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Power Bomberman is a freeware Bomberman Fan Game released in 2013 for Windows and macOS, with ongoing development.

The game's main feature is the Battle Mode – the series' classic multiplayer frenzy where players try to blow each other up with bombs. This mode allows both local and online gameplay for up to 12 players, with six different rulesets (Survival Battle, Reversi Battle, Dodge Battle, Hyper Battle, King Battle and Battle Royale). 58 unique stages — each with their own distinct appearance and hazards, as well as multiple variants and sizes — are featured, with an additional 14 "Wide" stages (of optimal size for gameplay with 9 or more people) also available.

Among its secondary features are Score Mode (a remake of Bomberman for the NES, including an enhanced "Turbo" variant), and an Item Help section that explains the various power-ups and items, both old and new to the series. 693 characters (and counting!) are playable, including many cameos from all across Konami and Hudson Soft's history.

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The game can be downloaded here.


Power Bomberman provides examples of:

  • 100% Completion: Unlocking all the characters will play the game's credits after leaving the Shop.
  • All There in the Manual: The name of the giant spider-like robot that shows up in some stage variants is stated to be Robo Bomber in the game's manual.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: Even more so than in the canon games, the Louies come in a multitude of colors, with each color getting different abilities.
  • Amusement Park: A common setting for stages. Bouncing Park takes place in a park filled with trampolines, while Circus Caper and Funhouse Kerfuffle take place in a circus and a funhouse respectively.
  • Athletic Arena Level:
    • Soccer Stadium takes place in a Soccer Stadium, where bombs that get kicked inside the goal will instantly explode at maximum firepower, while, fittingly enough, a voice exclaims "GOOOOOOAAAALLL!"
    • Advertisement:
    • Full Power and Ring Champions take place on a fighting arena and a boxing ring, respectively. Both lack items and are mostly devoid of soft blocks and give players maximum stats and some abilities right off the bat, making the battles a test of skill. The latter even allows you to interact with the ropes to fling yourself around!
  • Attract Mode: If left idle on the title screen for a while, the game will play a series of short demos. While some elements are predetermined, the combatant's actions are made up by the AI on the spot.
  • Battle Royale Game: Of the Last Man Standing variety. The game allows battles of up to 12 players, both local and online.
  • Big Ol' Eyebrows: Most characters from the two anime series have these, as does Hudson's idol Kotetsu.
  • Blackout Basement: The appropriately-named Lights Out is only illuminated by four spotlights that circle around the stage randomly, the rest of the stage being shrouded in shadow.
  • Boxing Kangaroo: Nagurooi's ability is decking other combatants in the face to briefly stun them.
  • Bubblegloop Swamp: Streaming Madness features shallow waters, light rains and wild vegetation.
  • The Bus Came Back: A ton of characters from previous installments are playable – regardless of how obscure they were, whether they'd been playable before or not, or how many years it's been since the last time they showed up.
  • Cartoon Bomb: As per usual for the series, this is the combatants' weapon of choice.
  • Casino Park: Spinning Fate, which features a giant slot machine, is designed to look like the lobby of a casino.
  • Cheesy Moon: The soft blocks in The Moon are wedges of cheese.
  • Collision Damage: All enemies cause this, both in Score Mode, and in the Battle Mode stages that feature them as hazards.
  • Construction Zone Calamity: Build 'n' Ruin takes place on the ground floor of a construction site, and features holes that allow explosions to pass through. Some stage variants feature extra hazards such as conveyor belts, magnets, seesaws and a giant robot.
  • Cool Airship: One of the Wide Stages takes place atop the Armor Joe from Bomberman Generation, complete with detachable sections.
  • Cosplay: One of the items, which originates from Super Bomberman 4. When collected, it changes the player's appearance to look like a different character and provides them with an extra hit.
  • Creator Cameo: Series creator Shinichi Nakamoto is featured among the audience in Full Power, his appearance based on the secret bonus item from Bomberman for the NES.
