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Stark Industries

Stark Family and Household

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Stark Employees

    Jason Wilkes 

Jason Wilkes

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wilkes_jason.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Reggie Austin

Voiced By: Esteban Desco (Latin-American Spanish dub), David Robles (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Agent Carter

"Do you want to be thunder struck?"

A Self-Made Man and a genius scientist working for Isodyne Energy, who unwillingly becomes involved in a mysterious murder case that will change his life forever.


  • Adaptational Heroism: He shares the same name as a villain in the comics. While he's done some less-than-reputable things such as selling out to Whitney Frost and threatening to shoot Peggy so he can better understand Zero Matter and his presumed new abilities, he shows remorse to Peggy, doesn't want to hurt others, and seems to be more of a victim than a villain.
  • Age Lift: His comic counterpart was an older man.
  • And I Must Scream: Is rendered invisible and intangible by the Zero Matter explosion. Howard Stark does devise a chemical that can make him visible in short bursts, but any time else he literally cannot even speak due to having intangible vocal chords.
  • Badass Bookworm: He served in the Navy during the war as an engineer, and can still handle himself.
  • Containment Field: With Stark's lab, he's able to build chamber that lets him turn solid again inside of it. Another dose of Zero Matter from Whitney Frost makes it so he can step outside of it and yet remain tangible, though not permanently.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: In-Universe, this is the reason he's hesitant to betray Isodyne, since - even though they're run by the bad guys - they were the only scientific laboratory that was willing to hire a black man into R&D after the war.
  • Hot Scientist: A male example.
  • Love Interest: For Peggy in Season 2.
  • Never Found the Body: The explosion caused by Zero Matter appeared to have vaporized him into another plane of reality. However, in reality it just made him both invisible and intangible.
  • Race Lift: He's a white man in the comics, but is African-American here.
  • Self-Made Man: He was born into a family of agricultural workers in Southern California's orange groves, and was a physicist with a doctorate and history of military service by the time of his adulthood. Extra impressive, considering the prejudice he experiences as a black man in The '40s due to Values Dissonance. However, Whitney Frost claims none of this mattered to Isodyne; they hired him only because they needed someone expendable to blame/kill should they had to coverup their stockpile of Zero Matter.
  • Skewed Priorities: The first thing he does when he finds an unknown woman wandering around his workplace? Take her to his lab to try out his moonshine and gush over the science of chemical manipulation. Then actually ask who she is and what she's doing there.
  • Spider-Sense: His connection to Zero Matter allows him to sense where its locations, letting Peggy's team seek bodies laced with it, including Whitney Frost.
  • Token Minority: He's the only character with a black actor to be listed in the main cast.
  • Unexpected Character: Jason Wilkes was extremely minor in the comics with only one appearance ever. Even Leet Brannis appeared more than once.

    Anton Vanko 

Anton Vanko

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2ef7145659711e18988cb56e537aa4ee.png
Click here to see Anton in Iron Man 2 

Species: Human

Citizenship: Russian

Portrayed By: Yevgeni Lazarev (Iron Man 2), Costa Ronin (Agent Carter)

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | Agent Carter

Howard Stark's Russian partner in inventions, until a falling out led to Vanko being deported to Siberia. He is also the father of Ivan Vanko.


  • Call-Forward: His appearance in Agent Carter as Howard Stark's partner, as in Iron Man 2 his death drives his son Ivan to seek revenge on Tony Stark.
  • The Lab Rat: For Stark and then for Peggy. Jarvis introduces her to him when she needs help tracking down the bad guys from the remains of the nitramine bomb.
  • Token Enemy Minority: A Russian-American character, on the protagonists' side, unconnected to the Russian Leviathan organization.

    Former Employees (Spider-Man: Far From Home spoilers) 
See MCU: Mysterio for information on Quentin Beck and William Ginter Riva.

    Other Employees 
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Pym Technologies

The Pym Family

Associates

    Scott Lang / Ant-Man II 

Former

    Darren Cross / Yellowjacket 
See the Other Supervillains page.

    Frank 

Frank

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/frank_1.jpg
"So it's a suit."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Pym Technologies

Portrayed By: Joe Chrest

Voiced By: Pedro de Aguillón Jr. (Latin-American Spanish dub), Jesús Rodríguez (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Ant-Man

"Unfortunately we can't just do whatever we want. Would be nice, though, right? But there are laws."

A senior executive at Pym Technologies.


  • Honest Corporate Executive: Despite the potential profit to be gained from selling the Yellowjacket, he's against it for moral and legal reasons.
  • Only Sane Man: He's the only person to openly stand up to Cross, voicing his concerns over what could be done with the Yellowjacket technology.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: Frank is killed early on to establish both how unpredictably dangerous Cross is and that he hasn't perfected the technology yet.

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Rand Enterprises

Rand Family

    Wendell Rand 

Wendell Rand

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: David Furr

Appearances: Iron Fist

The owner of Rand Enterprises, husband of Heather and father of Danny Rand.


    Heather Rand 

Heather Duncan Rand

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Victoria Haynes

Appearances: Iron Fist

The mother of Danny Rand and wife of Wendell Rand.


    Danny Rand 
See his page

Meachum Family

    Harold Meachum 

Harold Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/harold_meachum.png
"I have no idea what an Iron Fist is. Sounds like a sex toy."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: David Wenham

Appearances: Iron Fist

Wendell's business partner, and father of Joy and Ward Meachum.


