizontally, you have the D-pad on the left, the 1 and 2 buttons on the right replacing B and A respectively, and the + and - buttons in the middle standing in for Start and Select. The only fundamental changes made beyond aesthetics are the large A button on the front next to the D-pad, the Home button between + and -, the Z trigger on the back, and of course, the Wii's trademark motion controls. Likewise, the Wii Classic Controller was basically a Super Nintendo controller with dual analog sticks and two extra shoulder buttons.
  • Never Stop Sneakin', an Affectionate Parody of Metal Gear Solid, replicates the 3/4 View and low-res character model styles of MGS.
  • Ion Fury, a retitled prequel of Bombshell made with the Build engine (the engine that powers Duke Nukem 3D), is made to look as much like a '90s FPS game as possible.
  • The Darkside Detective homages the style of 1980s point-and-click games like Police Quest and Maniac Mansion, complete with blocky pixel art.
  • Uncanny Valley combines a Survival Horror story with VGA-era PC Adventure Game graphics and gameplay.
  • Golf Story has a Game Within a Game called Galf (as well as its sequels Galf Seasons and Galf Nights), designed to replicate the look and feel of NES golf games, complete with low-quality voice clips, an overhead view of the entire hole until you get to the green, only being allowed to shoot in 16 directions, and a limited game interface that requires you to manually change clubs and doesn't inform of you of club ranges (you have to open the digital manual to see them).
  • Transformers: Devastation homages the original G1 show (particularly the movie) in terms of visuals, design, writing, and voiceover work.
  • The Game & Watch Gallery series of games allows the player to play two versions of the Game & Watch games - a "Modern" version, which utilizes a new art style featuring the Super Mario Bros. characters, and a "Classic" version, which recreates the original handheld version of the game as closely as possible, complete with it making the original handhelds' beeping sounds.
  • Slap City has some retro style stages. "Clone Horde" version of Fluffy Field is done with N64-esque graphics, and Hurtland stage uses 8-bit visuals like Princess Remedy In a World of Hurt.
  • Ghostly Matter is heavily inspired by games of the 80s and 90s, down to the pixel graphics andd chiptune soundtrack, and also has several options to emulate the graphical glitches of a game being played on an old CRT monitor.
  • Project Warlock, a Wolfenstein 3D esque shooter made in Fall 2018, with RPG elements.
  • Return Of The Obra Dinn is a 3D, animated (partially), polygon-based game, but with a shader that renders every individual frame as if it's a heavily dithered, pixel-based image on a one- or two-color monitor from the early '80s even as the player character moves through the Ghost Ship of the title. The settings offer the ability to switch from the default Apple Macintosh display to IBM, Zenith, LCD, and various others. Settings with a black-and-white/green/grey feature a soft glow on the 'lit' pixels. As a further example within an example, the text and illustrations from the game are done in the style of 19th Century pen-and-ink illustrations, with the dithering corresponding rather neatly with the stippling techniques of the time.
  • In The Sims 4, the Vintage Glamour Stuff pack contains objects and gameplay inspired by aesthetics from The Roaring '20s to The ’50s. Bowling Night Stuff also takes cues from The ’50s.
  • The deluxe version of the remake of Resident Evil 2 has a feature where you can change the soundtrack (though some of the remake's songs will still play) to play the music from the original game. Menus, item boxes, and typewriters also use their classic sound effects with the music swap. Swapping the music will also have the familiar ominous voice that shouts "RESIDENT EVIL! 2!" at the title screen. The game also has DLC where Leon and Claire's character models can be swapped out for their original low polygon versions used in the original 1998 game.
  • The titular game in Nanashi no Game is based on 8-Bit style graphics, akin to Final Fantasy 1. Given Square Enix developed the game, this is likely intentional.
  • The Nintendo 3DS version of Dragon Quest XI has a mode where the game can be played with 16-bit graphics similar to the Dragon Quest games on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. This mode was later brought over to the Nintendo Switch version.
  • WRATH: Aeon of Ruin uses the Quake I engine, although it's really the modified derivative source port known as Darkplaces that started development in the early 2000's. Regardless, chunky low-poly models and pixellated textures are king.
  • FAITH and it’s sequel are horror games done in the style of old school Atari games from the late 80’s, with primitive-looking graphics and garbled chiptune music.
  • Babysitter Bloodbath and Power Drill Massacre both mimic the look and feel of PS1 Survival Horror games like the original Resident Evil, complete with tank controls and weird camera angles. Their plots homage retro horror movies from the 80’s and early 90’s, such as Halloween.
  • Pathway is a 2019 Roguelike with 2D, 16 bits-like pixellated graphics.
  • SilverFrame echoes early '90s 3d space combat games such as Wing Commander and X-Wing, with a touch of '80s arcade vector graphics.
  • The Messenger (2018) is a notable example as it uses 2 different styles. When the game begins it uses an 8-bit style and appears to be an homage to games like Ninja Gaiden. Then halfway through the game, you are sent 500 years into the future, and the game takes on a 16-bit style, and shifts into more of a Metroidvania.
  • Yo! Noid 2: Enter the Void (a Fan Sequel to the 1990 NES game Yo! Noid) is made to look like a Playstation game being played on a CRT television.

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