  • Creepy Cemetery: Night of the Bomb is a cemetery stage with tombstones and thorny bushes, set in front of a mansion. Its main gimmick is the swarms of bats, which obscure the action happening behind them. Notably, more Skulls than usual generate in this stage, and the only Louie available by default is Tatarooi, whose power is giving and removing Skull curses at will.
  • Danger — Thin Ice: Certain spots of Freezing Frenzy have thin ice that periodically breaks when stepped on. The combatants cannot fall in, however – once the ice is broken, the holes instead act as solid blocks.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Dr. Ein provides commentary for the Item Help section, which can be quite silly at times.
    Repel — Causes other players to automatically move away from you. Please wear deodorant, kids.
  • Demographic-Dissonant Crossover: The Guest Fighters include characters from some M-rated franchises, including Metal Gear and Silent Hill.
  • Destroyable Items: By default, all items except the Skull can be rid of with an explosion. The "Advanced Settings" tab allows for all items to be burnable, or for all to be fireproof.
  • Dice Roll Death: Rolling three skulls on the slot machine in Spinning Fate will automatically trigger Sudden Death, regardless of how much time is left.
  • Double Knockout: Completely possible – and not uncommon – in Battle Mode, which will lead to a draw.
  • Dream Match Game: The game features playable characters from across the franchise's entire history – whether they were originally playable, villains, or NPCs. This even includes characters from the various manga and the two anime series, Bomberman B-Daman Bakugaiden and Bomberman Jetters.
  • Easter Egg:
    • Inputting the Konami Code on the title screen will give '83 Bomberman a new alternate costume based on the Sharp MZ-700 version of the game.
    • The cursor for the Score Mode menu is Bomberman's old NES sprite. Holding the up or down key for a few seconds will make him move too fast, causing him to get dizzy.
    • Playing the game on April Fools' Day will play a special intro before the title screen parodying the SNES version of WWF Raw.
  • Everything's Better with Penguins: Pegi Jr. from Saturn Bomberman Fight!! and COM 2 from Bomberman 64: The Second Attack! make a reappearance. The game also features cameos from Glynn and Malon from Binary Land, Penta, Penko and Ginji from Antarctic Adventure and Yume Penguin Monogatari, Pentaro from Parodius and Penkuro from Crazy Cross.
  • Gangplank Galleon: Overboard takes place in a pirate ship, complete with the camera tilting up and down to simulate the movement.
  • Giant Foot of Stomping: The "Draw!" screen features the combatants panicking before a giant Bomberman foot stomps them.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: A possibility, thanks to certain villain characters being playable. This is especially amusing when done with otherwise serious and dark villains like Buggler and Sirius.
  • The Goomba: The Balloms serve this purpose in Score Mode, being the easiest enemies to kill.
  • Grievous Bottley Harm: Bottlooi's main weapon, useful for pushing items and bombs and stunning players for a very brief period of time.
  • Guest Fighter: Over a hundred of them! See Massive Multiplayer Crossover for just a few examples.
  • Hard-Drinking Party Girl: Bottlooi always carries bottles of sake around, which she will drink and/or throw.
  • Hartman Hips: The Louies all have broad hips as kangaroo type creatures; but the female louies, like Galooi and Bottlooi, noticeably have even wider hips.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: A player is not invulnerable to their own bombs, and it's very much possible to get killed by them accidentally.
  • Hollywood Magnetism: Dead End features large magnets that attract bombs in the direction they're pointing.
  • Inconveniently-Placed Conveyor Belt: A common hazard, which causes players and bombs to move. Some stages like On the Move have these as part of their factory-esque setting, while others like King of the Tomb and Aqua Smash get more creative and feature quicksand or water that act the part.
  • Interface Screw:
    • Night of the Bomb features swarms of bats, which cover small patches of the screen for a few seconds, then move to another part of the arena.
    • One of the Skull curses causes the player's controls to be inverted.
