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Spoilers for all works set prior to the end of Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

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    In General 
  • Dirty Coward: Thor explicitly accuses every assembled god on Omnipotence City of cowardice. Considering they're too afraid of the Necrosword to stop Gorr's rampage, instead being content to sit on pampered gilded thrones and indulge themselves when they greatly outnumber the already dying Gorr, he more than has a point.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness: In Phases One and Two, all Gods are implied to merely be Sufficiently Advanced Aliens and inter-dimensional beings running on Clarke's Third Law, worshipped by "primitive" Earth cultures who confused them for gods. After Doctor Strange (2016) introduced Fantasy elements into the MCU, Thor: Ragnarok and Thor: Love and Thunder lean more into the idea that they are genuine gods.
  • Jerkass Gods: While there are certainly exceptions, most gods are prone to selfishness, pride and hedonism, giving weight to Gorr's desire to wipe them all out.
  • Our Gods Are Different: Like in Real Life Mythologies and the original comics, the gods seen in the MCU comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some could pass off as humans like Asgardians and the Olympians. Some are vaguely humanoid with animal characteristics like the Ennead. Others are more distinctly inhumannote  such as dragons, Monstrous Humanoids, divine beasts, Celestials and dumplings.
  • Reduced to Dust: When Gods die, their corpse dissipates into a gold-colored dust.
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Norse Gods

    In General 
See the Asgardians page.

Wakandan Gods

    In General 

Wakandan Gods

Species: Gods

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War note  | Black Panther note 

A pantheon of deities worshipped in Wakanda. According to the nation's founding myth, Bast guided a warrior shaman to the heart-shaped herb and made him into the first Black Panther, while according to interviews Hanuman granted the Jabari with never-ending wood.


  • Crossover Cosmology: Due to Wakanda's (fictional) location being nestled right between Ethiopia and Kenya, it was practically right in the western-most-middle of The Silk Road, with both the land and sea routes connected just north of it. Due to this unprecedented cultural "mingling" of sorts, Wakanda's religions borrow many figures from that of others. Bast and Sekhmet are from Egyptian myth, while Hanuman is from Hinduism. Like most polytheists, Wakandans probably don't have strict mythology that prevents the assimilation of various deities.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: It's never made clear whether they actually exist or not, though the Super Empowering abilities of the heart-shaped herb and the magic properties of the Jabari's wood and snow imply that they do. Moon Knight reveals that, at a minimum, Bast and Hathor — and therefore Sekhmet by implication — are real and active deities.
  • Panthera Awesome: Bast and Sekhmet, who like their Egyptian counterparts are depicted as cats.

    Bast 

Bast

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/06409c6d_b658_4e8b_b73d_78b8e67830a8.jpeg
The Panther Goddess
Click here to see her human appearance 

Species: Ennead

Citizenship: Egyptian, Wakandan

Portrayed By: Akosia Sabet

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War note  | Black Panther note  | Thor: Love and Thunder

An Egyptian goddess worshipped in Wakanda, and patron deity of the Black Panther.


  • Ambiguously Evil: According to T'Chaka, she was involved in Wakanda's affairs and every Black Panther, its defender and king, draws power from her. But at the same time, she's seen on Omnipotence City, where gods indulge themselves with little to no regard for their believers and compete amongst themselves for most human sacrifices.
  • Ambiguous Situation: In Moon Knight she appears to be imprisoned. Supposedly, she is also in Omnipotence City during the time of Love and Thunder, and gods who hang out there aren't known for helping their adherents. Being imprisoned on Earth precludes kicking back in the city of the gods. Nothing thus far indicates she's absent from the Black Panther's life.
  • Cameo: A statue in Bast's likeness appears in Moon Knight, but neither the goddess or her Avatar appear through the portals to take part in Arthur Harrow's trial, with it being implied that she was one of the Egyptian deities imprisoned for continuing to meddle in mortal affairs. In Thor: Love and Thunder, however, she's briefly shown among the gods dwelling in Omnipotence City.
  • Ethnic God: Bast is the main deity worshiped in Wakanda, and is especially sacred to the Golden/Panther Tribe — with statues in her likeness being found throughout Birnin Zana.
  • Our Founder: Wakandan mythology portrays her as the one who led Bashenga, the first Black Panther and founder of the Panther Tribe, to the Heart-Shaped Herb; and as such statues depicting her likeness are found throughout the Wakandan capital city, Birnin Zana.
  • Panthera Awesome: Bast manifests as a colossal black panther in the summary of Wakanda's history shown in Black Panther.

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Egyptian Gods

    In General 
A pantheon worshipped in Egypt. Not possessing physical forms (at least anymore), they instead manifest through mortals they select, known as Avatars.
  • Ambiguous Situation: Where they sit in relation to the other pantheons. It's not clear if they were like the others, in that they once had physical forms which they since shed, or if they are indeed higher beings. Thor name drops Ra, but none of them, aside from Bast, are explicitly seen in Omnipotence City
  • God in Human Form: Since they no longer have physical forms in Earth, they instead select humans as Avatars who enact their will on their behalf.
  • Have You Seen My God?: They left Egypt long ago, holding that since the Egyptian people have forgotten them, the gods don't owe them anything anymore. That said, unlike the Norse or Greek pantheons, they still seem to keep active tabs on the happenings on Earth.
  • Physical God: Subverted. Unlike the other pantheons that are seen across the universe, the Egyptian gods don't exist on the same plain of existence, instead residing in the Duat, or a place Khonshu refers to as the "Over-Dimension". It's implied that they used to have a more physical presence in Egypt, but decided to leave, and now act through human Avatars.
  • Sealed Good/Evil In a Can: The standard punishment for a god that breaks ranks is for the other gods to imprison them in an ushabti for all time, as happened to Ammit, and later Khonshu.
  • We ARE Struggling Together: They are not nearly as cohesive as the other pantheons are indicated to be. It's shown that there used to be a lot more than them, but they were imprisoned in stone statues for unknown reasons.

    Khonshu 

Khonshu

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/0a601e52_6206_41e4_b585_790a56227f4c.jpeg
"You swore he would not interfere."

Species: God

Portrayed By: Karim El Hakim (on-set actor), Oscar Isaac

Voiced By: F. Murray Abraham

Appearances: Moon Knight

"I only punish those who have already done harm. I am real justice!"

The Egyptian god of the moon who gives Marc Spector and the other alters their powers.


