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Celestials

    In General 

The Celestials

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/b30868bd_d7ca_4205_be33_61323b856c4e.jpeg

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Eternals

An ancient race of powerful entities capable of manipulating matter and energy itself.


  • Ambiguous Robots: With the exception of Ego, most of the Celestials seen in the MCU resemble large, metallic automatons.
  • Ambiguous Situation: Whether Ego is a Celestial is unclear. He claims to be one, but also indicates he's the only one and his body is considerably different in form than the other Celestials. Though he may only refer to himself as a "celestial" in a generic term, rather than actually a member of the species.
  • Blue-and-Orange Morality: Celestials are mostly concerned with maintaining the consistent flow of creation and energy in the universe, preventing it from stagnating and dying, and so don't assign any value to individual worlds, or the life on it; in their eyes, a Celestial being born is more important than the deaths of billions, because that Celestial can now help create trillions more lives across the universe.
  • Cosmic Keystone: Celestials are the greatest energy wielders in the universe and function to recycle energy so that there's a regular flow of new worlds and life. Without them, the universe would be dying.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Celestials seen in Eternals are impossibly huge, unfathomable beings that look almost robot or steampunk-like in nature, but have a god-like presence. They're also insanely powerful, whose very births involve the destruction of an entire planet, and if Arishem is to be believed, they could effortlessly destroy the Earth if so inclined.
  • Energy Absorption: How they develop; Celestial seeds are planted in the cores of various planets, and are left to gestate over the ages, drawing energy from the life that develops from the planet, until they emerge, destroying the planet in the process.
  • Our Giants Are Bigger: The Celestials we see (aside from Ego) are impossibly huge, enough that a space colony can be built inside of one's head. When we see Celestials in their entirety in Eternals, they are shown to be almost as large as entire planets, with Arishem being so big entire asteroid belts form around him.
  • Genius Loci: At least one Celestial has been confirmed to have a planet-like form capable of sustaining it's own life, with it only being able to communicate using a human avatar.
  • Non-Malicious Monster: They don't have any ill will towards lesser life-forms. They don't choose to destroy entire planets populated by sentient beings, it's just the way that they're born.
  • Physical God: These things are far and removed the most powerful beings in the MCU, to the point where they actually created and maintain it. In Eternals, Arishem the Judge even claims that were it not for the Celestials' existence, the universe itself would eventually die out.
  • The Right of a Superior Species: Celestials see themselves as being so above other forms of life in the universe, and in some ways are, that they don't think twice about destroying an entire planets and their populations so as to birth new ones. That being said, their motive is not any kind of narcissism, but a rather understandable one in creating new stars and solar systems and galaxies so that the universe itself continues to exist.
  • Sufficiently Advanced Alien: They are powerful, ancient aliens barely distinguishable from gods.
  • Time Abyss: The Celestials are unfathomably old, even predating the Asgardians and Dark Elves.

    Eson the Searcher 

Eson the Searcher

Species: Celestial

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

A Celestial who wielded the Power Stone and used it to destroy a planet a long time ago.


  • The Cameo: Only appears briefly in Guardians of the Galaxy in a recording shown by the Collector to the titular heroes.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: Long ago, he made an unknown planet blow up by hitting the ground with his staff powered by the Power Stone.
  • Karma Houdini: Even though he wiped out the entire civilization of a planet, as far as we know he has never received any punishment for his crimes.
  • Magic Staff: He carries a staff just as tall as him that houses the Power Stone, giving it incredibly destructive powers.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Thanks to the power of an Infinity Stone, he can single-handedly cause the destruction of entire planets.
  • Planet Destroyer: For some unknown reason, he once used the Power Stone to destroy a planet, as shown during the Collector's presentation of the Infinity Stones.
  • The Voiceless: Doesn't say a single word during his short appearance.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: It's unknown what has become of him in the present day.
  • World-Wrecking Wave: During his monologue about the origin of the six Infinity Stones, the Collector shows images of Eson using the Power Stone to lay waste to a planet, with the Stone's energy destroying all life around him before spreading throughout the world.

    Ego 

    Arishem the Judge 

Arishem the Judge

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cc62c198_064b_4adf_a8a4_caaa4283a9ba.jpeg
"Your memories will show if they are worthy to live, and I will return for judgement."

Species: Celestial

Voiced By: David Kaye (English), Raúl Solo (Latin American Spanish)

Appearances: Eternals

The leader of the Celestials, responsible for the presence of both the Eternals and Deviants on Earth.


  • Advertised Extra: Although Arishem is featured heavily in the advertising for the movie, his actual screen time is fairly minimal, as he's mostly just used for an exposition dump and a Sequel Hook.
  • Anti-Villain: Unlike Ego who was driven by megalomania and arrogance, Arishem is more a force of nature concerned with maintaining universal balance.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Arishem is unambiguously depicted as the direct source of all the conflict in Eternals, but is too uninvolved to fully embrace the Big Bad role. As such, while stopping the Celestial he seeded within Earth is the Eternals' primary goal, they face additional threats in Ikaris and Kro — the former acts as Arishem's Heavy due to the god being unaware of his creations' betrayal, while the latter is the only antagonistic force not working for the Celestials and seeks to avenge the Deviants Arishem has had killed by the Eternals over the years.
  • Didn't Think This Through: Surprisingly for a godlike entity, sending extremely dangerous and powerful apex predators like the Deviants to planets to cull the native predators so sentient life could emerge had some very limited foresight. The Deviants began eating the sentient species as well, which forced Arishem to create the Eternals to combat them.
  • Drone of Dread: In Eternals, every time Arishem makes an appearance, there's a low "bwuuuuh" as his visage comes into view, adding to the trepidation characters have of him.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: While not necessarily evil, Arishem's plans bode ill for the Earth, and David Kaye brings an impressive Badass Baritone to convey the full force of Arishem's presence.
  • Graceful Loser: When he shows up, he is upset by how the Emergence was prevented, but acknowledges that the Eternals may have been correct in deciding Humans Are Special, and simply warns Earth that he will decide if the loss of Tiamut was worth it.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: More prominent than most examples, with a direct impact on every conflict in the film: the monstrous Deviants are prototype defenders for seeded planets; said planets, which include Earth among their number, are set to be destroyed as the newly-born Celestials awaken; Kro wants revenge for the Deviants he's left to die on these worlds; and the Eternals face an ideological split over whether or not they should obey their creator, with Ikaris becoming actively antagonistic in his support of the Celestial. Ultimately, however, Arishem isn't even in the climax, with Ikaris being the one to enforce his will.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: While he doesn't express any satisfaction in it, Arishem fully believes that creating new Celestials is worth the loss of entire worlds.
  • Large and in Charge: The master of the Eternals and apparent leader of the Celestials is a being who utterly dwarfs Earth.
  • ­Leitmotif: Each time he appears, "Audience with Arishem" plays, with the oppressive orchestra highlighting the gravitas of his implication in the overall story.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Ikaris's murder of Ajak was motivated by loyalty to Arishem, although the Celestial remains unaware she intended to betray him.
  • Out of Focus: Despite being heavily built up throughout the film, he doesn’t participate at all in the climax, with Ikaris having to act on his behalf. He makes up for it in a big way in the film's closing minutes.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Due to not being on Earth, he entrusts the Eternals with overseeing Tiamut's emergence. He isn't even aware of their betrayal until after they slay the Communicator, with Ikaris being the one to oppose them in the climax. Averted in the very end, when he personally comes to Earth to collect the remaining Eternals.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: He spares the Earth, despite it more or less being the reason Tiamut was killed, since he ultimately would get nothing out of it. Destroying the planet won't bring Tiamut to life and if Sersi is correct that Humans Are Special then the planet might be more useful alive than in pieces, so the only reason he would have is petty revenge, which is evidently something he's far above. Granted, he has the caveat that he'll only spare humanity if it is indeed worth all the trouble.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: While he's naturally displeased that the Eternals killed a Celestial, he states that he will spare humanity if their memories tell him they're truly worthy of life. That said, he never mentions what he'll do to the Eternals themselves.
  • Time Abyss: Even amongst the Celestials he's extremely old.
  • Villain Has a Point: Both Kingo and Ikaris believe Arishem's harvesting of worlds serves the greater cause of keeping the universe running. It is because of this that the former refuses to fight while the latter turns against the other Eternals.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: The destruction of seeded planets, while horrific, gives birth to new Celestials, who are responsible for keeping the universe running. It is because of this that Ikaris and Kingo refuse to turn against his plan.
  • You Don't Look Like You: In the comics, Arishem looks like an armoured muscular dude...with a featureless soup can for his head. Understandably changed so he's got six eyes and a fancy helmet-like head that makes him look closer to Eson than anything else.
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    Tiamut the Communicator 

Tiamut the Communicator

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tiamut.jpeg

Species: Celestial

Appearances: Eternals

The Celestial seeded within Earth by Arishem. As a Celestial's birth (an event known as "The Emergence") inevitably involves the seeded planet's destruction, stopping Tiamut's emergence becomes the main source of the conflict in Eternals.


  • Adaptational Name Change: In the comics, Tiamut was known as "The Dreaming Celestial", due to being trapped under the Diabolo Mountains in California. In the MCU, Tiamut's title is "The Communicator".
  • All Your Powers Combined: Inverted, as on their own the Eternals' Uni-Mind gestalt would never have allowed Sersi to be able to transmute Tiamut. Unfortunately, one member adding power to the Uni-Mind...was Tiamut itself.
  • Ambiguous Situation: It's unclear whether or not Tiamut willingly lent its power to the Uni-Mind to help the Eternals stop its own birth, though Arishem treats the ordeal as the Eternals sacrificing the nascent Celestial all the same.
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation: Tiamut in the comics was killed by a rogue cosmic race called the Exterminators. In Eternals, it dies before it has a chance to wake up from its birth.
  • Eye Lights Out: Its four glowing eyes fade out one by one as its face gradually turns to stone.
  • Final Boss: Stopping Tiamut's emergence is the Eternals' primary goal. Ikaris acts as a more personal antagonist during the climax, but ultimately has a Heel–Face Turn because of his love for Sersi and helps kill the Celestial.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: Tiamut is less of a character and more of a plot device during the events of Eternals, as it is the implications of its birth that drive the movie's main conflict.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Unwittingly lends its own power to the Uni-Mind, allowing Sersi to turn it to stone.
  • Taken for Granite: Thanks to a Uni-Mind powered Sersi transmutation, Tiamut's emergence is halted to just a hand and part of its head.
  • Walking Spoiler: Tiamut's impending emergence completely changes the stakes of the film, and The Reveal is directly tied to that of the Eternals' true nature.
  • You Don't Look Like You: In the comics, the Dreaming Celestial is typically depicted with its armor colored black, as this was part of its fall from grace. However, its original color was gold, which is the color Tiamut is here when it begins to emerge.

Sakaar

    In General 

Sakaar

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/img_3887.JPG

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok

"Fear not, for you are found. You are home. There is no going back. No one leaves this place. But what is this place? The answer is Sakaar. Surrounded by cosmic gateways, Sakaar lives on the edge of the known and the unknown. It is a collection point for all lost and unloved things, like you, but here at Sakaar you are significant, you are valuable. Here you are loved. And no one loves you more than The Grandmaster. He is the original, the first lost and the first found. The creator of Sakaar and father of the Contest of Champions. Where once you were nothing, now you are something."

A harsh and barbaric planet connected to many of the universe's wormholes.


  • Amazing Technicolor Population: Because of the planet's diversity, it's not uncommon to see a wide range of skin tones like red and blue.
  • Bread and Circuses: Really, the only thing that keeps a violent scavenger anarchy like Sakaar from tearing itself apart are the gladiatorial games that serve the double purpose of slaking the populace's rage and bloodlust, not to mention culling the numbers of rebellious warriors who can potentially start inconvenient revolutions.
  • Crapsack World: Sakaar is a Landfill Beyond the Stars that is ruled by an egotistical and lazy tyrant who frequently enslaves those who accidentally end up on his planet to fight in gladiator games for his own amusement.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Sakaaran mercenaries appeared as antagonists in Guardians of the Galaxy ahead of their planet's proper debut in Thor: Ragnarok.
  • Gladiator Games: One of the planet's main attractions are its brutal arena fights. The planet's diverse population means many powerful and unique beings are available to fight.
  • Landfill Beyond the Stars: The planet has a massive junkyard filled with trash from all over the universe.
  • Mooks: Humanoid Sakaaran mercenaries serve as Ronan and Korath's primary henchmen in Guardians of the Galaxy. Many are also part of Thanos' army.
  • Multicultural Alien Planet: Because so many wormhole trips end on Sakaar, its population is very diverse and made of up beings from many different planets. Actual native Sakaarans don't even appear on the planet until The Stinger.
  • Narnia Time: Time works... differently on Sakaar, either as a cause or an effect of all the portals. Sometimes it appears to pass slower (Loki arrives on Sakaar several weeks before Thor, despite being thrown out of the Bifrost by Hela only seconds earlier), but on other occasions it appears to pass faster (the Grandmaster says he would be millions of years old elsewhere in the universe, and Valkyrie doesn't seem to have aged at all since first encountering Hela many millennia ago, before Thor and Loki were even born).
  • Portal Crossroad World: ... Kind of. It's really easy to end up in this junk heap, but somewhat harder to leave. Not too difficult, but by the time travelers continue their journeys they usually identify as Sakaaran - if only because time works differently on Sakaar.
  • Servant Race: The humanoid Sakaarans are servants of the Kree accusers and of Thanos
  • Spared by the Adaptation: In Planet Hulk, Sakaar is destroyed by the ship Hulk arrived in. Here, it survives after the Hulk's departure.
  • Super-Sargasso Sea: In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, any Blind Jump will add you to the endless stream of junk falling from the myriad portals hovering above Sakaar.

    Native Sakaarans 

Native Sakaarans

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/img_4484.JPG
The native Sakaaran humanoid subspecies

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Thor: Ragnarok | Avengers: Endgame | What If...?

The brutal natives of the planet Sakaar. There are two types of Sakaarans, the more humanoid Sakaarans which served as underlings of Ronan the Accuser in Guardians of the Galaxy and the more insectoid ones appearing in Thor: Ragnarok. The former reappear as Mooks in Thanos' forces in Avengers: Endgame.


