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Main Character Index > Other Individuals and Organizations > Cosmic > Nine Realms (Asgard | Loki) | The Ravagers | The Lighthouse

Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

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Celestials

    In General 

The Celestials

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Eternals

An ancient race of powerful entities capaalieble of manipulating matter and energy itself.


na

    Ego 

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Eternals

    In General 

The Eternals

Appearances: Eternals

An ancient race of near superhuman immortals created by the Celestials.


  • Been There, Shaped History: Eternals are the source of many human myths and deities.
  • Long-Lived: They have incredibly long lifespans, with the main cast of Eternals being tens of thousands of years old.
  • Ultraterrestrials: Though enhanced by the Celestials, Eternals dwell on Earth.

    Ajak 

Ajak

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Salma Hayek

Appearances: Eternals

A leader among the Eternals.


    Ikaris 

Ikaris

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Richard Madden

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: In the comics, Ikaris is blond, whereas in the MCU he retains Richard Madden's auburn hair.

    Thena 

Thena

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Angelina Jolie

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


  • Adaptation Name Change: In the comics, her birth name was Azura, but was changed to Thena — to resemble that of Athena — as part of a treaty between the Eternals and the Greek Pantheon.
  • Blade on a Stick: Thena's Weapon of Choice is a long spear, bladed at the top, with a jagged-edge axe near the tip, curving into the polearm.
  • Lady of War: Kevin Feige described her as a warrior.
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    Sersi 

Sersi

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Gemma Chan

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


  • Love Interest: To Dane Whitman, the Black Knight.
  • Race Lift: Whereas the comics Sersi appears to be Mediterranean/Caucasian, MCU Sersi is played by an English of Chinese descent.

    Kingo 

Kingo

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Kumail Nanjiani

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


  • Race Lift: In the comics, Kingo has the appeareance of an East Asian. In the MCU, he's portrayed by a Pakistani-American Kumail Nanjiani.

    Makkari 

Makkari

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Lauren Ridloff

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


  • Disabled in the Adaptation: In the comics, Makkari has no disability. In the MCU, Makkari is deaf-mute as the actress portraying the role.
  • Gender Flip: In the comics, Makkari is male.
  • Race Lift: In the comics, Makkari has the appearance of a blond caucasian. In the MCU, Makkari is portrayed by African-American actress Lauren Ridloff.
  • Super Speed: Word of God describes her as the fastest Eternal.

    Phastos 

Phastos

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Brian Tyree Henry

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


    Sprite 

Sprite

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Lia [McHugh]

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


    Druig 

Druig

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Barry Keoghan

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal.


    Gilgamesh 

Gilgamesh

Species: Eternal

Portrayed by: Don Lee

Appearances: Eternals

An Eternal, and enemy of the faction led by Ajak.


Sakaar

    In General 

Sakaar

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/img_3887.JPG

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok

"Fear not, for you are found. You are home. There is no going back. No one leaves this place. But what is this place? The answer is Sakaar. Surrounded by cosmic gateways, Sakaar lives on the edge of the known and the unknown. It is a collection point for all lost and unloved things, like you, but here at Sakaar you are significant, you are valuable. Here you are loved. And no one loves you more than The Grandmaster. He is the original, the first lost and the first found. The creator of Sakaar and father of the Contest of Champions. Where once you were nothing, now you are something."

A harsh and barbaric planet connected to many of the universe's wormholes.


  • Amazing Technicolor Population: Because of the planet's diversity, it's not uncommon to see a wide range of skin tones like red and blue.
  • Bread and Circuses: Really, the only thing that keeps a violent scavenger anarchy like Sakaar from tearing itself apart are the gladiatorial games that serve the double purpose of slaking the populace's rage and bloodlust, not to mention culling the numbers of rebellious warriors who can potentially start inconvenient revolutions.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Sakaaran mercenaries appeared as antagonists in Guardians of the Galaxy ahead of their planet's proper debut in Thor: Ragnarok.
  • Gladiator Games: One of the planet's main attractions are its brutal arena fights. The planet's diverse population means many powerful and unique beings are available to fight.
  • Landfill Beyond the Stars: The planet has a massive junkyard filled with trash from all over the universe.
  • Mooks: Sakaaran mercenaries serve as Ronan and Korath's primary henchmen in Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • Multicultural Alien Planet: Because so many wormhole trips end on Sakaar, its population is very diverse and made of up beings from many different planets. Actual native Sakaarans don't even appear on the planet until The Stinger.
  • Narnia Time: Time works... differently on Sakaar, either as a cause or an effect of all the portals. Sometimes it appears to pass slower, for example when Loki ends up arriving on Sakaar weeks earlier than Thor despite being thrown out of the Bifrost by Hela only seconds earlier, but on other occasions it appears to pass faster, such as when Grandmaster says he would be millions of years old elsewhere in the universe or the fact that Valkyrie doesn't seem to have aged at all since first encountering Hela many millennia ago, before Thor and Loki were even born.
  • Portal Crossroad World: ... Kind of. It's really easy to end up in this junk heap, but somewhat harder to leave. Not too difficult, but by the time travelers continue their journeys they usually identify as Sakaaran - if only because time works differently on Sakaar.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: In Planet Hulk, Sakaar is destroyed by the ship Hulk arrived in. Here, it survives after the Hulk's departure.
  • Super-Sargasso Sea: In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, any Blind Jump will add you to the endless stream of junk falling from the myriad portals hovering above Sakaar.

    Native Sakaarans 

Native Sakaarans

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/img_4484.JPG

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Thor: Ragnarok | Avengers: Endgame

The brutal natives of the planet Sakaar. There are two types of Sakaarans, the more humanoid Sakaarans which served as underlings of Ronan the Accuser in Guardians of the Galaxy and the more insectoid ones appearing in Thor: Ragnarok. The latter are later seen as Mooks in Thanos' forces in Avengers: Endgame.


  • Alien Blood: They have yellow blood.
  • The Cameo: A few of them can be spotted in the crowds of the second post-credit scene of Thor: Ragnarok.
  • Creator Cameo: James Gunn plays the unmasked one in Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Dark Is Evil: They wear dark looking armor and work with Ronan the Accuser, who himself is no bright daisy and is unquestionably villainous.
  • Insectoid Aliens: The native Sakaarans have bug-like appearances underneath their armor.
  • Mooks: When Kraglin wonders how the Guardians will fight past an army of them, Drax says he thinks of them as "paper people", which Kraglin immediately agrees with, suggesting they're known for being easy to kill. Coming from Drax, who doesn't understand metaphors, this speaks volumes. Sure enough, the Guardians mow through them with ease, and Yondu takes on a squad of them single-handed before any of them can even move.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: There's very little that differentiates them from the Chitauri from The Avengers, seeing as how they're both grey alien Mooks that serve as underlings of Thanos.

The Grandmaster's Court

    The Grandmaster 

The Grandmaster

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_grandmaster_4.png
"It's main event time!"'

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Jeff Goldblum

Voiced By: Humberto Solórzano (Latin-American Spanish dub), Gilbert Lachance (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Thor: Ragnarok | What If...? | Thor: Love and Thunder

"My name is Grandmaster. I preside over a little harlequinade called the Contest of Champions."

Brother of Taneleer Tivan, the Collector, the Grandmaster is the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar and the one behind the planet's gladiator games.


  • Adaptational Dye Job: He's not covered in blue skin like his counterpart in the comics, but he's got some blue accents in his costuming and makeup.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: While shown to be evil, the MCU's Grandmaster does away with the worst aspects of both his comic book counterpart and the Red King from Planet Hulk. The Grandmaster in the comics delighted in being called "sorrow" by his victims, while the Red King was a sociopath that caused untold and needless destruction (such as unleashing alien parasites on the populace) because it was "his right, his duty and his pleasure". The cinematic version is certainly a saint compared to them.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics, the Grandmaster is an Elder of the Universe and nigh Physical God. Here, he doesn't display any real power at all aside from slowed aging.
  • Adaptation Species Change: He doesn't appear to be an Elder of the Universe in this version and is depicted more as a mortal with lots of influence.
  • Affably Evil: The man is certainly a bit unhinged and, you know, enslaves people and forces them to fight to death for his amusement. But he's also fairly polite and nice to his underlings, with standards and forging (incredibly odd) friendships with those beneath him.
    Loki: He's a lunatic, but he can be amenable.
  • Aw, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: In the non-canon Team Darryl short. While their dynamic could be a bit strained at times, the Grandmaster nevertheless sets up a commemorative little shrine for the late Topaz during his exile in Los Angeles.
  • Bad Boss: He's a downplayed version of this trope. He's a bit peeved that his second would think him so petty to execute someone for interrupting, but public executions are still a possibility for people who fail him.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: He's Jeff Goldblum Adam Westing as Ming the Merciless. Between his Adorkable personality, Porky Pig Pronunciation and general Cloud Cuckoolander behavior, it's hard not to smile and laugh at him. That all being said though, he also regularly kidnaps people and forces them to fight to the death for his amusement. Furthermore, he also randomly uses an ultra-tech staff to melt prisoners into disgusting, stinky puddles for little more reason than he can.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Tries to be the main threat of Thor: Ragnarok, enslaving Thor to fight as one of his gladiators and pretty much ruling Sakaar like some kind of dictator. Unfortunately for him, he's more of a nuisance and much, much less menacing than Hela.
  • "Blackmail" Is Such an Ugly Word: Sure, The Grandmaster keeps hundreds of kidnapped warriors to fight in gladiatorial matches to the death, but "slave" is just such a mean word; he prefers the term "prisoners with jobs."
  • Composite Character: In the film, he takes the Red King's role as the ruler of Sakaar and the one behind Hulk's enslavement.
  • Cool Ship: He has a big collection of ships, including one that he uses for his orgies and birthdays that ends up being used by Thor, Bruce Banner and Valkyrie to escape Sakaar through the Devil's Anus.
  • Depraved Bisexual: Throughout the film, he shows attraction towards Valkyrie, Thor, Loki, and his two harem girls.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: He's the antagonist of the Sakaaran portion of Ragnarok, but Hela serves as the main antagonist of the overall film.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He's one of the dancers that appears during the Creative Closing Credits for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: He's somewhat disgusted by his assistant Topaz's brutality at times, such as when she suggests killing Loki for merely interrupting.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: On his left arm, he wears a longer, golden sleeve that is absent on the right. Unlike most examples of this trope, it's more likely to establish him as eccentric rather than as awesome.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: He rules over Sakaar and is the only Sakaaran shown to dress in gold.
  • Guyliner: He wears blue eyeliner, which is an indicator that he's a flamboyant, Depraved Bisexual.
  • The Hedonist: His main desire is to be entertained, no matter who has to die to make that happen.
  • Human Alien: Take away his goofy clothes and makeup, and he looks no different than your average Earthling.
  • Klingons Love Shakespeare: During his stay in Los Angeles in a non-canon short, he tells his roomie Darryl that he loves learning about Earth's culture and is fascinated by toast of all things.
  • Large Ham: He's a Smug Snake utterly full of himself with a distinctively Jeff Goldblum delivery.
  • Laughably Evil: While he's an insane tyrant who delights in having his gladiatorial slaves fight to the death, he's also an eccentric and oddly affable goofball who utterly hams it up in the delightfully unique Jeff Goldblum style every time he's onscreen. Also, he prefers that you refer to his slaves as "prisoners with jobs".
  • Light Is Not Good: Even though he dresses in gold, he is depicted as the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar where he has people kidnapped and fighting in Gladiator Games for his own entertainment.
  • Monster Roommate: In the Team Darryl short, it's heavily implied that he murdered or at least silenced all the other people who wanted to apply to Darryl's Craigslist housemate ad to guarantee himself the position.
  • Mysterious Past: The twisted instructional "tunnel" that new champions ride through before meeting him calls him "the first lost and the first found". And he indicates that he may be millions of years old, possibly due to the strange temporal effects of Sakaar. With regards to how he wound up ruling Sakaar, that's all we hear.
  • No Name Given: Unlike his brother, we never hear his true name on screen; merely his epithet.
  • Related in the Adaptation: In the comics, he and the Collector consider each other "brothers" (since they are both Elders of the Universe), but aren't actually blood-related. Word of God is that they're actual biological siblings in the MCU, though this hasn't come up in the films.
  • Really 700 Years Old: Thanks to time being somewhat screwy on Sakaar, he's much older than he looks.
  • Time Abyss: According to Goldblum, this version is millions of years old. He even explains that time in Sakaar passes much slower than in other planets.
    The Grandmaster: Time works real different around these parts. On any other world, I'd be like millions of years old, but here on Sakaar...
  • Uncertain Doom: The Stinger shows him emerging from his crashed ship surrounded by thousands of revolutionaries, all silently staring at him. He tries to present himself as being a good sport and congratulating them on their rebellion, but the scene ends before we see whether or not the rebels decide to kill him. In the Team Darryl version of events, he winds up on Earth after either escaping or being exiled.
  • The Wonka: A complete goofball who is nonetheless the undisputed ruler of Sakaar, so he must be doing something right. Fittingly, he appears to subject newly recruited prisoners with jobs to an introduction backed by the music for "Pure Imagination".