  • Adaptational Comic Relief: Downplayed. He has been portrayed as a completely serious character in the comics (particularly in his earlier appearances), but many writers have him as being very ominous and threatening, but also a Deadpan Snarker prone to Comically Serious exasperation at his avatar's actions. This is the take the show goes with.
  • Adaptational Jerkass: Downplayed. While the Khonshu of the source material is generally supportive of both Marc and the other alters as they try to carry out his will, and even compliments Steven's appearance in one comic, their relationship has gradually degraded over the years, with Khonshu alternating between being a manipulative Trickster Mentor on his good days and an outright toxic Evil Mentor at his worst. In this series, Khonshu is openly disgusted with Grant and his incompetence right off the bat, and while he's slightly more polite with Marc, he does threaten to kill him if Steven screws up on his watch, and further implies that he will take Layla to be his next avatar if he tries to leave his service. The season finale reveals that he was bluffing on the last part to keep Marc in line, not because he has any moral line he wouldn't cross, but because there's actually a third alter in the mix that Marc and Steven are seemingly unaware of who seems to be fully subservient to Khonshu.
  • Ambiguously Evil: Khonshu's incredibly ruthless nature and tendency to emotionally manipulate his avatars make him a very shady character whose morals are hard to pin down. This is actually discussed in episode 5, where Steven thinks Khonshu has been emotionally manipulating Marc in their entire relationship, while Marc says he knew what he was getting into. The same episode also leaves a hanging implication that Khonshu may or may not have been involved in Randall's death, with Steven stepping on a bird skeleton whose skull bears an awfully close resemblance to Khonshu just before realizing that the cave is going to flood.
  • Anti-Hero: Khonshu's methods of justice are extremely ruthless and violent, but he does distinguish himself from Ammit by only inflicting vengeance after the crime is done.
  • Bad Boss: He threatens Marc, who consciously serves him, with death if Steven, who has no idea of either what he's doing or that he shares a body with someone else who has supernatural ties, loses the scarab.
  • Badass Baritone: Courtesy of F. Murray Abraham, he has a deep and powerful voice.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: In episode 6, Khonshu shows he's capable of holding his own in combat against other gods, and at the end is shown sporting modern attire — a stark white suit and gloves not dissimilar to those worn by Mr. Knight — when confronting Harrow.
  • Cassandra Truth: Due to his long, troubled history with his pantheon, his fellow gods refuse to hear him out when he tells them about Arthur's plans to release Ammit.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Khonshu doesn't directly grant his avatar powers; rather, his avatar can use Khonshu's ceremonial armor, which grants super strength, durability, and a potent Healing Factor, among other things.
  • Creepy Good: As a ten-foot-tall heavily bandaged staff-wielding mummy with a giant fuc—, um, floating bird skull for a head, one can forgive Steven for being absolutely terrified of him when Khonshu first starts appearing to him. Nonetheless, he considers the innocent to be under his protection, and seems to be the only Egyptian deity actively seeking to protect humanity from Ammit.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Khonshu responds to Steven's clueless and panicked antics with sarcastic annoyance and incredulity, demeaning him as a worm and a parasite whenever he's not just calling him an idiot.
  • Drama Queen: Khonshu is prone to overly dramatic displays. This is in full display during Harrow's trial when all the other gods speak normally through their avatars, while Khonshu is a Large Ham.
  • Dramatic Wind: Khonshu's temper tantrums are always followed by sudden gusts of wind. According to Harrow, dramatic wind is just about all that he can do to anyone who isn't his avatar.
  • Enraged by Idiocy: He initially despises Steven and constantly berates and castigates him for his incompetence, and while he is vastly kinder to Marc, he makes zero attempt to hide his displeasure with Marc's inability to keep Steven under control and threatens to replace him if he doesn't get his shit together. He eventually warms up to Steven when he proves himself to be useful in finding Ammit's tomb.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Khonshu is a Jerkass God with a Pay Evil unto Evil mentality, but he believes in punishing people for the crimes they have committed, not ones they might commit. He feels that people like Harrow, who would do such a thing, have no conscience.
  • Exact Words: He vows that "you two" [Marc and Steven] will be free from the contract, but there's nothing in there saying Jake Lockley couldn't take the helm.
  • Floating Limbs: His head floats atop his body without a visible neck.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: The rest of the Ennead barely tolerate Khonshu and, in the third episode, imprison him in stone. Only Hathor holds some lingering feeling of kinship for him.
  • God of the Moon: He's the Egyptian god of the moon and the source of Moon Knight's powers. Despite needing an avatar to carry out his will on Earth, he still holds domain over the moon, and in the third episode he shows this off by creating an eclipse for a few moments in broad daylight, and then later on rewinding the night sky by thousands of years.
  • God Is Flawed: Khonshu has many flaws, but hedonism and dodging responsibility are not among them. He was exiled from his own pantheon for being too involved in human affairs and, instead of lazing around Omnipotence City, he is still seeking champions to protect "the travelers of the night".
  • Good Is Not Nice: As a seemingly deliberate mirror of Affably Evil antagonist Arthur Harrow, who's very nice and supportive but wants to do despicable things in the name of genuinely vile ideals, Khonshu's justice is set on the firm foundation of punishing people for bad things they've actually done. He's just an enormous asshole about it, both to his avatar and everyone else.
  • Good Wears White: The "good" part is downplayed, but Khonshu's appearance is almost pure white in color.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Even centuries after humanity has ceased to worship him, Khonshu still believes in acting directly in fighting evil through his avatar, and is perfectly willing to sacrifice himself if it means protecting humanity from Ammit. However, his methods, abrasive personality, his preference for mentally-unstable avatars, and insistence on interacting with humanity rather than being a mere spectator have made him a pariah to his own pantheon, the gods turning a trial meant for Arthur Harrow into a condemnation against him.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He helps Steven find the coordinates to Ammit's tomb by moving the stars back 2000 years with Steven's help, despite knowing the Ennead will imprison him in a stone figurine for all of eternity once he does, which they summarily do.
  • Hidden Depths: According to Yatzil, Khonshu once enjoyed Hathor's music, which surprises Marc, who's only known Khonshu to enjoy the pain his avatar inflicts on the guilty.
  • Hypocrite: He basically tells Ammit he opposes her on the matter of free will, but he eliminates Marc and Steven's choice to serve him by giving them the illusion they are free of his will, only to have Jake continue to serve him instead.
  • I Gave My Word: Khonshu fulfills his end of the bargain and frees Marc and Steven from servitude. However, he only promised to free Marc and Steven, not Jake Lockley.
  • Immortal Immaturity: Having been banished by the other Egyptian gods, without an avatar his powers are limited to throwing objects around and flickering lights — which Harrow likens to a toddler throwing a tantrum. When Harrow later turns around the trial to point out Khonshu's own flaws and misgivings, Khonshu can only bellow through Marc that the former is lying and shouldn't be trusted, which does little to impress the other gods.
  • Improbably Predictable: Harrow can guess word-for-word what he is saying to Steven during their conversation in "Summon the Suit". This includes his commands for Steven to kill Arthur and his justification for only acting after a crime as "real justice". This is revealed to be because of Harrow's familiarity with Khonshu's general personality, due to being his former avatar.
  • Jerkass Gods: The first episode of Moon Knight portrays Khonshu as a complete asshole towards Steven Grant, one of the alters in the Moon Knight system who doesn't know they have DID. He seems to get on better with Marc Spector, but still isn't above threatening to kill him and Steven both, should they lose a specific trinket Marc and Khonshu were after. Despite this, episode 2 reveals he is at least A Lighter Shade of Black compared to Ammit, as while both of them desire to Pay Evil unto Evil, Ammit is willing to preemptively kill people for sins they've yet to commit, which Khonshu considers unethical.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: Khonshu is not pleasant in the least, but he can bring up valid points in his unpleasantness.
    • He condemns Arthur as having no conscience. Given how the man doesn't just admit he'd be willing to kill children as part of his own goals but tries to justify it as morally right to do so, and that he openly breaks his own rules in killing someone just because they happened to pick up the scarab he was after, Khonshu's not wrong about that one.
    • He's also not entirely wrong to point out that Steven Grant is far from a competent fighter, though he is a little unnecessarily cruel while commenting on the fact.
    • Contracting Marc to serve him while Marc was dying and in no position to refuse may have been manipulative and, at best, ethically questionable, but, as Marc acknowledges, accepting the deal did save his life.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: To say it's buried pretty deep would be the understatement of the century, but Khonshu seems to be more of a paragon than his abrasive attitude would indicate. For all of his harsh ways and uncertain goals, he's the only active Egyptian god who still takes a proactive role in protecting humanity after his other divine brethren have seen fit to stay on the sidelines.
  • Large Ham: Khonshu can be a very dramatic deity. While speaking through Marc in "The Friendly Type", Khonshu is so forceful and dramatic in his speech that it seems almost painful for Marc.
  • Leonine Contract: "Asylum" reveals that Khonshu made his pact with Marc while the latter lay dying from a gunshot wound, offering him survival if he agreed to serve as Khonshu's fist of vengeance.
  • Light Is Good: Downplayed. Khonshu, a god of the moon who appears both dressed in and made of total whiteness, does empower the heroic Moon Knight and serve justice with disdain for those who speak of The Evils of Free Will, but he's brutal and ruthless in pursuit of his goals, as well as being a definite jerkass.
  • Lunacy: Arthur implies that Khonshu either prefers "broken" people to be his avatars, or merely being his avatar is enough to drive people to mental illness, Arthur, Marc, and Steven being the three examples we see of this. Being the God of the Moon, a celestial body historically associated with madness, this makes a lot of sense.
  • Manipulative Bastard:
    • Khonshu contracted Marc to be his avatar while Marc was bleeding out from a gunshot wound and close to suicide, giving him the option of becoming Khonshu's avatar or dying. Steven explicitly calls this manipulation, though Marc is less aggrieved, as accepting the offer did save his life.
    • He also keeps Steven and Marc in the dark about Jake Lockley, as neither are even aware he exists, and makes the former two believe that they're free of his service, while in reality their body is still being used for Khonshu's goals.
  • Mummy: Khonshu's body is wrapped in mummy-like bandages.
  • No Indoor Voice: When appearing as himself, he speaks with a booming voice. When speaking through Marc at Harrow's trial, all he does is shout at the top of Marc's lungs.
  • "Not So Different" Remark: Both Marc and Ammit state that the latter is not very different from Khonshu, as they both want to Pay Evil unto Evil. Khonshu claims that he is Not So Similar, though, as he firmly believes in mortal's right to free will and only punishes people once they are known to be evil.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: He fully ascribes to this, constantly pushing Marc and Steven to be merciless with their opponents.
  • People Puppets: The first episode of Moon Knight shows that he is able to control the system's body when Steven Grant tries to give the scarab to Arthur Harrow.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Although Khonshu is quick to express his hatred of Steven initially, he does change his tune when Steven shows off his knowledge of Egyptian history in the third episode, actively explaining to him what's going on and even calling him by his name.
    • A Subverted example of this happens at the finale. While Khonshu does let Steven and Marc out of their deal, he is still connected to them thanks to Jake Lockley. After all, nothing was ever said about freeing anyone called Jake from their deal with Khonshu.
    • He refers to Jake Lockley as "my friend," not even sarcastically, which is more than he's done for Steven or Marc.
  • Photographic Memory: He remembers every night sky in exact detail.
  • Pitiful Worms: He has a habit of comparing people who irritate him (which isn't hard) to insects. He calls Steven a "worm" on several occasions, and in episode 6 he calls Layla a "little bug" when she refuses to be his avatar. It's kind of fitting, considering he is, well, a bird.
  • Reality Warper: Despite not having a physical presence and needing to use an avatar in the mortal world to get anything done, he shows that he is, in fact, a god when he causes an eclipse at will, and turns the stars back 2000 years (albeit needing Steven's help with the latter).
  • Secret Secret-Keeper: He's well aware who Jake is and that Steven and Marc aren't aware of him, but he's sure to keep quiet on even the slightest indication that there's a third alter in his service, and intends to keep it that way.
  • Skull for a Head: Just like his comic iteration, Khonshu has a floating avian skull for a head.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: His appearance in the final scene has him exchange his dusty old robes for Mr. Knight's pristine white suit.
  • Super Empowering: The first episode of Moon Knight reveals Marc Spector as Khonshu's chosen avatar, bestowing him with superhuman powers. When Khonshu is sealed away, the powers he grants go with him.
  • You Have GOT to Be Kidding Me!: When Steven throws the gun that Marc picked up at one of the cars during the chase scene in a panic, Khonshu asks, "Did he just throw the gun?"

    Ammit 

Ammit

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ammit_infobox.png
Click here to see her released 

Species: God

Portrayed By: Sofia Danu

Voiced By: Saba Mubarak

Appearances: Moon Knight

Ammit: "There is so little difference in what we want for this world. Why do this dance for the rest of time?"
Khonshu: "You know the answer. I only punish those who have chosen evil."
Ammit: "So do I, only I don't give them the satisfaction of committing it!"

An Egyptian goddess who devours the souls of anyone deemed impure.