  • Alien Blood: They have yellow blood.
  • The Cameo: A few of them can be spotted in the crowds of the second post-credit scene of Thor: Ragnarok.
  • Creator Cameo: James Gunn plays the unmasked one in Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Dark Is Evil: They wear dark-looking armor and work with Ronan the Accuser, who himself is no bright daisy and is unquestionably villainous.
  • Insectoid Aliens: The native Sakaarans have bug-like appearances underneath their armor. Miek's subspecies is the most insectoid of the two variants.
  • Mooks: When Kraglin wonders how the Guardians will fight past an army of them, Drax says he thinks of them as "paper people", which Kraglin immediately agrees with, suggesting they're known for being easy to kill. Coming from Drax, who doesn't understand metaphors, this speaks volumes. Sure enough, the Guardians mow through them with ease, and Yondu takes on a squad of them single-handed before any of them can even move.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: There's very little that differentiates them from the Chitauri from The Avengers, seeing as how they're both grey alien Mooks that serve as underlings of Cosmic warlords.
  • Zerg Rush: The Sakaaran soldiers that serve Thanos and Ronan rely on their huge numbers to overwhelm their enemies.

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The Grandmaster's Court

    The Grandmaster 

The Grandmaster

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_grandmaster_4.png
"It's main event time!"'

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: Sakaaran

Portrayed By: Jeff Goldblum

Voiced By: Humberto Solórzano (Latin-American Spanish dub), Gilbert Lachance (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 note  | Thor: Ragnarok | Thor: Love and Thunder

"My name is Grandmaster. I preside over a little harlequinade called the Contest of Champions."

Brother of Taneleer Tivan, the Collector, the Grandmaster is the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar and the one behind the planet's gladiator games.


  • Adaptational Dye-Job: He's not covered in blue skin like his counterpart in the comics, but he's got some blue accents in his costuming and makeup. (The director's twofold reasoning for this was that Goldblum had already played a blue-skinned extraterrestrial in 1988's Earth Girls Are Easy, and he wanted to emphasize the actor's natural charm.)
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: While shown to be evil, the MCU's Grandmaster does away with the worst aspects of both his comic book counterpart and the Red King from Planet Hulk. The Grandmaster in the comics delighted in being called "sorrow" by his victims, while the Red King was a sociopath that caused untold and needless destruction (such as unleashing alien parasites on the populace) because it was "his right, his duty, and his pleasure". The cinematic version is certainly a saint compared to them.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics, the Grandmaster is an Elder of the Universe and nigh Physical God. Here, he doesn't display any real power at all aside from slowed aging.
  • Adaptation Species Change: He doesn't appear to be an Elder of the Universe in this version and is depicted more as a mortal with lots of influence. (That said, Goldblum has described him as the former in an interview by way of claiming that he was not affected by Thanos's Snap in Endgame.)
  • Affably Evil: The man is certainly a bit unhinged and, you know, enslaves people and forces them to fight to the death for his amusement. But he's also fairly polite and nice to his underlings, with standards and forging (incredibly odd) friendships with those beneath him.
    Loki: He's a lunatic, but he can be amenable.
  • Ambiguously Related: Though the Collector and the Grandmaster are supposedly brothers per Word of God, there's nothing in-universe that reveals or even implies that this is the case.
  • Aw, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: In the non-canon Team Darryl short. While their dynamic could be a bit strained at times, the Grandmaster nevertheless sets up a commemorative little shrine for the late Topaz during his exile in Los Angeles.
  • Bad Boss: He's a downplayed version of this trope. He's a bit peeved that his second would think him so petty to execute someone for interrupting, but public executions are still a possibility for people who fail him.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: He's Jeff Goldblum Adam Westing as Ming the Merciless. Between his goofy personality, Porky Pig Pronunciation, and general Cloudcuckoolander behavior, it's hard not to smile and laugh at him. That all being said though, he also regularly kidnaps people and forces them to fight to the death for his amusement. Furthermore, he also randomly uses an ultra-tech staff to melt prisoners into disgusting, stinky puddles for little more reason than he can.
  • "Blackmail" Is Such an Ugly Word: Sure, The Grandmaster keeps hundreds of kidnapped warriors to fight in gladiatorial matches to the death, but "slave" is just such a mean word; he prefers the term "prisoners with jobs."
  • The Caligula: He's theatrical, maniacal, hedonistic, and lords over a civilization, which is not a good combination. Under his rule, Sakaar even uses slaves and hosts brutal gladiator fights like ancient Rome.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Comes with the territory of being a Jeff Goldblum character, really, but yes, he is quite an odd duck.
  • Composite Character: In the film, he takes the Red King's role from Planet Hulk as the ruler of Sakaar and the one behind Hulk's enslavement.
  • Cool Ship: He has a big collection of ships, including one that he uses for his orgies and birthdays that ends up being used by Thor, Bruce Banner, and Valkyrie to escape Sakaar through the Devil's Anus.
  • Depraved Bisexual: Throughout the film, he shows attraction towards Valkyrie, Thor, Loki (who it is heavily implied he has slept with), his two harem girls, and in a deleted scene a pair of cotton plush tentacles. Truthfully, "bisexual" might even be underplaying it.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: He's the antagonist of the Sakaaran portion of Ragnarok, but Hela serves as the main antagonist of the overall film.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He's one of the dancers that appears during the Creative Closing Credits for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: He's somewhat disgusted by his assistant Topaz's brutality at times, such as when she suggests killing Loki for merely interrupting.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: On his left arm, he wears a longer, golden sleeve that is absent on the right. Unlike most examples of this trope, it's more likely to establish him as eccentric rather than as awesome (while the Marvel Studios Visual Dictionary notes on his outfit say it's "for surprises").
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: He rules over Sakaar and is the only Sakaaran shown to dress in gold.
  • Guyliner: He wears blue eyeliner.
  • The Hedonist: His main desire is to be entertained, no matter who has to die to make that happen.
  • Human Alien: Take away his goofy clothes and makeup, and he looks no different than your average Earthling.
  • Klingons Love Shakespeare: During his stay in Los Angeles in a non-canon short, he tells his roomie Darryl that he loves learning about Earth's culture and is fascinated by toasts of all things.
  • Large Ham: He's a Smug Snake utterly full of himself with a distinctively Jeff Goldblum delivery.
  • Laughably Evil: While he's an insane tyrant who delights in having his gladiatorial slaves fight to the death, he's also an eccentric and oddly affable goofball who utterly hams it up in the delightfully unique Jeff Goldblum style every time he's onscreen. Also, he prefers that you refer to his slaves as "prisoners with jobs".
  • Light Is Not Good: Even though he dresses in gold, he is depicted as the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar where he has people kidnapped and fighting in Gladiator Games for his own entertainment.
  • Monster Roommate: In the Team Darryl short, it's heavily implied that he murdered or at least silenced all the other people who wanted to apply to Darryl's Craigslist housemate ad to guarantee himself the position.
  • Mysterious Past: The twisted instructional "tunnel" that new champions ride through before meeting him calls him "the first lost and the first found". And he indicates that he may be millions of years old, possibly due to the strange temporal effects of Sakaar. With regards to how he wound up ruling Sakaar, that's all we hear.
  • No Name Given: Unlike his brother, we never hear his true name (En Dwi Gast) on screen; merely his epithet.
  • Really 700 Years Old: Thanks to time being somewhat screwy on Sakaar, he's much older than he looks.
  • Related in the Adaptation: In the comics, he and the Collector consider each other "brothers" (since they are both Elders of the Universe), but aren't actually blood-related. Word of God is that they're actual biological siblings in the MCU, though this hasn't come up in the films. The non-canon theme park ride Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: BREAKOUT! references this in its queue with a painting of them playing checkers...capturing the moment Grandmaster Rage Quits and upsets the board while the Collector looks on smugly.
  • Sadist: His reactions during Thor's gladiator match with Hulk suggest he's less interested in watching the combat as he is watching his champion beat people to death.
  • Time Abyss: According to Goldblum, this version is millions of years old. He even explains that time in Sakaar passes much slower than in other planets.
    The Grandmaster: Time works real different around these parts. On any other world, I'd be like millions of years old, but here on Sakaar...
  • Uncertain Doom: The Stinger shows him emerging from his crashed ship surrounded by thousands of revolutionaries, all silently staring at him. He tries to present himself as being a good sport and congratulating them on their rebellion, but the scene ends before we see whether or not the revolutionaries decide to kill him. In the Team Darryl version of events, he winds up on Earth after either escaping or being exiled.
  • The Wonka: A complete goofball who is nonetheless the undisputed ruler of Sakaar, so he must be doing something right. Fittingly, he appears to subject newly recruited prisoners with jobs to an introduction backed by the music for "Pure Imagination".

    Valkyrie 
See the Asgard page

    Topaz 

Topaz

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/topaz_0.jpg

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: Sakaaran

Affiliation(s): Sakaaran Guards

Portrayed By: Rachel House

Voiced By: Olivia Mercenario (Latin-American Spanish dub), Catherine Hamann (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok

The Grandmaster's second-in-command.


  • Brutal Honesty: A common way for her snark to manifest. For example, when the Grandmaster reminds her he doesn't like the word slaves...
  • Canon Foreigner: She is a character from Malibu Comics' Ultra Force originally. Crossovers between Malibu Comics and Marvel Comics characters have not been unheard of however, such as in Avengers/Ultraforce.
  • Composite Character: As well as a Decomposite Character, as she takes Caiera's role as the personal bodyguard of Sakaar's king, while the rest of her stoyline is redistributed to Valkyrie.
  • Dark Action Girl: She's the Grandmaster's muscle and easily his most competent (loyal) underling. We never see her engage in physical combat, but when the heroes attempt to escape Sakaar aboard a stolen ship she gives chase in another craft, and proves more dangerous than all of the other pursuers combined.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Her extremely dry wit contrasts sharply with the Grandmaster's energetic, foppish sense of style and humor.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: She suggests to use the melt-stick on Loki because he interrupted the Grandmaster. The Grandmaster himself is shocked, and a bit offended.
  • Human Alien: She looks entirely and completely human, despite presumably being a member of an alien species.
  • In Name Only: She barely resembles or acts like her comic counterpart.
  • Jerkass: She doesn't even try to hide her disdain for Valkyrie, whose she's always trying to belittle or insult — much to the Grandmaster's annoyance.
  • Number Two: She's the Grandmaster's main henchwoman.
  • Oh, Crap!: She has one just before crashing her ship into a rock after being blinded by the Grandmaster's ship's fireworks when chasing Bruce Banner up to the Devil's Anus.
  • The Rival: She openly loathes Valkyrie because she doesn't hold Sakaar's Scrappers in very high regard and also most likely because Valkyrie is in the Grandmaster's good graces.
  • Sadist: She enjoys the pain and discomfort of others.
  • Servile Snarker: She obeys every order of the Grandmaster but it doesn't prevent her from voicing her opinion on the people he likes.
  • Tribal Face Paint: Wears white markings just like Valkyrie, although they are considerably more elaborate.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: During the airship chase on Sakaar, Banner manages to trick her into crashing into an outcropping of trash, totaling her ship. Her fate beyond that point is unknown, and she doesn't appear alongside the Grandmaster during the second Stinger. Unused versions of the ending show her escaping with the Grandmaster, which possibly indicates that she may have survived.

Gladiators

    Korg 

    Miek 

Former Gladiators

    Beta Ray Bill 

Beta Ray Bill

Species: Korbinite

Citizenship: Sakaaran

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok (sculpture)

A former gladiator who gained the title of Champion.


  • The Cameo: An sculpture of his head appears, decorating the facade of the Grandmaster's palace.

    Ares 

Ares

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Sakaaran

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok (sculpture)

A former gladiator who gained the title of Champion.


  • The Cameo: An sculpture of his head appears, decorating the facade of the Grandmaster's palace.

Nova Empire

The Nova Corps

    In General 

The Nova Corps

The enforcers of the Nova Empire, dedicated to preserving peace throughout known space.


  • Adaptational Wimp: Downplayed. The Nova Corps are depicted as an organization of Flying Brick Space Police in the comics, while in Guardians of the Galaxy they are a generic Redshirt Army... when facing the power of an Infinity Stone. Otherwise, they easily catch the Guardians of the Galaxy at the start, destroy their fair share of enemy fighters during the film's final battle even as civilians are evacuated, and together form-and-successfully-maintain an energy barrier that stops the Dark Aster in its tracks, despite it being a mile-wide flying fortress.
  • Anti-Hero: They're very well-intentioned and are dedicated to helping protect innocent people, but have a problem with Police Brutality and run a major Hellhole Prison in the form of "The Kyln".
  • Athens and Sparta: They and the rest of the Nova Empire are the Athens to the Kree's Sparta.
  • Badass Army: Sure, they may still get the crap kicked out of them a lot, but they still manage to kick tons of ass in their appearances.
  • Defiant to the End: Credit where credit is due, they make sure to always go down swinging.
  • Killed Offscreen: Heavily implied by both Thanos' decimation of their population and the theft of the Power Stone as mentioned in Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Light Is Good: Frequently associated with the color gold and stars, to the point where their spaceships looks like multi-pointed stars.
  • Men of Sherwood: The Nova Corps Space Police and Yondu's Space Pirates fight a lot of villains effectively in the climax, with fewer losses than the average fan would expect.
  • Space Police: They are a peace-keeping organization operating all over the Nova Empire's territory.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: It's unknown what exactly happened to them after the Snap, though it's more than likely that they're not doing too well considering how the Snap happened after both their capital of Xandar was brutally invaded by Thanos to get the Power Stone and half of the planet's surviving population was then executed. According to the Russo Brothers, some of the Corps were present at the Battle for Earth, just offscreen, so apparently some survived, at least.

    Irani Rael / Nova Prime 

Irani Rael / Nova Prime

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/e799796f1a0bce966fa0df2637697a46.png
"Are you telling me the fate of twelve billion people is in the hands of these criminals?!"

Species: Xandarian

Citizenship: Nova Imperial

Affiliation(s): Nova Corps

Portrayed By: Glenn Close

Voiced By: Yolanda Vidal (Latin-American Spanish dub), Ana Ángeles García (European Spanish dub), Miru Hitotsuyanagi (Japanese dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

The leader of the Corps. Not too thrilled that Quill and his friends are the last hope the galaxy has.