    Valkyrie 
See the Asgard page

    Topaz 

Topaz

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/topaz_0.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed By: Rachel House

Voiced By: Olivia Mercenario (Latin-American Spanish dub), Catherine Hamann (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok

The Grandmaster's second-in-command.


  • Canon Foreigner: She is a character from Malibu Comics' Ultra Force originally. Crossovers between Malibu Comics and Marvel Comics characters have not been unheard of however, such as in Avengers/Ultraforce.
  • Dark Action Girl: She's the Grandmaster's muscle and easily his most competent (loyal) underling. We never see her engage in physical combat, but when the heroes attempt to escape Sakaar aboard a stolen ship she gives chase in another craft, and proves more dangerous than all of the other pursuers combined.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Her extremely dry wit contrasts sharply with the Grandmaster's energetic, foppish sense of style and humor.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: She suggests to use the melt-stick on Loki because he interrupted the Grandmaster. The Grandmaster himself is shocked, and a bit offended.
  • The Dragon: See Number Two.
  • Foil: The Collector's assistant was extremely composed, unfailingly polite, even a desperate Stepford Smiler, and lived in fear of her boss. By contrast, Topaz is perpetually bored-looking, insolent and constantly frustrates and distracts the Grandmaster with her smart remarks.
  • Human Alien: She looks entirely and completely human, despite presumably being a member of an alien species.
  • Jerkass: She doesn't even try to hide her disdain for Valkyrie, whose she's always trying to belittle or insult — much to the Grandmaster's annoyance.
  • Number Two: She's the Grandmaster's main henchwoman.
  • Oh, Crap!: She has one just before crashing her ship into a rock after being blinded by the Grandmaster's ship's fireworks when chasing Bruce Banner up to the Devil's Anus.
  • The Rival: She openly loathes Valkyrie because she doesn't hold Sakaar's Scrappers in very high regard and also most likely because Valkyrie is in the Grandmaster's good graces.
  • Sadist: She enjoys the pain and discomfort of others.
  • Servile Snarker: She obeys every order of the Grandmaster but it doesn't prevent her from voicing her opinion on the people he likes.
  • Tribal Face Paint: Wears white markings just like Valkyrie, although they are considerably more elaborate.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: During the airship chase on Sakaar, Banner manages to trick her into crashing into an outcropping of trash, totaling her ship. Her fate beyond that point is unknown, and she doesn't appear alongside the Grandmaster during the second Stinger.
    • Word of God stated that unused versions of the ending show her escaping with the Grandmaster, which possibly indicates that she may have survived.

Gladiators

    Korg 

    Miek 

Former Gladiators

    Beta Ray Bill 

Beta Ray Bill

Species: Korbinite

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok (sculpture)

A former gladiator who gained the title of Champion.


  • The Cameo: An sculpture of his head appears, decorating the facade of the Grandmaster's palace

    Ares 

Ares

Species: Olympian

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok (sculpture)

A former gladiator who gained the title of Champion.


  • The Cameo: An sculpture of his head appears, decorating the facade of the Grandmaster's palace.

Nova Empire

The Nova Corps

    In General 

The Nova Corps

The enforcers of the Nova Empire, dedicated to preserving peace throughout known space.


  • Adaptational Wimp: Downplayed. The Nova Corps are depicted as an organization of Flying Brick Space Police in the comics, while in Guardians of the Galaxy they are a generic Redshirt Army... when facing the power of an Infinity Stone. Otherwise, they easily catch the Guardians of the Galaxy at the start, destroy their fair share of enemy fighters during the film's final battle even as civilians are evacuated, and together form-and-successfully-maintain an energy barrier that stops the Dark Aster in its tracks, despite it being a mile-wide flying fortress.
  • Anti-Hero: They're very well-intentioned and are dedicated to helping protect innocent people, but have a problem with Police Brutality and run a major Hellhole Prison in the form of "The Kyln".
  • Athens and Sparta: They and the rest of the Nova Empire are the Athens to the Kree's Sparta.
  • Badass Army: Sure, they may still get the crap kicked out of them a lot, but they still manage to kick tons of ass in their appearances.
  • Defiant to the End: Credit where credit is due, they make sure to always go down swinging.
  • Killed Offscreen: Heavily implied by both Thanos' decimation of their population and the theft of the Power Stone as mentioned in Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Light Is Good: Frequently associated with the color gold and stars, to the point where their spaceships looks like multi-pointed stars.
  • Space Police: They are a peace-keeping organization operating all over the Nova Empire's territory.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: It's unknown what exactly happened to them after the Snap, though it's more than likely that they're not doing too well considering how the Snap happened after both their capital of Xandar was brutally invaded by Thanos to get the Power Stone and half of the planet's surviving population was then executed.

    Irani Rael / Nova Prime 

Irani Rael / Nova Prime

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/e799796f1a0bce966fa0df2637697a46.png
"Are you telling me the fate of twelve billion people is in the hands of these criminals?!"

Species: Xandarian

Portrayed By: Glenn Close

Voiced By: Yolanda Vidal (Latin-American Spanish dub), Ana Ángeles García (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

The leader of the Corps. Not too thrilled that Quill and his friends are the last hope the galaxy has.


  • Adaptation Species Change: A Rigellian in the comics, a Xandarian in the MCU.
  • Big Good: The leader of the Nova Corps.
  • Cool Old Lady: As head of an organization of space cops, this is a given. Her calling the Jerkass Kree diplomat a "prick" is just icing.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": She is never referenced by any other name than "Nova Prime" through the entire movie.
  • Iron Lady: Takes her job very seriously, and keeps her cool even during an attack on her planet.
  • Never Mess with Granny: You don't get to be head of a group like the Nova Corps by being a pushover.
  • Not So Above It All: Her whole character is the epitome of a dignified, decorated leader for the Nova Corps... and when she called Kree Ambassador as "prick", it appears that even she falls victim to this movie's sense of humor.
  • Oh, Crap!: A dramatic instance when she hears that Ronan has an Infinity Stone and is on his way to Xandar.
  • Precision F-Strike: She calls the Kree's ambassador a "prick" as soon as the transmission between them is ended by the ambassador.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Definitely tough, and even though she may not like it, she recognizes that the Guardians are their best shot.
  • Space Cop: Da Chief space cop in fact.
  • Uncertain Doom: Given her headstrong personality and resolve to protect her people, she may have been either killed in Thanos' invasion, executed with half of the population or erased from existence by the Snap.

    Rhomann Dey 

Corpsman/Denarian Rhomann Dey

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4a4b40435ccd3d530fc69138e099cc78.png
"This might not be the best idea."

Species: Xandarian

Portrayed by: John C. Reilly

Voiced by: Ricardo Brust (Latin-American Spanish dub), Salvador Aldeguer (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

"I don't know that I believe anyone is 100% a dick, ma'am."

A high-ranking corpsman of the Nova Corps. Answers to Irani Rael.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Black hair in the comics, brown in MCU.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: In the comics, he's more associated with Richard Rider as his mentor and fellow Nova Corps member. He's also already dead before the formation of the Guardians and never actually met them.
  • Friendly Enemy: To Quill, who he's arrested before. He's jovial enough with him when arresting him again.
  • Good Parents: He personally said he's grateful to the Guardians because his daughter is still alive thanks to them defending Xandar.
  • Happily Married: He's married and has a daughter.
  • Interspecies Romance: His wife is a Krylorian seen with her daughter in the various crowd scenes in Xandar.
  • List of Transgressions: Reads the rap sheets of the Guardians after they're arrested on Xandar.
  • Nice Guy: To all appearances, Dey is a genuinely decent fellow just doing his job. He even finds it hard to believe that anyone is "100% a dick".
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Dey is seen watering some potted plants when he receives Quill's message about Ronan's impending attack.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He's willing to trust Peter Quill when the Ravagers come to save Xandar.
  • Space Cop: Naturally, since he's part of the Nova Corps.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: His comics self died the same issue he appeared, only living long enough to give his powers and explain the Nova Corps to Richard Rider. However, it may or may not be the case anymore after Infinity War.

    Garthan Saal 

Denarian Garthan Saal

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/e35b878a3aabf480b321e179fa774ade.png
"What a bunch of a-holes."

Species: Xandarian

Portrayed By: Peter Serafinowicz

Voiced By: Andrés García (Latin-American Spanish dub), Luis Reina (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

"For the record, I advised against trusting you here."

A Nova Corps officer.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Saal went insane and became a villain. Here, he remains loyal to the Nova Corps until his death.
  • Badass Baritone: Serafinowicz's deep voice at work.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: He is crushed to death by Ronan's ship in the film's climax. Poor Rocket had to hear his dying scream.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He gets some good snark at Rocket during the final battle, mentioning that he did not expect to be taking orders from a hamster.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He and his wingmen die fighting their hardest to stop Ronan from obliterating Xandar.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: He is correct when he mentions that the Guardians are a bunch of a-holes.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He dislikes Quill and the others (for good reason), but fights beside them at the end, and is genuinely disturbed by Ronan's attacking civilians.
    Saal: For the record, I advised against trusting you here. Prove me wrong.
  • Pet the Dog: Saal is the first Nova Corps officer to address Rocket by his name. His death leads Rocket to ram the Aster's flight deck.
  • Space Cop: A part of being a member of the Nova Corps
  • Surrounded by Idiots: You get the feeling that he feels this way, especially when working with Quill and the Ravagers in the film climax. The latter half of his above quote is implied to be a direct response to Peter Quill's gleeful "They got my dick message!"