  • Abled in the Adaptation: Harold's legs were amputated in the comics.
  • Abusive Parents: He treats Ward like a henchman and a whipping boy rather than his own son and he is not afraid of physically disciplining him to get that across. It's very telling that Ward says the last time he was happy was when Harold died (Ward was 15 years-old at the time). Harold also had one in his own father, who used to beat him with his belt all the time. When Bakuto is preparing to (try to) decapitate him, Harold's last words to his children are to express how much of a disappointment Ward has been to him and glorifying Joy for being the better choice.
  • Adaptational Badass: In the comics, Harold was an crippled and broken old man who lost his legs. Not only is he much younger, able-bodied and capable of fighting, but he is also The Ageless as result of his ties with the Hand.
  • Adaptational Jerkass: While Harold was involved in the death of Danny's parents in the comics, he had absolutely no involvement with the Hand and was instead motivated by jealousy, as he was in love with Danny's mother. Harold in the show is also a more active threat than his comic book counterpart, who was much more passive and wanted to be put out of his misery by Danny.
  • Affably Evil: He acts polite and reasonable to those he's talking to and even when angry, he still keeps the same calm tone. However...
    • Faux Affably Evil: After Ward kills him, his politeness becomes more of an act as he starts to lose traces of his humanity.
  • The Ageless: Since dying, he hasn't aged a day in thirteen years.
  • Age Lift: A great deal younger than his comic counterpart, who is depicted as an old man. See The Ageless above.
  • Bad Boss: Though he initially tries to paint himself as a Benevolent Boss in his introductory scene by teaching the values of appreciating and rewarding employees to his son, they aren't particularly impressive as he demonstrate it by giving his assistant Kyle a day off...when it's about to hit midnight. His subsequent appearances show him being very condescending towards him which leads to Harold brutally murdering him in a fit of madness caused by resurrection after Kyle declines the fancy ice creams Harold bought for him and asks for vanilla.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: With Madame Gao and Bakuto for Season 1 of Iron Fist. While the weakest of the three in terms of overall threat, and Gao and Bakuto are fighting to control him, Harold is responsible for the events of the series: he made a deal with Madame Gao's Hand faction to resurrect him after his cancer reached a terminal state, in exchange for using Rand Enterprises to move Gao's heroin over the world. When Wendell began getting suspicious, Harold got poison from Gao to kill the pilots of the Rands' plane, which resulted in the deaths of Wendell and Heather, as well as Danny heading to K'un-Lun. And ultimately, Harold is the last one of the three to be dealt with to end the season.
  • Brooklyn Rage: A martial arist and brutal fighter from New York.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: Harold is a pretty quirky guy to say the least, and his Sanity Slippage doesn't help. It doesn't make him any less of a Manipulative Bastard.
  • Came Back Wrong: Every death and resurrection makes him a little less human and more prone to violence.
  • Composite Character: The more villainous qualities of Ward in the comics have instead gone to him.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: While Wilson Fisk, Kilgrave, Cottonmouth, and Diamondback were all defined by their horrible childhoods, Harold serves as a sinister patriarchal role to both his children and Danny.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: A very shady businessman.
  • Deal with the Devil: Made a deal shortly before dying. It was to make him Immortal, but a puppet of the Hand.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: He's the main antagonist for the first part of the first season of Iron Fist. Subverted, though, in that he returns in the finale to be Danny's last opposition.
  • Dragon Ascendant: He served as The Dragon to the Hand, but once Gao and Bakuto are out of the way, he takes his place as the Final Boss that Danny has to deal with.
  • Evil All Along: He wasn't exactly a nice guy to begin with, but one could mistake him for simply being extreme but well-meaning early in the season. He's eventually revealed to be a cold-blooded murderer and just as bad as the Hand he serves, having been screwing with Danny's life even before his resurrection.
  • Exact Words: When Joy asks that he assure her that he did not have Lawrence killed, he truthfully answers that he did not. Because he did it himself.
  • Face Death with Dignity: When it looks like Bakuto has him dead to rights, he does his best to console a wounded Joy and assure her how everything will be okay. Though it's tempered a bit by the fact that his intended last words are "Ward, you are the greatest disappointment in my life."
  • Faking the Dead: The world thinks he died of cancer, but he's actually alive and well. Technically, both are true.
  • Fantasy-Forbidding Father: In Season 2, Joy tells Walker that Ward used to draw until Harold told him to stop because he saw it as a "distraction".
  • Final Boss: Once Gao and Bakuto had been dealt with, he rises as the final threat to Danny for Season 1.
  • Fingore: Gao's thugs try to amputate one of his fingers as a lesson on foolishness. After Danny blows his cover and he's forced to kill them, Harold amputates his finger anyway to keep Gao from raising suspicion. It apparently grows back as part of Harold’s resurrection, as all ten of his fingers are plainly visible afterwards.
  • Fire Keeps It Dead: He's cremated to prevent resurrection.
  • It's All About Me: Ward openly says that the only person Harold really cares about is himself.
  • Kingpin in His Gym: He is frequently shown going to town on his punching bag or sparring with a physical trainer, to help establish that he's a physical threat in addition to a corporate criminal.
  • Like a Son to Me: Towards Danny, it's not genuine.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Harold spends most of the show manipulating Danny, his children, and even the Hand.
  • The Nothing After Death: How he describes the afterlife to a recently murdered Kyle. He goes into more detail as to what it's like to pass on when he reunites with Joy.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Initially played straight; he's been publicly dead for several years seemingly due to the involvement of the Hand. Danny Rand's return to New York City forces him to directly involve himself in the world again.
  • Papa Wolf: Seeing a bruise on Joy's face leads him to slice the owner of the offending fist...vertically. Only extends to his daughter, since he clearly despises and denigrates his own son Ward every chance he gets.
  • Parental Favoritism: Blatantly prefers Joy over Ward.
  • Posthumous Character: Averted Trope. The Hand resurrected him when he died from cancer 13 years ago, and is pulling the strings of Rand Enterprises in secret.
  • Rasputinian Death: He's impaled on rebar, shot, falls off of a skyscraper, and is cremated to prevent him from resurrecting.
  • Resurrective Immortality: When he dies, he wakes up three days later fully healed.
  • Sanity Slippage: Thanks to the Hand resurrection techniques, and since he wasn't a very stable or terribly kind person to start with, he didn't have far to fall.
  • Supernaturally Young Parent: Justified TropeHarold died 13 years ago but was subsequently revived by The Hand, and a side effect of the resurrection is him retaining the appearance of the age at which he first died.
  • That Man Is Dead: Ward considers Harold to have died 13 years ago. The man before him who looks like his father is a monster who had part of his soul left in the grave.
  • Wicked Cultured: As benefiting a top businessman, he's seen enjoying fine alcoholic beverages and when he returns to Rand Enterprises, he shows up wearing a sharp three-piece suit.
  • You Killed My Father: Killed Danny's parents because they discovered his illicit dealings with The Hand.

    Joy Meachum 

Joy Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_joy_meachum.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jessica Stroup

Appearances: Iron Fist

Harold's daughter, running Rand Enterprises with her brother Ward when Danny Rand returns to New York.


  • Big Bad Ensemble: With Mary Walker and Davos in Season 2 of Iron Fist. She starts off working with Davos to undermine Danny, hiring Mary to achieve this, but then she has a Heel Realization and gradually turns against Davos, while Mary becomes a Wild Card with her own agenda.
  • Broken Pedestal: Walks away from Harold when she realizes what a monster he is. Unfortunately her relationship with Ward and Danny has also been destroyed, causing her to become an antagonist in Season 2.
  • Daddy's Girl: Issues notwithstanding, she adored and looked up to her father. Joy becomes Daddy's Little Villain shortly after learning of his resurrection.
  • Daddy Issues: Joy is flat out stated to have this. Even joining with Harold despite his unwillingness to explain his absence for 13 years and her protectiveness towards him despite being affiliated with the Hand. Ward even calls her out on this for using him as a replacement for her acceptance because she couldn't get the same from her father.
    Ward: I didn't ask to be the heir to your daddy issues, so grow up, and stop begging for my approval! It's cliche; it's pathetic!
  • Defrosting Ice Queen:
    • She's very cold to Danny when he returns but starts warming to him quicker than Ward does, especially once she realizes who he really is.
    • In Season 2 she rejects Ward's attempts to reconcile with her, but does hold out the possibility of doing so at some point in the future. After Davos nearly kills her and Ward turns up to rescue her, she's able to put aside much of her animosity towards him.
  • Determinator: Once Joy has a goal, she won't stop until it's achieved whether it's getting back into Rand, destroying Danny, or stopping Davos.
  • Evil Costume Switch: In Season 2, she's introduced wearing dark clothing and having switched the executive skirt for black leather pants.
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: Forms an alliance with Davos to steal the Iron Fist from Danny, only to find that Davos won't let her go afterwards, aiming to use her for influence and wealth for his own schemes. She then calls in Walker to take down Davos, only to find herself in the same position with Walker.
  • Face–Heel Turn: In Season 2 she allies herself with Davos' plan to get the Iron Fist, seeking to humiliate Danny as she blames him for everything that went wrong after he came back.
  • Hypocrite: Joy states that she's more open-minded than her brother's Black-and-White Morality. But at the end of the day, she's as obstinate as Ward in her opinions and is all too willing to side with her untrustworthy father despite Ward warning how dangerous Harold is, while spitting excuses for his behavior.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Joy starts season 2 siding with Davos to hurt Danny but when she realizes Davos' instability, she finds and delivers the key to stopping him without the help of any of the heroes (who have no idea she's even doing this). She later insists it was just because Davos had to be stopped, not to help the others, but Ward doesn't buy it.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: She isn't aware that her father is alive, not at first.
  • Love Makes You Evil: Joy loves her father and wants to please him, so much that she is willing to become more and more corrupted to keep up with Harold's immorality.
  • Morality Pet: Serves as one to Ward and Harold. Possibly also to Walker.
  • Related Differently in the Adaptation: Her counterpart in the comics is Ward's niece, but they're siblings here.
  • Self-Made Man: Her ultimate goal.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: While Ward is very obstinate and unfeeling, Joy is more reasonable and willing to listen. The pendulum then swings by the end of the season.
  • Vengeance Feels Empty: Her expression when she receives the video of Danny's defeat indicates this.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: In season 2, she calls out both Danny and Ward for repeatedly lying to and manipulating her and points out that Ward had pretty much their entire life to come clean but never did.