  • Adaptation Species Change: A Rigellian in the comics, a Xandarian in the MCU.
  • Big Good: The leader of the Nova Corps.
  • Cool Old Lady: As head of an organization of space cops, this is a given. Her calling the Jerkass Kree diplomat a "prick" is just icing.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": She is never referenced by any other name than "Nova Prime" through the entire movie.
  • Iron Lady: Takes her job very seriously, and keeps her cool even during an attack on her planet.
  • Never Mess with Granny: You don't get to be head of a group like the Nova Corps by being a pushover.
  • Not So Above It All: Her whole character is the epitome of a dignified, decorated leader for the Nova Corps... and when she referred to the Kree Ambassador as a "prick", it appears that even she falls victim to this movie's sense of humor.
  • Oh, Crap!: A dramatic instance when she hears that Ronan has an Infinity Stone and is on his way to Xandar.
  • Precision F-Strike: She calls the Kree's ambassador a "prick" as soon as the transmission between them is ended by the ambassador.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Definitely tough, and even though she may not like it, she recognizes that the Guardians are their best shot.
  • Space Cop: Da Chief space cop in fact.
  • Uncertain Doom: Given her headstrong personality and resolve to protect her people, she may have been either killed in Thanos' invasion, executed with half of the population or erased from existence by the Snap.

    Rhomann Dey 

Corpsman/Denarian Rhomann Dey

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4a4b40435ccd3d530fc69138e099cc78.png
"This might not be the best idea."

Species: Xandarian

Citizenship: Nova Imperial

Affiliation(s): Nova Corps

Portrayed by: John C. Reilly

Voiced by: Ricardo Brust (Latin-American Spanish dub), Salvador Aldeguer (European Spanish dub), Hiroshi Otaki (Japanese dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

"I don't know that I believe anyone is 100% a dick, ma'am."

A high-ranking corpsman of the Nova Corps. Answers to Irani Rael.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Black hair in the comics, brown in MCU.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: In the comics, he's more associated with Richard Rider as his mentor and fellow Nova Corps member. He's also already dead before the formation of the Guardians and never actually met them.
  • Friendly Enemy: To Quill, who he's arrested before. He's jovial enough with him when arresting him again.
  • Good Parents: He personally said he's grateful to the Guardians because his daughter is still alive thanks to them defending Xandar.
  • Happily Married: He's married and has a daughter.
  • Interspecies Romance: His wife is a Krylorian seen with her daughter in the various crowd scenes in Xandar.
  • List of Transgressions: Reads the rap sheets of the Guardians after they're arrested on Xandar.
  • Nice Guy: To all appearances, Dey is a genuinely decent fellow just doing his job. He even finds it hard to believe that anyone is "100% a dick".
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Dey is seen watering some potted plants when he receives Quill's message about Ronan's impending attack.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He's willing to trust Peter Quill when the Ravagers come to save Xandar.
  • Space Cop: Naturally, since he's part of the Nova Corps.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: His comics self died the same issue he appeared, only living long enough to give his powers and explain the Nova Corps to Richard Rider. However, it may or may not be the case anymore after Infinity War.

    Garthan Saal 

Denarian Garthan Saal

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/e35b878a3aabf480b321e179fa774ade.png
"What a bunch of a-holes."

Species: Xandarian

Citizenship: Nova Imperial

Affiliation(s): Nova Corps

Portrayed By: Peter Serafinowicz

Voiced By: Andrés García (Latin-American Spanish dub), Luis Reina (European Spanish dub), Yutaka Nakano (Japanese dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

"For the record, I advised against trusting you here."

A Nova Corps officer.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Saal went insane and became a villain. Here, he remains loyal to the Nova Corps until his death.
  • Badass Baritone: Serafinowicz's deep voice at work.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: He is crushed to death by Ronan's ship in the film's climax. Poor Rocket had to hear his dying scream.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He gets some good snark at Rocket during the final battle, mentioning that he did not expect to be taking orders from a hamster.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He and his wingmen die fighting their hardest to stop Ronan from obliterating Xandar.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: He is correct when he mentions that the Guardians are a bunch of a-holes.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He dislikes Quill and the others (for good reason), but fights beside them at the end, and is genuinely disturbed by Ronan's attacking civilians.
    Saal: For the record, I advised against trusting you here. Prove me wrong.
  • Pet the Dog: Saal is the first Nova Corps officer to address Rocket by his name. His death leads Rocket to ram the Aster's flight deck.
  • Space Cop: A part of being a member of the Nova Corps
  • Surrounded by Idiots: You get the feeling that he feels this way, especially when working with Quill and the Ravagers in the film climax. The latter half of his above quote is implied to be a direct response to Peter Quill's gleeful "They got my dick message!"

Nova Empire Citizens

    Bereet 

Bereet

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bereet.png

Species: Krylorian

Citizenship: Nova Imperial

Portrayed By: Melia Kreiling

Voiced By: Cecilia Gómez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Laura Pastor (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

One of Peter Quill's one-night-stands.


    The Broker 

The Broker

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/22aac0b5017330fe73a5a4cb11bf969c.png
"It's my policy never to discuss my clients, or their needs."

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: Nova Imperial

Portrayed By: Christopher Fairbank

Voiced By: Martín Soto (Latin-American Spanish dub), Luis Mas (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

A middleman established on Xandar, he brokers shady deals in rare artifacts for a very high-end clientele.


  • Action Survivor: He can be seen among the shell-shocked Xandarian civilians after the Dark Aster crashes into Xandar’s capital city.
  • Adaptational Heroism: He's a slaver in the comics. Here, he's just a black market fence who legitimately cares about his planet.
  • The Comically Serious: He isn't amused at all when Yondu mocks his speech pattern by immaturely interrupting him in a high-pitched voice.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": His real name is never mentioned in the movie. Everyone refers to him as Broker.
  • It's Personal: He's a loyal Xandarian citizen due to his use of the phrase "my culture" in describing Ronan's genocide.
  • Oh, Crap!: Starts panicking when he sees Quill holding the Orb Ronan the Accuser is furiously searching for.

The Sovereign

    In General 

The Sovereign

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | What If...? | Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol 3

A race of beautiful but arrogant gold-skinned humanoids.


  • Adaptation Name Change: They're clearly based on the Enclave, but are referred to as the Sovereign instead.
  • Adaptation Species Change: Much like what happened with Drax, the Sovereign — again, based on the Enclave — were Earth-based humans in the comics, but they were changed into Human Aliens when introduced in the MCU.
  • Artificial Human: Well, humanoid given that they are aliens, but they're an entire species created in pods.
  • Asshole Victim: One of the reasons Rocket justifies stealing batteries from them, citing their snobbishness and obnoxious nature. The other Guardians don't disagree but still feel it was needless trouble and professionally discrediting to rob the very thing they were hired to protect.
  • Attack Drone: They're far too vain to risk their beautiful, expensively-dressed hides in combat, so they exclusively use remote-piloted weaponry, which they treat as a particularly exciting, high-stakes form of arcade gaming. This serves two purposes - further emphasizing their "obnoxious sheltered teenager" characterization, and help make sure we don't feel too bad when the Guardians blow up a few hundred more Sovereign fighters. Sound effects even deliberately invoke playing in an old video game arcade when we see them being piloted.
  • Awaken the Sleeping Giant: The third Stinger for Guardians Vol. 2 heavily implies that they'll be a significantly more dangerous threat in the sequel, what with their leader Ayesha planning to unleash Adam Warlock upon the Guardians.
  • The Beautiful Elite: An entire planet of golden and elegant genetically perfect people. Or rather, self-proclaimed perfect snobs who try too hard to be elegant and aren't nearly as powerful and feared as the Kree Empire or other galactic superpowers are.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Downplayed, but Guardians Vol. 2 shows that they're not harmless and can be pretty dangerous when they really put their minds to it. In fact, their attack upon the Guardians within Ego is ultimately why Yondu is forced to perform a Heroic Sacrifice to save Peter.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: For Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2. They hate the Guardians after Rocket steals from them and legitimately try to kill them multiple times, but they're far less of a serious threat in the film's story than Ego the Living Planet is.
  • Composite Character: The Sovereign is an original creation that mixes together the Enclave (the human scientists who created the artificial humans Adam Warlock and Ayesha) with the Universal Church of Truth, a villainous organization that regularly clashed with the Guardians of the Galaxy in the comics.
    • Ayesha is herself a composite of the version of herself from the comics and the Matriarch, the leader of the Universal Church. Much like High Priestess Ayesha, they were very closely tied with Adam Warlock.
    • The Church was composed of a very diverse collection of aliens species instead of a singular one of gold-skinned individuals and possessed the sinister goal of conquering the universe and "purifying" those who wouldn't submit to their will. The Sovereign shares the same eugenics driven superiority but come off as petty, arrogant, small-minded, and are comparatively more passive (at least in the sequel) since they only react if they are crossed, though there are hints (such as Ayesha's interest in Peter's unknown genetic makeup) that they do have some bigger ambitions.
  • Dirty Coward: They don't actually fly ships into battle, preferring instead to control them remotely via what is basically a futuristic arcade game. They also hire the Guardians to kill the Abilisk because they consider that a better deal than actually risking any of their own people.
  • Face Ship: Their ships have two-way screens on the front so you can see who's controlling them.
  • Fantastic Racism: They considered themselves genetically perfect and look down on the races. The whole point of hiring the Guardians to defend their planet is because they consider them expendable.
  • Gold Makes Everything Shiny: This is the predominant color in their skin, clothing, and architecture.
  • Gold and White Are Divine: The Sovereign certainly think so. They believe themselves to be "genetically perfect" and they are all completely gold down to their eyes, and their high priestess Ayesha at one point dresses in pure white. In this case, however, Light Is Not Good.
    • The gold and white part is mostly shown when they wear gold winter capes decorated with white fur.
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: All of them are gold, and all of them were genetically engineered to be beautiful.
  • An Ice Suit: When visiting an ice planet, they wear grand Pimped Out Capes lined with white fur.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: The Sovereign might be unlikable snobs with a major superiority complex, but at least they honored their agreements with the Guardians right up until Rocket decided to steal what is rightfully theirs just for the hell of it.
  • Laughably Evil: While they initially come across as arrogant but dignified Space Elves, this steadily wears off over the course of Guardians Vol. 2, as the ridiculous, pathetic children beneath all that gold slowly get revealed, and it's played for all the comedy the film can muster.
  • Light Is Not Good: Ayesha and the rest of the Sovereign fit pretty well with the light motif, what with them being colored in shiny gold and all. However, they and Ego are the main villains of the second film's plot.
  • Not So Stoic: A chambermaid tries to remain as regal as the rest of her race, but she breaks into laughter upon hearing Taserface's name.
  • Planet of Hats: The Sovereign's hat is "Arrogant Bastards". In their first actual appearance on-screen, the High Priestess admits to the Guardians' faces that they were hired because, competency aside, they're more expendable than any of her precious genetically tailored people. When the Sovereign Fleet attacks shortly afterward, it's mentioned that they use remote-piloted drone ships in order to ensure there's no real danger to their people. When recruiting Yondu, the High Priestess Ayesha has an elaborate setup involving a ridiculously long unraveled carpet so she doesn't have to wet her feet by treading on the cold snow.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: The Sovereign admiral hesitates to blow up the Milano with the valuable stolen batteries that started the conflict, which would destroy the batteries altogether and, potentially, the entire remote-controlled fleet... but Ayesha's present concern — actually stating, in the junior novel, that they have many of both — is the "slight" against their people and the "heresy" that it represents. The order goes through; shoot with intent to kill.
  • Pride: It's more or less their hat. The Sovereign are extremely vain, arrogant, and easily-offended.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: They consider themselves genetically superior to just about everyone, but in practice, they come off as immature and ineffectual.
  • Superior Species: They claim to be a genetically superior race, but given that they do little to show it, it's clear the only ones who think this are themselves. They have the pompous attitude of rich snobs, and lose patience to frustration easily. The pilots directing their drone ships act like teenagers playing a video game, complete with one of them shouting "Damn!" and slamming her fist when her ship explodes, and the high priestess has attendants that are clearly trying to make her look dignified, but instead look silly.
  • Psychopathic Man Child: All of them act like snooty Alpha Bitches and Jerk Jocks who enjoy shooting things from the comforts of their own base.
  • Ultimate Life Form: They believe themselves to be "genetically perfect".
  • Uterine Replicator: Their species is genetically engineered from birth cocoons.
  • Villainy-Free Villain: On the surface, all they're trying to do is punish an enormous theft of priceless artifacts that are rightfully their own property. They're just so absurdly bratty about it that it's hard to sympathize with them.

    Ayesha 

Ayesha

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcy_ayesha.png
"Our concern is the slight against our people... We hire them and they steal from us. That is heresy of the highest order."

Species: Sovereign

Citizenship: Sovereign

Portrayed By: Elizabeth Debicki

Voiced By: Marcela Páez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Inés Blázquez (European Spanish)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol 3

The high priestess of the Sovereign who enlists the Guardians' help.