Nova Empire Citizens

    Bereet 

Bereet

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bereet.png

Species: Krylorian

Portrayed By: Melia Kreiling

Voiced By: Cecilia Gómez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Laura Pastor (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

One of Peter Quill's one-night-stands.


  • Badass Bystander: Bereet briefly appears during the attack on Xandar rescuing a young girl.
  • Bedmate Reveal: Sort of. Peter returns to his ship after stealing the orb only to realize that Bereet is still there.
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: Or rather magenta-skinned in this case.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Is introduced half-naked with Sex Hair.
  • "Oh, Crap!" Smile: She gives Peter one after she inadvertently answers a call from a pissed off Yondu Peter was trying to avoid.
  • Sexy Shirt Switch: That's pretty clearly Peter's T-shirt from when he was a kid that she's wearing.

    The Broker 

The Broker

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/22aac0b5017330fe73a5a4cb11bf969c.png
"It's my policy never to discuss my clients, or their needs."

Species: Unknown

Portrayed By: Christopher Fairbank

Voiced By: Martín Soto (Latin-American Spanish dub), Luis Mas (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

A middleman established on Xandar, he brokers shady deals in rare artifacts for a very high-end clientele.


  • Action Survivor: He can be seen among the shell-shocked Xandarian civilians after the Dark Aster crashes into Xandar’s capital city.
  • Adaptational Heroism: He's a slaver in the comics. Here, he's just a black market fence who legitimately cares about his planet.
  • The Comically Serious: He isn't amused at all when Yondu mocks his speech pattern by immaturely interrupting him in a high-pitched voice.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": His real name is never mentioned in the movie. Everyone refers to him as Broker.
  • It's Personal: He's a loyal Xandarian citizen due to his use of the phrase "my culture" in describing Ronan's genocide.
  • Oh, Crap!: Starts panicking when he sees Quill holding the Orb Ronan the Accuser is furiously searching for.

The Sovereign

    In General 

The Sovereign

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

A race of beautiful but arrogant gold-skinned humanoids.


  • Artificial Human: Well, humanoid given that they are aliens, but they're an entire species created in pods.
  • Asshole Victim: One of the reasons Rocket justifies stealing batteries from them, citing their snobbishness and obnoxious nature. The other Guardians don't disagree but still feel it was needless trouble and professionally discrediting to rob the very thing they were hired to protect.
  • Attack Drone: They're far too vain to risk their beautiful, expensively-dressed hides in combat, so they exclusively use remote-piloted weaponry, which they treat as a particularly exciting, high-stakes form of arcade gaming. This serves two purposes - further emphasizing their "obnoxious sheltered teenager" characterization, and helping make sure we don't feel too bad when the Guardians blow up a few hundred more Sovereign fighters. Sound effects even deliberately invoke playing in an old video game arcade when we see them being piloted.
  • Awaken The Sleeping Giant: The third Stinger for Guardians Vol. 2 heavily implies that they'll be a significantly more dangerous threat in the sequel, what with their leader Ayesha planning to unleash Adam Warlock upon the Guardians.
  • The Beautiful Elite: An entire planet of golden and elegant genetically perfect people. Or rather, self-proclaimed perfect snobs who try too hard to be elegant and aren't nearly as powerful and feared as the Kree Empire or other galactic superpowers are.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Downplayed, but Guardians Vol. 2 shows that they're not harmless and can be pretty dangerous when they really put their minds to it. In fact, their attack upon the Guardians within Ego is ultimately why Yondu is forced to perform a Heroic Sacrifice to save Peter.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: For Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2. They hate the Guardians after Rocket steals from them and legitimately try to kill them multiple times, but they're far less of a serious threat in the film's story than Ego the Living Planet is.
  • Composite Character: The Sovereign is an original creation that mixes together the Enclave (the human scientists who created the artificial humans Adam Warlock and Ayesha) with the Universal Church of Truth, a villainous organization that regularly clashed with the Guardians of the Galaxy in the comics.
    • Ayesha is herself a composite of the version of herself from the comics and the Matriarch, the leader of the Universal Church. Much like High Priestess Ayesha, they were very closely tied with Adam Warlock.
    • The Church was composed by a very diverse collection of aliens species instead of a singular one of gold-skinned individuals and possessed the sinister goal of conquering the universe and "purifying" those who wouldn't submit to their will. The Sovereign shares the same eugenics driven superiority but come off as petty, arrogant and small-minded and are comparatively more passive (at least in the sequel) who only react if they are crossed, though there are hints (such as Ayesha's interest in Peter's unknown genetic makeup) that they do have some bigger ambitions.
  • Dirty Coward: They don't actually fly ships into battle, preferring instead to control them remotely via what is basically a futuristic arcade game. They also hire the Guardians to kill the Abilisk because they consider that a better deal than actually risking any of their own people.
  • Face Ship: Their ships have two-way screens on front so you can see who's controlling them.
  • Fantastic Racism: They considered themselves genetically perfect and look down on the races. The whole point of hiring the Guardians to defend their planet is because they consider them expendable.
  • An Ice Suit: When visiting an ice planet, they wear grand Pimped Out Capes lined with white fur.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: The Sovereigns might be unlikable snobs with a major superiority complex, but at least they honored their agreements with the Guardians right up until Rocket decided to steal what is rightfully theirs just to teach them a lesson.
  • Gold Makes Everything Shiny: This is the predominant color in their skin, clothing, and architecture.
  • Gold and White Are Divine: The Sovereign certainly think so. They believe themselves to be "genetically perfect" and they are all completely gold down to their eyes, and their high priestess Ayesha at one point dresses in pure white. In this case, however, Light Is Not Good.
    • The gold and white part is mostly shown when they wear gold winter capes decorated with white fur.
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: All of them are gold, and all of them were genetically-engineered to be beautiful.
  • Laughably Evil: While they initially come across as arrogant but dignified Space Elves, this steadily wears off over the course of Guardians Vol. 2, as the ridiculous, pathetic children beneath all that gold slowly gets revealed, and it's played for all the comedy the film can muster.
  • Light Is Not Good: Ayesha and the rest of the Sovereign fit pretty well with the light motif, what with them being colored in shiny gold and all. However, they and Ego are the main villains of the second film's plot.
  • Planet of Hats: The Sovereign's hat is "Arrogant Bastards". In their first actual appearance on-screen, the High Priestess admits to the Guardians' faces that they were hired because, competency aside, they're more expendable than any of her precious genetically tailored people. When the Sovereign Fleet attacks shortly afterwards, it's mentioned that they use remote-piloted drone-ships in order to ensure there's no real danger to their people. When recruiting Yondu, the High Priestess Ayesha has an elaborate setup involving a ridiculously long unraveled carpet so she doesn't have to wet her feet by treading on the cold snow..
  • Pride: It's more or less their hat. The Sovereign are extremely vain, arrogant, and easily-offended.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: They consider themselves genetically superior to just about everyone, but in practice, they come off as immature and ineffectual.
  • Superior Species: They claim to be a genetically superior race, but given that they do little to show it, it's clear the only ones who think this are themselves. They have the pompous attitude of rich snobs, and lose patience to frustration easily. The pilots directing their drone ships act like teenagers playing a video game, complete with one of them shouting "Damn!" and slamming her fist when her ship explodes, and the high priestess has attendants that are clearly trying to make her look dignified, but instead look silly.
  • Psychopathic Man Child: All of them act like snooty Alpha Bitches and Jerk Jocks who enjoy shooting things from the comforts of their own base.
  • Ultimate Life Form: They believe themselves to be "genetically perfect".
  • Uterine Replicator: Their species is genetically engineered from birth cocoons.
  • Villainy-Free Villain: On the surface, all they're trying to do is punish an enormous theft of priceless artifacts that are rightfully their own property. They're just so absurdly bratty about it that it's hard to sympathize with them.

    Ayesha 

Ayesha

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcy_ayesha.png
"Our concern is the slight against our people... We hire them and they steal from us. That is heresy of the highest order."

Species: Sovereign

Portrayed By: Elizabeth Debicki

Voiced By: Marcela Páez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Inés Blázquez (European Spanish)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3

The high priestess of the Sovereign who enlists the Guardians' help.


  • Adaptational Modesty: Wears a flowing golden gown instead of the Leotard of Power she has in the comics.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, Ayesha wasn't the leader of an sinister alien civilization, but rather the Enclave's rebellious creation that turned against them for being evil. Here, not only she serves as an antagonist to the Guardians of the Galaxy, but also takes aspects from the Enclave by creating Adam Warlock and essentially being combined with them.
  • Adaptational Wimp: She lacks the superhuman strength, flight and cosmic energy manipulation that her comic book counterpart possessed. Instead, she is a schemer that stays in the background and can't be bothered to do things herself, relying on the Ravagers and remote controlled starfighters in the climax.
  • Armchair Military: Though she is willing to pilot the fighters with her people when needed, the ships are all remote controlled from her base.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Subverted - she operates one of the hundreds of starfighters when they take on the Guardians, but they're all wirelessly controlled so she's in no more danger than any of their pilots, and she's not presented as a significantly greater threat than any of the rest of her fleet.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Ayesha swears vengeance on the Guardians for daring to offend the Sovereign. When the Sovereign forces try to pursue the Guardians, they end up getting easily swatted away by Ego. They try to hire the Ravagers to find the Guardians, resulting in Taserface's mutiny. Once the Sovereign find the Guardians, they try to capture them again, but end up only distracting the Guardians while they're fighting the real villain. As of The Stinger, Ayesha's still at it, but even the other Sovereign are getting tired of her wasting resources on the Guardians. She may ascend to true Big Bad status in Vol. 3, as she's bioengineering a powerful being called Adam Warlock; but it also has the potential to backfire on her really badly (as in the comics, Adam Warlock is a powerful hero).
  • Color-Coded Patrician: Since gold is their people's color, she stands out by wearing a cape covered with white fur, instead of a gold cape lined with fur.
  • The Comically Serious: Amusingly pompous in her arrogance, she's a rich font of unorthodox comedy right until she reveals that she's in the process of creating Adam Warlock to hunt down and destroy the Guardians.
  • Composite Character:
    • Ultimately proves to be one with the Enclave, as she takes their place as the creator of Adam Warlock.
    • Also one with the Matriarch of the Universal Church of Truth.
  • Covert Pervert: Despite having contempt for forms of reproduction, she is not above showing interest how "lesser species reproduce" by hitting on Peter. In front of his love interest no less.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: At first it seems like she's gonna be the main antagonist of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, pursuing the Guaridans over a slight, but she becomes small fry when Ego the Living Planet's plan to assimilate all life is discovered.
  • Expository Hairstyle Change: As the Guardians further frustrate Ayesha, her hair is no longer styled, but loose and disheveled.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: Ayesha is covered in gold, reflecting her lofty position as the leader of the Sovereign (who are naturally gold).
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: Golden-skinned, and inhumanly beautiful.
  • Failed Attempt at Drama: When she recruits the Ravagers to pursue the Guardians, she makes a Big Entrance with a ridiculously long entourage, including two minions deploying a blue carpet from a roller so her feet won't get cold in the snow...Until the roller gets jammed.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: Pretty much nothing goes right for her or her species in the movie, and her reactions to her repeated failures drive in just how little the Sovereign matter overall. She's trying her best to defy the trope with the creation of Adam, though.
  • It's the Principle of the Thing: When told that blowing up the Guardians' ship could blow up the batteries, she says that punishing the Guardians for their insult is more important.
  • Light Is Not Good: Her body may be radiantly golden and shiny, but her nature is not that good.
  • Meaningful Name: Ayesha in the Western world was a name popularized by H. Rider Haggard's Shenote . Like Haggard's character, Marvel's Ayesha is an unnaturally beautiful haughty woman, "She who must be obeyed".
  • Not So Above It All: She appears to be flirting with Quill when she shows interest in "privately discussing" archaic reproduction methods with him.
  • Pretty in Mink: Her winter cape mostly covered with white fur, when her subordinated wear gold capes lined with fur, when she comes to make a deal with Yondu.
  • Revenge Before Reason: She gets called on for using so many resources just to punish the Guardians.
  • Statuesque Stunner: She is 6'3", and a very gorgeous Gold-Skinned Space Babe.
  • Villainous Breakdown: She grows increasingly frustrated with her failed attempts to destroy the Guardians, until at the end she's left sitting staring into space, with her hair in disarray and her advisers wanting to talk to her about her wasting of resources. However it emerges that she's not defeated yet; rather she's in a state of Dissonant Serenity when she reveals she's creating Adam Warlock for the sole purpose of hunting down and finally killing her enemies.
  • Womanchild: Humorously, the Sovereign in general seem to have the emotional maturity of spoiled 14-year olds, and Ayesha is no exception. Given her own megalomania, she also doubles as a more light-hearted example of Psychopathic Womanchild.