    Ward Meachum 

Ward Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_ward_meachum.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tom Pelphrey

Appearances: Iron Fist

Harold's son, running Rand Enterprises with his sister Joy when Danny Rand returns to New York.


  • Adaptational Heroism: He gets to have a Heel–Face Turn whereas his comic counterpart did not. Up until that point, however, he's as bad as his comic counterpart was.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Ward Meachum is blonde in the comics, while here his hair is black.
  • Age Lift: He goes from being Harold's brother to Harold's son.
  • Agent Scully: He will always refuse to believe any of the fantastical stories accompanied by Danny including; the homeless man who walks in is Danny Rand back from the dead, Danny's story on Rand being used to smuggle heroin, The Hand holding a girl hostage in one of Rand's warehouses. He finally has a Heel Realization after he sees the decapitated head of a Hand member who failed to stop Danny.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: He suffers a bad case of this at first: despite living in a city of ninjas, bulletproof men and mind-rapists, not to mention a full-on extra-terrestrial invasion, Ward has trouble believing Danny, officially stated as deceased, may actually be who he says he is. Though in his defense, he has problems admitting that because of how troublesome it would have been to his position in Rand Enterprises, it can get ridiculous that he still doesn't entertain the notion while speaking with his own father Harold, who was brought back to life by an evil ninja cult and whom Ward has been forced to serve as lackey.
  • The Atoner: Thanks to his Character Development, Ward tries hard to be a good guy in Season 2. While he successfully makes amends with Danny, Joy blows him off. He lapses back into addiction (this time getting shitfaced drunk in the morning) and starts atoning again.
  • Big Brother Instinct:
    • While Ward has many flaws, he genuinely cares and wants to protect Joy even at personal cost.
    • In season 2, he also starts acting more protective and brotherly towards Danny, outright referring to Danny as his brother at several points. Seeing what Davos did to Danny drives Ward to get himself piss-drunk and pick a losing fight with a bartender twice his size.
  • Black-and-White Morality: Joy describes his worldview as being this way.
  • Bully Turned Buddy: When they were children, Ward bullied Danny. In season 1, when the long-lost adult Danny returns, Ward doesn't seem to think their relationship was that antagonistic, and by the time season 2 starts, they've become close friends.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: He doesn't remember any of what he and Danny did together, including the bullying he did growing up, seemingly because it was so commonplace he doesn't care to remember.
  • Butt-Monkey: Ward does not catch a break at all. He's consistently being manipulated, kicked around, and forced to play second-fiddle to both Danny and Joy.
  • Character Development: Goes through some extreme changes, to the point he's almost unrecognizable at the end of the season then as the person we're first introduced to.
  • Crying Wolf: He lied to Joy about everything from the purpose of business deals to their father's death, so by the time he tries to tell her about how dangerous Harold is, she doesn't believe him and it contributes to her Face–Heel Turn.
  • The Dragon: To his father, Harold.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Literally the first childhood flashback Danny has of childhood with Ward is Ward refusing to follow the rules of the game they're playing when he starts to lose, kicking Danny in the balls, throwing all of the game pieces off of the table, and then blaming Danny for it when his parents show up a minute later. Danny helps him grow out of his Jerkass-ness by the end of the first season.
  • Everyone Has Standards: He's quite disdainful of the trust fund babies in New York City who live off their parents' money and don't work. While he too was born into a life of privilege, he and his sister actually run the day-to-day operations of the company their father helped build and earn their own salaries.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Tells a reporter all about Danny's decision to have the company sell medicine at cost without realizing this actually makes Danny look good.
  • Face–Heel Revolving Door: Ward is a weak man who is full of Conflicting Loyalties and deeply desires to be his own man. As he tries to deal with the events of season one, he makes various deals and compromises with both the heroes and the villains and it is hard at times to figure out whose side he is on. By the end of the show, he's settled on "Face".
  • Fatal Flaw: Ward has a laundry list of flaws, but the top one is his hatred of his father, and more specifically his childish reaction to being ordered around. His biggest problems are caused when Harold orders him to back Joy on the Danny apologizing scandal, and Ward refuses to. Ward has been considering it until Harold orders him to go along with it.
  • Freudian Excuse: It becomes obvious early on that all of Ward's problem come from being treated like crap by his powerful and sadistic father while simultaneously getting very ruthless life philosophy beat into him by his father since childhood, and the stress of having to secretly deal with his father in the present day.
  • Functional Addict: He pops pain pills like they're candy, but otherwise seems to not be affected too much. Until he ends up hooked on the Hand's tainted heroin, that is, and he's forced to get detoxified.
  • Generation Xerox: Plays with it with his hair. Mimics his dad's hairstyle. Shows how he's mimicking Harold's ethics.
  • Good Hair, Evil Hair: His slicked-back hairstyle can be seen as shady.
  • Grew a Spine: He starts season one as a weak minion of his father, but gets Character Development and starts to assert himself. He finally has enough and stabs his father to death. He has a Heel–Face Turn when he finally has the courage to do the right thing and stick with it.
  • Hate Sink: He was initially depicted as this, being a bully as a child and a Corrupt Corporate Executive as an adult. He does grow out of it after a Hazy Feel Turn.
  • Heel–Face Turn: By the end of the show, he has made a complete 180 and even offers to work with Danny as equals "the way our fathers should have".
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Halfway through the second season of Iron Fist, Ward starts referring to Danny as his brother, caring for him as he convalesces from the shit Davos did to him. By the end of the season, they're traveling together, full partners.
  • Irony: Early in the season he has Danny incarcerated in Birch Psychiatric Hospital where he was treated as a mental patient by Paul Edmonds. Later on, Ward in the season he is sent to the exact same institute for being an addict and interrogated by the same psychiatrist.
  • Karma Houdini: Downplayed. While he ends up in a good position despite repeated attempts to murder Danny, it's hard to argue the sheer amount of suffering he goes through over the whole season isn't punishment enough, plus he ends up a genuinely better person because of it.
  • Mommy Issues: Is accused of having these by Joy in season 2.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted, as he's the second character in the MCU who answers to the name "Ward", alongside Grant Ward from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..
  • Out, Damned Spot!: Ward demonstrates this repeatedly. He first gets blood on his sleeve after Danny takes him to see the decapitated head of a Hand soldier who failed to stop Danny, which Ward tries to rub off. He later gets it again when he kills Harold by stabbing him to death, first seeing blood on his sleeve and hand before he starts seeing it everywhere, dripping from doors and walls. It doesn't go away until Harold comes back to life.
  • Patricide: Ward kills Harold in "Felling Tree With Roots". It doesn't stick. The first time, anyway.
  • Rage Quit: Danny's first childhood flashback shows Ward refusing to follow the rules of Monopoly when he starts to lose, then throwing all of the pieces on the floor.
  • Related Differently in the Adaptation: He's Harold's son in the show whereas he was his brother in the comics.
  • Sanity Slippage: Throughout the first season, the stress of Danny's return, his father's sociopathic controlling over him, his increasing addiction to pain meds (and withdrawal when they are thrown away) and his inability to tell Joy - the only person he could ever confide in - slowly erodes his fried nerves, eventually leading to him killing his father when he takes all of his money when Ward tries leaving the country. He eventually gets better when Joy learns the truth behind everything nd he learns to trust Danny.
  • Schoolyard Bully All Grown Up: Although not directly from the schoolyard, Ward is no less of a self-involved prick to Danny than from when they were kids. Their first on-screen interaction of them as kids had Ward cheating him out of Monopoly money; years later, Ward would grow up to embezzle millions of dollars from Rand Enterprise's pension fund.
  • Self-Made Orphan: He kills his father, Harold, twice. The first time by stabbing him to death after being fed up with being abused as his father's underling. This doesn't last since Harold returns from the dead. The second time he shoots an already impaled Harold off a building then had his body cremated to prevent resurrection.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: While Joy is slightly more empathetic and reasonable, Ward is less forgiving and stuck in his ways. At first.
  • Slasher Smile: He gives one after he murders Harold, finally being freed of his abusive father.
  • Smug Snake: He's very condescending toward Danny upon his return, and doesn't immediately believe it's him.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: inverted. Under his seriously shitty dad, he bullied Danny, grew into a seriously troubled adult, and eventually had a Heel–Face Turn.
  • Villainous Breakdown: His constant state for almost the entire first season, with the strain of Danny's return and having to keep Harold's state of being alive a secret. The drugs don't help.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: He has become this with Danny by the start of season 2.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Was always treated worse then Danny by Harold, which he responded to by bullying Danny. This continues even to the present, with Harold welcoming Danny with open arms
  • Written-In Absence: He's on a business trip during The Defenders.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: Ward would be a pretty effective villain in a corporate espionage thriller, but the poor bastard has no idea how far over his head he is, in a comic book superhero story.
  • Yuppie: He has the look and personality down to a tee; he's a ruthless business man in a three-piece suit and a comb-over haircut ripped straight from Patrick Bateman. He runs a tech and pharmaceutical company that he embezzles from in a lucrative position inherited to him by his abusive, controlling father, he focused more on the profits of his company over ethical ramifications and keeps himself together with a steady diet of addictive pain meds and alcohol.