  • Adaptational Modesty: Wears a flowing golden gown instead of the Leotard of Power she has in the comics.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, Ayesha wasn't the leader of a sinister alien civilization, but rather the Enclave's rebellious creation that turned against them for being evil. Here, not only does she serve as an antagonist to the Guardians of the Galaxy, but also takes aspects from the Enclave by creating Adam Warlock and essentially being combined with them.
  • Adaptational Wimp: She lacks the superhuman strength, flight and cosmic energy manipulation that her comic book counterpart possessed. Instead, she is a schemer that stays in the background and can't be bothered to do things herself, relying on the Ravagers and remote controlled starfighters in the climax.
  • Armchair Military: Though she is willing to pilot the fighters with her people when needed, the ships are all remote controlled from her base.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Subverted - she operates one of the hundreds of starfighters when they take on the Guardians, but they're all wirelessly controlled so she's in no more danger than any of their pilots, and she's not presented as a significantly greater threat than any of the rest of her fleet.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Ayesha swears vengeance on the Guardians for daring to offend the Sovereign. When the Sovereign forces try to pursue the Guardians, they end up getting easily swatted away by Ego. They try to hire the Ravagers to find the Guardians, resulting in Taserface's mutiny. Once the Sovereign find the Guardians, they try to capture them again, but end up only distracting the Guardians while they're fighting the real villain. As of The Stinger, Ayesha's still at it, but even the other Sovereign are getting tired of her wasting resources on the Guardians. She may ascend to true Big Bad status in Vol. 3, as she's bioengineering a powerful being called Adam Warlock; but it also has the potential to backfire on her really badly (as in the comics, Adam Warlock is a powerful hero).
  • Color-Coded Patrician: Since gold is their people's color, she stands out by wearing a cape covered with white fur, instead of a gold cape lined with fur.
  • The Comically Serious: Amusingly pompous in her arrogance, she's a rich font of unorthodox comedy right until she reveals that she's in the process of creating Adam Warlock to hunt down and destroy the Guardians.
  • Composite Character:
    • Ultimately proves to be one with the Enclave, as she takes their place as the creator of Adam Warlock.
    • Also one with the Matriarch of the Universal Church of Truth.
  • Covert Pervert: Despite having contempt for forms of reproduction, she is not above showing interest how "lesser species reproduce" by hitting on Peter. In front of his love interest no less.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: At first it seems like she's gonna be the main antagonist of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, pursuing the Guardians over a slight, but she becomes small fry when Ego the Living Planet's plan to assimilate all life is discovered.
  • Expository Hairstyle Change: As the Guardians further frustrate Ayesha, her hair is no longer styled, but loose and disheveled.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: Ayesha is covered in gold, reflecting her lofty position as the leader of the Sovereign (who are naturally gold).
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: Golden-skinned, and inhumanly beautiful.
  • Failed Attempt at Drama: When she recruits the Ravagers to pursue the Guardians, she makes a Big Entrance with a ridiculously long entourage, including two minions deploying a blue carpet from a roller so her feet won't get cold in the snow...Until the roller gets jammed.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: Pretty much nothing goes right for her or her species in the movie, and her reactions to her repeated failures drive in just how little the Sovereign matter overall. She's trying her best to defy the trope with the creation of Adam, though.
  • It's the Principle of the Thing: When told that blowing up the Guardians' ship could blow up the batteries, she says that punishing the Guardians for their insult is more important.
  • Light Is Not Good: Her body may be radiantly golden and shiny, but her nature is not that good.
  • Meaningful Name: Ayesha in the Western world was a name popularized by H. Rider Haggard's Shenote . Like Haggard's character, Marvel's Ayesha is an unnaturally beautiful haughty woman, "She who must be obeyed".
  • Not So Above It All: She appears to be flirting with Quill when she shows interest in "privately discussing" archaic reproduction methods with him.
  • Pretty in Mink: Her winter cape mostly covered with white fur, when her subordinated wear gold capes lined with fur, when she comes to make a deal with Yondu.
  • Revenge Before Reason: She gets called on for using so many resources just to punish the Guardians.
  • Statuesque Stunner: She is 6'3", and a very gorgeous Gold-Skinned Space Babe.
  • Villainous Breakdown: She grows increasingly frustrated with her failed attempts to destroy the Guardians, until at the end she's left sitting staring into space, with her hair in disarray and her advisers wanting to talk to her about her wasting of resources. However it emerges that she's not defeated yet; rather she's in a state of Dissonant Serenity when she reveals she's creating Adam Warlock for the sole purpose of hunting down and finally killing her enemies.
  • Womanchild: Humorously, the Sovereign in general seem to have the emotional maturity of spoiled 14-year olds, and Ayesha is no exception. Given her own megalomania, she also doubles as a more light-hearted example of Psychopathic Womanchild.

    Adam Warlock 

Adam Warlock

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/adam_warlock.png

Species: Sovereign

Citizenship: Sovereign

Portrayed By: Will Poulter

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 note  | Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol 3

An artificial being created by Ayesha.


  • Artificial Human: He is one in the making.
  • Decomposite Character:
    • Vision was based on him, being a powerful artificial being with an Infinity Stone stuck in his forehead.
    • The Collector in the first Guardians Of The Galaxy movie had a different looking cocoon in his collection that Word of God confirmed was meant to be Adam Warlock. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 introduced him as a separate character.
  • Red Herring: A cocoon reminiscent of one that he has resided in the actual comics appeared in the first Guardians movie as a part of the Collector's collection. However, the ending to Vol. 2 establishes that he wasn't even alive at that time, meaning that the mysterious cocoon was not his.

The Deviants

    In General 

The Deviants

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9a5a4d36_cb6e_4ce0_b0dd_fe4cfbfcbc0e.jpeg

Appearances: Eternals

A monstrous race of near-immortal beings also genetically engineered by the Celestials and are also historical enemies of the Eternals, their racial cousins.


  • Adaptational Abomination: In the comics, they were often bizarre-looking but still humanoid creatures, here however they're animal-like sinuous monsters.
  • Adaptational Backstory Change: The Deviants in the comics are an ancient subspecies of humans genetically modified by the Celestials. Here, they are an independent species completely unconnected to humans.
  • Adaptational Non Sapience: In the comics, the Deviants were able to create advanced civilizations that could dominate entire worlds. Here, they all lack sapience and require the absorption of cosmic energy from the Eternals to evolve and achieve sapience.
  • Animalistic Abomination: The Deviants all look like primal predators, albeit with incredibly alien-like skin and features.
  • Evil Is Visceral: Their bodies mostly look like they're all muscle without any skin.
  • Evolution Power-Up: The Deviants adapt and evolve to take on characteristics of a planet's predators whom they were created to consume and destroy. This includes the Eternals themselves.
  • Gone Horribly Right: As mentioned below, the Deviants were created to be the ultimate adaptive apex predator for other powerful predators that could potentially endanger other intelligent life. Unfortunately, their bloodthirsty nature and ability to adapt after killing predators eventually made the Deviants unstoppable killing machines, to the point that Arishem had to create the Eternals to destroy them.
  • Grew Beyond Their Programming: The Deviants were initially created by Arishem to be apex predators that exclusively hunted other native predators to protect any budding intelligent life they endangered, and were capable of rapidly evolving to resemble the predators they killed to increase their effectiveness. However, it wasn't long before they became so much like their original prey that they evolved to hunt said intelligent life anyway and bred out of control, necessitating the creation of the Eternals as countermeasures against them.
  • Immune to Bullets: Bullets can irritate them or even knock them down, but they appear entirely incapable of killing the Deviants or even piercing their flesh even at point-blank range, reinforcing that the Eternals and their powers are the only things truly capable of killing them.
  • Metamorphosis Monster: It's revealed with Kro that the Deviants can forcibly evolve themselves by consuming an Eternal's cosmic energy. Kro uses his absorption powers to evolve throughout the film, and he feeds some of Ajak's energy to the last few Deviants to mutate them to more powerful forms.
  • Monster in the Ice: The Eternals were under the impression that they defeated the last of Earth's Deviants about five hundred years ago, so they're surprised when new ones turn up in the present day. It's later revealed that these "new" Deviants were frozen in ice in Alaska for millennia and were thawed out due to glacial melting.
  • Non-Malicious Monster: Surprisingly, they fit this. The Eternals are told they're parasitic monsters that deliberately, and maliciously hunt intelligent life, when they're really just animals trying to survive, and don't have the mental capacity to make moral decisions. The problem is simply they see humans as just another kind of prey.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: Most of the Deviants we see in Eternals are mindless predators who want nothing more than to kill and consume anything they come across. At it turns out, that was more or less how they were created. Things changed, however, when they started targeting the life they were supposed to protect.
  • Predators Are Mean: They are invasive alien predators that prey on intelligent life, and the villains that the heroic Eternals are at war with. Which is a lie — the Deviants are still predators, but were made to be predators of predators, "protecting" intelligent life in a roundabout way, until of course they evolved to start hunting said intelligent life anyway.

    Kro 

Kro

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/8232f22f_93ff_490c_839b_d872b2ebd5c1.png
"I will kill you all for what you have done to my kind."

Species: Deviant

Portrayed By: Arie Dekker (mocap)

Voiced By: Bill Skarsgård (English), Masaki Terasoma (Japanese)

Appearances: Eternals

An unusually powerful Deviant unlike any other the Eternals have faced over the millennia. His appearance is the harbinger of a global threat.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: In the comics; Kro has pinkish-red skin like that of a satanic demon. In the film, he is emerald green with some hints of red and purple on his body.
  • Adaptational Ugliness: Kro was never particularly attractive in the comics; however, while he looked like a rosy red demon there, he looks much more ugly and inhuman in the film.
  • Adapted Out: In the comics, he and Thena had a millennia-long affair that only ended early in the 20th century, and they still care deeply for each other in the present day. In the film, they're nothing more than antagonistic to each other, and Thena ends up killing Kro while he's in the process of trying to kill her.
  • All There in the Script: His name is never spoken in the film, but it appears in the credits.
  • Anti-Villain: At first a mere beast, achieving sentience allows him to form more tangible motives... anger over his people being used and discarded, and awareness that the Eternals are here to destroy the planet. The Eternals even question allying with him, but ultimately reason that letting him gain more power would be too dangerous.
  • Arch-Enemy: For all the Eternals, but especially Thena, as he's responsible for the deaths of both Ajak and Gilgamesh, the latter of which Thena had formed a strong bond with due to him taking care of her for thousands of years. During the climactic final battle, Thena goes out of her way to find and fight Kro herself in order to avenger Gilgamesh's death.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: While obviously not as great of a threat as the Celestials, Kro is still a major problem as the leader of the Deviants, trying to kill the Eternals even as Tiamut threatens to destroy the world.
  • Bishōnen Line: He starts the film as just another Deviant, a monstrous if unusually powerful beast resembling a tentacled, four-eyed ape if anything. After absorbing Gilgamesh's energy, he evolves into his pictured humanoid form and gains true sentience. A flashback showing Ajak's death at his hands reveals he was originally more animalistic, resembling a generic quadruped predator with tentacles before becoming more ape-like after taking Ajak's powers.
  • Combat Tentacles: Boasts a vast array of menacing sharp-tipped tentacles sprouting from his back, that he uses in battle. They possess the ability to steal the Eternals' cosmic energy.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Kro initially seems to be the main threat of the film as the one responsible for killing Ajak. He's quickly sidelined by the reveal of Arishem's true plans for Earth and the revelation that Ikaris fed Ajak to him, but nevertheless returns in the climax to try and exact revenge.
  • Energy Absorption: His unique power as a Deviant is to steal cosmic energy from Eternals using his tentacles. Sapping their energy evolves Kro to become more and more intelligent and human-like, as well as granting him his victim's powers.
  • Extra Eyes: This version of Kro has four eyes, perhaps to give him a more monstrous and intimidating appearance.
  • Healing Hands: Is capable of healing himself rapidly using cosmic energy, which the Eternals note is similar to Ajak's healing abilities. He took this ability from her after he killed her and absorbed her energy.
  • Hero Killer: In the millions of years that this particular group of Eternals has been active, their only deaths happen that week because Kro kills Ajak and Gilgamesh.
  • It Can Think: At the beginning of the film, the bestial Kro distinguishes himself from other Deviants by possessing the ability to speak broken words, act intelligently, and heal himself - qualities no other Deviant has ever displayed. He gained these powers from killing Ajak, and only gets more intelligent after killing Gilgamesh.
  • Power Parasite: Kro has the ability to sap the cosmic energy giving the Eternals life with his tentacles to empower and evolve himself, which he uses to steal Ajak and Gilgamesh's powers.
  • Super-Persistent Predator: He's determined to find and kill the Eternals, following them to London, the Amazon rainforest, and finally an island in the Indian Ocean. It's later revealed that he's doing this to get revenge for the other Deviants the Eternals killed.
  • Villainy-Free Villain: He never actually goes after any innocents after achieving sentience, something actually noted, only targeting the Eternals (who from his perspective are the villains of the story). Ultimately his actions would have doomed the planet, but he's likely unaware of this and there was, unfortunately, no real opportunity to convince him.

The Tivan Group

    The Collector 

Taneleer Tivan / The Collector

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/06cbd5ddd90dac0676c27dd6bb8a5891.png
"One down, five to go."

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: None

Affiliation(s): Tivan Group

Portrayed By: Benicio del Toro

Voiced by: Jaime López (Latin-American Spanish dub), Pablo Adán (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Thor: The Dark World note  | Guardians of the Galaxy | Avengers: Infinity War

"Sir... You must allow me to pay you now so that I may own your carcass. At the moment of your death, of course."

The person with the largest collection of interstellar fauna, relics and species in the galaxy. The Collector operates out of a place in space aptly named Knowhere.

Lady Sif and Volstagg trust the remaining Aether with him in the form of an Infinity Stone, believing that he can keep it away from the other Infinity Stone, the Tesseract. However, he secretly wants to use the Aether to build the Infinity Gauntlet. Later, when he encounters Peter Quill and his band, The Collector attempts to strike a dubious bargain.

He is the brother of the Grandmaster, the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar.