    Sovereign Chambermaid 

Sovereign Chambermaid

Species: Sovereign

Portrayed by: Hannah Gottesman

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

A Sovereign female under the service of High Priestess Ayesha.


  • Not So Stoic: She tries to remain as regal as the rest of her race, but she breaks into laughter upon hearing Taserface's name.

    Adam Warlock 

Adam Warlock

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/adam_warlock.png

Species: Sovereign

Portrayed by: TBD

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

An artificial being created by Ayesha.


  • Artificial Human: He is one in the making.
  • Decomposite Character: Vision was based on him, being a powerful artificial being with an Infinity Stone stuck in his forehead. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 introduced him as a separate character.
  • Red Herring: A cocoon reminiscent to one that he has resided in in the actual comics appeared in the first Guardians movie as a part of the Collector's collection. However, the ending to Vol. 2 establishes that he wasn't even alive at that time, meaning that the mysterious cocoon was not his.

The Skrulls

    In General 

The Skrulls

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_skrulls.png

Appearances: Captain Marvel | Spider-Man: Far From Home

A race of warlike shape-shifting aliens.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, the Skrulls were a race of Scary Dogmatic Aliens who used their shapeshifting to invade planets and their war with the Kree was a case of Evil vs. Evil. In Captain Marvel, the Skrulls (or at least the ones that we meet in the film) are refugees from a civilization shattered by brutal Kree imperialism.
  • Alien Blood: Their blood is purple.
  • Aliens of London: They speak with an Australian accent.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: They have green skin with thin stripes.
  • Anti-Hero: As they point out they're living through a hellish war. Those that fight have done some bad things including occasional assassinations and hiding among civilians knowing their presence will lead to Kree bombings.
  • Decomposite Character: In the Ultimate Marvel comics, it was heavily implied that the Chitauri were an offshoot or extremist faction of the Skrull race. In the MCU, the Chitauri are a completely distinct species and lack the ability to shapeshift like Skrulls, implying there is no common ancestry here.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: They were actually established to exist in a prequel comic made for the first Guardians of the Galaxy movie, which had a brief scene showing somebody trying to sell a "Skrull detector" at a market Gamora was passing through.
  • Hero Antagonist: During the first act of Captain Marvel, before they're revealed to be Good All Along.
  • Invading Refugees: Deconstruction. Not only is this what they actually are, it's only because the Kree won't let them resettle on an uninhabited planet. If given the choice, the Skrulls know they're a Dying Race and that a war is an incredibly stupid idea, but the Kree force them into a Cornered Rattlesnake stance.
  • Older Than They Look: At their adulthood, they stopped aging as shown in Spider-Man: Far From Home, where Talos and Soren appeared the way they looked back in The '90s.
  • Painful Transformation: A Skrull's process of turning into another shape... doesn't exactly look like it tickles.
  • Pointy Ears: They have quite large, pointy ears.
  • Remember the New Guy?: They came into contact with Captain Marvel in The '90s, but they are never referenced (outside the above-mentioned comic) until their appearance in Captain Marvel. This is because they've been primarily just trying to hide from their Kree persecutors.
  • The Reptilians: The Skrulls are a race of reptilian humanoids, and they are called such at least once in Captain Marvel.
  • Shapeshifting Excludes Clothing: They don't simulate clothes on their own; rather, their clothing is generated by a device implanted on their bodies.
  • Space Jews: Played very straight when it comes to their backstory. They were unwilling to submit before a mighty empire out to conquer them. As punishment for their defiance, their ancestral home was destroyed, and their people were scattered wide and far, and are now looking for a new place to call home, all while they continue to be the regular victims of a genocidal campaign run by said empire.
  • Secondary Color Nemesis: They have green skin in their natural state, and the entire species has an apparent fondness for purple. Subverted, because they are not the bad guys. The Kree are imperialist madmen, whereas the Skrulls just want to survive and find a home where they can live in peace.
  • Spot the Imposter: While they have computers that copy the memories of those they shapeshift into, they can only scan recent memories, leading to the Skrulls messing up when someone is probing their current form's history.
  • This Was His True Form: When a Skrull impersonating someone else dies, they revert back to their natural form.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: Their chief ability is altering their bodies to disguise others. They even possess the mannerisms of their adopted form to better sell the illusion.

    Talos 

Talos

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/d2b6dbfd_5ad3_49fd_b832_5209edfdba5d.jpeg

Click here to see him disguised as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent 

Species: Skrull

Portrayed by: Ben Mendelsohn, Samuel L. Jacksonnote 

Voiced By: Ricardo Mendoza (Latin American Spanish dub), Toshihiko Seki (Japanese dub)

Appearances: Captain Marvel |Spider-Man: Far From Home

A Skrull commander who leads an invasion on Earth.


  • Accent Relapse: Talos switches between using an American accent when disguised as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and Ben Mendelsohn's native Australian accent when in his natural Skrull form. He even switches between the two to taunt Fury when fighting him.
  • Action Dad: He's a Skrull general who also has a beloved daughter.
  • Adaptational Angst Upgrade: Inverted. In the comics, Talos had to live with the stigma of being a mutant who did not have the signature Skrull ability to shapeshift, until he learned that the mutation also granted him strength far superior to any Skrull and on par with any of the Super-Skrulls, which enabled him to become a fearsome warrior till a disgraceful defeat until he redeemed himself in the eyes of his peers by fighting Hulk. Since he has the power of shapeshifting here, he is suffering from none of that. At least not at first.
  • Adaptational Superpower Change: Lacks the Skrulls' traditional Shapeshifting powers in the comics, but has them in the MCU. This is likely because Marvel Studios knew that audiences would find it confusing at best and infuriating at worst to have a member of a shapeshifting species lack those abilities himself.
  • Adorkable: While he can be very dangerous and ruthless when he needs to be - and he needs to be often given his enemies are the Kree — underneath it all he's infectiously likable and jovial if you're on his good side. And while some aspects of Earth customs are lost on him, to others he adapts surprisingly quickly (he doesn't know where a human ass is located, but knows all about borrowing sugar from neighbors). And then there's the blazer he wears over his Skrull uniform (likely taken from the real Director Keller), just because it looks stylin'. And then in the post-credits for Spider-Man: Far From Home, he's too embarrassed to admit to Nick Fury he was suckered by Mysterio despite his wife's urging to report to Nick about the danger on Earth.
  • Affably Evil: He's polite, A Father to His Men, occasionally cracks jokes with his fellow Skrulls, and even breaks character as the director of S.H.I.E.L.D. to give one of his soldiers in an autopsy chambers last rites. Subverted, in that he really isn't even evil.
  • Alien Arts Are Appreciated: He's a fan of William Shakespeare, if his quoting of Henry IV is of any indication.
  • Anti-Hero: Despite being Good All Along, he readily admits that he has done plenty of underhanded things in pursuit of his goals.
  • Awesome Aussie: He has his actor's natural Australian accent and is Good All Along.
  • Badass Longcoat: He's the leader of the Skrulls who make their way onto Earth in Captain Marvel, and he's dressed in a long coat that the other Skrulls don't have.
  • Battle Couple: His wife Soren is a badass fighter in her own right, and they get some moments to shine together in Far From Home while undercover as Nick Fury and Maria Hill.
  • Big Bad: He appears to be the primary antagonist of Captain Marvel... Though it turns out he isn't. He is actually not only a very friendly guy but also a selfless person to his own people especially his wife and daughter and the film's Tritagonist.
  • Body Double: In Far From Home, he spends the whole movie impersonating Nick Fury on the latter's orders while he is off on some other business.
  • Character Tics: He's got his own spin on the Face Palm where his eyes widen and he shakes his head "no." He uses this to express dry disappointment towards his Science Guy, and later when they're flying towards Mar-Vell's ship.
  • Cynical Mentor: To Peter Parker in Far From Home, largely because Talos is reluctant to admit that he's in over his head and is trying to do what Nick Fury would do in a situation like this. Still, he makes some good points for the lessons Peter needs to learn about the full extent of his power and responsibilities.
  • Deadpan Snarker: As characters in the MCU tend to be. At the Rambeau household, after Carol treats Maria's neighbor as if he were Talos in disguise, the real Talos is behind them and chides her: "You should be kinder to your neighbors. Never know when you'll need a cup of sugar." He then waves his arms, remarking that Carol should put her "jazz hands" away so they can talk because he doesn't want to fight.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Is the antagonist of the first two acts of Captain Marvel — before it's revealed he's actually a good guy.
  • Due to the Dead: Talos finds a fallen comrade who is lying on autopsy table being conducted by S.H.I.E.L.D. He takes a moment to whisper a prayer.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Has a deep, ominous voice with an especially Australian accent.
  • Fake American: In-Universe. Talos disguises himself as an American S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, also played by Australian Ben Mendelsohn.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: With Carol and Maria, but Nick Fury especially. Talos didn't get along with them at all, and they worked with each other in Teeth-Clenched Teamwork, but Fury eventually regards him as a friend.
  • Frontline General: He is in the field with the other Skrulls and takes point when negotiating.
  • Good All Along: He was never a bad guy, but he doesn't deny that he's done terrible things in his life, because he just wanted to find the remnants of his people who were given safe haven by Mar-Vell.
  • General Ripper: At first, he was the ruthless general of the Skrull refugees who has committed various war crimes to keep his people safe from the Kree Empire. He does later decide to enter an Enemy Mine with Carol by attempting diplomacy to know where Mar-Vell's lab is in order to keep his people safe, softening up his ruthlessness in the process.
  • Good Parents: After he helped Carol recover her memories, they go to Mar-Vell's Imperial cruiser ship not only to get the Tesseract but to reunite with his wife and daughter who are hiding there.
  • Happily Married: He and Soren are devoted to one another. Twenty-nine years later in Spider-Man: Far From Home, they're still very happy together, even if they do have their moments of standard old married couple bickering.
  • Hero Antagonist: During the first two acts of Captain Marvel. After it's revealed that the Skrulls are not evil terrorists and just want someplace to live in peace, Talos plays the Tritagonist.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Kree propaganda publicizes him as a vicious terrorist who invades and takes over other planets. All he wanted is to protect his family and find a new home for his people, even if he did a lot bad things to do so.
  • Human Disguise:He's actually playing the role of Nick Fury in Spiderman: Far From Home.
  • Master Actor: He is very skilled at impersonating others, the trait not every member of his shapeshifting species possesses equally.
  • Marquee Alter Ego: Talos spends portions of Captain Marvel in human form, as seen in his S.H.I.E.L.D. agent disguise. This is not only done to showcase the Skrulls' shapeshifting ability, but also to give Ben Mendelsohn an excuse to get out of his Skrull costume and show his actual face... Which conveniently happens to look just like a S.H.I.E.L.D. director in 1995.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Mysterio's final con of outing Peter Parker as Spider Man and blaming for the drone attacks probably would not be as damaging to Peter if Fury had issued a report on the subject which would have blamed Mysterio officially. Given that Talos was impersonating Fury, this makes it more of his fault.
  • Not Quite Dead: Near the end of Captain Marvel, Talos is shot in the back by Yon-Rogg as he escapes with his family and new allies. He lies on his back and calls his daughter closer for comfort. Talos doesn't bite it.
  • Not So Different: This is why he forgives Carol for her actions against his people: His hands are filthy from war, just like hers.
  • Papa Wolf: He is willing to do anything to protect his family. He outright states that his hands are dirty from the war.
  • Precision F-Strike: He was willing to give Mysterio the benefit of the doubt, but watching the supposed Elementals spontaneously fuse into one monster makes him call the situation "bullshit."
  • Rogues-Gallery Transplant: He has no relation to Carol Danvers in the comics. He debuted as an Anti-Villain in the Peter David era of Hulk comics, and was an uneasy ally to Nova and Ronan in Annihilation. The closest he comes to being associated with the name Captain Marvel or Carol Danvers would be during his appearance in Howard the Duck's comic as a villain, during which he came into conflict with an Avengers team which included Monica Rambeau and Kamala Khan, who respectively had carried Carol's titles of Captain Marvel and Ms Marvel. However, Monica was known as Captain Marvel before Carol was, and was going by the name Spectrum when fighting Talos, and Kamala has only superficial relations to Carol other than the fact that she is a Legacy Character and an Ascended Fanboy of Carol.
  • Tritagonist: He's this to Carol's The Protagonist and Nick's Deuteragonist in Carol's solo movie.
  • Walking Spoiler:
    • In Captain Marvel, he's not the Big Bad at all, but a victim of the Kree's genocidal campaigns, and he just wants to be safe with his family again.
    • In Spider-Man: Far From Home, the fact that he's impersonating Nick Fury while the real Fury is in space is a surprise plot twist.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: He's willing to have one of his men target Monica as a way of making sure that he can speak with Maria, Nick Fury, and Carol Danvers. While he doesn't turn out to be evil, and he does insist that he would never have actually ordered Monica to be hurt, this does go to show that he's capable of being ruthless. Later, after he's reunited with his family, when Carol apologizes to his people and tells him that she will no longer take part in an unjust war against the Skrulls, he admits that for all his noble intentions, he's no saint, either.