Rand Board

    Lawrence Wilkins 

Lawrence Wilkins

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lawrencewilkins.jpg
"Don't expect anyone here to be listening to a kid who got his MBA from a Himalayan monastery."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Clifton Davis

Appearances: Iron Fist

A member of the Rand Enterprises board of directors.


  • Boom, Headshot!: Harold Meachum shoots him in the head, and stages his death to look like a suicide.
  • Canon Foreigner: There's no Lawrence Wilkins in the comics.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He is embezzling from Rand and hires prostitutes with company money. He also wanted to sell a life-saving medicine at ten times the production cost.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Despite having some skeletons of his own, Lawrence has kids, and a nephew in the hospital, all of whom he loves. Harold actually asks if he wants to preserve his image as a loving uncle/father before capping him in the head.
  • Fatal Family Photo: Has a photograph of his son on his desk.
  • Irony: Tries to offer Joy and Ward a severance package in the same amount that they had tried to buy Danny out for.
  • Never Suicide: Harold covers up his murder of him by staging it to look like suicide. Everyone buys it.
  • Office Golf: Has a putt-putt hole in his office.
  • Smug Snake: A backstabbing, swindling, no-good man that was all smiles and polite belittling of Danny and anybody that was against the bottom line.
  • Trespassing to Talk: On the victim end of this, courtesy of Harold Meachum.

Rand Employees

    Kyle 

Kyle

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Alex Wyse

Appearances: Iron Fist

A young assistant attending to Harold Meachum's every whim.


  • Apologizes a Lot: He does this to Harold a lot, who mocks him for it.
  • Butt-Monkey: Harold likes to torment him in an indirect casual way, like giving him the day off when it's almost midnight.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Is killed by Harold with an ice cream scoop.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: Perhaps one of the most extreme examples: Harold brutally kills him with an ice cream scoop. What incurred this violent punishment? Asking if there was any vanilla ice cream in the selection of gourmet flavors Harold bought for him.
  • Extreme Doormat: He is so passive and submissive to Harold that he can't even stop apologizing about it even as Harold mocks him about doing so.
  • Manchild: Somewhat. When asked what he would hypothetically do with an immortal life, all he can come up with is eating ice cream for every meal consequence-free.
  • Morality Pet: Zig-Zagged Trope. For most of the show, Harold is nothing but a rude and dismissive Bad Boss toward Kyle. After dying and resurrecting again he makes a genuine effort to bond with him, but this is when he winds up murdering the poor kid. Given that Harold's resurrection method causes its subjects turn on their closest loved ones first, in an incredibly perverse way the fact that Kyle was his first recent victim proves that Harold did care for him like a family member all along.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: His sudden death at Harold's hands is the first sign that resurrection is destabilizing Harold's mental state.
  • Secret-Keeper: One of the few people besides the Hand and Ward to know that Harold is alive.
  • Sweet Tooth: Again, ice cream.
  • Yes-Man: Harold has him hanging on his every word.
  • Undying Loyalty: Takes Harold's abuse without a single complaint.

    Shannon 

Shannon

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Esau Pritchett

Appearances: Iron Fist

The head of security at Rand.


  • The Dragon: Not only is he the head of security at Rand, he's Ward's main enforcer in the early episodes.
  • Scary Black Man: A tall and imposing African-American that acts as a thug for his employer.

Harold's Enforcers

    Kevin Singleton 

Kevin Singleton

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ramon Fernandez

Appearances: Iron Fist

A bodyguard and enforcer for Harold.


  • The Brute: He fills this role to Harold's Big Bad and Ward's The Dragon. He's tasked with destroying Danny Rand's hospital records and gets into a physical confrontation with him.
  • Noodle Incident: He mentions a task he performed for Harold Meachum in Miami that turned messy.

Hammer Advanced Weapons Systems

    In General 

Hammer Industries

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | Luke Cage

A weapons manufacturer company led by Justin Hammer.


  • Always Second Best: They appear to be this to Stark Industries. For instance, they only became the primary weapon contractors for the U.S. Armed Forces after Stark Industries stopped manufacturing weapons.
  • Evil, Inc.: They are basically what Stark Industries used to be before Tony's change of heart, if not worse. They have no ethical issue with manufacturing dangerous weapons and collaborating with criminals.
  • Incompetence, Inc.: Very few of their products actually work properly, with a missile that was supposed to level buildings failing to even tickle a single man, demonstrating serious quality control problems. According to Tony, their technology is at least 20 years behind Stark Industries. However, by the time of Luke Cage they have become much more competent.
  • Mega-Corp: Not as much as Stark Industries, but still counts.
  • Took a Level in Badass: By Luke Cage, Hammer Industries has exceeded in the failures of the past by creating smarter, deadlier weapons, such as the "Judas" bullet, crafted from Chitauri metal and able to penetrate otherwise impervious materials. The bullet is essentially the "Ex-Wife" done right. It's likely that without Hammer's "oversight" the company was actually able to get things done.

Leadership

    Justin Hammer 

Justin Hammer

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hammer_justin.jpg
"I wanna make Iron Man look like an antique."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Sam Rockwell

Voiced By: Jose Antonio Macielas (Latin-American Spanish dub), José Javier Serrano (European Spanish dub), Toshiyuki Morikawa (Japanese dub), Guillaume Lebon (French dub), Gilbert Lachance (Canadian French dub), David Nathan (German dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | All Hail the King

"We all know why we're here – in the last six months Anthony Stark has created a sword with untold possibilities, and yet he insists it's a shield. He asks that we trust him as we cower behind it."