  • Aborted Arc: His appearance in The Stinger for Thor: The Dark World implies that he intends to collect all six Infinity Stones for his own sinister plot. This seems to be largely abandoned in later installments: the destruction of his residence in Guardians of the Galaxy and his implied death in Avengers: Infinity War cause him to lose the Power and Reality Stones, allowing for Thanos to collect them for himself.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics he commonly has the appearance of an almost skull-faced old man, as opposed to the more handsome Del Toro in the films.
  • Adaptational Wimp: Collector in the comics could hold an entire team of Avengers at bay with just the things in his collection, and if the situation called for it he had some energy-controlling powers he could use as well. If he has those, he didn't have time to use them, and most of his collection didn't survive the Power Stone going off inside of it. He handled it pretty well himself, though.
  • Alliterative Name: Taneeler Tivan.
  • Ambiguously Related: Though the Collector and the Grandmaster are supposedly brothers per Word of God, there's nothing in-universe that reveals or even implies that this is the case.
  • Asshole Victim: While it is unknown what had happened to him after Thanos destroyed his entire place, whatever Thanos brought onto him is certainly well-deserved since he was a greedy, cruel Bad Boss who enslaved his workers.
  • Bad Boss: He locked one of his assistants in his collection for disappointing him and uses her as an example to Carina to keep her from disappointing him. This bites him in the caboose later on, as the mistreated assistant grabs the Infinity Stone in an attempt to kill both herself and the Collector.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: His goal was to collect the Infinity Stones for himself, presumably for some selfish needs. While he acquired two, he lost the Power Stone shortly after it came into his possession, and by the events of Avengers: Infinity War, Thanos came to his place and took the Reality Stone off his hands, most likely killing him in the process. Well, so much for that.
  • Black Eyes of Crazy: His tendency to bow his head, obscuring his eyes, along with his Excessive Evil Eyeshadow give the impression of bright irises and black sclera.
  • The Cameo: His collection features a few nods to other characters in the Marvel Universe, including Adam Warlock's cocoon, the telepathic space dog Cosmo, Howard the Duck, and possibly Beta Ray Bill. It also features a Chitauri soldier and a Dark Elf, as well as the alien space slugs from Slither and Tobias Funke after he blue himself.
  • Camp Straight: Apparently, the script specifically called for "an outer-space Liberace", which is what Del Toro delivers.
  • Celebrity Paradox: As far as Black Widow is concerned, the James Bond franchise exist in the MCU with Benicio del Toro having played henchman Dario in Licence to Kill.
  • Cold Ham: He's an incredibly larger-than-life presence, and dresses accordingly, but he very rarely raises his voice above a conversational tone.
  • The Collector: Well, duh. It's in his name, no less. His role in the plot is hiring people like the Ravagers to build his Infinity Stone collection.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Gamora points out that the profitable mining operations that the Tivan Group is conducting to extract the organic materials from Knowhere are highly dangerous and highly illegal.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He appeared in the post-credits scene of Thor: The Dark World.
  • Faux Affably Evil: He flatters his guests (although Sif and Volstagg seem to be aware it's just an act), but he's a horrible boss.
  • Goth: His fashion wouldn't look out of place in a Tim Burton movie.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: It was his constant mediocre treatment of Carina, demanding she polish every last surface in his shop and threatening to put her in a box if she didn't comply, that caused her to snap and use the Infinity Stone to blow up the place and herself, wiping out most of his unique and valuable inventory, except for Cosmo and Howard.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink: After Carina used the Power Stone to blow up his base, he reaches for alcohol. At least he has Howard the Duck for a drinking buddy.
  • It Amused Me: It seems that he wants to have the Infinity Stone that drives the plot of the entire movie (and on a larger scale, the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe)... just because he'd like to own it.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: He's more than willing to work with the Asgardians to keep the Aether safe — but only so he can use it for his own designs.
  • Kick the Dog: He threatens to incarcerate Carina if she does not clean the cages properly. This eventually backfires once Carina brings some warranted payback by destroying his collection with the Power Stone.
  • Killed Offscreen: Possibly. His appearance in Infinity War is only as an illusion created by Thanos using the Reality Stone in order to lure the Guardians into a trap. It's left unclear if the real Collector was confronted and potentially killed by Thanos when the latter arrived to take the Stone.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: One of his assistants has had enough of his treatment and destroys his base with the Infinity Stone, leaving him injured and depressed. After this, whatever he plans to do with the Infinity Stones will have to wait.
  • Licked by the Dog: Cosmo seems to like him, although this disgusts Howard the Duck.
  • Milking the Giant Cow: While describing the Infinity Stone he is given to making dramatic gestures, which is promptly mocked by Rocket.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Both in appearance, personality and mannerisms, he resembles quite a bit Andy Warhol or, as Del Toro once described him, a "space Liberace".
  • Related in the Adaptation: In the MCU, the Grandmaster and him are brothers.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His appearance during the post post credits scene of Thor: The Dark World would later tie into the events of all the other movies afterwards leading up to Avengers: Infinity War in which Thanos crosses paths with The Collector and once again uses the same torture technique on the Collector that he used on Thor and later Nebula to get him to tell him everything he knows about the location of the Power Stone.
  • Spanner in the Works: It is his repeated attempts to acquire the Orb that spoil Thanos and Ronan’s plans, specifically... Through the Broker, he’s the one that points the Ravagers and Peter in the direction of Morag, setting the events of the movie in motion and his monetary offer is what prompts Gamora to betray Thanos.
  • Time Abyss: His brother is billions of years old, and he doesn't appear to be much younger.
  • Troll: While talking to Groot he asks if Rocket is Groot's pet, predictably enraging Rocket. His smirk shows this is exactly what he'd intended.
  • Uncanny Valley Makeup: His makeup makes him look a little weirder than he is already, to say the least.
  • Uncertain Doom: In Infinity War. The only time we saw The Collector was an illusion created by Thanos to trick the Guardians into believing he hadn't gotten the Reality Stone yet. The Collector's status prior to this is unknown, though one can reasonably assume he was either captured or killed by Thanos given that Knowhere has been completely destroyed.
  • Unrelated in the Adaptation: Carina is the Collector's daughter in the comics. In the MCU they are not even from the same species.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Genuinely believes he's helping preserve endangered species from a possible cataclysm. Though his methods may not be perfect, he is attempting to do a good thing.
  • White Hair, Black Heart: He has white blonde hair and isn't super nice.
  • Wild Card: It's not entirely clear whose side he's on or why he wants to build the Infinity Gauntlet but he's willing to work with heroes like the Asgardians or criminals like the Ravagers to get the the stones needed to build it. Most likely he's working for himself. He is a collector, after all.

    Carina 

Carina

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2b1b7fdf3a78a8a1b4c4a578e36f1558.png
"I will no longer be your slave!"

Species: Krylorian

Citizenship: None

Affiliation(s): Tivan Group

Portrayed By: Ophelia Lovibond

Voiced by: Analíz Sánchez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Eva Díez [Guardians of the Galaxy] (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Thor: The Dark World note  | Guardians of the Galaxy

A slave of the Collector who cleans the cases he keeps his collection in.


  • Adaptational Wimp: Her comic book counterpart can fire energy bursts, alter and summon matter, sense futures and alternate realities and even swap the minds of others from one body to another. MCU Carina is only a humanoid.
  • Catchphrase: "I present to you, Taneleer Tivan, the Collector".
  • The Dog Bites Back: While it's unknown and doubtful she knew what would happen when she grabbed the Infinity Stone, the Collector's abuse and threats made sure she didn't care as long as he suffered one way or another.
    Carina: I will no longer be your slave!
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Appears alongside the Collector, as stated above. Her job is making the introduction, so technically she shows up first!
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: She's a Krylorian, a race of magenta-skinned humanoids.
  • Stepford Smiler: She puts on a smile and cheery attitude for guests, but she really hates Tivan due to all the abuse he puts her through.
  • Unrelated in the Adaptation: Carina is the Collector's daughter in the comics. In the MCU, they are not even from the same species.

The Collector's prizes

    Howard the Duck 

Howard the Duck

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/howard_duck_7523.png
"What do you let him lick you like that for? Gross."
Click here to see him as he appears in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 

Species: Unknown

Portrayed By: Seth Green

Voiced By: Ricardo Méndez (Latin-American Spanish dub); Roberto González [Guardians of the Galaxy], Rafael Alonso Roldán [Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2] (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Avengers: Endgame

"You know what they say: 'You’re outta luck until you’ve gone duck!'"

One of the Collector's prizes: a duck-like alien (or possibly, as in the original continuity, an accidental visitor from Another Dimension) who seems to be in no hurry to escape. He eventually does, however, and ends up hanging out with the Ravagers.


  • Adaptational Modesty: In many of his appearances in the comics, Howard went commando. Every appearance from his movie counterpart has worn pants.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: He is among the heroes summoned by Doctor Strange while wielding a BFG in Endgame.
  • The Alcoholic: Minus his cameo in Endgame, Howard is always seen with a drink in his hand.
  • The Cameo:
    • He appears in one of the stingers of Guardians of the Galaxy, but also in a Freeze-Frame Bonus much earlier in the film, locked in a containment unit in the background when the Collector turns to meet the Guardians.
    • He also appears in a bar in the Ravager Base during the sequel. He is also part of the illustrations for the credits complete with sommelier style holding of a wine glass.
    • He makes a blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo in Endgame to the right of Wasp and alongside the Ravagers as one of the heroes Doctor Strange portals into the final battle against Thanos.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Pun intended. Moments before the Collector's Face-Revealing Turn in Guardians of the Galaxy, the Collector looks in his direction.
  • Early Installment Character-Design Difference: He has a semi-realistic Funny Animal appearance in the first Guardians of the Galaxy movie, but subsequent appearances have his proportions look more cartoony and evocative of his design in the 2015 Marvel Comics miniseries.
  • Funny Animal: Quite literally. He even makes a quack at the Collector's expense.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: He may have been imprisoned by the Collector in a zero-privacy cell for an unknown length of time, but he doesn't hold it against the guy. At least, not when there's a chance of a free drink.
  • Guttural Growler: Has a somewhat low, raspy voice, presumably from smoking.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: No pun intended, considering he’s a duck and all, but Howard has been reserved solely for funny cameos and jokes during his tenure in the MCU thus far. Come the climax of Endgame, he’s among the many heroes who answer the call to arms to help fight Thanos, showing that he is willing to lay down his life to helping protect and save the universe from oblivion.
  • Nice Hat: His red fedora can be seen lying on the floor next to him.
  • Noodle Incident: It's never explained how he came to be part of The Collector's collection, though one would assume it's quite the story. Equally mysterious is how he came to be in the Ravager Base Bad-Guy Bar, and became badass enough to join them for the Battle of Earth.
  • Quacking Up: Howard is a prominent example of this trope due to his outgoing personality.
  • Really Gets Around: It's implied, by his one line in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, that Howard scores pretty frequently.
  • Refuge in Audacity: The only reason his cameo in Guardians of the Galaxy, and his subsequent appearances, aren't ridiculed for being too out-there for this continuity is because he's in movies that co-star a gun-toting raccoon.
  • Rule of Funny:
    • The reason why he is introduced in The Stinger to Guardians of the Galaxy is because the people at Marvel thought it would be funny. Apparently the director thinks this as well, hence his reasoning for putting him in:
      James Gunn: [on Howard's inclusion] Me having a bit of fun. We don't take ourselves too seriously.
    • This was the reason why he was among the heroes included in the final battle against Thanos.
  • Stockholm Syndrome: For some reason, he didn't immediately decide to run away after the Collector's lab blew up and released him from his captivity. Maybe the Collector just makes a good drink, or he has nowhere better to go. He later changed his mind, and ended up with the Ravagers.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Implied, given that he's one of the Ravagers on the front lines at the Battle of Earth.
  • Toothy Bird: In his first appearance, he has human teeth in his beak. In his second, not so much.
  • Umbrella Drink: He takes a swig from one, which is presumably alcoholic. "It burns going down."
  • Waistcoat of Style: He has a red one, complete with a tie and an undershirt.

    Cosmo 

Cosmo

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cosmo.jpg

Species: Earth Dog

Citizenship: Russian

Portrayed By: Fred the Dog

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | The Guardians Of The Galaxy Holiday Special

A dog used as a test subject by a U.S.S.R. space program and now part of the Collector's collection.


  • Mythology Gag: Shares a moment glaring with Rocket, referencing their frequent headbutting in the comics.
  • Older Than They Look: Considering the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the fact that most Soviet dog spaceflights took place in the 50's and 60's, he has lived past the average dog lifespan by a few decades and still looks like a dog in his prime.
  • Uncertain Doom: His fate after Thanos raided Knowhere is unknown. However, he was planned to show up in Infinity War with Howard in a scene, only for it to be cut for time, indicating he is still alive.

Titan

    In General 

Titan

Appearances: Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame

A desolated planet that was home to the Titans before their extinction.


  • Adaptation Deviation: In the comics, Thanos's homeworld is the real-life moon of Saturn named Titan. In the MCU, Titan is a fictional planet outside of the solar system.
  • Binary Suns: The planet Titan has two suns. One large and yellow, with the other being smaller and blue.
  • Colony Drop: During his fight against the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy on Titan, Thanos uses the Power and Space Stones to shatter one of the moons and then rain the fragments on the heroes.
  • Derelict Graveyard: Since the extinction of the Titans, the planet is covered with wrecked spaceships.
  • Detonation Moon: One of Titan's moons gets blown up when Thanos uses the Infinity Stones on it to hurl the debris at the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • Ghost Planet: Titan suffered apocalyptic disaster related to their resources. All that's left is massive amounts of wrecked buildings and walkways.
  • Urban Ruins: The place where the heroes confront Thanos resembles the ruins of an alien city.

    Titans 

Titans

Appearances: The Avengers note  | Guardians of the Galaxy | Avengers: Age of Ultron note  | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame | Eternals note 

A race of humanoid aliens that is almost extinct.


  • Adaptation Species Change: The Titans in the comics were an offshoot of Eternals called Titanian Eternals. Aside from Eros, there is no indication if that is still the case here as they appear to be treated as if they were a separate species.
  • Dying Race: The race is nearly extinct, with Thanos being the only known survivor, and he dies during the events of Avengers: Endgame. However, it's revealed in The Stinger of Eternals that some other Titans are still alive, including Thanos' brother Eros.
  • Human Alien: From what is shown when Thanos uses the Reality Stone to create an illusion of the planet Titan before its population became extinct, the Titans seem to have a similar appearance to humans. Confirmed when Eros shows up in Eternals, and he looks virtually indistinguishable from a normal human. Thanos is obviously an exception, as he was born disfigured.
  • Overpopulation Crisis: Long ago, the Titans suffered from overpopulation, and the subsequent abuse of natural resources led to their extinction. This is what drives Thanos, one of the few survivors, to make sure that this doesn't happen again on any other planet.
  • You're Insane!: According to Thanos, the other Titans called him a madman when he suggested to kill half the population to solve their planet's Overpopulation Crisis.

    A'Lars 

A'Lars

Species: Titan

Citizenship: Titan

Appearances: Avengers: Infinity War note 

The father of Thanos.


  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Red Skull calls him "A'Lars", but his code name "Mentor" from the comics is never used.
  • The Ghost: He is briefly mentioned by Red Skull as Thanos's father in Infinity War, but he never made an actual appearance.
  • Uncertain Doom: He is probably dead since Thanos mentions that he is the only member of his race to have survived. However, The Stinger of Eternals reveals that his brother Eros is alive as well, so it may be possible that A'Lars also survived.

    Thanos 

Thanos

    "The New Guy" (massive spoilers for Eternals

Eros / Starfox

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9e6b5c5b_63f3_42a4_a622_f6d1bf8a3b39.jpeg
"Your friends are in big trouble, and we know where to find them."

Species: Eternal

Citizenship: Titan

Portrayed By: Harry Styles

Voiced By: Emmanuel Bernal (Latin American Spanish)

Appearances: Eternals note 

An Eternal who became the adoptive brother of Thanos.