  • Adaptational Villainy: While Ammit was indeed a god that devoured impure souls in Egyptian mythology, she only ever did so after they were judged in the afterlife to be deserving of it due to the deeds they committed in life. Here, she's decided to start doing it to the living, whether or not they've even done anything that warrants her brand of justice yet. She does appear in the Moon Knight comics as well, and again, she is not exactly a villain there either, and is in fact an ally of Khonshu rather than his enemy.
  • Affably Evil: Much like her avatar Arthur Harrow, episode 6 reveals her to be this. She is a Reasonable Authority Figure who appoints Arthur as her avatar in gratitude for his service to her, she's an effective leader to her followers, and she's initially reluctant to use violence against Khonshu. Ammit tries a number of times to convince him that her way is right and that she really is doing this for the good of the world.
  • Animalistic Abomination: Ammit, at least in ancient Egyptian art, had a chimeric body with the head of a crocodile, the forelegs of a lion, and the hindquarters of a hippopotamus, and is a powerful goddess who feasts on the souls of those she judges as corrupt.
  • Anthropomorphic Shift: In ancient Egyptian art, Ammit is portrayed as an animalistic being walking on four legs. In the series, she receives more humanoid features and is bipedal instead, with her lion and hippo characteristics being toned down.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: While she's the biggest threat that the heroes of Moon Knight must face down, it is only thanks to the leader of her followers, Harrow, that she is able to see her judgement enacted upon the world. He agrees to act as her avatar in the finale, working together to punish the "unbalanced."
  • Composite Character: Her bipedal stance is based on Sobek, another Egyptian god, who is depicted as a human-like figure with a crocodile head.
  • Contralto of Danger: Saba Mubarak gives Ammit a suitably low, rumbling voice that almost puts Khonshu's own deep voice to shame.
  • Dark Action Girl: Ammit wishes to rip evil up by the roots, and will smite anyone who stands in her way.
  • The Dreaded: She's basically "the World's First Boogeyman", as Steven Grant puts it.
  • Everybody Hates Hades: While Ammit was feared in Ancient Egypt for being a soul-eater and wasn't worshipped because of it, she never really did anything outside of the role the rest of the pantheon had her do, which was devouring impure souls after Anubis had already judged them guilty. Here she's portrayed as a Knight Templar, killing people for crimes they may or may not have committed yet while they're still alive.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Her Contralto of Danger is deep enough to give even Khonshu's Badass Baritone a run for its money.
  • Evil Plan: Kill everyone on the planet whose scales do not balance in order to prevent the evil she sees that they will do in the future. Then continue doing so in accordance with her idea of pre-emptive justice. Freeing Ammit, so she can do this, is what drives Harrow throughout Moon Knight.
  • Fallen Hero: Hero may be a bit of a stretch, given her role in the afterlife, but in the old days, she faithfully performed what was considered an important cosmic function. By the modern era, thousands of years later, she has moved on to a more proactive judgement.
  • Foil: To her nemesis, Khonshu; both see themselves as bringers of justice, both are willing to use ruthless and even extreme methods to accomplish their goals, and both have had Arthur Harrow as an avatar. However, Ammit is Affably Evil compared to Khonshu being a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, and while he only believes in punishing the guilty, she considers this too lenient, and seeks to kill those who may or may not commit crimes. Their relationships with Harrow also contrast; Harrow deeply regrets his service to Khonshu and the moon god considers his ex-avatar to have no conscience, whereas Ammit happily accepts Harrow despite, and even because of his flaws, earning his genuine loyalty and devotion. Finally, while Ammit has a genuinely positive relationship with Harrow, Khonshu's relationship with Marc and Steven is troubled at best, and it's only Jake Lockley that Khonshu gets along with due to their mutual sense of justice.
  • The Ghost: Ammit is mentioned and invoked, but due to having been sealed away her presence is only indirectly felt... at least until Harrow releases her in episode 6.
  • Green and Mean: She has green scales and is ferocious in battle.
  • Green Gators: She is a crocodilian goddess with green scales.
  • Hypocrite: She accepts Arthur as her avatar despite the fact that his own scales lack balance because of how loyal he is to her bloody campaign of killing impure souls before they get the chance to prove themselves impure. Her reasoning is that her last avatar, who had perfectly balanced scales, betrayed her, because someone with balanced scales, i.e. a good person, would take offense to what she was doing. The fact this means that what she is doing is by her own definition wrong is entirely irrelevant.
  • Jerkass Gods: Ammit is a Knight Templar who once served as The Executioner for the Ennead, but came to believe that mortals should be judged pre-emptively — even for actions they have yet to and may not ever commit.
  • Knight Templar: Arthur preaches that had she not been limited to judging souls postmortem, she could have prevented all the man-made horrors throughout history.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Centuries ago, Ammit chose Alexander the Great as her avatar, and it is strongly implied that she is the reason why he became such a renowned ruler and conqueror.
  • Names To Run Away From Very Fast: Ammit translates to "Devourer of the Dead" — Hearts, that is, leading to a deceased person's spirit roaming the dark forever, never to find peace. There's also the fact that her current avatar's last name is Harrow, a word which means to cause distress to someone.
  • Never Smile at a Crocodile: Ammit has the head and tail of a crocodile, and she is malevolent to those who possess and will someday possess defiled souls.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: While admitting that Harrow's unbalanced scales would normally mean judgement and death, Ammit spares him, recognizing his loyalty and the fact that her previous Avatar (whose scales did balance) betrayed her and seeing Harrow's willingness to cross moral lines in her service as an advantage, given the extent of her plans.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Very downplayed, but, while she is indeed prepared to pass judgement on humanity to eliminate all future evil, we do see that this is in fact a test, and it's possible for ordinary people to pass. Further enforced in episode 6, where she notes that Harrow's scales are still imbalanced, which to her would normally ensure his death. Harrow is willing to accept his death, but Ammit deems him her most worthy avatar because he shows Undying Loyalty to her even in the darkest times and understands what she's trying to achieve.
  • Rerouted from Heaven: When she judges souls, they are consigned directly to the Duat, regardless of the religion of the subject or the moral standards of their own gods. Furthermore, they aren't even given a chance for proper judgement even within the Egyptian afterlife. Taweret is appalled by this miscarriage of cosmic justice.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: On top of not being the type to kill humans for bad things they didn't even do yet in Egyptian Mythology, she wasn't really an object of worship either, the Egyptians refrained from doing so due to her grim service. Furthermore, she was never the judge of who is good or evil in the first place — that was Anubis, the reason why the scales of justice are associated with him and not Ammit, and an assembly of judges appointed by Osiris.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: Ammit's ambitions were deemed extreme enough that the Ennead sealed her away, though she still has enough presence left to mark Arthur Harrow as her avatar and to devour the souls of those he judges unworthy. She's sealed into Harrow's body at the end of episode 6, but Marc and Steven refuse to kill him to stop Ammit once and for all. Jake Lockley, on the other hand…
  • Seers: She is able to see all the crimes someone will commit — or possibly might commit, it isn't entirely clear — and uses that information in her judgement.
  • Soul Eating: Ammit devours the souls of those she deems corrupt and unworthy, consigning them directly to the Duat with no hope of proper judgement. In episode 6, she is shown to grow larger and more powerful by doing so.
  • Super Empowering: Ammit has claimed Arthur Harrow as her avatar, branding him with a tattoo that judges the souls of those he performs a ritual to test. In episode 6, she claims him as her avatar in full, granting him powers similar to Moon Knight's.
  • Today, X. Tomorrow, the World!: Shortly after Ammit is liberated from her imprisonment and made Arthur Harrow her new avatar, she intends to judge every soul in Cairo before moving on to the rest of the world.
  • We Can Rule Together: During the final battle in "Gods and Monsters", Ammit offers Khonshu a chance for the both of them to rule the world together, and she does not take his rejection lightly.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: According to Arthur Harrow, Ammit got tired of judging only the souls of the deceased, and decided to judge the living as well — even for actions they have yet to commit, and had she been active, Harrow claims all of history's dictators and tyrants would've pre-emptively felt her wrath.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Harrow silently confirms that Ammit will kill children (or possibly even has) if she believes they will one day commit evil, which horrifies Steven.
  • You Are Better Than You Think You Are: In a rare villainous use of this trope, Ammit assures Harrow that, although his scales are unbalanced, he is worthy to be her Avatar and she gratefully accepts him. She's genuine in her praise, as well, speaking of Harrow's loyalty as she battles Khonshu.
  • Your Soul Is Mine!: She feeds on both evil and pre-evil souls to grow larger and more powerful.

    Taweret 

Taweret

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/taweret_mcu.jpg
"Hi!"

Species: God

Portrayed By: Antonia Salib

Voiced By: Antonia Salib

Appearances: Moon Knight

"Welcome, gentle traveler... travelers, to the realm of the Duat!"

The Egyptian goddess of childbirth and fertility.


  • Aliens of London: Despite being an Egyptian goddess, she speaks with a posh British accent.
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: While Anubis is more famous for the role, Taweret was in fact invoked to purify the dead during their passage in the Duat — her role as Goddess of Mothers extending to their rebirth in the afterlife.
  • Ambiguous Situation: She seems to have taken over Anubis' job (since he's been imprisoned as a statue, like Khonshu, as shown in previous episodes). She relies on cue cards to tell her how to go about it.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Taweret arrives just in time to use her boat in slowing down a sand tsunami from consuming Marc and Steven.
  • Cue Card: She uses a stack of cheat sheets to help her remember her lines when welcoming new souls to the afterlife and the rules they have to follow.
  • Decomposite Character: As it turns out, Taweret's powers and blessings are what create the MCU counterpart to the Scarlet Scarab through Layla El-Faouly. The Scarab itself, originally the source of the powers, is turned into a MacGuffin related to Ammit instead.
  • Don't Fear The Reaper: In her new job as a psychopomp, she's quite friendly, and patiently explains what's going on to Marc and Steven, and (eventually) even tries to help them avert their fate, especially upon witnessing unbalanced souls being condemned before their time by Harrow and Ammit's doing. She calls their actions unjust and "evil".
  • Foil: To Ammit. Both are mix-and-match critters made up of crocodile, hippo, and lion parts, but while Ammit is all about destruction, Taweret is about rebirth. Where Ammit punishes people for sins they've yet to commit, Taweret supports and guides the souls in her care, even being willing to bend the rules when she perceives something to be seriously wrong. Even their demeanours are opposite — Ammit is serious and ferocious, and utterly convinced of her own righteousness, while Taweret is cheerful and excitable, but willing to listen and willing to make compromises to reach a worthy goal. Their differences extend to their avatars — while Harrow attacks a van full of innocent bystanders in the finale, Taweret's newly minted avatar Layla rushes over to protect them and make sure they are unhurt.
  • Foreshadowing: Her appearance was foreshadowed as far back as the first episode, where Steven is seen handling a box of Taweret plushies at work.
  • Furry Reminder: Her ears flap just like a hippo's, and she has a deep breath sound befitting her appearance, in contrast to her high-pitched voice.
  • Genki Girl: She positively squees when Layla reluctantly agrees to become her avatar.
  • Huggy, Huggy Hippos: Taweret greets Marc and Steven with a friendly "hi!", and they respond by screaming like little girls. She is also incredibly welcoming, and is more than happy to explain the nature of the afterlife.
  • Nice Girl: She's very kind and understanding towards Marc and Steven, and encouraging of their journey to come to a greater understanding of each other. After a little bit, she even decides to help them try to get back to the land of the living. She also takes an instant shine to Layla, and cheerfully squees when she agrees to be Taweret's avatar.
  • Oh, Crap!: She has this reaction when she witnesses several unbalanced souls of the upper world being forcibly judged and condemned to the Duat before their time.
  • People Puppets: She can possess dead bodies to speak to the living. She can also control and speak directly through Layla as well, once Layla becomes her avatar.
  • Psychopomp: It's implied she's been promoted to the imprisoned Anubis' job of judging souls and ferrying them to the Field of Reeds, and is still new enough at her job to need cue cards to guide Marc and Steven on their journey to the afterlife.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!: She's initially intent on ferrying Marc and Steven to the Field of Reeds — assuming they pass their judgement — but when she sees the chaos that Ammit's cult is causing, she agrees to help them return to the world of the living, despite knowing Osiris will be furious with her for doing so. Unfortunately, they don't pass their test in time, and Steven is dragged into the Duat by the damned souls of the people Marc killed, while Marc is sent to the Field of Reeds before they can reach Osiris's portal. When a huge wave of sand threatens to devour Marc and Steven before they can reach the Gates of Osiris, Taweret saves them by ramming her boat into the sand.
  • Super Empowering: Despite not having shown any form of combat capabilities, she is still an Egyptian goddess, and, as it turns out, is capable of empowering someone to be her avatar. She just does exactly that for Layla, granting her powers and Egyptian-themed armor to fight Harrow and his disciples with.
  • Vocal Dissonance: She has a high-pitched, feminine voice, despite being a goddess with the features of a hippopotamus, which is one of the most aggressive and dangerous animals on Earth.
  • Well-Trained, but Inexperienced: As an Egyptian goddess, she is well versed in the history of her own pantheon, but she is new at being a psychopomp, and even admits when she goes to take Marc and Steven's hearts that she wasn't sure she'd be able to do it without blowing their chests open.
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    Bast 
See under Wakanda Gods above.