    Norex 

Norex

Species: Skrull

Portrayed by: Matthew Maher

Appearances: Captain Marvel

Talos's second-in-command and appointed "Science Guy".


  • Evil Genius: Talos's resident scientist among the few Skrull characters. This is inverted after The Reveal that the Skrulls are the good guys, after which he becomes The Smart Guy.
  • Go Out with a Smile: After receiving a fatal wound from Yon-Rogg, he taunts Yon-Rogg that he is too late with a smile on his face.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He remains behind on Earth posing as Carol in order to delay and distract Yon-Rogg and Starforce while the real Carol and co. search for Mar-Vell's lab, which costs him his life when his cover is blown.
  • Mauve Shirt: The only other Skrull character besides Talos who has some kind of role at least until Mar-Vell's lab is found, he gets a couple gags to himself, and stays behind on Earth to keep Yon-Rogg busy at the cost of his life.
  • Nerdy Nasalness: He's the "science guy" and speaks with a nasal voice that other voiced Skrulls don't possess.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Even Talos only refers to him as his "science guy".
  • Would Hurt a Child: When Talos corners the Main Characters at Maria's house he has Norex shapeshift into Maria and lead Monica away from them as an unknowing hostage so they would stand down under threat of what would happen to her. After Talos reveals his true intentions to them he makes it clear this was a bluff and it's implied with Norex's position as the comic relief that he wouldn't have gone through with it.

    Talos's Family 

Talos's Family

Species: Skrull

Portrayed by: Sharon Blynn, Cobie Smuldersnote  (Soren) | Auden L. Ophuls and Harriet L. Ophuls (Talos’s Daughter)

Appearances: Captain Marvel | Spider-Man: Far From Home

Talos's wife, Soren, and their daughter, who have been hidden aboard Mar-Vell’s orbiting laboratory cruiser for years.


  • Alien Arts Are Appreciated: Mar-Vell has stocked their hideaway with all sorts of human gadgets and toys, such as a Fonzie lunchbox, NERF guns and Space Invaders arcade game to play in their six years spent in hiding.
  • Bald Women: It's unknown if this is a Skrull racial trait, since there are haired Skrulls in the comics.note 
  • Battle Couple: Soren is a badass fighter in her own right, and she and Talos fight alongside each other throughout Spider-Man: Far From Home while undercover as Maria Hill and Nick Fury.
  • Body Double: Soren acts as Maria Hill's body double in Far From Home.
  • BFG: While masquerading as Maria Hill, Soren manages to shoot down a Stark drone using a rocket launcher.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Even Soren thought Talos went a little too far taking out the then-director of S.H.I.E.L.D. and assuming his form.
  • Happily Married: Soren with Talos. Twenty-nine years later in Spider-Man: Far From Home, they're still very happy together, even if they do have their moments of standard old married couple bickering.
  • No Name Given: Unlike his wife (Soren), who is named in the credits, Talos’s daughter receives no name in the movie.
  • Walking Spoiler:
    • In Captain Marvel, their existence is what proves to Carol, Fury and Maria that the Skrulls are desperate refugees instead of brutal terrorists.
    • Soren's presence in Spider-Man: Far From Home at all is a pretty big spoiler, showing that S.H.I.E.L.D. authorizes Skrulls to impersonate their own agents.
  • Women Are Wiser: Well, Soren is wiser than her husband. In Far From Home, she points out that they are basically kidnapping Peter Parker, has no qualms about hurting Talos's pride when he claims he was always suspicious of Mysterio, calls him out for letting the situation getting so far out of hand, and gets him to call the real Nick Fury about this mess.

The Tivan Group

    The Collector 

Taneleer Tivan / The Collector

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/06cbd5ddd90dac0676c27dd6bb8a5891.png
"One down, five to go."

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Benicio del Toro

Voiced by: Jaime López (Latin-American Spanish dub), Pablo Adán (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Thor: The Dark World | Guardians of the Galaxy | Avengers: Infinity War

"Sir... You must allow me to pay you now so that I may own your carcass. At the moment of your death, of course."

The person with the largest collection of interstellar fauna, relics and species in the galaxy. The Collector operates out of a place in space aptly named Knowhere.

Lady Sif and Volstagg trust the remaining Aether with him in the form of an Infinity Stone, believing that he can keep it away from the other Infinity Stone, the Tesseract. However, he secretly wants to use the Aether to build the Infinity Gauntlet. Later, when he encounters Peter Quill and his band, The Collector attempts to strike a dubious bargain.

He is the brother of the Grandmaster, the hedonistic ruler of Sakaar.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics he commonly has the appearance of an almost skull-faced old man, as opposed to the more handsome Del Toro in the films.
  • Adaptational Wimp: Collector in the comics could hold an entire team of Avengers at bay with just the things in his collection, and if the situation called for it he had some energy-controlling powers he could use as well. If he has those, he didn't have time to use them, and most of his collection didn't survive the Power Stone going off inside of it. He handled it pretty well himself, though.
  • Alliterative Name: Taneeler Tivan.
  • Asshole Victim: While it is unknown what had happened to him after Thanos destroyed his entire place, whatever Thanos brought onto him is certainly well-deserved since he was a greedy, cruel Bad Boss who enslaved his workers.
  • Bad Boss: He locked one of his assistants in his collection for disappointing him and uses her as an example to another to keep her from disappointing him. This bites him in the caboose later on, as the mistreated assistant grabs the Infinity Stone in an attempt to kill both herself and the Collector.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: His goal was to collect the Infinity Stones for himself, presumably for some selfish needs. While he acquired two, he lost the Power Stone shortly after it came into his possession, and by the events of Avengers: Infinity War, Thanos came to his place and took the Reality Stone off his hands, most likely killing him in the process. Well, so much for that.
  • Black Eyes of Crazy: His tendency to bow his head, obscuring his eyes, along with his Excessive Evil Eyeshadow give the impression of bright irises and black sclera.
  • The Cameo: His collection features a few nods to other characters in the Marvel Universe, including Adam Warlock's cocoon, the telepathic space dog Cosmo, Howard the Duck, and possibly Beta Ray Bill. It also features a Chitauri soldier and a Dark Elf, as well as the alien space slugs from Slither and Tobias Funke after he blue himself.
  • Camp Straight: Apparently, the script specifically called for "an outer-space Liberace", which is what Del Toro delivers.
  • Cold Ham: He's an incredibly larger-than-life presence, and dresses accordingly, but he very rarely raises his voice above a conversational tone.
  • The Collector: Well, duh. It's in his name, no less. His role in the plot is hiring people like the Ravagers to build his Infinity Stone collection.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Gamora points out that the profitable mining operations that the Tivan Group is conducting to extract the organic materials from Knowhere are highly dangerous and highly illegal.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He appeared in the post-credits scene of Thor: The Dark World.
  • Faux Affably Evil: He flatters his guests (although Sif and Volstagg seem to be aware it's just an act), but he's a horrible boss.
  • Goth: His fashion wouldn't look out of place in a Tim Burton movie.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: It was his constant mediocre treatment of Carina, demanding she polish every last surface in his shop and threatening to put her in a box if she didn't comply, that caused her to snap and use the Infinity Stone to blow up the place and herself, wiping out most of his unique and valuable inventory, except for Cosmo and Howard.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink: After Carina used the Power Stone to blow up his base, he reaches for alcohol. At least he has Howard the Duck for a drinking buddy.
  • It Amused Me: It seems that he wants to have the Infinity Stone that drives the plot of the entire movie (and on a larger scale, the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe)... just because he'd like to own it.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: He's more than willing to work with the Asgardians to keep the Aether safe — but only so he can use it for his own designs.
  • Kick the Dog: He threatened to incarcerate Carina if she does not clean the cages properly. This eventually backfires once Carina brings some warranted payback by destroying his collection with the Power Stone.
  • Killed Offscreen: Possibly. His appearance in Infinity War is only as an illusion created by Thanos using the Reality Stone in order to lure the Guardians into a trap. It's left unclear if the real Collector was confronted and potentially killed by Thanos when the latter arrived to take the Stone.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: One of his assistants has had enough of his treatment and destroys his base with the Infinity Stone, leaving him injured and depressed. After this, whatever he plans to do with the Infinity Stones will have to wait.
  • Licked by the Dog: Cosmo seems to like him, although this disgusts Howard the Duck.
  • Milking the Giant Cow: While describing the Infinity Stone he is given to making dramatic gestures, which is promptly mocked by Rocket.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Both in appearance, personality and mannerisms, he resembles quite a bit Andy Warhol or, as Del Toro once described him, a "space Liberace".
  • Related in the Adaptation: In the MCU, the Grandmaster and him are brothers.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His appearance during the post post credits scene of Thor: The Dark World would later tie into the events of all the other movies after Thor: The Dark World leading up to Avengers: Infinity War in which Thanos crosses paths with The Collector and once again uses the same torture technique on the Collector that he used on Thor and later Nebula to get him to tell him everything he knows about the location of the Power Stone.
  • Spanner in the Works: It is his repeated attempts to acquire the Orb that spoil Thanos and Ronan’s plans, specifically... Through the Broker, he’s the one that points the Ravagers and Peter in the direction of Morag, setting the events of the movie in motion and his monetary offer is what prompts Gamora to betray Thanos.
  • Time Abyss: His brother is billions of years old, and he doesn't appear to be much younger.
  • Troll: While talking to Groot he asks if Rocket is Groot's pet predictably enraging Rocket. His smirk shows this is exactly what he'd intended.
  • Uncanny Valley Makeup: His makeup makes him look a little weirder than he is already, to say the least.
  • Uncertain Doom: In Infinity War. The only time we saw The Collector was an illusion created by Thanos to trick the Guardians into believing he hadn't gotten the Reality Stone yet. The Collector's status prior to this is unknown, though one can reasonably assume he was either captured or killed by Thanos given that Knowhere has been completely destroyed.
  • Unrelated in the Adaptation: Carina is the Collector's daughter in the comics. In the MCU they are not even from the same species.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Genuinely believes he's helping preserve endangered species from a possible cataclysm. Though his methods may not be perfect, he is attempting to do a good thing.
  • White Hair, Black Heart: He has white blonde hair and isn't super nice.
  • Wild Card: It's not entirely clear whose side he's on or why he wants to build the Infinity Gauntlet but he's willing to work with heroes like the Asgardians or criminals like the Ravagers to get the the stones needed to build it. Most likely he's working for himself. He is a collector, after all.