  • Accents Aren't Hereditary: Eros speaks with Harry Styles' natural English accent, which heavily contrasts with Thanos's rugged American-like one.
  • Adaptational Late Appearance: In the comics, Eros usually appears alongside Thanos, while in the MCU, he makes his debut appearance long after Thanos is dead.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: The one aversion in the film, as most of the cast either don't have codenames to begin with (most of the Eternals) or haven't taken theirs up yet (Dane Whitman). Pip calls him Starfox during his Hammy Herald routine, while Eros introduces himself properly with his real name.
  • Hero of Another Story: If Pip the Troll is to be believed, Eros has apparently done quite a few heroic deeds in the cosmos that the audience has yet to hear the details of.
  • Meaningful Name: As with the other Eternals, Eros' name connects to mythology - specifically, he shares his name with the Greek god of love and sex, who is the basis for Cupid. It also positions him nicely as a foil to his late brother Thanos - their respective names come from Sigmund Freud's view of humanity as having both a life instinct (Eros) and a death drive (Thanatos). While Thanos certainly lives up to the "death" part, Eros is introduced offering to help the spacefaring Eternals find their captured friends, potentially helping to preserve life.
  • Primary-Color Champion: Eros wears a red cape and his suit is red with yellow/gold features.
  • Red Is Heroic: Eros is introduced as a heroic character with a red suit and a red cape.
  • Related Differently in the Adaptation: In the comics, Eros and Thanos are biological brothers. In the MCU, they are adoptive brothers.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: Thanos was a deformed, widely feared and despised madman with a stoic demeanor and hulking, brutal appearance. Eros, on the other hand, is a charming Pretty Boy who, despite a number of heroic deeds to his name (at least according to Pip), isn't as well known as his villainous brother.

    Pip the Troll 

Pip

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/a073da8d_db44_498e_aa18_6cb1d519b9a8.jpeg
"No more drunk teleporting for you."

Species: Troll

Portrayed By: Patton Oswalt

Appearances: Eternals note 

Eros's companion.


  • The Alcoholic: Pip's completely smashed when he's first introduced to the audience, drunkenly faceplanting onto the ground of the Eternals' ship via teleportation, and later rambling about Eros's accomplishments to them.
  • Hammy Herald: Pip is clearly enjoying himself as he introduces Starfox to the Eternals during the mid-credit scene.
  • Sentimental Drunk: Pip hypes up Eros while he's plastered, in spite of the latter's insistence that he doesn't have to do it every time he shows up someplace. Pip responds by telling him that everything he does is awesome, and so is obligated to do it.
  • Unreliable Narrator: Played for Laughs, since Pip is completely drunk out of his mind when bragging about Eros's accomplishments, making it hard to tell what he's making up, misremembering, or actually telling the truth about. To his credit though, Eros doesn't actually say much to contradict him, outside of correcting Pip about the name of one of the foes he faced.
  • You Sound Familiar: He is voiced by Patton Oswalt, who previously played all four of the Koenig brothers in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..

Lamentis

    Lamentis-1 

Lamentis-1

Appearances: Loki (appears in Episode 3: "Lamentis", Episode 4: "The Nexus Event")

A moon that is supposed to be destroyed in 2077.


  • Alien Sky: The skies of Lamentis-1 have a distinct purple color, which slowly gets darkened as the planet it's about to crash into covers more and more of it.
  • Colony Drop: In 2077, fragments of the planet Lamentis crashed on the moon Lamentis-1.
  • Crapsack World: Lamentis-1 is on the brink of complete destruction in 2077, where the poorer citizens of the world are left to die an agonizing death while the wealthier ones get to go a place called the Ark to live the rest of their days. The Ark itself ends up destroyed and kills everyone on it anyways.
  • Death by Adaptation: The planet Lamentis never got destroyed in the comics.
  • Meaningful Name: The moon has the word "Lament" in its name, and its destruction is apparently one of the worst cataclysms on the TVA's records.
  • Neon City: The Ark is situated in the middle of Shuroo, a sprawling, crowded, futuristic city, with neon lights and paint decorating it.
  • Numbered Homeworld: The moon is called "Lamentis-1"

    Lamentians 

Lamentians

Species: Lamentians

Appearances: Loki (appears in Episode 3: "Lamentis")

The inhabitants of the moon Lamentis-1.


  • Apocalypse Anarchy: The poor of Lamentis-1 devolve into chaotic rioting as the imminent destruction of their world approaches, and they realize that the rich are barring them from the only means of survival.
  • The Elites Jump Ship: The rich of Lamentis-1 gather on an Ark in order to escape the destruction of their world, while leaving the poor behind to die.
  • Human Aliens: They are pretty much indistinguishable from normal humans. Even their names are similar to those of Earth.
  • Kill the Poor: Lamentis-1's solution to avoid overcrowding on the Ark is to allow the wealthier folks to purchase tickets aboard while leaving the desperate and enraged poor to die on the moon that they're abandoning.

    Patrice's wife 

Patrice's wife

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4d0e5da0_1c09_4401_96f5_ce7e39eac88c.jpeg

Species: Lamentian

Citizenship: Lamentian

Portrayed By: Susan Gallagher

Appearances: Loki (appears in Episode 3: "Lamentis")

An old woman living on Lamentis-1.


  • Awful Wedded Life: Implied. Apparently, her husband Patrice never said anything nice to her in 30 years.
  • BFG: She has a huge gun and uses it on Sylvie and Loki, though its blasts are nonlethal.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: She uses her gun to blast away two Frost Giants, no less.
  • Killed Offscreen: Since it has been established that there were no survivors, we can safely assume that she died during Lamentis-1's destruction.
  • Never Mess with Granny: She seems to be at least in her 60s, but she's not afraid to blast away intruders with her gun, as Sylvie and Loki discover the hard way.
  • No Name Given: Her actual name is never revealed.
  • Spot the Imposter: When her husband Patrice shows up and tries to compliment her, she realizes it's not him because the real Patrice never said anything that nice to her.

    Patrice 

Patrice

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3d8d70b9_b560_40be_9d11_5e921cb2d47a.jpeg

Species: Lamentian

Citizenship: Lamentian

Portrayed By: Alex Van

Appearances: Loki (appears in Episode 3: "Lamentis" note )

An old man who lived on Lamentis-1.


  • Aerith and Bob: Unlike most aliens in the MCU, he has a name that is pretty common on Earth.
  • Awful Wedded Life: Implied. Apparently, he never said anything nice to his wife in 30 years.
  • Dead Person Impersonation: It's implied that Patrice is dead, and Loki briefly tries to pretend to be him.
  • The Ghost: Technically, the real Patrice never actually appears. All we see of him is a picture and Loki taking his appearance.
  • Out-of-Character Alert: When "Patrice" tries to compliment his wife, she blasts him away because the real Patrice never said anything that nice to her.
  • Uncertain Doom: We don't know what actually happened to him. He's implied to be dead, but it's not confirmed.

Others

Maveth

    Will Daniels 

Will Daniels

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/daniels_will.jpg
"I have never been able to resist doing something when I'm told the odds are impossible."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Dillon Casey

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 49: "4,722 Hours")

A NASA astronaut who was sent through the Kree portal to Maveth in 2001 as part of Project Distant Star Return, who Simmons runs into after she's also sucked in.


  • Action Survivor: The only member of his team able to keep it together in their hellish situation trapped on the alien planet. Surviving on an alien world by himself for fourteen years is certainly an impressive feat.
  • Ambiguously Evil: HYDRA was responsible for Will and his fellow astronauts' trip to Maveth, and Will's uniform had a proto-HYDRA logo on the shoulder, but whether Will himself was a member of HYDRA is left unclear.
  • Canon Foreigner: There is no Will Daniels in the comics.
  • Bus Crash: Died covering Simmons as Fitz brought her back, as revealed in "Maveth".
  • The Eeyore: He makes a pact with Simmons; she'll be "the voice of hope, and he'll be the "voice of doom" to keep both balanced.
  • Fish out of Temporal Water: With no updates from Earth since 2001, he's naturally amazed at Simmons' Smartphone.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation: After fourteen years alone, he's naturally gone a little off. He keeps Simmons imprisoned at first just to make sure she's real.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He distracts the thing hunting him and Simmons so she can get back to Earth, including using the bullet he was planning to save for when he truly couldn't go on anymore.
  • Impossible Task: He's drawn to these, which is why he volunteered for the Monolith mission.
  • Killed Offscreen: Will is killed by Hive while Simmons escapes and he ends up as another host for the ancient Inhuman.
  • My Greatest Failure: He had one job on the mission; keep the other three guys alive. Not only did he fail with all three, he had to kill the last one himself in self-defense.
  • My Greatest Second Chance: When another Lab Rat (Simmons) comes through the portal, he makes sure she stays alive and gets home.
  • Never Tell Me the Odds!: Someone telling him "this is impossible" only makes him want to do it more.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Was either this or Evil All Along due to the revelation HYDRA was responsible for his expedition. Whether he was a genuine astronaut who choose the wrong mission or a loyal HYDRA agent is not addressed, though evidence exists for both options. With his death, it is unlikely to be ever answered.

Sarge's Squad

    In General 

Sarge's Squad

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A mysterious planet-hopping crew led by Sarge.


  • Aliens Speaking English: They can speak and understand English perfectly despite having never been to Earth.
  • Human Aliens: They look human, but seemingly originate from different worlds. Jaco's fire-breathing ability seems to support they aren't humans from an Alternate Universe.
  • Evil Counterpart: To the original Bus team led by Coulson, each being led by a version of Phil Coulson that operates out of a vehicle (the Bus for Team Coulson, Sarge's Truck for Sarge's team) with the ultimate objective to protect people, Sarge's team does it by way of being well-intentioned extremists rather than take steps to actually save individual lives like S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Expy: Sarge's entire crew looks like they came straight out of a Mad Max movie. From their clothes, weapons, especially their truck, and their cutthroat attitudes, they'd be right at home in the Wasteland.
  • Four Is Death: As Tinker dies very shortly after being introduced to the audience, they're effectively a gang consisting of four members.
  • Hell-Bent for Leather: Whatever world they came from seems to have been deep in The Apunkalypse.
  • Outside-Context Problem: Obviously, nobody knows where the hell they came from and what it is that they seek.
  • Reality Warper: Them arriving on Earth causes all kinds of weird stuff to happen.
  • The Spook: Very little is known about them. They're not from Earth, they're not human in spite of their appearances, and they're clearly up to no good. Everything else remains a mystery.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: They're hunting down parasitic alien creatures called the Shrike that invade worlds and have been following them world to world. Trouble is, Sarge and his team don't care if they have to leave collateral damage in their wake and are perfectly okay with destroying worlds they believe to be too far gone... including the Earth.

    Sarge 
See his folder at MCU: Dimensions.

    Snowflake 

Snowflake

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/snowflake_3.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Brooke Williams

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The sole female member of Sarge's crew.


  • Affably Evil: Despite her clear psychosis, Snowflake's butterfly speeches seem genuinely intended to comfort her victims, and she takes a sincere liking to May and Deke.
  • Ax-Crazy: She is obviously a little...off. Her response to people's deaths is to just talk about how they'll become "butterflies". (Sometimes she'll cheerfully tell you what a beautiful butterfly you'll make while she's killing you.)
  • Blue-and-Orange Morality: Her understanding of death is a bit...off, and doesn't seem to think that killing people is a bad thing because they'll become "beautiful butterflies".
  • Book Dumb: If the subject is not cutting people up, or pseudo-philosophy about reincarnation, odds are it will be lost on Snow. Her most extensive knowledge of an atom bomb was it is pretty to watch go off.
  • Butterfly of Death and Rebirth: Believes that when people die, they will become butterflies. So she has no problems with killing.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: Has an odd spacey demeanor, and talks about what beautiful butterflies people will make after she kills them, showing an off-kilter view of death and rebirth. Assuming, of course, that she's not faking it.
  • Dark Action Girl: The sole female member of the team and plenty capable of kicking ass.
  • Dissonant Serenity: Again, she's eerily calm even when she's about to kill people.
  • Evil Counterpart: To Daisy. Both are Action Girls, Snowflake appears close with Sarge (as Daisy was with Coulson), they have similar appearances, and both attract the attention of Deke.
  • Knife Nut: She carries a knife and seems to be pretty good at using it.
  • Mistreatment-Induced Betrayal: Turns on Sarge after he leaves her to die with May, Daisy, and Deke.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: When Daisy describes herself as a hacker, Snowflake asks if that means that Daisy hacks people to pieces with a worryingly wide grin.
  • Obfuscating Insanity: In the episode "The Other Thing", it's implied that her unhinged personality is just an act, based on her conversation with May towards the end of the episode.
  • Odd Couple: With Deke.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome: Even after she helps stop Sarge's plan, Daisy still has Snowflake placed in lockup. Helping S.H.I.E.L.D. and having the hots for Deke doesn't change the fact that she's an Ax-Crazy lunatic who's killed several people.
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: She cuts her own head and then runs out pretending that she's a civilian and the others have her baby, distracting the S.H.I.E.L.D. team just long enough for the bombs to go off. She's worryingly casual about it, doing it without hesitation and showing no sign of pain.

    Jaco 

Jaco

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jaco.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Winston James Francis

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The biggest member of Sarge's team.


  • Affably Evil: The most level-headed and polite man in Sarge's team. Not that it makes him any less dangerous. He eventually defects to SHIELD.
    Jemma: "I like you."
    Jaco: "Well, that's because I'm a likable person."
  • Affectionate Nickname: Pax calls him "Jaco the Giant," which both Davis and Yo-Yo take to doing as well after Jaco's Heel–Face Turn.
  • Bald of Evil: Not a single hair on his head.
  • Beard of Evil: A quite unkempt one.
  • Bizarre Alien Biology: It's not even known what he (or the rest of Sarge's men) really are, but his biology seems to differ slightly from the others. He's seen huffing cleaning fluid while Sarge remarks he hasn't breathed his own atmosphere in ages. It would seem wherever Jaco is from, the atmosphere is thick with ammonia - quite toxic to regular humans.
  • The Brute: Though he has been quite a civil version of the trope.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: He really just wanted to be a baker back on his homeworld. Then the Shrike wiped it out, he joined Sarge's Badass Crew, and the rest is history.
  • Genius Bruiser: While Tinker was the resident scientist of the group, it's obvious Jaco is extremely intelligent himself. He's at least knowledgeable enough in geology to simplify PEGS (piezoelectric crystals) to a scared jewelry store employee.
  • Heel–Face Turn: After some prodding from Yo-Yo, he realizes that Sarge's countless sacrifice of innocents all in the name of stopping Izel is wrong, so he defects to SHIELD.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He sacrifices himself to blow up Izel's ship. Unfortunately she'd already slipped away turning it into a somewhat Senseless Sacrifice. The only upside is he stopped Sarge's A-Bomb from killing any innocents.
  • Large Runt: The massive Jaco insists that he was the runt of the litter compared to his seven brothers.
  • The Philosopher: Further subverting his brutish appearance, Jaco seems to be very thoughtful and cultured.
    Jaco: If you consider the infinite complexity of nature, maybe strange is the norm.
  • Playing with Fire: Don't leave him coughing for too long, or he'll begin exhaling like a dragon.
  • Supreme Chef: Combined with Real Men Wear Pink. Despite his massive size and strength, back on his home planet he was - according to him - a damn good baker who passed his skills on to his family. Then his planet went to shit and Sarge saved just him.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: Doesn't hurt a group of kids who witness him materializing on Earth, and later tells a little girl to run away from a blast radius.