    The Ennead Council 

The Council (Hathor, Horus, Isis, Osiris, Tefnut)

Species: God

Citizenship: Egyptian

Portrayed By: Khalid Abdalla (Selim/Osiris), Diana Bermudez (Yatzil/Hathor), Declan Hannigan (Horus), Hayley Konadu (Tefnut), Nagisa Morimoto (Isis)

Appearances: Moon Knight

An assembly of the Egyptian gods who, through their avatars, pass judgment on other members of their pantheon and their respective avatars.


  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: The Egyptian gods never had such significant influence on Moon Knight's adventures in the comics as they do on the show, with their avatars all being created specifically for the show.
  • Divine Intervention: Osiris decides to intervene after Marc rejects the Field of Reeds and returns to the Duat to save Steven, and they both freeze with their hands intertwined. He opens his gates and allows the sun to heat up both men and their now single mutual heart so they can escape the underworld and return to their body.
  • God Is Neutral: They prefer inaction, in part because they feel humanity turned their backs on them first. The end credits and the opening to episode 4 show that they've been very strict in enforcing this, with numerous other Egyptian gods — including the likes of Khepri, Wadjet, and Anubis — having been imprisoned in ushabti statuettes like Khonshu was.
  • The Gods Must Be Lazy: The Ennead are content to reside in the spirit world and act only as Powers That Be instead of directly interacting with mortals like the Norse gods do, and banished Khonshu because the missions he assigns his avatar, Moon Knight, threatened to reveal their existence. Khonshu considers them lazy, and calls them out on it during Harrow's trial. Later, Osiris's avatar Selim meets privately with Harrow, showing him the imprisoned Khonshu, possibly implying Osiris (or simply just his avatar) is more involved in worldly affairs than he first appeared. The same is likely true for Hathor, who according to her avatar Yatzil shares some possibly romantic memories with Khonshu, and advises Marc to look for Senfu's sarcophagus, as it contains hints to the location of Ammit's tomb. The final episode has Osiris finally decide to avert this by helping Marc and Steven escape the Duat.
  • Horrible Judge of Character: The council trusts Arthur Harrow's word over that of Khonshu. This ends up with all their avatars getting slaughtered when Harrow becomes Ammit's avatar. Whoops.
  • Pet the Dog: Osiris opens his gates to allow Marc and Steven to return to the living world to stop Arthur and Ammit when Marc comes back for Steven and agrees to condemn himself to the Duat. Taweret even calls him a "softie".
  • Properly Paranoid: Yatzil, Hathor's avatar, remains behind after the meeting of the Ennead to speak with Marc and quietly tell him another way he can find Ammit's tomb, saying that she isn't sure who to trust. Sure enough, we learn that Osiris's avatar (and by extension possibly Osiris himself) might be in league with Harrow. This doesn't seem to be the case with any of them, as Harrow goes on to kill the avatars, which likely causes Osiris to allow Marc and Steven a chance to leave the afterlife.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: The Ennead was a collection of nine gods note , not five (although Hathor does mention that the five attending the meeting are just the ones that happen to be present at that time). The meeting itself includes every god that was traditionally part of the Ennead save for Hathor, who in the actual myths was not a member of the Ennead.note  The fact that a large number of the Egyptian gods have been sealed away in statue form suggests that their membership has simply changed over the millennia.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Harrow plays all of the Ennead, especially Osiris's avatar Selim, like a fiddle, convincing them that Khonshu is not to be trusted and Marc is too unstable to know what he is doing while working to free Ammit behind their backs.
  • We Used to Be Friends: Hathor apparently feels this way towards Khonshu. She remembers him fondly, and is presented as the most sympathetic god at the trial. This soft spot extends to her avatar Yatzil, who goes out of her way to help Marc.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: After they've imprisoned Khonshu, the newly freed Ammit has no more use for them; she has all the avatars gunned down by her disciples before they can act against her.

The Loa

    In General 

The Loa

Species: Loa

Citizenship: Haitian

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

Powerful entities that reside in the Dark Dimension. They are the main religious figures of the Haitian Vodou and Louisiana Voodoo.


    Papa Legba 

Papa Legba

Species: Loa

Citizenship: Haitian

Portrayed By: Lane Miller, Maceo Smedley III, Devyn A. Tyler

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

A Loa residing in the Darkforce Dimension.


  • Divine Date: It is apparently married to Evita's aunt.
  • A Form You Are Comfortable With: It takes the form of young Tyrone for Tandy. For Mayhem, it took the form of Fuchs. Later, it also takes the form of Tandy's ballet instructor.
  • I Have Many Names: It introduces itself as That Which Stands at the Crossroads to Tandy. Among them, it names "Saint Peter", "Atibon", and "Papa Legba" as examples. Tandy opts to call it "Papa Mystery".
  • Public Domain Character: It is based on Papa Legba, a loa in Haitian Voudou culture.
  • Sweet Tooth: He loves candy and sometimes demands it as payment.

    Baron Samedi 

Baron Samedi

Species: Loa

Citizenship: Haitian

Portrayed By: Justin Sams

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

A Loa of the dead residing in the Darkforce Dimension.


  • Chess with Death: Tandy concluded this was what she had to do to free Tyrone. It was a very logical conclusion based on Baron Samedi running a metaphorical arcade and having a representation of him in the prize display, it was wrong though, she had to convince a shell-shocked Tyrone to leave the realm. We never got to see if she succeeded or not because of the next trope.
  • Divine Date: Evita offers herself to marry him so he will free Tyrone.
  • Jerkass Gods: He is much less friendly than Papa Legba.
  • Psychopomp: He is loa of the dead and almost took Tyrone after he succumbed to despair-induced Power Incontinence.
  • Public Domain Character: He is based on the loa of the same name from Haitian Voudou culture.

Greek Gods

    Zeus 

Zeus

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/thorloveandthunderzeus.png
"Let's see who you are. I take off your disguise. And... flick!"

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek

Portrayed By: Russell Crowe

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

"It used to be that being a god, it meant something. People would whisper your name, before sharing their deepest hopes and dreams. They begged you for mercy, without ever knowing if you were actually listening. Now, when they look to the sky, they don't ask us for lightning, they don't ask us for rain, they just want to see one of their so-called superheroes. When did we become the joke? No. No more. They will fear us again, when Thor Odinson falls from the sky."

The Greek God of the Skies and the King of Olympus.