  • Intra-Franchise Crossover: If it's a Bomberman work, chances are it's represented in some way, mainly through characters. It doesn't just limit itself to the main series of games either, as it also takes from the spin-offs, cancelled titles, the various manga, the two anime series, and even promo art.
  • Invincibility Power-Up:
    • The Vest provides the player with a few seconds of invincibility towards fire and some stage hazards at the cost of slowing them down.
    • When activated, the Rocket causes the player to launch upwards for a few seconds, avoiding anything underneath them.
    • The Shield can be held up, causing a combatant to block any explosion in front of them.
  • Invisibility: The Invisibility does Exactly What It Says on the Tin: for a short period of time, it makes all other players unable to see the one who picked it up. As Local Battle mode has all the players share a screen, this item is completely restricted to Online Battle mode.
  • Joke Item: The Salt Bomb from Bomberman Hero is here and it's just as useful as it was in that game: not very. It lowers a player's explosion range to one tile, can't kill enemies or set off other bombs, and makes a very unsatisfying sound when exploding.
  • Kaiju:
    • Aladdin Bomber, the giant on Tower of Wind who originates from Bomberman Online. He can't actually damage the player, nor can the player damage him, though he will cause wind, which will sweep the bombs.
    • The titular Bomura from Bomura's Rampage, who stomps around the stage and can breathe fire upon the player.
  • Kangaroos Represent Australia: Buckarooi wears a slouch hat, and their main ability is throwing a boomerang.
  • Kingmaker Scenario: If the "Revenge Bomber" option is set to "on" and a player is knocked out, that player can toss bombs into the stage to try and knock out the other players as well. If set to "super", it has the added bonus of bringing a player back to life if their bomb manages to knock out another player.
  • Large Ham: The Atomic voice option is louder and much more talkative than the default Classic voice, especially when the match starts, as it's possible for everyone to shout a Pre-Asskicking One-Liner all at once.
  • Lethal Joke Item: The Salt Bomb becomes the deadliest bomb in the game if Health Mode is set to Healthbar, as its salt will dry a full healthbar in a few milliseconds.
  • Lethal Lava Land: Oil Shock takes place in a volcano, and contains tracks of oil that can be set ablaze by explosions.
  • Level Ate:
    • Märchen World features all sorts of sweets as part of its tileset, from chocolate hard blocks to jelly soft blocks.
    • Happy Birthday takes place on a giant cake, featuring candles that will melt over time.
  • Long Song, Short Scene: Battle Mode matches don't usually last more than two or three minutes and, due to the music restarting during Sudden Death in order for Songs in the Key of Panic to work, only one or two minutes of each song end up playing. As such, any song longer than that won't play in full during normal gameplay, a notable example being Hi-Ten Chara Bomb's theme, which is over five minutes long.
  • Lost in the Maize: Kinky Cornfield, an original wide stage, takes place in a huge corn maze with a labyrinthine design.
  • Luckily, My Shield Will Protect Me: The Shield is a power-up that, when held up, blocks all explosions that would normally hit the combatant from the front. However, a player cannot move and hold the shield up at the same time.
  • Man-Eating Plant: The Bombervorous Plants spring out of the ground to chomp down bombers with their venus flytrap-like mouths. It's in their name, after all!
  • Massive Multiplayer Crossover: The game features the return of many characters from previous installments, including a lot of earlier cameos such as Lode Runnernote  and Warionote . However, the game also features playable appearances from Konami and Hudson Soft characters that hadn't crossed over with the series before, such as Dino Riki, Rin Kagura, Sparkster and Django.
  • Megamix Game: The game brings back a ton of characters from throughout the series' history and includes many items and features from previous games. Downplayed when it comes to the stages: although several of them reference other titles in the series (see Nostalgia Level), the developers prioritize originality and enjoyment over representation.
  • Minecart Madness: The main gimmick of Manic Mine is the minecart, which will lead the player through a series of tracks, destroying all soft blocks in its path and running over players. It's also present in some variations of other stages such as Lights Out and The Duel.