    Pax 

Pax

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pax.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Matt O'Leary

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The third member of Sarge's team.


  • Beard of Evil: Just like his teammate Jaco.
  • Butt-Monkey: He's the almost-Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain of the crew since he endures more abuse and humiliation than the rest. Even Sarge and Jaco can't hold back a laugh or two at his expense.
  • Character Death: After he's wounded in a fight with Yo-Yo, Sarge kills him so he won't hold the rest of the team back.
  • Facial Horror: His face is horrifically burned by Yo-Yo, though Sarge puts him out of his misery quickly afterwards.
  • Meaningful Name: "Pax" is Latin for "peace." Pax is the only one of Sarge's crew that appears to want to stop and stay awhile on this Earth before they do something to it.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Sarge cruelly disposes of him after he's wounded by Yo-Yo. This was the turning point for Jaco to defect.

    Tinker 

Tinker

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Xavier Jimenez

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The last member of Sarge's team, who dies shortly after arriving on Earth.


  • Almost Dead Guy: He actually survives for a while after getting stuck into the wall, long enough to deliver a warning to S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Tele-Frag: Falls victim to this, getting stuck in a concrete wall.
  • Vagueness Is Coming: He lives just long enough to warn that Pachakutiq is coming and can't be stopped.

The Lazy Comet

    Viro 

Viro

Species: Sivian

Portrayed By: Paul Telfer

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Controller of the Lazy Comet, which transports cargo, mostly Xandarian snails, throughout several planets.


  • Aliens Speaking English: He speaks in the same language as Fitz and Enoch, without any hint of Translation Convention or Translator Microbes being at play.
  • Bad Boss: Viro exploits his crewmembers and doesn't give a damn about their lives. If Fitz hadn't rigged the ship's airlocks, Viro would've spaced all his engineers to avoid paying their wages.
  • Human Aliens: Sivians seem human except for having inhumanly skyblue irises.
  • Thrown Out the Airlock: Viro tries to do this to Fitz and all his engineers, but Fitz rigged the airlocks to Viro and his thugs are the ones that end up spaced while Fitz and the Sivian engineers remain safe.

Kitson

    Mr. Kitson 

Mr. Kitson / Kitson III

Species: Unknown Extraterrestrial Race

Portrayed By: Anthony Michael Hall

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The ruler of Kitson.


    Montalban 

Montalban

Species: Astran

Portrayed By: Louie Ski Carr

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

An enforcer of Mr. Kitson at the House of Games.


  • Bald of Evil: He's completely bald.
  • Beard of Evil: He has a dark beard and serves as the enforcer of an space mob boss, presiding over a game in which players put their own freedom as collateral.
  • Rubber-Forehead Aliens: Other than his green skin, red eyes and bony ridges instead of eyebrows, he looks human.

Naro-Atzia

    Pretorious Pryce 

Pretorious Pryce

Species: Naro-Atzian

Portrayed By: Clark Middleton

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Naro-Atzian custom officer at Customs Station CI-741.


Other Creatures & Alien Races

    Abilisk 

The Abilisk

Species: Unknown

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

An inter-dimensional creature that is feeding on the power source of the Sovereign, who hire the Guardians of the Galaxy to eliminate it.


  • Alien Blood: Its blood resembles yellow slime.
  • Breath Weapon: It has one that resembles the aurora borealis. Its actual effect is unclear due to most of the fight being a Meaningful Background Event, but Rocket's weapon catches fire when he's struck full-blast by its streaming light.
  • Combat Tentacles This creature's bread and butter, although it has a host of other abilities as well.
  • Kill It Through Its Stomach: Subverted, in that Drax's idea to attempt this against it proved wholly ineffective.
  • Lamprey Mouth: Has at least three rows of sharpened teeth filling multiple levels on the inside of its mouth.
  • Starfish Aliens: A giant, tentacled monster that travels between dimensions and particularly loves to menace the Sovereign world.

    Goose 

Goose

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/goosecaptainmarvel.png

Species: Flerken (disguised as a red, mackerel tabby domestic short-haired cat)

Citizenship: Kree Imperial, American

Portrayed By: Reggie, Gonzo, Rizzo, Archie

Appearances: Captain Marvel

"Aren't you the cutest little thing?"
Nick Fury, Captain Marvel

A mysterious cat that gets entangled with Carol Danvers and S.H.I.E.L.D. in the 1990s.


  • Adaptation Name Change: In the comics, Captain Marvel's cat is named Chewie in a Shout-Out to Star Wars.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: She was originally owned by Mar-Vell instead of Carol.
  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: He's Carol's pet in the comic, but in the movie she's the original Mar-Vell's, and later stays with Fury, while Carol remains indifferent to her.
  • Alien Animals: Can easily blend in as an Earth cat.
  • Animalistic Abomination: Is actually a flerken, a species of catlike aliens who have pocket dimensions in their stomach and can extend an array of tentacles larger than most other species out of her mouth to attack and send things into it. Also claws that carry potent infections.
  • Badass Adorable: The Kree were frozen with terror the moment they scanned her; restraining her and fitting her with a muzzle, prompting Fury to shout "Hey, it's a cat, not Hannibal Lecter." The fact that she can sprout a Kraken's worth of tentacles out of said mouth and drag entire grown-men into it more than justifies said restraints.
  • Berserk Button: Goose tolerates all of the affection and handling Fury gives her...up until he shoves his head in her face, to which she immediately responds with hissing and blinds his left eye with one swipe.
  • Big Eater: Played for Laughs, she can devour grown men in seconds like they were M&Ms. She won't eat friendly people, though. Which is why she won't eat Talos when he's taken the form of a Kree soldier. She also didn't even hesitate to eat the Tesseract for safekeeping.
  • Bigger on the Inside: It would be anatomically impossible for Goose's cat-sized body to contain that huge mass of horrifying tentacles without some dimensional warping going on.
  • Black Hole Belly: Goose's stomach is capable of holding grown men and Infinity Stones inside of her. Although she coughs up the latter during The Stinger.
  • Call a Rabbit a "Smeerp": Subverted. Nick Fury is amused by how absolutely terrified the Kree and Skrulls are of the "flerken", because she appears to be nothing more than a perfectly normal adorable widdle kitty cat. She is not just a perfectly normal widdle kitty cat.
  • Cross-Cast Role: She is portrayed by four male cats, since a vast majority of orange cats are male.
  • Cute Creature, Creepy Mouth: She looks like a normal cat, until she unfurl a ton of tentacles to swallow things.
  • Cuteness Proximity: Nick Fury, of all people, reacts like this to Goose.
  • The Dog Is an Alien: The cute cat is in fact a flerken, a rare and dangerous alien species.
  • A Dog Named "Cat": A cat/flerken named Goose.
  • The Dreaded: The Kree and the Skrulls are mortifyingly scared of her. As she's a Flerken, it's justified. She's essentially one of the Marvel universe's bedtime horror stories - though only if you are mean. If she judges you as a friendly, she's just an adorable kitty with above-average intelligence.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Keen-eyed fans noticed her silhouette in the corner of the teaser poster.
  • Eating Solves Everything: Need to dispose of some people trying to kill you? Goose will swallow them right up. Need a safe place to hold an object of limitless power? Her stomach is just the right place.
  • Eating the Enemy: Goose swallows up several Kree soldiers while Nick Fury is holding her in Talos's satellite.
  • Evil-Detecting Dog: Cat to be more precise, she will not harm anyone who is deemed friendly like Talos.
  • Extreme Omnivore: She eats fully armed Kree soldiers. Then she eats The Tesseract (albeit puking it up later like it's a hairball.)
  • Gender Equals Breed: Averted. She's a female orange tabby.
  • It Can Think: While the characters are figuring out what to do with it, Goose eats the Tesseract to keep it safe, showing that she may in fact understand what they're saying.
  • Killer Rabbit: Adorable she may be, but Goose is a Flerken, an alien that can spring tentacles at a moment's notice and hold entire pocket dimensions within them.
  • Logical Weakness: Since her Combat Tentacles come from her mouth, simply muzzling her to keep it shut will nullify the threat.
  • Lovecraftian Superpower: She can extend a huge mass of fleshy tentacles larger than herself from her mouth, use them to swallow things far bigger than her, and even swallow the Tesseract without any ill effects.
  • Mysterious Past: How she ends up on Earth is not revealed, other than she was originally owned by Mar-Vell, who might've gotten her from somewhere in the galaxy.
  • Not So Harmless: Goose actually takes a bit of comical abuse during the flight in the Quadjet, before she's revealed to be The Dreaded at the same level as Hulk or Groot!
  • Overly Long Tongue: Her mouth tentacles are essentially this taken up to eleven.
  • Phlebotinum-Handling Equipment: When Fury adamantly refuses to grab the Tesseract with his bare hands, Goose immediately gobbles it up, ending the argument. Since she's immune to the object's effects, she becomes a safe and handy Stomach of Holding for it until she finally coughs it up on Fury's desk, several days later, with all the dignity and grace of hacking up a hairball.
  • Shout-Out: Her name has been changed to Goose as a reference to the character in Top Gun.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: She is the one directly responsible for Nick Fury's iconic eyepatch; when he annoyed her too much by playing with her chin one times too many, she scratched his left eye blind in one swipe.
  • Stomach of Holding: Is able to swallow things much bigger than herself. When Fury and Maria Rambeau discuss how to keep the Tesseract safe, Goose promptly swallows it and coughs it back up again when the threat is long over.
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: Pukes up the tesseract in a Post Credits Scene.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: Goose's terrifying Combat Tentacles are easily nullified by putting a muzzle on her. And since she's usually friendly or at least neutral at first sight (despite Lawson's claims) until you actually threaten her, it's a simple matter to grab her and muzzle her.
  • Wound That Will Not Heal: Flerken scratches don't heal. Fury being a bit too affectionate with her cost him his eye.

    Vrellnexians 

Vrellnexians

Species: Vrellnexian

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A race of monstrous alien beasts which Team Coulson encounter on a mysterious space vessel.


  • Adaptational Nonsapience: In the comics they stood upright and engaged in commercial slave trading (even trying to enslave the Asgardians in their first appearance), while the MCU Vrellnexians seem to just be animals of prey.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Vrellnexians had a light grayish purple skin and red eyes in the comics, but here have a blend of gray and blue for their skin and have darker, less striking eyes.
  • Ascended Extra: The Vrellnexians are a pretty obscure alien race from Marvel lore, to the point that it was only due to a human calling them one by name that anyone made the connection.
  • Fangs Are Evil: They have very sharp fangs, which you will definitely notice when they kill you in painful fashion.
  • Insectoid Aliens: They are supposedly this, but have characteristics that are evocative of reptiles.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: They were enemies of Thor in the comics, believe it or not, and the species have never menaced S.H.I.E.L.D. agents before.
  • Xenomorph Xerox: They've been designed to look closer to xenomorphs in comparison to their look from the comics.

    Gibborim 

Gibborim

Species: Gibborim

Appearances: Runaways

A long-lived race of pure light beings who have mastered space travel.

For specific Gibborim, see PRIDE and Runaways

  • Energy Being: Gibborim are composed of light.
  • Demonic Possession: They require host human bodies in order to survive Earth's atmosphere. This process takes some time but eventually the mind of the host becomes inactive.
  • Half-Human Hybrid: While inside a human host, Gibborim may reproduce with humans, producing half-Gibborim hybrids with Gibborim powers.
  • Powers via Possession: They alter the biology of their host bodies, which develops healing properties, and also become capable of projecting bursts of light. Offspring of Gibborim while inside a host body develop Gibborim abilities.
  • Possession Burnout: Employing their powers causes the host bodies to deteriorate and require the energy transfers through the Dematerialization Box.

    Xartan 

Xartan

Species: Xartan

Appearances: Runaways

A long-lived race of shapeshifters.

For specific Xartans, see Runaways

    HYDRA's Champion 

HYDRA's Champion

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: None

Appearances: What If...?

A tentacled monstrosity from beyond the stars, brought to Earth by the Red Skull of an alternate universe to serve as HYDRA's champion. An individual of the same species is summoned and absorbed by another alternate universe's Doctor Strange.


  • Combat Tentacles: Fitting for an Eldritch Abomination, it uses these to fight Captain Carter, and in another universe, uses them to give Doctor Strange a sound thrashing.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The champion is only described as "a being from beyond the stars," and what little is seen looks like it would fit in perfectly with other Lovecraftian horrors.
  • Final Boss: Kills Red Skull and threatens to destroy the world in the climax of the first episode of What If...?
  • Make Me Wanna Shout: When it finds itself cornered by Captain Carter, the HYDRA Stomper, and the Howling Commandos, it reveals its mouth and unleashes a high-pitched scream to stun them.

    Gorr the God Butcher 

Gorr

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_gorr.png
"You are not like the other gods I've killed."

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: Christian Bale

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

"The only ones who gods care about is themselves. So this is my vow: all gods will die."