  • Adaptational Badass: In status, not actual fighting prowess or moral character. Zeus here is the head of Omnipotence City, the nexus place for every deity in the universe, making him not just the Top God of his pantheon, but every single one that exists.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Unlike other interpretations, Zeus is depicted here as a perverted, cowardly, old Jerkass God who likes to party with beautiful maidens and has no interest in joining the battle against Gorr or granting Thor and his allies an army, instead wanting to concentrate on orgies and parties. Though if anything, these traits actually make him more accurate to the original myths than most depictions.
  • Adaptational Wimp: Zeus in the comics is an enormous and utterly ripped Skyfather-level god who is at the upper echelons of power in the Marvel Universe, and famously gave the Hulk one of the most spectacular and thorough beatings he has ever received. Here, he is a pudgy old man of average stature who is terrified of Gorr and deliberately hiding from him, though he won't publicly admit it, and while the Thunderbolt is an exceptionally powerful weapon that he is quite skilled at using, he doesn't appear to have much else going for him and is overall vastly weaker than his comics counterpart, as Thor was able to seriously injure and nearly kill him by hurling his Thunderbolt through his chest, though Zeus ultimately survived.
  • Adipose Rex: A chubby man whose physique is an early indicator that he's more interested in self-indulgence than heroism.
  • Ambiguously Bi: He's surrounded by attractive handmaidens (called "Zeusettes" in the cast list), but also listed in the cast are two "Zeus Pretty Boys" (who appear on the podium next to him alongside his handmaidens). He also gets up close with Thor while the latter is naked and attempts to invite him to a godly orgy. This is in keeping with Classical Mythology where Zeus practiced pederasty with Ganymede.
  • Ambiguously Related: How he relates to Thena, who was shown to be the source of the Athena mythological figure when Athena is Zeus's daughter, remains unknown.
  • Blow You Away: Thor: Love and Thunder shows that Zeus can create a gust of wind powerful enough to blow clothes away.
  • Broken Pedestal: Thor is shown to really admire Zeus when going to Omnipotence City. However, he later admits you should never meet your hero as Zeus turns out to be a total Jerkass who only truly cares for himself and is too afraid of Gorr to help Thor and his allies against the God Butcher.
  • Casting Gag: This is not the first time Russell Crowe plays the father of an extraterrestrial who possesses superhuman strength.
  • Dirty Coward: Is too afraid to do anything against Gorr and instead decides to continue his business in Omnipotence City with his fellow gods.
  • Dirty Old Man: He is portrayed as an old man who loves surrounding himself with young pretty maidens and planning orgies, just as in the myths.
  • Does Not Know His Own Strength: His "flick" was only meant to dislodge Thor's hood. Unfortunately, a lot more than just the hood was dislodged.
    Thor: You flicked too hard, dammit!
  • Dramatically Missing the Point: In The Stinger of Love and Thunder, he ruminates how faith in gods have been declining throughout the years. Rather than considering that the Gods have been taking their worship for granted and neglecting the well-being of their worshippers (which is what created the God-Butcher in the first place), he instead blames superheroes for upstaging them before sending Hercules to enact petty vengeance on Thor.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: His motivation to send Hercules after Thor in The Stinger of Love and Thunder, is that he feels that humans don't respect the gods anymore. Of course, considering the cowardly asshole he (and many other gods) have proven to be, he's not really worthy of their respect.
  • Everybody Loves Zeus: He is the leader of all the gods and beloved by everyone, including Thor who thinks he would rally an army of gods to defeat Gorr the God Butcher. But it's soon subverted when he's revealed to be a lazy, cowardly hedonist who rather let the universe be terrorized by Gorr while he and the other gods hide in the safety of their city. After nearly being killed by Thor, Zeus realizes that his reputation has fallen wayside in favor of superheroes, and he vows to restore it by becoming of a god of fear and vengeance.
  • Fake Muscles: His golden cuirass has sculpted abdominal muscles covering his gut.
  • Fantastic Racism: Mortals are just tools for him, but he clearly has it out for superheroes like the Avengers, etc, all for stealing his worshippers.
  • Fat Bastard: An overweight Jerkass God who's a lazy coward.
  • Glass Cannon: Make no mistake, Zeus’s Thunderbolt is extremely powerful, and he clearly knows how to use it, to the point of being a showoff with it... but while he can use it to almost One-Hit Kill Korg, this hits Thor’s Berserk Button and results in Zeus being shot through with his own weapon mere seconds later after he throws it at Thor. However, he did manage to survive Thor's counterattack, though it clearly left him injured and either unable or unwilling to go after Thor himself, instead deciding to dispatch Hercules for the task.
  • God of Thunder: Thor calls him the God of Lightning while Thor himself is the God of Thunder and looks up to him rather than seeing him as a rival.
  • The Gods Must Be Lazy: He has no interest in joining the battle against Gorr or granting Thor and his allies an army, instead wants to concentrate on orgies and partying. The only matter that seems to concern him is his worshippers being stolen.
  • Gold and White Are Divine: Zeus is the King of Olympus who wears gold and white.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: The king of the Greek pantheon and ruler of the gods of Omnipotence City, who as noted above wears gold armor.
  • Hidden Depths: Though not necessarily positive ones. At first he seems like a cowardly hedonist who is only concerned with divine indulgence and keeping the party train going. The Stinger however shows that he's actually quite despondent over how the gods are no longer revered and worshipped by humanity in favor of superheroes in the modern age, sounding rather morose when he explains how he views things. His response to this is definitely not in anyone's favor but his own though...
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Tries zapping Thor with his Thunderbolt, resulting in Thor doing a Catch and Return straight through Zeus’s chest.
  • How the Mighty Have Fallen: Thor says this word-for-word when he realizes that Zeus is not the all-powerful and noble deity that he looked up to.
  • Insistent Terminology: He may be the God of Lightning, but his weapon is not a "lightning bolt", it's the Thunderbolt!
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: He takes no interest in helping Thor. For a brief moment he admits to Thor in a face-to-face unheard by the other gods that he's aware of the danger Gorr is for the gods and is afraid of him. However, directly after that, he loudly refuses to even help them out by lending his lighting bolt, leading to Thor seemingly killing him. He demonstrates this again in The Stinger. You'd think being publicly denounced as a coward by the Norse God of Thunder (basically his Norse counterpart) and defeated by him using his own weapon would be a slice of Humble Pie for him and possibly lead to a Heel Realization that he's been too wrapped up in himself to remember the mortals down below. NOPE. Instead, he sends his son Hercules to kill Thor for his defiance, needlessly cause untold destruction to remind the mortals (who haven't done anything to him) to fear the gods again and not revere superheroes anymore. Even though it's established mortals stopped revering the gods (Zeus himself in particular) because none of them gave a shit about them.
  • Jerkass Gods: Just like his mythological portrayal, the Zeus of the MCU is an asshole who prefers to participate in orgies instead of protecting the innocent.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • Thor comes to him looking for help to fight Gorr, and warns him Gorr is looking to make contact with Eternity and will likely wish for all the gods to die. However, Zeus points out that the Necrosword slowly corrupts and kills its wielder, Gorr can't get to Eternity without the key to the gates to its realm, and in the meantime the only gods he's killed are lesser deities. From Zeus' perspective, the best way to deal with Gorr is to just stay out of his way until he dies.
    • He's even shown to be right, in a manner of speaking- Gorr was after Thor's axe Stormbreaker the whole time because it would give him access to the Bifrost, which would let him be able to get to Eternity. If Thor had stayed in Omnipotence City, Gorr would have never have been able to complete his Evil Plan and may indeed have died- although, to be fair to Thor, this does overlook all of the children that Gorr has kidnapped, and neither Zeus nor Thor knew that Stormbreaker was in fact the key to Gorr winning in the first place.
    • He refuses to lend Thor his Thunderbolt to help him fight Gorr, which is portrayed as part of his selfishness and cowardice. However, consider that Thor and his allies had infiltrated Omnipotence City, interrupted Zeus' speech, and Thor publicly called Zeus a coward; this was all before Thor asked for the Thunderbolt. If someone else had treated Thor this way and then asked to borrow Stormbreaker, with no guarantee they'll survive to return it, he'd probably be indignant and refuse too.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Not lifting a finger to save innocent children from being murdered when you have a literal army of Gods. If Gorr were half as weak as he claimed (only killing "lesser" gods), he shouldn't have shied away from dealing with him personally, let alone sending someone to help Thor.
    • He also pokes at Odin’s death, Asgard’s fall and it’s people being near extinction as well as their new way of life.
  • Lack of Empathy: Zeus is clearly more interested in self-indulgence than he is other people's issues.
    • He dismisses the gods Gorr has already killed as merely "lesser" gods who probably wouldn't have mattered anyway, despite the fact that Omnipotence City is made up of countless deities most people probably never heard of.
    • He's extremely callous towards Thor when they meet, even mocking Thor to his face about the terrible situation he's in and basically chalks it up to as "Asgardian problems" that they themselves should solve on their own. One has to wonder how he'd take it if the roles were reversed.
    • The Stinger shows Zeus wishing to kill Thor for his "insolence" and taking absolutely no responsibility for him giving Thor every reason to do what he did. When he sends his son Hercules to kill Thor, he mentions he wants the mortals to remember to fear the gods, with seemingly no care for how it's achieved.
  • Large Ham: He has all the bombast one would expect from a Top God, and the accent and lisp only enhances it.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: After seemingly striking down Korg with his Thunderbolt, Zeus himself is seemingly killed with the very same weapon by Thor, who subsequently steals the Thunderbolt as well. Like Korg, Zeus managed to survive.
  • Light Is Not Good: Asides from being a god in white and gold, he is mostly a jerkass to other people and will have no problem with almost murdering Korg.
  • Mirror Character:
    • To Odin. Both of them are gods who rule over a powerful area that's tucked away from most of the outer universe, and have children they are very proud of. They both also display jerkass tendencies towards people who upset or annoy them, but while Odin does because of his determination to do well by his people, Zeus does it for his own pleasure.
    • He's also one to the Grandmaster. Both of them are very old beings who rule over an isolated area in space that is difficult to get to, and prefer to engage in hedonistic behavior at the expense of lesser beings rather than do anything to help the world around them.
  • Murder by Inaction: What his refusal to lift a finger to save the kidnapped children of Asgard and Gods outside Omnipotence City basically amounts to.
  • Narcissist: Zeus is an egotistical blowhard who revels in the adoration of others and hates the fact that he and other gods are no longer feared and worshipped as they once were.
  • Never My Fault: Instead of looking at himself and realizing his own shitty attitude is why mortals don't revere the gods anymore, Zeus instead blames Thor and superheroes in general for his fall from grace, sending his son Hercules to kill the Odinson in an act of petty revenge.
  • Not Quite Dead: He is seemingly killed by Thor in their battle at Omnipotence City but is revealed to be alive in The Stinger.
  • The Nudifier: Zeus's flicking abilities have the power to blast off Thor's clothing, much to his frustration. He then threatens to do the same thing to Jane Foster and Valkyrie, and they barely avoid this fate by removing their disguises.
  • Pet the Dog: While he refuses to help Thor fight Gorr and rescue the Asgardian children, he invites Thor (as well as Jane, Valkyrie, and Korg) to stay in Omnipotence City, essentially offering them refuge from the God-butcher. And he admits he "flicked too hard" and gives Thor a toga for modesty's sake. Though this winds up downplayed when Zeus makes it clear that none of them are allowed to leave for risk of Gorr making his way there.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Thor has apparently been a fan of Zeus for years when there had been no previous mention of Asgardians being aware of other gods and Eternals specified that Greek myths were exaggerations of the Eternals' adventures.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: Thor describes Zeus as being among the oldest and wisest of gods. This isn't even true in his own mythology, where's he's actually the youngest of his siblings and Athena — the goddess of wisdom — to name one is definitely wiser than Zeus.
  • Shadow Archetype: Zeus is exactly as arrogant, selfish and hedonistic as Thor was in his first film. Thor overindulged in his love of battle, while Zeus prioritizes his orgies and partying rather than doing anything about Gorr. Thor's disgust with how vile Zeus really is displays how much growth Thor's gone through since the old days.
  • Shock and Awe: Zeus has power over lightning, much like Thor (he even tries to demean Thor saying thunder is only the noise that comes after lightning), mostly manifested through Thunderbolt.
  • Swiss-Army Weapon: His Thunderbolt is even more versatile than Mjölnir and Stormbreaker. Zeus can hurl it like a javelin, command it to fly at super-high speeds just by willing it, can wield it as a melee weapon, can segment it to dual-wield as two smaller weapons, and it can be used to travel across the cosmos. And of course, it can do all of this while generating lightning in various ways.
  • Top God: He seems to be the leader of all the gods in the universe rather than just the Greek pantheon.
  • Torso with a View: He gets speared through at least his heart and his spine. It's treated like he sprained his ankle.
  • Truer to the Text: He is a jerk of a god and a womanizer, which makes him close to the myth asides from some minor things.
  • Unexplained Recovery: Thor throws his Thunderbolt straight through his chest, and him falling over implies he died. In The Stinger, he's revealed to somehow have survived and in good enough health to sic Hercules on Thor and co.
  • Wins by Doing Absolutely Nothing: His plan for dealing with Gorr is to stay in Omnipotence City, the safest place he knows and where he already lives, until the Necrosword consumes him, confident that he won't be among the gods he kills before that happens and will be unable to reach Eternity to wipe them all out. Without Thor's interference it would likely have succeeded, though it's obviously not a very admirable plan.

    Son of Zeus (Unmarked Spoilers for Thor: Love and Thunder

Hercules

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hercules_tlat.png
"Yes, father.