  • Mook Maker: Monster Havoc has one of these at the center of the stage, as do variations of other stages like Fort Bombyard and Future World. Breaking the soft blocks around it will allow the monsters to roam free around the stage, with deadly results.
  • Mutually Exclusive Powerups: A lot, in order to keep the control scheme simple. In case more than one of these is picked up, the last one to be will override the one before it. Specific examples of this include...
    • A player can only have one type of bomb at a time (not counting normal bombs). As such, all bomb types are this to each other.
    • The Shield, Rocket, Bomb Change, Ruse, Dash, Whip, Gun and Bomb Conjure, as they are all activated by pushing/holding the D button.
    • The Line Bomb, Power Glove, Super Power Glove and Juggle Bomb, as they require tapping/holding the A button while on top of a bomb.
    • The Kick and Bomb Pass, as they are both triggered by running into a bomb.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Atomic Bomberman is the only character to have multiple death animations, which are pulled straight from its home game.
    • The Bowling Bomb bears resemblance to the Hard Blocks from one of the battle stages from Bomberman Blast.
    • The fountain in Night of the Bomb's Net-de 3 variant contains a statue similar to the Komori Count, the fourth boss in Bomberman '94.
    • The blimp from Super Bomberman's title screen can often be seen flying by the background of High Life.
  • Neon City: Hit the City features one of these as its backdrop.
  • New Work, Recycled Graphics: Some character sprites and stage tiles are taken wholesale from previous installments in the series; most noticeably, Bomberman himself uses his sprite from Saturn Bomberman. It's sometimes done as a stylistic choice, such as '85 Bomberman using the unedited sprite from his game to capture the Retraux feel.
  • No Fair Cheating:
    • By using the Juggle Glove (and, less commonly, the Power Glove), a player could spam explosions by repeatedly tossing bombs directly into fire, basically creating an impenetrable wall of fire. This was patched in version 0.7.6 by disabling the Glove for a seconds if done for too long.
    • If a player were to push two Clatter Boxes against to the wall so that they are stuck between them, they would be practically impossible to kill in certain circumstances. Version 0.7.7b made players and items that get stuck between these get bounced out.
    • Taunting could be used to make the player stop in place if they were to get the "Slide control" Skull curse. This was once again patched in 0.7.7b by disabling that player's ability to taunt if they get the curse.
  • No Mouth: Zig-Zagged. A ton of characters, mainly all the "Bomber" ones, lack a mouth. However, a lot of other characters, mainly the cameos, are drawn with a mouth.
  • No Plot? No Problem!: The game lacks a plot, as the main focus is placed on the Battle Mode, with the equally plotless Score Mode being a secondary game mode.
  • Nostalgia Level: Several of the Battle Mode stages are remakes of stages from earlier games in the series. Others look like stages from other games, but have new gimmicks to them, while others yet recreate old gimmicks in brand new locations.
  • Notzilla: The robotic Bomura from Saturn Bomberman makes a reappearance. This time, they get their own stage, Bomura's Rampage, which features them rampaging over a half-destroyed city.
  • One-Hit Kill: Some hazards can lead to this, regardless of whether healthbars are turned on or not:
    • Being crushed by a Sudden Death block, or falling on top of one.
    • Falling. This can happen in several ways, such as by being tossed off-stage in Rock Garden or Runaway Train, having the floor under you be destroyed by a meteor in Out of Touch, stepping on an open trap door in High Life, or standing on one of the Armor Joe's sections as it detaches.
    • Being run over, either by a minecart, the giant rolling snowball in Freezing Frenzy and Chill Zone, or the train in The Duel.
    • Some other stage hazards can kill the player in one hit, such as the Sandman block in King of the Tomb and the Bombervorous Plants.
  • One-Hit-Point Wonder: The combatants are this if the "Health Mode" option is set to Classic. The Louies can also only sustain a single hit – except for Metalooi, who can sustain two.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted. Due to the large amount of characters, some of them share the same name. For example, there are two characters named Bongo: one of the area bosses from Bomberman Land Touch! and the member of the Jetters from Bomberman Jetters.