    Carina 

Carina

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2b1b7fdf3a78a8a1b4c4a578e36f1558.png
"I will no longer be your slave!"

Species: Krylorian

Portrayed by: Ophelia Lovibond

Voiced by: Analíz Sánchez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Eva Díez [Guardians of the Galaxy] (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Thor: The Dark World | Guardians of the Galaxy

A slave of the Collector who cleans the cases he keeps his collection in.


  • Adaptational Wimp: Her comic book counterpart can fire energy bursts, alter and summon matter, sense futures and alternate realities and even swap the minds of others from one body to another. MCU Carina is only a humanoid.
  • Catchphrase: "I present to you, Taneleer Tivan, the Collector".
  • The Dog Bites Back: While it's unknown and doubtful she knew what would happen when she grabbed the Infinity Stone, the Collector's abuse and threats made sure she didn't care as long as he suffered.
    Carina: I will no longer be your slave!
  • Driven to Suicide: Touches the Infinity Stone, blowing herself up and freeing or destroying most of the Collector's collection.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Appears alongside the Collector, as stated above. Her job is making the introduction, so technically she shows up first!
  • Green-Skinned Space Babe: She's a Krylorian, a race of magenta-skinned humanoids.
  • I Die Free: She'd rather die than keep serving the Collector.
  • Stepford Smiler: She puts on a smile and cheery attitude for guests, but she really hates Tivan due to all the abuse he puts her through.
  • Unrelated in the Adaptation: Carina is the Collector's daughter in the comics. In the MCU, they are not even from the same species.

The Collector's prizes

    Howard the Duck 

Howard the Duck

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/howard_duck_7523.png
"What do you let him lick you like that for? Gross."
Click here to see him as he appears in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 

Species: Unknown

Portrayed By: Seth Green

Voiced By: Ricardo Méndez (Latin-American Spanish dub); Roberto González [Guardians of the Galaxy], Rafael Alonso Roldán [Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2] (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Avengers: Endgame

"You know what they say: 'You’re outta luck until you’ve gone duck!'"

One of the Collector's prizes: a duck-like alien (or possibly, as in the original continuity, an accidental visitor from Another Dimension) who seems to be in no hurry to escape. He eventually does, however, and ends up hanging out with the Ravagers.


  • Adaptational Modesty: In many of his appearances in the comics, Howard went commando. Every appearance from his movie counterpart has worn pants.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: He is among the heroes summoned by Doctor Strange while wielding a BFG in Endgame.
  • The Cameo:
    • He appears in one of the stingers of Guardians of the Galaxy, but also in a Freeze-Frame Bonus much earlier in the film, locked in a containment unit in the background when the Collector turns to meet the Guardians.
    • He also appears in a bar in the Ravager Base during the sequel. He is also part of the illustrations for the credits complete with sommelier style holding of a wine glass.
    • He makes a blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo in Endgame to the right of Wasp and alongside the Ravagers as one of the heroes Doctor Strange portals into the final battle against Thanos.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Pun intended. Moments before the Collector's Face-Revealing Turn in Guardians of the Galaxy, the Collector looks in his direction.
  • Funny Animal: Quite literally. He even makes a quack at the Collector's expense.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: He may have been imprisoned by the Collector in a zero-privacy cell for an unknown length of time, but he doesn't hold it against the guy. At least, not when there's a chance of a free drink.
  • Guttural Growler: Has a somewhat low, raspy voice, presumably from smoking.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: No pun intended, considering he’s a duck and all, but Howard has been reserved solely for funny cameos and jokes during his tenure in the MCU thus far. Come the climax of Endgame, he’s among the many heroes who answer the call to arms to help fight Thanos, showing that he is willing to lay down his life to help protect and save the universe from oblivion.
  • Nice Hat: His red fedora can be seen lying on the floor next to him.
  • Noodle Incident: It's never explained how he came to be part of The Collector's collection, though one would assume it's quite the story. Equally mysterious is how he came to be in the Ravager Base Bad-Guy Bar, and became badass enough to join them for the Battle of Earth.
  • Really Gets Around: It's implied, by his one line in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, that Howard scores pretty frequently.
  • Refuge in Audacity: The only reason his cameo in Guardians of the Galaxy, and his subsequent appearances, aren't ridiculed for being too out-there for this continuity is because he's in movies that co-star a gun-toting raccoon.
  • Rule of Funny:
    • The reason why he is introduced in The Stinger to Guardians of the Galaxy is because the people at Marvel thought it would be funny. Apparently the director thinks this as well, hence his reasoning for putting him in:
      James Gunn: [on Howard's inclusion] Me having a bit of fun. We don't take ourselves too seriously.
    • This was the reason why he was among the heroes included in the final battle against Thanos.
  • Stockholm Syndrome: For some reason, he didn't immediately decide to run away after the Collector's lab blew up and released him from his captivity. Maybe the Collector just makes a good drink, or he has nowhere better to go. He later changed his mind, and ended up with the Ravagers.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Implied, given that he's one of the Ravagers on the front lines at the Battle of Earth. You clearly don't fuck with this duck.
  • Toothy Bird: In his first appearance, he has human teeth in his beak. In his second, not so much.
  • Umbrella Drink: He takes a swig from one, which is presumably alcoholic. "It burns going down."
  • Waistcoat of Style: He has a red one, complete with a tie and an undershirt.
  • You Don't Look Like You: He has a semi-realistic Funny Animal appearance in the first Guardians of the Galaxy movie, but subsequent appearances has his proportions look more cartoony and evocative of his design in the 2015 Marvel Comics miniseries.

    Cosmo 

Cosmo

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cosmo.jpg

Species: Earth Dog

Portrayed By: Fred the Dog

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

A dog used as a test subject by a U.S.S.R. space program and now part of the Collector's collection.


  • Mythology Gag: Shares a moment glaring with Rocket, referencing their frequent headbutting in the comics.
  • Older Than They Look: Considering the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the fact that most Soviet dog spaceflights took place in the 50's and 60's, he has lived past the average dog lifespan by a few decades and still looks like a dog in his prime.
  • Uncertain Doom: His fate after Thanos raided Knowhere is unknown. However, he was planned to show up in Infinity War with Howard in a scene, only for it to be cut for time, indicating he is still alive.

The Chronicoms

     In General 

The Chronicoms

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Am ancient race of synthetic, semi-robotic beings from the planet Chronyca-2, in the constellation Cygnus.


  • Alien Non-Interference Clause: They are forbidden from interfering in the affairs of the races they observe, unless it's to prevent an extinction-level event.
  • Biblical Motifs/Theme Naming: All of them are named after figures from the Bible. How come the Chronicoms not stationed on Earth also have Biblical names is not brought up.
  • Expy: Hunters' relentlessness, ruthlessness and lack of emotion sure sound similar to certain robotic soldiers disguised under synthetic skin.
  • Fantastic Caste System: According to Enoch, there are many "varietals" of Chronicoms. Two types are known:
    • Anthropologists are dispatched to observe a species after it achieves a recognizable form of sentience. This observation can take millennia (Enoch arrived on a Earth around 30,000 BCE). Unfortunately in "The Sign", they're all reassigned as Hunters.
    • Hunters are the warriors are trackers of the Chronicoms, protecting their planet and hunting down target. They are the most aggressive, and most unrelenting, of the Chronicoms, but can't seem to fix a problem unless it involves violence.
  • Human Aliens: Invoked and subverted. Their real bodies are covered in a kind of synthetic skin that gives them human appearance.
  • Time Police: The Hunters are responsible for going after those who "tamper with the universe". Subverted when it turns out that they just wanted Team Space to tell them how they traveled through time, as they wanted to use that knowledge to save their planet from its destruction.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: The anthropologists are calm, collected, and can be reasoned with. The hunters are aggressive, prone to violence and engage in Stupid Evil tactics if they can't get their way. Even after the other Hunters turn on Altarah when they realize time travel is not a viable option, they still decide to conquer an already inhabited world rather than locate and settle an uninhabited planet.

    Atarah 

Atarah

Species: Chronicom (Hunter)

Portrayed by: Sherri Saum

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.'

The leader of the surviving Chronicoms after the Shrike destroyed their planet.