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek

Portrayed By: Brett Goldstein

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder (In The Stinger)

The son of Zeus.


  • Adaptational Villainy: A hero in the myths (though Values Dissonance was in play) and in the comics, here he's essentially a hitman for his highly corrupt father and the equally highly corrupt Omnipotence City, although it would hardly be the first time Hercules was tricked into fighting Thor over false pretenses.
  • Ancient Grome: Once again, he's referred to by his more famous Roman name rather than his proper Greek "Herakles." Though, in the comics, it's explained that he chose to change his name out of spite toward Hera.
  • The Cameo: Appears in the Stinger of Thor: Love and Thunder, tasked by Zeus to take down Thor.
  • Carpet of Virility: Hercules is a muscular man with dark chest hair.
  • Mr. Fanservice: As expected of the Greek god of physical manliness, he is quite attractive in a hunkish way.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: Shown wearing nothing on his upper body apart from some pieces of armor and a harness.

    Ares 

Ares

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek, Sakaaran

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Ragnarok (sculpture)

A former gladiator who gained the title of Champion.


  • The Cameo: An sculpture of his head appears, decorating the facade of the Grandmaster's palace.

    Dionysus 

Dionysus

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek

Portrayed By: Simon Russell Beale

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

The Greek god of wine and debauchery.


  • Adaptational Villainy: Averted, actually. Unlike the other greek god entries, the fact that he is chilling out in Omnipotence City makes perfect sense. Parties and orgies are part of his domain as a god.
  • The Cameo: Makes a minor appearance in Thor: Love and Thunder in Omnipotence City as a member of the Council of Godheads.

    Minerva 

Minerva

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek

Portrayed By: Carmen Foon

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

The Greek goddess of wisdom and strategy.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In the original Greek myths, Athena, while not above the occasional spiteful curse, was one of the more level-headed of her pantheon. Here, she's content to the hedonistic luxury of Omnipotence City while Gorr rages across the cosmos.
  • Ambiguous Situation: What her relation to Thena, who was described as the real female warrior who storytellers exaggerated into the goddess of war, is unclear, though she is named after her Roman name Minerva.
  • Ancient Grome: A Greek goddess with a Roman name, in order to avoid confusion with Thena from Eternals, who was credited with at least some of the myths related to Athena.
  • The Cameo: Makes a minor appearance in Thor: Love and Thunder in Omnipotence City as a member of the Council of Godheads.
  • Girlish Pigtails: Sports a set of these.
  • One-Steve Limit: Unlike her father and brothers, Minerva is referred to by her Roman name rather than her Greek name, since it might cause confusion with Thena from the Eternals.

    Artemis 

Artemis

Species: Olympian

Citizenship: Greek

Portrayed By: Priscilla Doueihy

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

The Greek goddess of the hunt.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In the original Greek myths, Artemis, while not above the occasional spiteful curse, was one of the more level-headed of her pantheon. Here, she's content to the hedonistic luxury of Omnipotence City while Gorr rages across the cosmos.
  • The Cameo: Makes a minor appearance in Thor: Love and Thunder in Omnipotence City as a member of the Council of Godheads.

The Cosmic Entities

    In General 

The Cosmic Entities (Infinity, Eternity, Entropy, and Death)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cosmic_entities_mcu.png

Species: Cosmic Entity

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy note  | Thor: Love and Thunder

Primordial beings that existed since the dawn of the universe, and according to legend, the ones that forged the Infinity Stones. They are anthropomorphic entities that represent universal concepts.


  • Above the Gods: There are many Physical Gods in the MCU who while powerful, are tangible and can be killed. These guys are basically the gods of the gods, so powerful, mysterious, and completely beyond mortal comprehension.
  • Adaptational Badass: In comics, even the likes of Death and Eternity were nothing before the might of the combined Infinity Gems. In the show, they're implicitly above the Stones by possibly creating them.
  • Adapted Out: There were five cosmic entities from the very beginning of creation in the comics: Eternity, Infinity, Death, Oblivion, and Galactus. However, due to Marvel Studios not having the rights to Galactus at the time Guardians of the Galaxy was released, he wasn't included amongst their numbers. For some reason, Oblivion is replaced with Entropy.
  • Anthropomorphic Personification: If any of them were to ever appear, they would be this by default. Eternity appears in the climax of Love and Thunder, but it's not particularly anthropomorphic, being a humanoid outline through which you can observe the cosmos, as in the comics.
  • The Anti-God: Entropy and Death are described as the destruction to Eternity and Infinity's creation.
  • The Cameo: Beyond the mural depicting them in Guardians of the Galaxy, Death gets mentioned once by the Other at the end of The Avengers (when he claims that challenging Earthlings is "to court Death") and Eternity gets mentioned once by Star-Lord during Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 when the latter is awakening his Celestial powers.
  • Cosmic Entity: Existed since the Big Bang? Check. Embody essential aspects of existence? Check. Powerful enough to create items that are themselves nigh-omnipotent like the Infinity Stones? Check.
  • Greater-Scope Paragon: While not so much heroic as they are neutral universal forces, their possible creation of the Infinity Stones is what essentially drives forward the MCU's Myth Arc from Phase 1 to Phase 3.
  • The Omnipotent: They are not so much living beings as representations of the various concepts of the universe, and they are all-knowing and all-powerful enough to possibly forge an artifact of power that turns its owner into a Reality Warper. They are likely far, far above beings like the Celestials, Ego, the Spirit of Vengeance, Odin or Surtur, and also possibly Dormammu. It's also unknown what their relationship with the TVA and He Who Remains is and which party is more powerful, considering the Entities are literally fundamental parts of existence, but the TVA routinely prunes entire universes, and He Who Remains literally lives outside of time.
  • Reality Warper: If they did in fact make the Infinity Stones, which provide their users with reality warper powers, they themselves are likely this as well.
  • Story-Breaker Power: If they are even half as powerful as the legend depicting their creation of the stones implies, they are far and away too powerful for any other character in the entire MCU to compare to (save perhaps Dormammu while the latter is in his own dimension).

    Eternity 

Eternity

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/eternity_tlat.png

Species: Cosmic Entity

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy note  | Thor: Love and Thunder

A being that is more powerful than any god that lives at the very center of the universe, being its Anthropomorphic Personification.


  • Above the Gods: Gods in the universe revere him in a way similar to how mortals revere them. Even his wish-granting can be compared to a god answering a prayer.
  • Adaptational Personality Change: Whenever Eternity appears in the comics, he is usually standing over them with a deep scowl on his face, finding the petty concerns of lower-beings beneath him. His MCU counterpart is seen sitting cross-legged in a serene dimension in a manner evocative of the Buddha, willing to grant the wish of the one person dedicated enough to reach him.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: In the comics, Eternity is a being so far beyond the minor trifles of mortals and, while not hostile, really doesn't like it when someone beseeches him. Here, it seems to be common knowledge among the gods that he is perfectly willing to grant the wish of whoever finds him.
  • Adaptation Distillation: By the end of Thor: Love and Thunder, Eternity is depicted as an omnipotent entity meditating at the center of the universe, silently waiting for someone to reach him so he can grant their wish, like a god answering a prayer. As per the comics, Eternity is the embodiment of the universe, an aloof and haughty being who considers gods and mortals far beneath his concern and is usually rather indignant when invoked by them, let alone being asked for favors.
  • Celestial Body: Like is comic book counterpart, his body looks more like a silhouette cut in the background, his body displaying a picture of stars and galaxies.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Eternity is the MacGuffin of Love and Thunder, as Gorr's discovery that he can use Stormbreaker to open the way through the Altar of Eternity to reach Eternity and be granted his wish of every god in the universe dying. Eternity only appears for a few minutes and never has any speaking lines, but has a really big impact on the story before and after its appearance.
  • Super Empowering: At the end of Thor: Love and Thunder, Eternity grants Gorr's dying wish and resurrects his daughter, which also grants her some super powers. We don't know their full extent, but they include eye lasers.
  • The Voiceless: Eternity has no spoken lines that we hear during its time on screen.

The Celestials

    In General 

The Celestials

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/b30868bd_d7ca_4205_be33_61323b856c4e.jpeg

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Eternals | Thor: Love and Thunder

An ancient race of powerful entities capable of manipulating matter and energy itself.


  • Ambiguous Robots: With the exception of Ego, most of the Celestials seen in the MCU resemble large, metallic automatons.
  • Ambiguously Related: Whether Ego is a Celestial is unclear. He claims to be one, but also indicates he's the only one and his body is considerably different in form than the other Celestials. Though he may only refer to himself as a "celestial" in a generic term, rather than actually a member of the species.
  • Blue-and-Orange Morality: Celestials are mostly concerned with maintaining the consistent flow of creation and energy in the universe, preventing it from stagnating and dying, and so don't assign any value to individual worlds, or the life on it; in their eyes, a Celestial being born is more important than the deaths of billions, because that Celestial can now help create trillions more lives across the universe.
  • Cosmic Keystone: Celestials are the greatest energy wielders in the universe and function to recycle energy so that there's a regular flow of new worlds and life. Without them, the universe would be dying.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Celestials seen in Eternals are impossibly huge, unfathomable beings that look almost robot or steampunk-like in nature, but have a god-like presence. They're also insanely powerful, whose very births involve the destruction of an entire planet, and if Arishem is to be believed, they could effortlessly destroy the Earth if so inclined.
  • Energy Absorption: How they develop; Celestial seeds are planted in the cores of various planets, and are left to gestate over the ages, drawing energy from the life that develops from the planet, until they emerge, destroying the planet in the process.
  • Our Giants Are Bigger: The Celestials we see (aside from Ego) are impossibly huge, enough that a space colony can be built inside of one's head. When we see Celestials in their entirety in Eternals, they are shown to be almost as large as entire planets, with Arishem being so big entire asteroid belts form around him.
  • Genius Loci: At least one Celestial has been confirmed to have a planet-like form capable of sustaining it's own life, with it only being able to communicate using a human avatar.
  • Non-Malicious Monster: They don't have any ill will towards lesser life-forms. They don't choose to destroy entire planets populated by sentient beings, it's just the way that they're born.
  • Not so Above It All: While the Celestials might be the most powerful beings in the universe (baring cosmic entities like Eternity of course), in Thor: Love and Thunder, some Celestials are seen at Omnipotence City participating in Zeus's annual meetings. Keep in mind that these meetings are basically parties where the gods compare sacrifices and partake in orgies.
  • Physical God: These things are far and removed the most powerful beings in the MCU, to the point where they actually created and maintain it. In Eternals, Arishem the Judge even claims that were it not for the Celestials' existence, the universe itself would eventually die out.
    • A couple of them cameo amongst the gods in Omnipotence City in Thor: Love and Thunder implying they're considered gods in-universe.
  • The Right of a Superior Species: Celestials see themselves as being so above other forms of life in the universe, and in some ways are, that they don't think twice about destroying an entire planets and their populations so as to birth new ones. That being said, their motive is not any kind of narcissism, but a rather understandable one in creating new stars and solar systems and galaxies so that the universe itself continues to exist.
  • Sufficiently Advanced Alien: They are powerful, ancient aliens barely distinguishable from gods. Considering some are seen in Omnipotence City in Thor: Love and Thunder, the distinction lacks any difference.
  • Time Abyss: The Celestials are unfathomably old, even predating the Asgardians and Dark Elves.