A cosmic killer who seeks to render the gods extinct.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: The comic version of Gorr from Thor: God of Thunder was a hideous alien with a bulbous noseless face, fangs, Twi'lek-like head-tails, and a disheveled look. Here, he looks more human-like, is clad in a white robe, and is played by Mr. Fanservice Christian Bale... though the official trailer shows his appearance is still very unsettling.
  • Adaptational Modesty: The comic version of Gorr is almost always naked save for his symbiote forming a black cloak and what amounts to a thong. Here, he wears a white robe and cape.
  • Ax-Crazy: The trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder shows that Gorr is looking forward to butcher every living god he sees.
  • Black-and-White Insanity: He refuses to see gods as anything but a burden to remove from the universe. His color scheme matches his look.
  • Black Swords Are Better: Gorr's weapon of choice is a "strange and terrifying" jet-black sword called the Necrosword, which grants him the power to slay gods.
  • Composite Character: Gorr bears marks on his forehead that homage the Imperator, a Dr Strange villain who wished to purge the world like Gorr, but of magic.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: The trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder shows that unlike Loki — who wanted to prove his worth to his family, Malekith — who wanted to bring perpetual darkness to the Nine Realms, and Hela — who wanted to conquer the entire galaxy, Gorr simply wants to see every god and god-like being in existence dead.
  • Cool Sword: Gorr wields the Necrosword — a divine weapon capable of slaying gods — in the form of a black longsword.
  • Covered in Scars: As shown in the merchandise, Gorr has scars on the sides of his face, as well as his arms. A scene in the official trailer — presumably to before he got the Necrosword — shows him without them.
  • Dark Is Evil: Gorr uses his black Necrosword to butcher gods and god-like beings across the galaxy, and commands a horde of jet-black monsters called Black Berserkers.
  • Darkseid Duplicate: He's a hairless, colorless extraterrestrial being with gleaming yellow eyes and affiliation with darkness and death who seeks out a cosmic artifact that will grant him the power to dominate all life in the universe, as well as aspiring to conquer the realm of the gods. Fitting that his actor was famously part of a DC franchise before moving onto Marvel.
  • Evil Makes You Ugly: The official trailer reveals that before he took up the Necrosword he was rather handsome, but that his lips, gums, and teeth have been stained black by his use of the god-slaying weapon.
  • Facial Markings: A clip in the official trailer shows Gorr had grey tattoo-like markings running across his eyes before he took up the Necrosword, though these have been covered in a mess of scars.
  • Greyscale of Evil: In an otherwise vibrant film, he stands out for being practically devoid of any colour besides black and white.
  • Kill the God: As his sobriquet suggests, Gorr aims to kill all gods regardless of whether they're good or evil. The teaser trailer shows Thor and Korg discovering the corpse of Falligar the Behemoth, one of Gorr's victims, and Gorr's Black Berserkers are shown launching an attack on New Asgard to slaughter the Asgardians.
    Gorr: The only ones who gods care about is themselves. So this is my vow: all gods will die.
  • Knight of Cerebus: The official trailer has the signature Waititi charm and goofiness... and then Gorr's speech and the corresponding visuals bring the upbeat vibe to a screeching halt. Even after the upbeatness continues, every time Gorr appears, he's taken seriously.
  • Light Is Not Good: Despite his white clothing and pale skin, Gorr is a deicidal maniac.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: A guy named Gorr the God Butcher definitely isn't someone who wants to be your friend.
  • Ominous Obsidian Ooze: A clip in the official trailer shows Gorr with a viscous black liquid oozing from his mouth.
  • Rage Against the Heavens: Gorr's modus operandi, as revealed in the official trailer, is to kill every god in existence as retribution for their hubris, entitlement, and the suffering they tend to inflict on mortals.
  • Scary Teeth: He has shark-like fangs for teeth, stained dark grey by his use of the Necrosword.
  • Supernatural Gold Eyes: Gorr's yellow irises stand out as the only trace of color on his person, highlighting that he's a dangerous alien warrior corrupted by his divine god-slaying sword.
  • You Don't Look Like You: Comics Gorr has a distinctly alien appearance, while movie Gorr resembles a bald, pale skinned version of his actor. Presumably this is so the filmmakers can exploit some of the terrifying facial expressions Christian Bale is capable of making as seen in films like American Psycho.

    Black Berserkers 

Black Berserkers

Species: TBD

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

Monsters that serve Gorr in his deicidal campaign.


  • Combat Tentacles: The Black Berserkers that are shown at the end of the teaser trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder sport numerous tendrils they use in combat.
  • God-Eating: At the end of the teaser trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder, one of the Black Berserkers is shown grabbing an Asgardian and taking a bite out of them.
  • Mooks: The teaser trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder shows that the Black Berserkers are Gorr the God Butcher's foot soldiers.
  • More Teeth than the Osmond Family: The Black Berserkers possess gaping fanged maws, with one shown taking a bite out of its opponent in the teaser trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder.
  • You Don't Look Like You: The LEGO merchandise for Gorr's attack on New Asgard and the official trailer show that at least some of the Black Berserkers look very different from their Xenomorph Xerox comic book counterparts.
  • Zerg Rush: The Black Berserkers use their numbers to overwhelm their enemies, as revealed in the teaser trailer for Thor: Love and Thunder.

Variants

Team Thor's reality

    Team Thor's Grandmaster 

The Grandmaster

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/af69c5ef_ed80_4c8b_a8b4_7d5909123422.jpeg

Species: Unknown

Citizenship: Sakaaran, American

Affiliation(s): Darryl Jacobson

Portrayed By: Jeff Goldblum

Appearances: Team Thor

The Grandmaster of Earth-16828, who moves in with Darryl in L.A.


  • Dirty Old Man: The Grandmaster spies on Darryl as he's taking a shower and draws him naked. Later, when he is practicing a phone call with Darryl about telling David's mother of her son's death, he starts to flirt with "Mrs. Richardson" and asks her what she's wearing while making seductive noises.
  • Manchild: He is rather childish and lets others do all the work for him.
    Darryl: He says he's over one million years old which I find hard to believe because he acts quite young, almost immature.
  • Mood-Swinger: The Grandmaster is prone to that:
    Darryl: He is very charming and persuasive, but sometimes he completely loses his temper.
  • No Sense of Personal Space: He squeezes himself between Darry and one of his friends sitting on a couch so he can sit next to Darryl and put his arm around his shoulders.
  • The Peeping Tom: The Grandmaster watches Darryl shower and sleep, and also draws him during that.
  • The Slacker: Darryl cooks and does the laundry for the Grandmaster and also drives him around.
  • Stalker with a Crush: The Grandmaster gives off these vibes with Darryl, given his flirty dialogue and the fact The Grandmaster has drawn Darryl nude in the shower.
  • Technologically Blind Elders: When the Grandmaster is excited that his YouTube video already has views, Darryl has to explain to him twice that these are just the Grandmaster's own views.

Star-Lord T'Challa's reality

    The Collector 

Taneleer Tivan / The Collector

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/collector_28what_if29.png
"There is a blank wall in the commissary that I just haven't been able to find the right piece for."

Species: Unknown

Affiliations: The Tivan Group

Voiced By: Benicio del Toro

Appearances: What If...?

The Collector of Earth-21818, who took over as the intergalactic kingpin after his universe's Thanos's Heel–Face Turn.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Taken further than his already better-looking Sacred Timeline counterpart as he's got both Benicio Del Toro's likeness and a very chiseled build.
  • Adaptational Badass: Compared to his sacred timeline counterpart, this version of Tivan is ripped, fully capable of fighting T'Challa and Yondu simultaneously. He also wields an impressive arsenal of collected weapons, including Hela's crown. The last one is particularly notable, as Hela effortlessly wiped out the entire Asgardian army, singlehandedly massacred all but one of the elite Valkyries, and could only be killed by Ragnarok. This implies that the Collector managed to defeat her even with her immense power. He also has Captain America's shield and Mjolnir, which has disturbing implications of what he did while Thanos's replacement of most feared villain in the cosmos.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Begs for mercy when Carina pulls a Do with Him as You Will on him.
  • Alternate Self: To the Collector of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where he ends up becoming the most powerful figure in the galaxy due to the Evil Power Vacuum that formed after Thanos gave up on his conquest.
  • Alternate Universe Reed Richards Is Awesome: Downplayed as while he is indeed far more of a threat than his counterpart in the Sacred Timeline and essentially takes the place of Thanos as the Big Bad of the MCU, he is defeated far more easily by T'Challa and Yondu while it took an entire army to defeat Thanos in Endgame.
  • Arc Villain: The main antagonist of “What if… T’Challa Became a Star-Lord?
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation: Played with, as his death is only implied in both cases. In the Sacred Timeline, Thanos invaded Knowhere and brought it to ruin during his hunt for the Reality Stone; the Collector is only shown in a hallucination brought about by the Stone, with the real one nowhere to be seen. Here, his assistant Carina betrays him and sets free the numerous lifeforms he had captive; the last we see is him getting cornered by his captives.
  • Evil Power Vacuum: Without Thanos as the galaxy's Big Bad, the Collector steps into the role and recruits the Black Order to his cause.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Implied to be killed by his former captives and directly lampshaded by the man himself right before he meets his fate.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: It's heavily implied that he's already taken care of (or at least stolen weapons belonging to) various heroes and villains in the MCU, such as Captain America, Thor, Korg, Malekith, and Hela.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: When he sees all the very pissed off people he imprisoned in his collection closing in on him, he can only squeak out, "Oh, karma."

    Carina 

Carina

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/carinawhatif2.jpg
"I liked that thing you said about not locking people in cages."

Species: Krylorian

Voiced By: Ophelia Lovibond

Appearances: What If...?

The Carina of Earth-21818.


  • Alternate Self: To the Carina of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where she manages to get revenge on the Collector after he's defeated by T'Challa and Yondu.
  • The Dog Bites Back: Like her Sacred Timeline counterpart, she tries to pull one of these. Unlike her Sacred Timeline counterpart, it works. She releases all of the Collector's prisoners to get their revenge on their captor after the Ravagers turn the tables.
  • Do with Him as You Will: Removes the Collector from the cage T'Challa and Yondu put him in... so she can free his prisoners to get their revenge on him.
  • Grew a Spine: T'Challa's comment about history punishing those who keep men in cages strikes a chord with Carina. It inspires her to gun down Ebony Maw and the Collector, even citing it as her motivation.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Carina's Sacred Timeline version was killed when she came in contact with the Power Stone. In this timeline, Carina never touches the Stone and is successful in getting revenge against the Collector.

    Howard the Duck 

Howard the Duck

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/howardwhatif2.png
"My guess, he's [Collector] compensating for something big. Or small, if you catch my drift."

Species: Unknown

Voiced By: Seth Green

Appearances: What If...?

The Howard the Duck of Earth-21818.


  • The Alcoholic: Much like his Sacred Timeline counterpart, this Howard loves a good cocktail. Midway through his tour of Tivan's collection lair, he actually gives up so that he can hang out at the bar and get more drinks.
  • Alternate Self: To the Howard of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where he is freed from Tivan's collection by T'Challa, and gives him a tour of the place as a result.
  • Ascended Extra: In the Guardians movies, Howard appears very briefly, only ever having one line per movie. In What If...?, Howard plays a role in the plot, albeit a small one. Specifically, he attempts to give T'Challa directions to the Embers but is unable to do so before Proxima Midnight locks down the facility.
  • Skewed Priorities: After T'Challa frees him from his cage, Howard leads him to a bar where he decides it's the perfect time to get another cocktail. T'Challa leaves him to his own devices when the alarms sound.
  • Stockholm Syndrome: Implied, as Howard seems less intent on escaping the Collector's base of operations than he is to hang out at the bar and drink, even seeming confused that T'Challa doesn't seem interested in joining him.

    Cosmo 

Cosmo

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cosmowhatif2.png

Species: Earth Dog

Appearances: What If...?

The Cosmo of Earth-21818.


  • Alternate Self: Serves as this to Cosmo of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where he's freed from Tivan's collection by T'Challa, and thus accompanies the cosmic hero as he escapes from Knowhere.
  • The Cameo: Can be seen briefly in Tivan's collection.
  • Canine Companion: This version of Cosmo gets rescued by T’Challa and joins him on his travels.

Party Thor's reality

    Grandmaster 

The Grandmaster

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9e776410_9c31_4792_b77d_b368f20cb676.jpeg
"Mmm, Topaz, what do I always say? I love cake."

Species: Unknown

Voiced By: Jeff Goldblum

Appearances: What If...?

The Grandmaster of Earth-72124.


  • Alien Arts Are Appreciated: Apparently the Grandmaster of this universe really likes to DJ, as he hosts a rave that Thor, Jane, and their friends all participate in.
  • Alternate Self: To the Grandmaster of the original timeline, coming from a universe where he joins Thor's massive party, even serving as a DJ at one point.
  • Covered in Gunge: He briefly pauses the music to let down a huge sea of foam to cover the raving guests.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: He and Topaz take off in motorscooters after Thor tries to get him to participate in the cleanup of Earth.

    Topaz 

Topaz

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cc8169d8_da3d_4496_8a73_037a68a48870.jpeg

Species: Unknown

Voiced By: Rachel House

Appearances: What If...?

The Topaz of Earth-72124.


  • Alternate Self: To the Topaz of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where she and the Grandmaster join Thor's Midgard party.
  • Kick the Dog: She steals one of Thor’s scooters, and calls him a loser as she drives away.

    Howard the Duck 

Howard the Duck

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9c6a4a01_c923_45d9_a766_a1ea9aed0fc5.jpeg
"Well, it's happy hour. Want some half-price nachos?"

Species: Duck

Voiced By: Seth Green

Appearances: What If...?

The Howard the Duck of Earth-72124, where Thor became the God of Parties.


  • Alternate Self: To the Howard of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where he participates in Thor's massive Midgard party and ends up getting engaged to Darcy Lewis.
  • Ascended Extra: Like in episode 2 of What If...? Howard contributes more to the plot unlike in the Guardians films, though not to the same extent. After getting married to Darcy he's the one who gives Jane the idea of contacting Frigga to stop Thor's party, resulting in a much happier outcome.
  • Interspecies Romance: Him, a talking cartoon duck, and Darcy, a human, end up getting married.
  • Noodle Incident: How exactly Howard and Darcy ended up arranging a marriage between them is never explained, with only a split second clip showing us it even happened.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: Ends up getting married to Darcy Lewis.

    Ayesha 

Ayesha

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/81b60adf_4376_4b36_a264_377e7a1666f0.jpeg

Species: Sovereign

Voiced By: N/A

Appearances: What If...?

The Ayesha of Earth-72124.


  • Alternate Self: To the Ayesha of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where she comes to Earth to participate in a global party hosted by Thor.
  • Villains Out Shopping: The usually stoic and cold Ayesha can be seen taking a selfie with Thor.

Infinity Ultron's reality

    Grandmaster 

The Grandmaster

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/707fc43f_8768_45f0_aad2_3369fa4b30a6.jpeg

Species: Unknown

Voiced By: N/A

Appearances: What If...?

The Grandmaster of Earth-29929, who dies during Ultron's genocidal quest for peace.


  • Alternate Self: To the Grandmaster of the Sacred Timeline, coming from a universe where his dictatorship over Sakaar comes to an end after Infinity Ultron destroys the planet and everyone on it.
  • Face Death with Dignity: When he sees his arena being conquered, he just closes his eyes and resigns to his fate before he dies.

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