  • Big-Bad Ensemble: Sarge and Izel are the main threats, but Atarah is obsessed with hunting down FitzSimmons so they can unlock time travel.
  • Decoy Antagonist: She's killed off by Malachi, who takes over the Chronicoms to launch an invasion of Earth
  • Sanity Slippage: Assuming she wasn't always like this, Atarah's sanity seems to have dropped considerably following the destruction of Chronyca-2. When told that FitzSimmons are in danger of being killed by merging their minds, Atarah flat out says she doesn't care and is willing to let them die before they can develop a means of time travel, which would leave the Chronicoms with nothing. Towards the end of the season, after seeing FitzSimmons memories, the other Hunters realize they can't time travel to save Chronyca-2, so they believe the Chronicoms should conquer a new world. Atarah, however, deludes herself into believing that the memories prove time travel is possible and refuses to abandon the idea. Recognizing that Atarah has lost her mind, Malachi kills her with Baal-Gad's consent.
  • Stupid Evil: She wants to go back through time to save her planet. But her method of threatening to kill everybody who can't help her or even worse can help her out of spite, evaporates whatever sympathy the audience might have for her plight.

    Malachi 

Malachi

Species: Chronicom (Hunter)

Portrayed by: Christopher James Baker

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Chronicom hunter who serves as Atarah's lieutenant.


  • The Bad Guy Wins: At the end of season six, Malachi and his army manage to take the Lighthouse and Fury's black box, although most of S.H.I.E.L.D. escapes.
  • The Dragon: He leads the hunt for Team Space at Altarah's orders, and serves as her main enforcer.
  • Dragon Ascendant: After killing Atarah, Malachi leads the Chronicoms' raid on the Lighthouse, and is set up as the Big Bad of the show's seventh season.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: After seeing FitzSimmons memories, Malachi concludes that saving Chronyca-2 is impossible, and the Chronicoms would be better off conquering a new world to establish a colony called Chronyca-3. Atarah refuses to move from her plan on time travel, so Malachi ultimately kills her at the other Hunters approval.
  • The Starscream: Malachi betrays and kills Atarah in order to take over the Chronicoms and enforce his own plan to establish Chronyca-3 on Earth

    Baal-Gad 

Baal-Gad

Species: Chronicom (Hunter)

Portrayed by: Christian Ochoa

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Chronicom hunter under Malachi.


  • The Dragon: Becomes Malachi's after the later takes over from Atarah

    Isaiah 

Isaiah

Species: Chronicom (Anthropologist turned Hunter)

Portrayed by: Jan Uddin

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Chronicom Anthropologist reassigned as a Hunter after Malachi's takeover.


  • Face–Heel Turn: He turns on Enoch and his plan to organize the Anthropologists after Malachi reassigns all Anthropologist as Hunters.
  • Kill and Replace: Enoch kills him and impersonates him in order to infiltrate the Hunters and reach Earth.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: He turns on Enoch simply because Malachi changes his job description.

Others

Terrans

    Will Daniels 

Will Daniels

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/daniels_will.jpg
"I have never been able to resist doing something when I'm told the odds are impossible."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Dillon Casey

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 49: "4,722 Hours")

A NASA astronaut who was sent through the Kree portal to Maveth in 2001 as part of Project Distant Star Return, who Simmons runs into after she's also sucked in.


  • Action Survivor: The only member of his team able to keep it together in their hellish situation trapped on the alien planet. Surviving on an alien world by himself for fourteen years is certainly an impressive feat.
  • Ambiguously Evil: HYDRA was responsible for Will and his fellow astronauts' trip to Maveth, and Will's uniform had a proto-HYDRA logo on the shoulder, but whether Will himself was a member of HYDRA is left unclear.
  • Canon Foreigner: There is no Will Daniels in the comics.
  • Bus Crash: Died covering Simmons as Fitz brought her back, as revealed in "Maveth".
  • The Eeyore: He makes a pact with Simmons; she'll be "the voice of hope, and he'll be the "voice of doom" to keep both balanced.
  • Fish out of Temporal Water: With no updates from Earth since 2001, he's naturally amazed at Simmons' Smartphone.
  • Foil: He's the opposite polarity of his romantic rival, Fitz. He's an astronaut Action Hero who can be "science-y" when he needs to be, in contrast to Fitz, who is an engineer Science Hero who can bring on the action when he needs to. Both of them are also willing to sacrifice their relationship with Simmons so she can be happy with the other guy.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation: After fourteen years alone, he's naturally gone a little off. He keeps Simmons imprisoned at first just to make sure she's real.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He distracts the thing hunting him and Simmons so she can get back to Earth, including using the bullet he was planning to save for when he truly couldn't go on anymore.
  • Impossible Task: He's drawn to these, which is why he volunteered for the Monolith mission.
  • Killed Offscreen: Will is killed by Hive while Simmons escapes and he ends up as another host for the ancient Inhuman.
  • My Greatest Failure: He had one job on the mission; keep the other three guys alive. Not only did he fail with all three, he had to kill the last one himself in self-defense.
  • My Greatest Second Chance: When another Lab Rat (Simmons) comes through the portal, he makes sure she stays alive and gets home.
  • Never Tell Me the Odds!: Someone telling him "this is impossible" only makes him want to do it more.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Was either this or Evil All Along due to the revelation HYDRA was responsible for his expedition. Whether he was a genuine astronaut who choose the wrong mission or a loyal HYDRA agent is not addressed, though evidence exists for both options. With his death, it is unlikely to be ever answered.

Sarge's Squad

    In General 

Sarge's Squad

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A mysterious planet-hopping crew led by Sarge.


  • Aliens Speaking English: They can speak and understand English perfectly despite having never been to Earth.
  • Human Aliens: They look human, but seemingly originate from different worlds. Jaco's fire-breathing abilty seems to support they aren't humans from an Alternate Dimension.
  • Evil Counterpart: To the original Bus team led by Coulson, each being led by a version of Phil Coulson that operates out of a vehicle (the Bus for Team Coulson, Sarge's Truck for Sarge's team) with the ultimate objective to protect people, Sarge's team does it by way of being well-intentioned extremists rather than take steps to actually save individual lives like S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Expy: Sarge's entire crew looks like they came straight out of a Mad Max movie. From their clothes, weapons, especially their truck, and their cutthroat attitudes, they'd be right at home in the Wasteland.
  • Five-Man Band:
  • Four Is Death: As Tinker dies very shortly after being introduced to the audience, they're effectively a gang consisting of four members.
  • Hell-Bent for Leather: Whatever world they came from seems to have been deep in The Apunkalypse.
  • Outside-Context Problem: Obviously, nobody knows where the hell they came from and what it is that they seek.
  • Reality Warper: Them arriving on Earth causes all kinds of weird stuff happening.
  • The Spook: Very little is known about them. They're not from Earth, they're not human in spite of their appearances, and they're clearly up to no good. Everything else remains a mystery.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: They're hunting down parasitic alien creatures called the Shrike that invade worlds and have been following them world to world. Trouble is, Sarge and is team don't care if they have to leave collateral damage in their wake and perfectly okay with destroying worlds they believe to be too far gone... including the Earth.

    Sarge 
see his folder at MCU: Others

    Snowflake 

Snowflake

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/snowflake_3.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Brooke Williams

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The sole female member of Sarge's crew.


  • Affably Evil: Despite her clear psychosis, Snowflake's butterfly speeches seem genuinely intended to comfort her victims, and she takes a sincere liking to May and Deke.
  • Ax-Crazy: She is obviously a little...off. Her response to people's deaths is to just talk about how they'll become "butterflies". (Sometimes she'll cheerfully tell you what a beautiful butterfly you'll make while she's killing you.)
  • Book Dumb: If the subject is not cutting people up, or pseudo-philosophy about reincarnation, odds are it will be lost on Snow. Her most extensive knowledge of an atom bomb was it is pretty to watch go off.
  • Butterfly of Death and Rebirth: Believes that when people die, they will become butterflies. So she has no problems with killing.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: Her understanding of death is a bit...off, and doesn't seem to think that killing people is a bad thing because they'll become "beautiful butterflies".
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: Has an odd spacey demeanor, and talks about what beautiful butterflies people will make after she kills them, showing an off-kilter view of death and rebirth. Assuming, of course, that she's not faking it.
  • Dark Action Girl: The sole female member of the team and plenty capable of kicking ass.
  • Dissonant Serenity: Again, she's eerily calm even when she's about to kill people.
  • Evil Counterpart: To Daisy. Both are Action Girls, Snowflake appears close with Sarge (as Daisy was with Coulson), they have similar appearances, and both attract the attention of Deke.
  • Knife Nut: She carries a knife and seems to be pretty good at using it.
  • Mistreatment-Induced Betrayal: Turns on Sarge after he leaves her to die with May, Daisy, and Deke.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: When Daisy describes herself as a hacker, Snowflake asks if that means that Daisy hacks people to pieces with a worryingly wide grin.
  • Obfuscating Insanity: In the episode "The Other Thing", it's implied that her unhinged personality is just an act, based on her conversation with May towards the end of the episode.
  • Odd Couple: With Deke.
  • Reality Ensues: Even after she helps stop Sarge's plan, Daisy still has Snowflake placed in lockup. Helping S.H.I.E.L.D. and having the hots for Deke doesn't change the fact that she's an Ax-Crazy lunatic who's killed several people.
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: She cuts her own head and then runs out pretending that her partners have her baby, distracting the S.H.I.E.L.D. team just long enough for the bombs to go off. She's worryingly casual about it, doing it without hesitation and showing no sign of pain.

    Jaco 

Jaco

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jaco.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Winston James Francis

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The biggest member of Sarge's team.


  • Affably Evil: The most level-headed and polite man in Sarge's team. Not that it makes him any less dangerous. He eventually defects to SHIELD.
    Jemma: "I like you."
    Jaco: "Well, that's because I'm likable."
  • Affectionate Nickname: Pax calls him "Jaco the Giant," which both Davis and Yo-Yo take to doing as well after Jaco's Heel–Face Turn.
  • Bald of Evil: Not a single hair on his head.
  • Beard of Evil: A quite unkempt one.
  • Bizarre Alien Biology: It's not even known what he (or the rest of Sarge's men) really are, but his biology seems to differ slightly from the others. He's seen huffing cleaning fluid while Sarge remarks he hasn't breathed his own atmosphere in ages. It would seem wherever Jaco is from, the atmosphere is thick with ammonia - quite toxic to regular humans.
  • The Brute: Though so far, he has been quite a civil version of the trope.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: He really just wanted to be a baker back on his homeworld. Then the Shrike wiped it out, he joined Sarge's Badass Crew, and the rest is history.
  • Genius Bruiser: While Tinker was the resident scientist of the group, it's obvious Jaco is extremely intelligent himself. He's at least knowledgeable enough in geology to simplify PEGS (piezoelectric crystals) to a scared jewelry store employee.
  • Heel–Face Turn: After some prodding from Yo-Yo, he realizes that Sarge's countless sacrifice of innocents all in the name of stopping Izel is wrong, so he defects to SHIELD.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He sacrifices himself to blow up Izel's ship. Unfortunately she'd already slipped away turning it into a somewhat Senseless Sacrifice. The only upside is he stopped Sarge's A-Bomb from killing any innocents.
  • Large Runt: The massive Jaco insists that he was the runt of the litter between he and his seven brothers.
  • Supreme Chef: Combined with Real Men Wear Pink. Despite his massive size and strength, back on his home planet he was - according to him - a damn good baker who passed his skills onto his family. Then his planet went to shit and Sarge saved just him.
  • The Philosopher: Further subverting his brutish appearance, Jaco seems to be very thoughtful and cultured.
    Jaco: If you consider the infinite complexity of nature, maybe strange is the norm.
  • Playing with Fire: Don't leave him coughing for too long, or he'll begin exhaling like a dragon.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: Doesn't hurt a group of kids who witness him materializing on Earth and later tells a little girl to run away from a blast radius.