    Knowhere 

Knowhere

See the Knowhere page.

    Eson the Searcher 

Eson the Searcher

Species: Celestial

Appearances: Guardians of the Galaxy

A Celestial who wielded the Power Stone and used it to destroy a planet a long time ago.


  • The Cameo: Only appears briefly in Guardians of the Galaxy in a recording shown by the Collector to the titular heroes.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: Long ago, he made an unknown planet blow up by hitting the ground with his staff powered by the Power Stone.
  • Karma Houdini: Even though he wiped out the entire civilization of a planet, as far as we know he has never received any punishment for his crimes.
  • Magic Staff: He carries a staff just as tall as him that houses the Power Stone, giving it incredibly destructive powers.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Thanks to the power of an Infinity Stone, he can single-handedly cause the destruction of entire planets.
  • Planet Destroyer: For some unknown reason, he once used the Power Stone to destroy a planet, as shown during the Collector's presentation of the Infinity Stones.
  • The Voiceless: Doesn't say a single word during his short appearance.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: It's unknown what has become of him in the present day.
  • World-Wrecking Wave: During his monologue about the origin of the six Infinity Stones, the Collector shows images of Eson using the Power Stone to lay waste to a planet, with the Stone's energy destroying all life around him before spreading throughout the world.

    Ego 
See Ego

    Arishem the Judge 

Arishem the Judge

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cc62c198_064b_4adf_a8a4_caaa4283a9ba.jpeg
"Your memories will show if they are worthy to live, and I will return for judgement."

Species: Celestial

Voiced By: David Kaye (English), Raúl Solo (Latin American Spanish)

Appearances: Eternals

The leader of the Celestials, responsible for the presence of both the Eternals and Deviants on Earth.


  • Advertised Extra: Although Arishem is featured heavily in the advertising for the movie, his actual screen time is fairly minimal, as he's mostly just used for an exposition dump and a Sequel Hook. That said, his overall importance to the narrative cannot be overstated; every major conflict in the movie ultimately traces back to Arishem.
  • Anti-Villain: Unlike Ego who was driven by megalomania and arrogance, Arishem is more a force of nature concerned with maintaining universal balance.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Arishem is unambiguously depicted as the direct source of all the conflict in Eternals, but is too uninvolved to fully embrace the Big Bad role. As such, while stopping the Celestial he seeded within Earth is the Eternals' primary goal, they face additional threats in Ikaris and Kro — the former acts as Arishem's Heavy due to the god being unaware of his creations' betrayal, while the latter is the only antagonistic force not working for the Celestials and seeks to avenge the Deviants Arishem has had killed by the Eternals over the years.
  • Didn't Think This Through: Surprisingly for a god-like entity, sending extremely dangerous and powerful apex predators like the Deviants to planets to cull the native predators so sentient life could emerge had some very limited foresight. The Deviants began eating the sentient species as well, which forced Arishem to create the Eternals to combat them.
  • Drone of Dread: In Eternals, every time Arishem makes an appearance, there's a low "bwuuuuh" as his visage comes into view, adding to the trepidation characters have of him.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: While not necessarily evil, Arishem's plans bode ill for the Earth, and David Kaye brings an impressive Badass Baritone to convey the full force of Arishem's presence.
  • Graceful Loser: When he shows up, he is upset by how the Emergence was prevented, but acknowledges that the Eternals may have been correct in deciding Humans Are Special, and simply warns Earth that he will decide if the loss of Tiamut was worth it.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: More prominent than most examples, with a direct impact on every conflict in the film: the monstrous Deviants are prototype defenders for seeded planets; said planets, which include Earth among their number, are set to be destroyed as the newly-born Celestials awaken; Kro wants revenge for the Deviants he's left to die on these worlds; and the Eternals face an ideological split over whether or not they should obey their creator, with Ikaris becoming actively antagonistic in his support of the Celestial. Ultimately, however, Arishem isn't even in the climax, with Ikaris being the one to enforce his will.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: While he doesn't express any satisfaction in it, Arishem fully believes that creating new Celestials is worth the loss of entire worlds.
  • Large and in Charge: The master of the Eternals and apparent leader of the Celestials is a being who utterly dwarfs Earth.
  • ­Leitmotif: Each time he appears, "Audience with Arishem" plays, with the oppressive orchestra highlighting the gravitas of his implication in the overall story.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Ikaris's murder of Ajak was motivated by loyalty to Arishem, although the Celestial remains unaware she intended to betray him.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Due to not being on Earth, he entrusts the Eternals with overseeing Tiamut's emergence. He isn't even aware of their betrayal until after they slay the Communicator, with Ikaris being the one to oppose them in the climax. Averted in the very end, when he personally comes to Earth to collect the remaining Eternals.
  • Out of Focus: Despite being heavily built up throughout the film, he doesn’t participate at all in the climax, with Ikaris having to act on his behalf. He makes up for it in a big way in the film's closing minutes.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: He spares the Earth, despite it more or less being the reason Tiamut was killed, since he ultimately would get nothing out of it. Destroying the planet won't bring Tiamut to life and if Sersi is correct that Humans Are Special then the planet might be more useful alive than in pieces, so the only reason he would have is petty revenge, which is evidently something he's far above. Granted, he has the caveat that he'll only spare humanity if it is indeed worth all the trouble.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: While he's naturally displeased that the Eternals killed a Celestial, he states that he will spare humanity if their memories tell him they're truly worthy of life. That said, he never mentions what he'll do to the Eternals themselves.
  • Time Abyss: Even amongst the Celestials he's extremely old.
  • Top God: Arishem is the Prime Celestial, the godlike beings's leader and implicitly the first of them.
  • Villain Has a Point: Both Kingo and Ikaris believe Arishem's harvesting of worlds serves the greater cause of keeping the universe running. It is because of this that the former refuses to fight while the latter turns against the other Eternals.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: The destruction of seeded planets, while horrific, gives birth to new Celestials, who are responsible for keeping the universe running. It is because of this that Ikaris and Kingo refuse to turn against his plan.
  • You Don't Look Like You: In the comics, Arishem looks like an armoured muscular dude...with a featureless soup can for his head. Understandably changed so he's got six eyes and a fancy helmet-like head that makes him look closer to Eson than anything else.

    Tiamut the Communicator 

Tiamut the Communicator

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tiamut.jpeg

Species: Celestial

Appearances: Eternals

The Celestial seeded within Earth by Arishem. As a Celestial's birth (an event known as "The Emergence") inevitably involves the seeded planet's destruction, stopping Tiamut's emergence becomes the main source of the conflict in Eternals.


  • Adaptational Name Change: In the comics, Tiamut was known as "The Dreaming Celestial", due to being trapped under the Diabolo Mountains in California. In the MCU, Tiamut's title is "The Communicator".
  • All Your Powers Combined: Inverted, as on their own the Eternals' Uni-Mind gestalt would never have allowed Sersi to be able to transmute Tiamut. Unfortunately, one member adding power to the Uni-Mind...was Tiamut itself.
  • Ambiguous Situation: It's unclear whether or not Tiamut willingly lent its power to the Uni-Mind to help the Eternals stop its own birth, though Arishem treats the ordeal as the Eternals sacrificing the nascent Celestial all the same.
  • Born as an Adult: Seems to have the proportions as an adult Celestial despite literally hatching from an egg.
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation: Tiamut in the comics was killed by a rogue cosmic race called the Exterminators. In Eternals, it dies before it has a chance to wake up from its birth.
  • Eye Lights Out: Its four glowing eyes fade out one by one as its face gradually turns to stone.
  • Final Boss: Stopping Tiamut's emergence is the Eternals' primary goal. Ikaris acts as a more personal antagonist during the climax, but ultimately has a Heel–Face Turn because of his love for Sersi and helps kill the Celestial.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: Tiamut is less of a character and more of a plot device during the events of Eternals, as it is the implications of its birth that drive the movie's main conflict.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: If Tiamut lent his power to the Uni-Mind willingly, then he gave his life to save Earth from his own emergence.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Unwittingly lends its own power to the Uni-Mind, allowing Sersi to turn it to stone.
  • Taken for Granite: Thanks to a Uni-Mind powered Sersi transmutation, Tiamut's emergence is halted to just a hand and part of its head.
  • Walking Spoiler: Tiamut's impending emergence completely changes the stakes of the film, and The Reveal is directly tied to that of the Eternals' true nature.
  • You Don't Look Like You: In the comics, the Dreaming Celestial is typically depicted with its armor colored black, as this was part of its fall from grace. However, its original color was gold, which is the color Tiamut is here when it begins to emerge.

Other

    The Living Tribunal 

The Living Tribunal

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5f6c32fa_bc02_484b_a494_3067841c0fc5.jpeg

Species: Cosmic Entity

Appearances: Loki note  | Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness | Thor: Love and Thunder note 

A three headed cosmic being.


  • Ambiguous Situation: Whether it is him in Multiverse of Madness or merely colossal statues of him with glowing eyes.
  • The Cameo: He has a very brief appearance in Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness as one of the dimensions that Stephen Strange and America Chavez travel through.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Two of them. In Doctor Strange, Baron Mordo is seen wielding a staff called "The Staff of the Living Tribunal". In Episode 5 of Loki, a statue of him can be seen in the Void.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: His body is a golden color and is an exceedingly powerful cosmic god.
  • Multiple Head Case: He has at least four heads.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Each head wears a purple cloth, and he is a cosmic god.
  • Saved for the Sequel: He was originally supposed to appear for the first time in Avengers: Infinity War during the fight between Thanos and Doctor Strange on Titan, where he then would have judged Thanos for all of his crimes. The scene was removed due to it not flowing well with the rest of the fight. He instead appears for the first time in Multiverse of Madness.
  • You Don't Look Like You: He has a nack, or necks, rather than a head floating over his torso.