CEO of Hammer Industries, and a (self-perceived) rival of Tony Stark. He forges a temporary alliance with Ivan Vanko, but the latter just makes use of his resources - not taking him seriously at all. An all-around obnoxious loser.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics Hammer is much older, originally modelled after Peter Cushing, in the MCU he is played by Sam Rockwell, an actor often seen as sexy.
  • Adaptational Comic Relief: His comics counterpart is more cynical and his hatred of Tony Stark is much more apparent and bitter.
  • Adaptational Dumbass: His comics counterpart is a much, much more competent businessman. His company was indicated to actually be one of the sources of supervillains' equipment. If this version of Hammer tried getting into the supervillain arms trade, his customers would probably kill him themselves.
  • Adaptational Nationality: American here, his comic book counterpart is British with a citizenship in Monaco.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics, Hammer is a legit rival and a threat to Stark. Here? Not so much.
  • Age Lift: His comics counterpart is much older.
  • Ambiguously Bi: In Iron Man 2, he is briefly seen with Christine Everhart who seemingly flirted with him... until she left him when Tony told her Hammer lost his contract with the Government. In the short film All Hail the King, Hammer has a new male sidekick who constantly follows him and strokes his shoulder (Justin even calls him "baby"). Such behavior isn't uncommon in prison but Hammer also talks about his "understanding" relationship with Tony that gives his jealousy a possible new meaning.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Thinks he's Tony's rival and is using Vanko to further his plans to show up Tony with the tech Vanko designs for him. The reality is the other way round.
  • But Not Too White: During his first meeting with Vanko his palms are visibly orange, indicating that he forgot to wash the fake tan off his hands after applying it.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: For all his villainous aspirations, he's just plain weird in what appears to be a failed attempt to appear rich eccentric.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Commissions a felon to help advance his company's projects after springing the aforementioned felon from prison.
  • Driven by Envy: He has people killed just to get Vanko out so he can make his Hammer drones, all for the sake of showing up Tony Stark. Thus, Evil Is Petty.
  • Evil Counterpart: Tries oh-so-hard to be this to Tony, only to fail spectacularly. It's really driven home during his display at the expo where he tries dancing his way onto the stage in an utterly feeble impersonation of Tony's showmanship to a very underwhelmed audience. Hilariously, when Tony shows up in the Iron Man armor, doing nothing more than coming in for a landing on the stage, the crowd goes wild.
  • Evil Plan: Repeat: everything he does is for the sake of showing up Tony Stark.
  • First-Name Basis: He's the only one to call Tony Anthony.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Despite being pleasant and professional, Hammer is not above bombings, prison breaks, and keeping people prisoner.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Even though he's wealthy like Tony, he definitely envies Tony's talent and success. His technology throughout the film is described as a joke and a failed knock-off of Stark's. His jealousy is even shown when he's talking to Stark or mentioning him. Heck, most of his motivation in the film is to upstage Stark.
  • Hidden Depths: He shows himself to be a rather capable dancer at the Stark Expo when making his introduction.
  • Ignored Enemy: Despite his efforts, Tony barely acknowledges Hammer as a fellow industrialist, let alone a rival.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: His efforts at being either a respected businessman or a crafty villain are both such Epic Fail, it would be hard not to feel sorry for the poor schmuck, except for...
  • Jerkass: ...The fact that he's one of the oiliest, most dickish characters in 21st century movies.
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: He's not as smart as he makes himself out to be.
  • Large Ham: Being an Evil Counterpart of Tony, he still needed to be a man full of himself. All Hail the King even has Hammer complaining about Slattery stealing the spotlight from him too — both represent how Evil Is Hammy, but Hammer does it without effort to overact!
  • Made of Explodium:
    • His "Ex-Wife" miniature bunker-buster projectile is supposedly extremely explosive. Emphasis on supposedly, because it doesn't work at all. Though Fridge Logic can be applied here, as a bunker-buster relies on the momentum from being fired from a range to bury itself into a target, while Rhodey fired it at close range, hence why it was unable to penetrate Vanko's armor.
      Hammer: These are the Cubans, baby. This is the Cohibas, the Montecristos. This is a kinetic-kill, side-winder vehicle with a secondary cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine RDX burst. It's capable of busting a bunker under the bunker you just busted. If it were any smarter, it'd write a book, a book that would make Ulysses look like it was written in crayon. It would read it to you. This is my Eiffel Tower. This is my Rachmaninoff's Third. My Pieta. It's completely elegant, it's bafflingly beautiful, and it's capable of reducing the population of any standing structure to zero. I call it "The Ex-Wife."
    • Luke Cage shows us that the Judas bullet has exceeded the "Ex-Wife" by penetrating otherwise impervious materials due to being forged out of Chitauri metal.
  • More Dakka: His armors and drones are equipped with massive ammunition. Tony lampshades it about Rhodey's War Machine armor that Hammer outfitted.
    Tony: You have a big gun, you aren't the big gun.
    Rhodey: Tony, don't be jealous.
    Tony: No, it's subtle, all the bells and whistles.
    Rhodey: Yeah, it's called being a Badass.
  • Motor Mouth: Often speaks in fast and rambling sentences in imitation of Tony's own Motor Mouth but his own version is just rambling useless facts and trivia.
  • Never My Fault: As he's being dragged to jail for attempting to kill Tony Stark and allying himself with Vanko, he accuses Pepper Potts of ruining his career and reputation.
  • Pointy-Haired Boss: It is strongly implied that it is through his managing that Hammer Industries is the Incompetence, Inc. that it is made out to be in Iron Man 2. He is obviously not as tech-savvy as Tony and not as business savvy as Pepper, cutting corners a lot in his tech and his managerial decisions (like hiring the clearly deranged Ivan Vanko to build his dangerous weapons for him with minimal oversight) that usually causes more problems down the line. The fact that he has Tony and Stark Industries to compare him to unfavorably in the eyes of the public certainly does not help. It is not until years after Justin is sent to prison (as well as the influx of alien technology from "The Incident") that Hammer Industries is able to make weapons that actually work.
  • Pride: It's his sin, he wants to be recognized and admired as the top arms dealer, before Tony.
  • Put on a Prison Bus: Arrested by the authorities after his complicity with Vanko's crimes was exposed. He is sent to Seagate Penitentiary and remains there ever since, making only a brief cameo in All Hail the King short.
  • Redemption Promotion: The Ex-Wife doesn't work in Iron Man 2. In the Iron Man 3 Prelude comic, an Ex-Wife is launched at War Machine and temporarily disables it. This is the one Tony made, not the Hammer-downgraded one. Looks like he had something on it after all.
  • Replacement Flat Character: In a sense, Hammer represents everything Tony Stark was before his Character Development in the first movie, being just as arrogant and showy of an Arms Dealer, except with none of the intelligence to back his ego up.
  • Sinister Sweet Tooth: Admits as much. He's eating ice cream when he meets up with Ivan and sucking on a lollipop while presenting weapons to Rhodes (pictured above) and confessed to Ivan that "he likes his dessert first".
  • Smug Snake: He has the same ego as Tony, but none of the genius to back it up.
  • Unknown Rival: To Tony. It was emphasized thoroughly in the second film.

Employees

    Jack 

Jack

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jack_3.bmp
"It's a beautiful bird!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jack White

Appearances: Iron Man 2

Justin Hammer's personal assistant and butler.