  • Original Character: Defied when it comes to playable characters, but played straight with the Louies. Barring the seven from Super Bomberman 5, all the rest are original to this game.
  • Palette Swap: Per the rest of the series, several combatants have multiple recolors, although they are no longer based on player slot, instead being freely selected with the L and R buttons. A few characters such as Hige Hige Combatant get new outfits this way, and others like Land Bomberman change their design entirely.
  • Perpetual Beta: Despite the first version being released on 2013, the game's current version is 0.7.7c. The developers have stated that the game will probably never be truly "complete", so it's unlikely it'll ever reach version 1.0.0.
  • Poison Mushroom: Five of them: the Bomb Down, Fire Down and Geta lower the player's bomb stock, explosion range and movement speed, respectively, the Skull places a random curse upon the player which might then be passed onto another player, and the Salt Bomb decreases the explosion range of the player's bombs to a single tile.
  • Post-Defeat Explosion Chain:
    • One of the stages takes place atop the Armor Joe. Destroying all the engines in a section will cause it to detach with a quick succession of small explosions.
    • Blowing up the piñata will detonate it in a series of small explosions, with items shooting into the arena all throughout this.
    • Winning a round of Hyper Battle will make the player float in the air while the arena is destroyed with a rapid sequence of explosions, before a final large blast blows the other combatants away.
  • Power-Up Mount: The Louies, which a combatant can ride by hatching one of their eggs. Each different color has a different ability.
  • Random Number God: Should three 7s be rolled on the slot machine in Spinning Fate, the game will generate a couple of Heart items.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: All the music in the game originates from previous installments in the series. More specifically, over a hundred of these tracks serve as background music during the game's Battle Mode, while Score Mode lifts its soundtrack from the game it's remaking – Bomberman for NES.
  • Retraux: The appropriately-named stage Retro is visually based on Bomberman for the NES down to the bombs, fire and items, including new old-school sprites for those that hadn't been invented at the time.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: The Louies, of course! These ones in particular are based on their Super Bomberman 5 appearance, with a lot more of these adorable kangaroos making their debut in this game.
  • Shifting Sand Land: King of the Tomb takes place outside of a pyramid and features moving quicksand, and Whoosh Star takes place on a sandy floating island with ruined structures and cacti.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Push's description in the Item Help section includes the line "Long live the king".
    • The game adopts a couple of ideas from Spark World, a Bomberman clone for the Super Famicom. The Juggle Glove originates from this game, even using the same sprite, as does High Life's concept.
    • One of the stages is called Panic at the Disco, a reference to the music group of the same name.
    • Two stages placed beside each other on the Stage Select screen are called Out of Touch and Out of Time, a reference to a Daryl Hall & John Oates song.
    • According to one of the spriters, the rhinoceros that stands on the sidelines in Midtown Madness is a reference to the French play Rhinoceros.
    • The draw screen has a foot stomping on players, à la Monty Python's Flying Circus.
  • Silliness Switch: The game provides the option of using the hilariously hammy voice acting from Atomic Bomberman, and if that isn’t silly enough, there are also the "Wicked" voices, which use the same lines but chaotically distorted.
  • Single-Use Shield: The Heart and Cosplay provide the player with an extra hit. The former stacks, but the latter doesn't.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: Freezing Frenzy is an ice stage featuring igloos, snowmen, thin ice and avalanches. Chill Zone, a wide stage, features many of the same elements, as well as a variant with a slippery floor.
  • Songs in the Key of Panic: After the "Hurry Up" message shows up and Sudden Death starts, the background music will speed up.
  • Space Zone: Out of Touch takes place in a transparent platform floating in space. In some variations, the platform will get hit by meteors.
  • Stealth Pun: High Life takes place in an office building where the players can fall down open Trap Doors and into fire. They are literally getting fired.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: Inevitable, due to the characters' main weapon being Cartoon Bombs.