    Chthon 

Chthon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/chthon_wundagore_statue.png

Species: Demon

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madnessnote 

"Eons ago, the first demon, Chthon, carved his dark magic into this tomb."
Wong

A demonic entity who created the runes used in the Darkhold.


  • The Corrupter: Indirectly; reading the Darkhold, Chthon's creation, drives people to embrace their worst qualities and makes them obsessively focused on their own selfish goals. Its victims include Eli Morrow, Holden Radcliffe, Aida, Wanda Maximoff, and at least two variants of Stephen Strange.
  • Dark Is Evil: Described by Wong as "the first demon", Chthon carved runes of dark magic into the walls on Mount Wundagore, runes that were later transcribed to create the Darkhold, seemingly with the ultimate goal of empowering the Scarlet Witch to conquer and/or destroy the multiverse.
  • Evil Sorcerer: Creating the runes that were written into the Darkhold implies he's a master of Chaos Magic.
  • The Ghost: Chthon has yet to make a physical appearance outside of a statue, but his presence is felt as Wong mentions that he is the one who created the runes that were written into the Darkhold.
  • God of Chaos: He's the origin behind the Darkhold's existence and Wanda's chaos magic.
  • God of Evil: Considering that Wong described him as the first demon, it's clear that Chthon isn't the nicest guy around.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: As the creator of the Darkhold, Chthon is a behind-the-scenes antagonist for Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Runaways, WandaVision, and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness; with his presence only being felt in the latter.
  • The Unfought: Despite all the harm that the Darkhold has wrought, it's creator has yet to be confronted by any of the heroes.

    Falligar the Behemoth 

Falligar

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/8d71239d_4c86_4750_9712_574c3d0ed022.jpeg

Species: God (Falligarian)

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

A god slain by Gorr the God Butcher.


    Rapu 

Rapu

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jackass_rapu.png

Species: God

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: Jonny Brugh

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

One of the apathetic gods of Gorr's homeworld.


  • Adaptational Badass: In the original story, both the golden god and Knull were badly wounded when Gorr found them, with former asking for Gorr's help and the latter seemingly already being dead. In Thor: Love and Thunder, Rapu fought and killed the Necrosword's former owner while still having the energy to celebrate afterwards. Somewhat justified, as it was Knull Rapu's comic counterpart fought.
  • Adaptational Backstory Change: In Thor: God of Thunder, the first god Gorr killed was not of his homeworld and badly wounded by the wielder of the Necrosword; asking Gorr for help only to be met with disgust and rage. In Thor: Love and Thunder, Rapu is one of the gods of Gorr's homeworld, and is cruel and dismissive towards him when asked for help.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Of the golden god who begged for Gorr's help in battle with Knull and who was Gorr's first victim. Said golden god was implied to have been benevolent, and it's implied that it was Knull butchering his pantheon that led to Gorr's homeworld becoming a near-inhospitable desert. Here, Rapu outright doesn't care at all about his followers, seeing them as expendable, and let all of them die to the desert while he and his fellow gods enjoyed themselves in a lush rainforest.
  • Alien Blood: He has golden ichor for blood, as shown when Gorr decapitates him.
  • Asshole Victim: He's the first god Gorr slays, and he quite frankly had it coming.
  • Berserk Button: He becomes enraged when his once-follower Gorr renounces him to his face and tells him he is not a god, going from simply mocking him to trying to kill him. Also, Rapu didn't take kindly to Gorr eating some of his fruit.
  • Broken Pedestal: Gorr is originally shown to worship him, but when he meets his god in person, that god turns out to be a total Jerkass, which leads to Gorr's vow to Kill the Gods in the first place.
  • The Bully: He's very self-centered, loves to mock those he deems beneath him, throws his weight around (especially when he thinks Gorr can't defend himself) and even gets the other deities to bully and mock Gorr along with him when he arrives. Even if his followers weren't all dead, he'd still fit the bill for this trope.
  • Dirty Coward: He uses his godhood and size to bully Gorr and later attempts to kill Gorr for renouncing him. However, after Gorr is chosen by the Necrosword and uses it to stab him in the neck, Rapu unsuccessfully tries to reason with Gorr to have his life spared.
  • Entitled Bastard: He cares nothing for his followers or their suffering and mistreats Gorr for expecting an afterlife, eating his fruit and generally being there. Yet he still expects to be praised and worshipped — and furiously tries to kill Gorr once he rejects to follow him.
  • Fantastic Racism: Against mortals. Rapu sees them as a lesser race whose sole reason for existing is to worship gods.
  • God-Emperor: Aside from being a literal god, he refers to his domains as an "empire" that was being threatened by the previous owner of the Necrosword. Though, as Gorr points out, his empire is gone as he has no followers left.
  • God of Light: One of his titles being "Bringer of Light" and him being decked out in golden armor with a sun-shaped headdress indicates this. Doesn't make him a good god though.
  • Hate Sink: His sole purpose is to give sympathy to Gorr's god-killing crusade.
  • Hypocrite: Rapu considers his worshippers worthless and replaceable, mocking the one pious believer who actually finds him. When his depraved indifference and casual cruelty make Gorr stop worshipping him, however, Rapu is furious.
  • "It" Is Dehumanizing: He refers to Gorr as “it” after first hearing him speak.
  • Jerkass Gods: He rivals Zeus in this department! Not only does he not care for his "worshippers" who've all starved to death, he thinks that suffering and worshipping him is their purpose.
  • Karmic Death: Rapu is killed by Gorr, a former follower of his whom he refused to help and show kindness to, with the Nercosword.
  • Kick the Dog: A starving Gorr who just lost his daughter stumbled upon him and he does this several times within the minutes before The Dog Bites Back. To wit:
    • He initially dismisses Gorr's presence in his oasis at all, showing annoyance that he's even there.
    • He claims that Gorr's suffering is All for Nothing and that only a Cessation of Existence awaits him after death.
    • He declares that Gorr does have a purpose once he's threatened — to die by his hand for his own amusement.
  • Lack of Empathy: First, he complains about a starving Gorr eating some of Rapu's fruit (which is plentiful), then he shows an utter lack of regard or respect for the worshippers who died slow, agonizing deaths in his name, as well as mocking Gorr's own suffering, his beliefs, and what Rapu considers the pointlessness of his existence.
  • Light Is Not Good: One of his epithets is, according to Gorr, "Bringer of Light", but Rapu turns out to be a callous and selfish Jerkass God who doesn't care for his followers.
  • Mayincatec: Rapu appears to be heavily modelled after the Inca or Mayan gods.
  • Narcissist: Rapu's only interest is his own pleasure and glory, and he doesn't care one tiny bit for the people he expects to worship him. When Gorr renounces his faith, Rapu becomes enraged and tries to kill Gorr on the spot, showing that, despite his general callousness and direct cruelty towards Gorr, Rapu still expected Gorr to worship him and couldn't stand the idea that he didn't.
  • Neck Lift: When Gorr repudiates him for not helping his worshippers, Rapu grabs him by the throat and lifts him off he ground with the intent of throttling him. This puts Rapu in decapitation range when the Necrosword responds to Gorr's rage and binds itself to him.
  • Off with His Head!: After stabbing him in the neck, a newly-empowered Gorr beheads Rapu with the Necrosword.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Just before the beginning of the movie, Rapu and his friends somehow managed to slay the previous wielder of the Necrosword.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: He only appears for a single scene, but his actions cause Gorr's Faith–Heel Turn and start his crusade to murder entire pantheons of gods.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Rapu mocks and attacks Gorr while the Necrosword is within reach, and while being aware of its ability to choose a new wielder. The end result has the sword attach itself to Gorr and Rapu becomes the first of many gods to be slain by the newly minted God Butcher.
  • Top God: He's implied to be the leader of Gorr's pantheon. He's the only one of the gods with a given name and those in his paradise follow his word with no resistance. Boy, did they pick a good one.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: While a thoroughly loathsome piece of work in his own right, Rapu had no intentions of Gorr becoming anything but a corpse; his callousness and cruelty towards the broken man allowed the Necrosword to latch on to Gorr and set him off on a rampage that sees countless gods (starting with Rapu himself) dead.
  • We Have Reserves: His attitude about worshippers in a nutshell; Rapu is totally unconcerned when Gorr informs him that all of his believers have perished from drought, simply assuming that there will inevitably be others. Unfortunately for Rapu, since Gorr’s people were his only followers at the time and as Gorr — the last of his followers — abandoned his loyalty, Rapu had no followers left to worship him even if Gorr hadn't killed him for his cruelty and disregard towards him.

    Bao 

Bao

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bao_1.png
"Bao!"

Species: God (Dumpling)

Citizenship: None

Voiced By: Simona Paparelli

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

The God of Dumplings.


  • Ambiguously Evil: Like Ninny, they seem charming and personable enough, but the fact that they're a god on Omnipotence City, where deities indulge in vices with no regard for their worshippers and compete amongst themselves for number of Human Sacrifices in their names, puts their moral compass in question.
  • Non-Standard Character Design: Not even like the other CGI creations Marvel has put out, Bao looks like a baozi with a cartoony, simplified face drawn on it, like something out of The LEGO Movie.
  • Pokémon Speak: Subverted. Its first words on-screen happens to be its own name, but later it can be seen and heard chanting Zeus' name along with the other gods.
  • Rule of Funny: Why there's a god that looks like dumpling with a cartoon face is never elaborated on and sticks out from the other Marvel characters and is just there for a sight gag and Shout-Out.
  • Shout-Out: To Bao, being a sentient Bao.

    Ninny of the Nonny 

Ninny of the Nonny

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ninny_nonny.png
"Heeey, Ninny Nonny!"

Species: God (Kronan)

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: Taika Waititi

Appearances: Thor: Love and Thunder

The Kronan God.


  • Ambiguously Evil: Like Bao, he seems charming and personable enough, but the fact that he's a god on Omnipotence City, where deities indulge in vices with no regard for their worshippers and compete amongst themselves for number of Human Sacrifices in their names, puts his moral compass in question.
  • Ethnic God: Appears to be the patron deity of his species, the Kronans.
  • Grandpa God: He has a bushy white beard and happens to be the god of his species, which indicates this.
  • Non-Mammalian Hair: Despite being a Rock Monster like the other Kronans, he has a bushy white beard.
  • Pokémon Speak: The only line he gets is saying his own name unprompted. He presumably chants Zeus' name along with the other gods, but can't be heard doing so.
  • Rock Monster: A god made out of rocks, like the Kronans that worship him.
  • Throne Made of X: In Omnipotence City, he sits on a throne made of scissors.
  • Visual Pun: He sits on a throne made of scissors, because rock beats scissors.

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