  • Ascended Extra: His actor Jack White was originally hired as the food stylist who prepared and served the salmon carpaccio to Vanko in the aircraft hangar, but he ended up appearing in several scenes as Hammer's assistant.
  • Canon Foreigner: He isn't based on any characters from the comics.
  • The Danza: He shares his first name with the actor who portrayed him, Jack White.
  • Evil Counterpart: Being Justin Hammer's assistant and butler, he can be considered as one to either Pepper Potts or Happy Hogan. He isn't that much evil, though.
  • Minion with an F in Evil: He may be working for Hammer, but he doesn't do anything really evil himself and come across as a pretty pleasant guy.
  • Non-Action Guy: He doesn't appear to have any combat skills, and doesn't intervene at all when his boss get tackled by Natasha Romanoff and later taken in custody by police officers.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted. There are plenty of other characters named Jack (or similar names) within the MCU (Jack Taggart, Jack Rollins, Jack Murdoch...).
  • Old Retainer: It's not clear how long he has been working for Hammer, but he's quite older than him and seems entirely loyal to him.
  • Only One Name: His last name is never mentioned, he's only referred as "Jack" throughout the movie, even in the credits.
  • Personal Mook: He serves as Justin Hammer's personal assistant, butler, waiter, porter and possibly driver as well.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: While he has apparently no problem with the fact that his boss has organized the escape of a dangerous criminal which resulted in several people's death, he doesn't seems particularily evil, just happening to work for the wrong person.
  • Satellite Character: He is Justin Hammer's assistant, and that's pretty much all there is to say about him. He barely interacts with anyone else during the movie except Vanko on brief occasions.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome: On Hammer's orders, he tried to to fit his head into that of a drone, even though it had no openings and was clearly too small. Predictably, it didn't work.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: He's last seen running away from the premises after Justin Hammer got arrested. It's unknown what happened to him afterwards, and if he got arrested for his complicity or not.
  • Yes-Man: He tends to agree with everything his boss says even when he's blatantly lying, notably when he tried to pass off some random bird as Vanko's pet and (falsely) complimented it.
    Vanko: This is not my bird.
    Hammer: What do you mean? That's the bird! This is the bird! Yeah! I pulled a lot of strings to get this bird. This is a great bird!
    Jack: It's a beautiful bird!

    Hammer's henchmen 

Hammer's henchmen

Species: Humans

Citizenship: American

Appearances: Iron Man 2

Two henchmen of Justin Hammer.


  • Bag of Kidnapping: After taking Vanko's bird, they put it in a bag.
  • Bloodless Carnage: Partially averted, as we can see blood on Vanko's hands after he killed them.
  • Dead Guy on Display: After killing them, Vanko hangs them in the control room. Their dead bodies are later found by Black Widow and Happy Hogan when they come to arrest Vanko.
  • Giant Mook: They are both beefy guys, and Hammer thinks they're strong enough to deal with Ivan Vanko. He's wrong, though.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: Their deaths were apparently quite bloody, thankfully they only happen offscreen.
  • Informed Ability: According to Justin Hammer, they are tough guys that Vanko shouldn't try to mess with. However, Vanko didn't seem to have much trouble killing them.
  • Kick the Dog: On Hammer's order, one of them takes Vanko's bird from him in a brutal manner.
  • Killed Offscreen: Both of them are killed by Vanko, but their deaths aren't shown onscreen.
  • No Name Given: We don't get any name for either of them.
  • Poke the Poodle: Hammer orders them to take Vanko's pillows. Both of them. And his shoes.
  • The Voiceless: Neither of them has any lines of dialogue.

    Hammer Technician 

Hammer Technician

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Brian Schaeffer

Appearances: Iron Man 2

A technician of Hammer Industries.


  • Enemy Mine: When the drones start wreaking havoc at Stark Expo, he's willing to help Pepper Potts find a solution, even though she works for a rival company.
  • No Name Given: His name is never said during the film.
  • Smart People Wear Glasses: He wears a huge pair of glasses and seems to be one the few Hammer Industries employees to be somewhat competent at their job.
  • Token Good Teammate: Despite working for Hammer Industries, he does his best to help Pepper stop the drones' attack and tells her everything he knows.
  • You Look Familiar: His actor Brian Schaeffer played other minor roles in several MCU films.

    Hammer Security Guards 

Hammer Security Guards

Species: Humans

Citizenship: American

Appearances: Iron Man 2

The security guards at the Hammer Industries facility.


  • Blinded by the Light: At one point, Black Widow uses flash bombs to temporarily blind two guards before attacking them.
  • Boxing Battler: Happy Hogan engages in a crude boxing match against one of the guards.
  • Cherry Tapping: After beating all the others in pretty awesome ways, Black Widow ends up defeating the last security guard with a pepper spray, without even looking.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: While it's very easy for Black Widow to defeat a large number of guards, Happy Hogan struggles to fight a single one of them.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: All the guards who confront Black Widow are defeated without any difficulty. Averted with the one fighting Happy Hogan, who manages to put quite a hard fight.
  • Ear Ache: When fighting one of the guards, Happy eventually gains the upper hand after biting his opponent's ear.
  • Groin Attack: Black Widow neutralizes a guard by hitting him in the groin.
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: It's ridiculously easy for Happy Hogan and especially Black Widow to break into their building and defeat all of them.
  • A Handful for an Eye: During the fight against Black Widow, two guards are blinded by the smoke of her flash bombs, and another one gets pepper-sprayed in the eyes shortly after.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Black Widow steals a guard's pepper spray at some point, and then uses it to defeat another guard.
  • Lawman Baton: At least one of them uses a baton to attack Black Widow.
  • The Man They Couldn't Hang: One of the guards ends up hanged, but he struggles so much that he apparently manages to survive.
  • Mooks: They are Justin Hammer's minions, and their only purpose in the movie is to be defeated in various ways by Black Widow in order to show how badass she is.
  • Mook Chivalry: For the most part, they only try to fight Black Widow one or two at a time. To be fair, those hallways are rather narrow.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: The only reason the security guards oppose Black Widow and Happy Hogan is because they did broke into the building they are supposed to protect. Technically, the guards are just doing their job.
  • Would Hit a Girl: None of them appear to have issue with fighting Black Widow. In their defense, she's the one who attacked first.

Products

    Hammer Drones 

Hammer Drones

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hammer_drones_4.bmp

Species: Drones

Citizenship: None

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Iron Man 2

An army of drones created by Hammer Industries to be sold to the military. They started as Powered Armors similar to Iron Man's suits, but Ivan Vanko was recruited to work on them and decided to change them to drones in order to hack them and use them in his plans to take revenge on Tony Stark.