  • Sudden Death: When time is running out (default is when 50 seconds are left, but this can be customized), indestructible blocks will fall into the stage and crush any player below them. They also fill up the stage, making the playable area smaller. As per the rest of the series, this is also subverted, as a draw can still happen if the last few blocks knock out the remaining players all at once (or even within a second or so of each other).
  • Suicide Attack: Metalooi's main ability – besides being able to sustain one more hit than the other Louies – is transforming into a missile to cause a massive explosion. If it already sustained a hit, it will instead explode on the spot with minimal firepower.
  • Super Speed: The main gimmick of several variants of B-1 Circuit is that all the players move at the maximum possible speed. Due to this, there are a lot of Getas among the selection of power-ups: although they are normally power-downs that lower a player's speed, this effect ends up being beneficial this time around.
  • Tertiary Sexual Characteristics: Bomberlady looks exactly like Bomberman, except for the fact that she also wears a bow, has eyelashes, and her suit is more dress-like in shape.
  • Timed Power-Up:
    • The Vest (which makes the player invincible), the Invisibility (which turns the player invisible) and the Merger (which allows the player to merge with other players upon coming into contact with them) all last for a short period of time. They are also stackable, as picking another one up will extend the effect's duration.
    • Inverted with the Skull, which is a Timed Power-Down. Unlike the other three, the timer does not stack; picking another one up will instead reset the internal timer and give the player a different curse. The effect can be cut short by picking up a power-up or touching another player.
  • Title Scream: Just BOMBERMAN! though, provided by Kazuko Sugiyama.
  • The Tokyo Fireball: Bomura's Rampage takes place in a coastal city being terrorized by the eponymous monster. The Tokyo Tower is actually present in one of the variants.
  • Traintop Battle: Runaway Train takes place atop the titular vehicle. Eventually, one of the wagons will detach, forcing the combatants to jump to the next car or else be instantly eliminated.
  • Trap Door: High Life has trap doors that open when a switch on the wall is activated. Falling into these leads to a One-Hit Kill.
  • Underground Level: Rustle Rustle Burn takes place in an archaeological site below the surface, which contains bushes that are large enough for bombs and players to hide.
  • Under the Sea: Splish-Splash features seashells, kelp, currents and fountain springs, as well as an added oscillating effect to make it look like it takes place underwater.
  • Unique Enemy: There's a few enemies that only appear in a single stage. Examples include Bomura, the yellow mooks in Clitter Clatter, the Cyber Mice in Future World and the Sandman Block in King of the Tomb.
  • Variable Mix: The music for ??? speeds up every time the note items show up, gets briefly pitched down once they are all collected, and becomes violent and jumbled when a player dies.
  • Vocal Dissonance: Regardless of their appearance, every character by default is given Kazuko Sugiyama's voice. This also applies when selecting the Atomic Bomberman-style voices from the options menu, as they are stereotypical and obviously male. Taken to ridiculous levels with the Wicked voice, which uses the same lines as the Atomic voice but randomly distorted to hilarious degrees.
  • Wackyland: ??? takes place in a stylized retro void of bright colors where heavily distorted music can be heard and altered by note items and player deaths.
  • Whale Egg: True to the rest of the series, the kangaroo-esque Louies hatch from eggs.
  • Whip It Good: One of the items, used to stun opponents and push bombs and items forward. If the hit connects on the tip, it stuns for longer and sends the objects farther.
  • Wrap Around: Almost every stage contains borders that allow players, bombs and items to come out from the other side, both vertical and horizontal. In some stages like Oshikura Manju and Land of Hevol, players can simply walk through these; for others, it only happens when something is tossed off-stage thanks to items like the Bomb Punch and Power Glove. Notable aversions include Out of Touch (where anything that falls off doesn't return, and players are instantly killed) and The Zap Wall (where anything thrown against the wall simply bounces off).


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