    Pax 

Pax

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pax.jpg

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Matt O'Leary

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The third member of Sarge's team.


  • Beard of Evil: Just like his teammate Jaco.
  • Butt-Monkey: He's the almost-Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain of the crew since he endures more abuse and humiliation than the rest. Even Sarge and Jaco can't hold back a laugh or two at his expense.
  • Character Death: After he's wounded in a fight with Yo-Yo, Sarge kills him so he won't hold the rest of the team back.
  • Facial Horror: His face is horrifically burned by Yo-Yo, though Sarge puts him out of his misery quickly afterwards.
  • Meaningful Name: "Pax" is Latin for "peace." Pax is the only one of Sarge's crew that appears to want to stop and stay awhile on this Earth before they do something to it.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Sarge cruelly disposes of him after he's wounded by Yo-Yo. This was the turning point for Jaco to defect.

    Tinker 

Tinker

Species: Unknown

Portrayed by: Xavier Jimenez

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The last member of Sarge's team, who dies shortly after arriving on Earth.


  • Almost Dead Guy: He actually survives for a while after getting stuck into the wall, long enough to deliver a warning to S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Tele-Frag: Falls victim to this, getting stuck in a concrete wall.
  • Vagueness Is Coming: He lives just long enough to warn that Pachakutiq is coming and can't be stopped.

The Lazy Comet

    Viro 

Viro

Species: Sivian

Portrayed By:

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Controller of the Lazy Comet, which transports cargo, mostly Xandarian snails, throughout several planets.


  • Aliens Speaking English: He speaks in the same language as Fitz and Enoch, without any hint of Translation Convention or Translator Microbes being at play.
  • Bad Boss: Viro exploits his crewmembers and doesn't give a damn about their lives. If Fitz hadn't rigged the ship's airlocks, Viro would've spaced all his engineers to avoid paying their wages.
  • Human Aliens: Sivians seem human except for having inhumanly skyblue irises.
  • Thrown Out the Airlock: Viro tries to do this to Fitz and all his engineers, but Fitz rigged the airlocks to Viro and his thugs are the ones that end up spaced while Fitz and the Sivian engineers remain safe.

Kitson

    Mr. Kitson 

Mr. Kitson / Kitson III

Species: Unknown Extraterrestrial Race

Portrayed By: Anthony Michael Hall

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The ruler of Kitson.


    Montalban 

Montalban

Species: Astran

Portrayed By: Louie Ski Carr

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

An enforcer of Mr. Kitson at the House of Games.


  • Beard of Evil: He has a dark beard and serves as the enforcer of an space mob boss, presiding over a game in which players put their own freedom as collateral.
  • Rubber-Forehead Aliens: Other than his green skin, red eyes and bony ridges instead of eyebrows, he looks human.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: For all his imposing appearance, he does tell Simmons she's too good for a place like Kitson, and to lay off the alien drugs.

Naro-Atzia

    Pretorious Pryce 

Pretorious Pryce

Species: Naro-Atzian

Portrayed By: Clark Middleton

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Naro-Atzian custom officer at Customs Station CI-741.


Other Creatures & Alien Races

    Abilisk 

The Abilisk

Species: Unknown (Inter-dimensional Beast)

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

An inter-dimensional creature that is feeding on the power source of the Sovereign, who hire the Guardians of the Galaxy to eliminate it.


  • Alien Blood: Its blood resembles yellow slime.
  • Breath Weapon: It has one that resembles the aurora borealis; its actual effect is unclear due to most of the fight being a Meaningful Background Event.
  • Combat Tentacles This creature's bread and butter, although it has a host of other abilities as well.
  • Kill It Through Its Stomach: Subverted, in that Drax's idea to attempt this against it proved wholly ineffective.
  • Lamprey Mouth: Has at least three rows of sharpened teeth filling multiple levels on the inside of its mouth.
  • Starfish Aliens: A giant, tentacled monster that travels between dimensions and particularly loves to menace the Sovereign world.

    Goose 

Goose

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/goosecaptainmarvel.png

Species: Flerken (disguised as a red, mackerel tabby domestic short-haired cat)

Portrayed by: Reggie, Gonzo, Rizzo, Archie

Appearances: Captain Marvel

"Aren't you the cutest little thing?"
Nick Fury, Captain Marvel

A mysterious cat that gets entangled with Carol Danvers and S.H.I.E.L.D. in the 1990s.


  • Adaptation Name Change: In the comics, Captain Marvel's cat is named Chewie in a Shout-Out to Star Wars.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: She was originally owned by Mar-Vell instead of Carol.
  • Alien Animals: Can easily blend in as an Earth cat.
  • Animalistic Abomination: Is actually a flerken, a species of catlike aliens who have pocket dimensions in their stomach and can extend an array of tentacles larger than most other species out of her mouth to attack and send things into it. Also claws that carry potent infections.
  • Badass Adorable: The Kree were frozen with terror the moment they scanned her; restraining her and fitting her with a muzzle, prompting Fury to shout "Hey, it's a cat, not Hannibal Lecter." The fact that she can sprout a Kraken's worth of tentacles out of said mouth and drag entire grown-men into it more than justifies said restraints.
  • Black Hole Belly: Goose's stomach is capable of holding grown men and entire infinity stones inside of her. Although she coughs up the latter during The Stinger.
  • Big Eater: Played for Laughs, she can devour grown men in seconds like they were M&Ms. She won't eat friendly people, though. Which is why she won't eat Talos when he's taken the form of a Kree soldier. She also didn't even hesitate to eat the Tesseract for safekeeping.
  • Bigger on the Inside: It would be anatomically impossible for Goose's cat-sized body to contain that huge mass of horrifying tentacles without some dimensional warping going on.
  • Call a Rabbit a "Smeerp": Subverted. Nick Fury is amused by how absolutely terrified the Kree and Skrulls are of the "flerken", because she appears to be nothing more than a perfectly normal adorable widdle kitty cat. She is not just a perfectly normal widdle kitty cat.
  • Cross-Cast Role: She is portrayed by four male cats, since a vast majority of orange cats are male.
  • Cuteness Proximity: Nick Fury, of all people, reacts like this to Goose.
  • The Dog Is an Alien: The cute cat is in fact a flerken, a rare and dangerous alien species.
  • The Dreaded: The Kree and the Skrulls are mortifyingly piss scared of her. As she's a Flerken, it's justified. She's essentially one of the Marvel universe's bedtime horror stories - though only if you are mean. If she judges you as a friendly, she's just an adorable kitty with above-average intelligence.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Keen-eyed fans noticed her silhouette in the corner of the teaser poster.
  • Eating Solves Everything: Need to dispose of some people trying to kill you? Goose will swallow them right up. Need a safe place to hold an object of limitless power? Her stomach is just the right place.
  • Eating the Enemy: Goose swallows up several Kree soldiers while Nick Fury is holding her in Talos's satellite.
  • Evil-Detecting Dog: Cat to be more precise, she will not harm anyone who is deemed friendly like Talos.
  • Extreme Omnivore: She eats fully armed Kree soldiers. Then she eats The Tesseract (albeit puking it up later like it's a hairball.)
  • It Can Think: While the characters are figuring out what to do with it, Goose eats the Tesseract to keep it safe, showing that she may in fact understand what they're saying.
  • Killer Rabbit: Adorable she may be, but Goose is a Flerken, an alien that can spring tentacles at a moment's notice and hold entire pocket dimensions within them.
  • Logical Weakness: Since her Combat Tentacles come from her mouth, simply muzzling her to keep it shut will nullify the threat.
  • Lovecraftian Superpower: She can extend a huge mass of fleshy tentacles larger than herself from her mouth, use them to swallow things far bigger than her, and even swallow the Tesseract without any ill effects.
  • Mysterious Past: How she ends up on Earth is not revealed, other than she was originally owned by Mar-Vell, who might've gotten her from somewhere in the galaxy.
  • Not So Harmless: Goose actually takes a bit of comical abuse during the flight in the Quadjet, before she's revealed to be The Dreaded at the same level as Hulk or Groot!
  • Phlebotinum-Handling Equipment: When Fury adamantly refuses to grab the Tesseract with his bare hands, Goose immediately gobbles it up, ending the argument. Since she's immune to the object's effects, she becomes a safe and handy Stomach of Holding for it until she finally coughs it up on Fury's desk, several days later, with all the dignity and grace of hacking up a hairball.
  • Shout-Out: Her name has been changed to Goose as a reference to the character in Top Gun.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: She is the one directly responsible for Nick Fury's iconic eyepatch; when he annoyed her too much by playing with her chin one times too many, she scratched his left eye blind in one swipe.
  • Stomach of Holding: Is able to swallow things much bigger than herself. When Fury and Maria Rambeau discuss how to keep the Tesseract safe, Goose promptly swallows it and coughs it back up again when the threat is long over.
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: Pukes up the tesseract in a Post Credits Scene.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: Goose's terrifying Combat Tentacles are easily nullified by putting a muzzle on her. And since she's usually friendly or at least neutral at first sight (despite Lawson's claims) until you actually threaten her, it's a simple matter to grab her and muzzle her.
  • Wound That Will Not Heal: Flerken scratches don't heal. Fury being a bit too affectionate with her cost him his eye.

    The Vrellnexians 

The Vrellnexians

Species: Vrellnexian

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A race of monstrous alien beasts which Team Coulson encounter on a mysterious space vessel.


  • Adaptational Dumbass: In the comics they stood upright and engaged in commercial slave trading (even trying to enslave the Asgardians in their first appearance), while the MCU Vrellnexians seem to just be animals of prey.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Vrellnexians had a light grayish purple skin and red eyes in the comics, but here have a blend of gray and blue for their skin and have darker, less striking eyes.
  • Ascended Extra: The Vrellnexians are a pretty obscure alien race from Marvel lore, to the point that it was only due to a human calling them one by name that anyone made the connection.
  • Fangs Are Evil: They have very sharp fangs, which you will definitely notice when they kill you in painful fashion.
  • Insectoid Aliens: They are supposedly this, but have characteristics that are evocative of reptiles.
  • Rogues-Gallery Transplant: They were enemies of Thor in the comics, believe it or not, and the species have never menaced S.H.I.E.L.D. agents before.
  • Shout-Out: They've been designed to look closer to xenomorphs in comparison to their look from the comics.

    The Watchers 

The Watchers

Species: Watchers

Appearences: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

A race of bulbous headed, bald and blue-eyed aliens that act as the watchers of the entire universe, ensuring that things unfold as they are supposed to.


  • All-Powerful Bystander: Supposedly they are quite powerful, but getting them to actually do anything is a rather tall order. They aren't referred to as The Watchers for nothing.
  • The Mole: Stan Lee's cameo in the film has him informing them of his previous (by the film's release schedule) cameo in Captain America: Civil War, presumably making his previous MCU cameos actually be informant missions for them. He's even credited as "Watcher Informant" in the credits.
  • Series Continuity Error: Stan Lee informing them of his cameo in Civil War opens up a plot hole as Civil War takes place several years after this film, which is set only two months after the first Guardians film. James Gunn has acknowledged this error, but also explains it away with Stan using the FedEx disguise from Civil War on more than one occasion.
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