  • Action Bomb: They're revealed to be this at the end of the final battle, when it turns out all the drones (as well as Whiplash's armor) have a Self-Destruct Mechanism that Vanko is planning to use as a last attempt to kill the heroes.
  • Airborne Mook: All the drones are able to fly, but the Air Force Drones are the best example as they primarily attack the hero while flying in mid-air, whereas the other drones usually attack from the ground.
  • Alien Blood: Every time they are torn apart by the heroes, they bleed oil. Justified, since they are robots after all.
  • All There in the Manual: Some details about the Hammer Drones not shown in the movie are revealed in the Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, such as the facts that the Navy Drones have fixed-point coil lasers, the Air Force Drones have thermal vision vortex ring guns, and the Marine Drones have high-definition cameras.
  • American Robot: Subverted. At first, Justin Hammer tries to pass them off as this. The drones were built to serve in the U.S. Armed Force, they come in Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine models, and every model has a specialist weapon or device attached to it (a tank gun for the Army, missile launchers for the Navy, high-speed flight systems for the Air Force, and close-range machine guns for the Marines). Too bad Ivan Vanko has different plans for them...
  • Animated Armor: Initially, they were created to be simple armors that have to be piloted by someone inside of them. However, when Ivan Vanko was recruited to work with Hammer, he decided to turn the armors into drones capable of moving on their own, without needing any pilots.
  • Anti-Air: This is pretty much the Army Drones' job, as they are the ones charged with firing at Iron Man while he's flying in the air. They fail to actually hit him though, but they accidentally shoot down one of the Air Force Drones.
  • Anti-Climax: After Justin Hammer and Ivan Vanko spent a large part of the movie building an army of robots supposedly capable of challenging Iron Man, you'd be forgiven for expecting an epic showdown between them and the heroes during the climax... Instead, after the (admittedly pretty cool) Chase Scene, Iron Man and War Machine manage to easily defeat all of them in less than a minute.
  • Arm Cannon: The drones all have machine guns mounted in their arms, as well as missile launchers in the case of the Air Force and the Marine Drones, and also multigrenade launchers for the Army Drones.
  • Artistic License – Gun Safety: All the drones have their weapons fully loaded, despite the fact that they weren't expected to perform any live fire demonstrations during the presentation. Granted, this was probably Vanko's doing, but it's still odd that nobody involved in transporting them to the expo tried to check first.
  • Artistic License – Military: Even though they are supposed to be "the new face of the United States Military", there are only four different lines of drones (one for the U.S. Army, one for the Navy, one for the Air Force and one for the Marine Corps), while there are five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. For some reason, the United States Coast Guard is the only one that was not included (maybe Justin Hammer simply forgot it even existed?).
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: Once they are activated, they do nothing but attack Iron Man over and over, no matter what. Even when one of them crashes into an advertising screen, it immediately gets up and keeps attacking the hero like nothing happened. Justified, as it's in their program to specifically target Iron Man.
  • Attack Drone: They are an army of fully weaponized drones created for combat, and at the climax of the movie, Ivan Vanko remotely controls them to attack the heroes.
  • Backpack Cannon: The Air Force Drones have machine guns mounted on their back, allowing them to shoot at their target while flying.
  • Badass Army: They are an army of flying robots armed with missile launchers and tank guns that are supposed to replace the U.S. militaries. Slightly subverted in that they're not badass enough to defeat Iron Man and War Machine, though (admittedly, this is not exactly an easy task).
  • BFG: All the Army Drones have a shoulder-mounted tank gun that is certainly big enough to qualify.
  • The Blank: Unlike Iron Man's and Whiplash's armors, or even their previous design, the Hammer Drones lack anything resembling a human face, eyes or a mouth.
  • Boom, Headshot! / Your Head A-Splode: During the battle inside the Oracle Dome, War Machine blows off one of the Marine Drones' head with his guns before spraying the rest of its body with bullets.
    • Just before, Iron Man breaks a Marine Drone's head into pieces by kicking it with his knee, then crushes its remaining corpse with his elbow.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Kind of justified, actually. Even though they fire an astonishing number of bullets at the heroes, the fact that they were converted into drones without pilots inside them means the recovered space could have been used to provide them with more ammunition.
    • In addition, the trope is partially averted as the Navy Drones eventually run out of missiles, and the Army Drones never use their tank guns during the battle inside the Oracle Dome, implying they are short of ammunition. Plus, it can be easily assumed that all the drones that tried to fight the heroes hand-to-hand did so because they were out of bullets.
  • Bullet Sparks: In the final battle, they fire plenty of bullets on the heroes, which make lots and lots of sparks.
  • Cannon Fodder: It's implied the drones' real purpose is to get destroyed by Iron Man and War Machine's weapons so that they will be out of ammo when Whiplash arrives.
  • Chase Scene: The Air Force Drones have a pretty memorable one near the end of the film, where they pursue the protagonist all around Stark Expo, until they get all destroyed thanks to some Wronski Feints.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: The drones have repulsors that leave a blue-ish trail when they are activated, making it easier to differentiate them from Iron Man and War Machine (who both have brighter colors) in scenes where they are all flying.
    • In addition, each of the four line-up of drones has a different color, which also helps a bit to tell them apart.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: Averted. When the Hammer Drones attack in great numbers, Iron Man and War Machine manage to deal with them without too much trouble, and when faced against a single drone, they can defeat it just as easily, as seen with the one that tried to shoot a child.
  • Cool Guns: Of course, they are all filled with cool guns of all kinds. In particular, the Army Drones have a tank gun mounted on their shoulders that is based on the M242 Bushmaster.
  • Cranial Processing Unit: Destroying their heads seems to be a pretty effective way to kill them, as seen on several occasions during the final fight.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: They didn't do particularly well against Iron Man and War Machine, to say the least. During the battle inside the Oracle Dome, they all end up destroyed in barely a minute.
  • Cyber Cyclops: All of them have a rectangular camera on their face that they use to see, making them look like this trope.
  • Dark Is Evil: They have rather dark colors, and serve as the Big Bad's army.
  • Defeat Equals Explosion: Played with. They all explode shortly after being defeated, however it's due to Vanko activating their Self-Destruct Mechanism rather than because of the defeat in itself (that being said, he activated it because he and his drones lost the battle...).
  • Diagonal Cut: After Iron Man used his Death Blossom lasers to kill the last drones, a couple of them remain standing for a few seconds before collapsing, sliced in half.
  • Disastrous Demonstration: Invoked. Vanko deliberately waits until the Hammer Drones are being displayed at Stark Expo as a big event before taking control of them and letting them cause mayhem.
  • 11th-Hour Ranger: The Marine Drones stay dormant during the majority of the chase scene and are only activated near the end of it, just in time to join the other drones for the final fight against Iron Man and War Machine in the Oracle Dome.
  • Elite Mooks: While they are still defeated without too much trouble by the heroes, the drones are definitely far more powerful and dangerous compared to the Hammer security guards. Heck, with all the firepower at their disposal, they're arguably some of the strongest and most destructive Mooks within the entire MCU.
  • Everyone Chasing You: All the Air Force Drones plus War Machine chase Iron Man for several minutes during the finale, and later the other drones follow him to the Oracle Dome as well.
  • Evil Is Bigger: Downplayed compared to Iron Monger, but the drones are at least one full head taller than human beings, including the heroes when they wear their Powered Armors.
  • Evil Knockoff: The Hammer Drones are low-quality knockoffs of Iron Man's armors, designed to compete with him.
  • Eye Lights Out: Downplayed. Some, but not all, of the drones have the light of their arc reactor fading off when they get killed.
  • Faceless Goons: In comparison to Iron Man and War Machine, they have particularly non-human faces, which serves to dehumanize them and make sure that the audience won't empathize too much with them or feel too bad when they are violently massacred.
  • Family-Unfriendly Violence: In the battle towards the end of the movie, the drones get slaughtered by the heroes in rather brutal ways, such as having their head blown off, getting cut in half or being smashed into pieces. Even if they are not flesh-and-blood, the way their oil is splattering every time they get hurt still makes it look like a bloodbath and can be a little disturbing to watch...
  • Fake Ultimate Mook: Despite being supposed to "make Iron Man look like an antique", they all get beaten by him fairly easily, and are shown to have less efficient firepower and cannot take nearly as much damages as him.
  • Flight: All of them have flight capability due to being designed with repulsor flight technology. The Air Force models in particular are skilled enough to effectively chase Iron Man throughout Stark Expo for a long period of time.
  • Flying Firepower: In addition to having the ability to fly, they all have machine guns built in their wrist and are equipped with missile launchers, tank guns, grenade launchers and other firearms of all kinds.
  • Four Is Death: There are four different lines of drones, each representing a branch of the U.S. Armed Force (even though there are actually five branches...), and they all are equally deadly Killer Robots.
  • Friendly Fire: One of the Army Drones accidently shoots down an Air Force Drone that was chasing Iron Man, while targeting the latter. Shortly afterward, it happens again in the battle inside the Oracle Dome, where one of the drones fires a missile at Iron Man and hits the Marine Drone that was behind him.
  • Glowing Mechanical Eyes: The rectangular cameras on the drones' faces that serve as their eyes are constantly glowing in blue light.
  • Gone Horribly Right: Justin Hammer insisted to Vanko that he wanted the drones to steal the show. Well, they did... by wreaking havoc and causing panic at Stark Expo. Probably not the way he intended, but at least he can be sure that every newspaper is going to talk about it.
  • Gone Horribly Wrong: From Justin Hammer's point of view at least, the drones presentation didn't exactly go as planned. From Ivan Vanko's view, on the other hand, everything went perfectly according to his plans.
  • Grenade Launcher: The Army Drones all have a multigrenade launcher installed on their wrist.
  • Geo Effects: When the drones arrive in the Oracle Dome, they surround Iron Man and War Machine from a much more elevated position, which according to Rhodey give them the advantage over the two of them in the ensuing battle. Subverted, as the drones loose the fight anyway.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: During the final battle, some drones' parts are used by Iron Man to do this to other drones
  • Guilt-Free Extermination War: Being robots, they obviously feel nothing about killing the heroes, and unsurprisingly, neither do the heroes have any guilt about destroying them.
  • Hack Your Enemy: They started off as Hammer Industries' products, but Vanko easily manages to hack them to make them become his own Mooks.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: At the end of the battle inside the Oracle Dome, all the remaining drones get sliced in two by Iron Man and his Death Blossom lasers.
  • Heart Light: Just like Iron Man's, Iron Monger's, War Machine's and Whiplash's armors, the Hammer Drones have a glowing arc reactor installed in their chest that powers them.
  • Heavily Armored Mook
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: At least one of the Air Force Drones gets blasted out of the sky by a misplaced shot from an Army Drone.
    • It happens quickly, but during the final fight we can see in the background one of the Marine Drones being blown up by another drone's missile that missed Iron Man.
  • Hollywood Hacking: Ivan Vanko managed to hack into their system with incredible ease. Apparently, Hammer's security systems are just the worst. Lampshaded by Vanko:
    Ivan Vanko: Software shit.
  • Homing Projectile: The Navy Drones and Air Force Drones both have guided missile launchers mounted on their arms. During the chase scene in the carpark, one of the Air Force Drones fires two of its missiles at Iron Man, only for him to manage a High-Speed Missile Dodge.
  • Immune to Bullets: Surprisingly averted, unlike Iron Man's and War Machine's and even the second Whiplash's armors, they are totally vulnerable to bullets. Rhodey is notably able to take down several of them with any of his different types of guns in the final battle.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Downplayed, as they actually manage to hit the heroes when they're firing normal bullets with their machine guns, but they completely miss every time they try to use a weapon that may have a chance to seriously hurt them such as the tank guns or missile launchers.
  • Incredibly Obvious Bomb: They become these in the end, with their arc reactors ticking and flashing red light faster and faster, making it clear to everyone (except Pepper Potts, surprisingly) that they are going to self-destruct.
  • Informed Ability: According to Justin Hammer, the drones are supposed to "make Iron Man look like an antique" and to be capable of replacing not only him, but also the U.S. militaries. However, they are clearly shown to be far less powerful than any of Iron Man's armors, and they can't even withstand bullets particularly well, making Hammer's claims extremely doubtful at best.
  • Infrared Xray Camera: Apparently, some of the drones have thermal vision cameras.
  • In-Series Nickname: Tony Stark refers to them as "Hammeroids" at one point. The term became very popular among fans.
    Tony: I will formally apologize when I am not fighting off a Hammer-oid attack.
  • Instant Awesome: Just Add Mecha!: They are the first humanoid-shaped robots of large size introduced in the MCU, but certainly not the last ones.
  • It's Raining Men: Near the end of the movie, the drones go after Iron Man and War Machine inside the Oracle Dome. Once there, they all drop from a certain height and land around the two heroes one-by-one, surrounding them. Since they are robots made of metal and they slightly used their Rocket Boots to slow down their descent, the fall doesn't hurt them at all.
  • Job-Stealing Robot: Justin Hammer is planning to make them replace the U.S. militaries in order to reduce human casualties (he still says he consider human presence as necessary though, but he's only talking about men in Powered Armors), as well as Iron Man himself. In a sense, when they are turned into drones they also technically stole the job of whoever was supposed to pilot them as Powered Armors.
  • Killer Robot: They are heavily armed robots designed for the sole purpose of destroying their enemies.
  • Kinetic Weapons Are Just Better: Even though they have similar technology to Iron Man, who has Repulsors, Chest Blaster and Frickin' Laser Beams , and were created by Vanko, who is capable of creating Electro-whips, the drones only use relatively common weapons, such as machine guns, missiles and grenade launchers. It didn't really help them win against the heroes during the climactic battle, though.
  • Law of Inverse Recoil: Justified. The Army Drones utilize rather huge tank guns, but they manage to avoid being Recoiled Across the Room every time they shoot by using foot-mounted anchor spikes that serve as outriggers.
  • Let's Split Up, Gang!: While chasing Iron Man through the carpark, a few Air Force Drones split up from the others in order to lure him back to Stark Expo. Also, when the four lines of drones are activated they all go on separate directions, with the Air Force Drones following Iron Man through the sky, the Navy Drones going at the exit to fire their missiles, the Army Drones accompanying them outside and placing themselves at the stairs to shoot at Tony, and the Marine Drones staying where they are.
  • Light Is Not Good: Despite having a Heart Light and a glowing camera on their face, they are definitely not good guys. Instead, they're dangerous Killer Robots used by the Big Bad to try to kill the heroes.
  • Losing Your Head: Due to them being robots, Hammer can remove one of the drones' head and shows it to Vanko when asking what it was without it being a problem. Vanko himself did the same thing the first time he comes face-to-face with them, while they were still Powered Armors.
    Justin Hammer: What is that? Ivan...What’s this? Is that a helmet? It doesn’t look like a helmet to me. How are you supposed to get a head in there? Jack, could you put your head in there? Try to put your head in there. Go ahead. Try to put your head in there. See, Ivan? He can’t put his head in there. That’s...That's... That’s not a helmet. It’s a head.
  • Machine Blood: The way their oil is spurting every time they are injured during the fight against Iron Man and War Machine makes it very reminiscent of blood.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: This trope is the Navy Drones' speciality, as they all have two shoulder-mounted missile launchers, each of them carrying six missiles, plus three others mounted in a pod on each of their arms, making a total of eighteen missiles per drones. The Air Force Drones and the Marine Drones also have missiles inside their arms.
  • Made of Plasticine: Compared to Iron Man's and War Machine's as well as Whiplash's armors, at least. During the final battle, the two heroes manage to tear them apart as easily as if they were made of cardboard.
  • Mecha-Mooks: The Hammer Drones are a typical example of this trope. They are non-sentient robots sent by the Big Bad to kill the heroes, attack them in large number, but are quite easily destroyed in various manners. Good thing Vanko made them drones rather than men in Powered Armors, this way the audience has no problem when they are brutally slaughtered by the heroes.
  • Military Salute: Vanko tells Justin Hammer that "make salute" is the only thing they are ready do for now. Of course, he was lying and the drones can do much more than that, but it turns out they can indeed make a military salute and they all do one at the same time in response to Rhodey's during the presentation at Stark Expo.
  • Missile Lock-On: Vanko locked all of them on Iron Man, causing the Air Force Drones and War Machine to chase him unrelentingly through Stark Expo while the other drones are firing at him from the ground.
  • Mistaken Identity: One of them mistakes a kid wearing an Iron Man mask for the real deal and tries to shoot him. Fortunately, the real Iron Man shows up just in time and blast the drone down as it realises its mistake.
  • Mook Carryover: Sort of. They were first created by Justin Hammer (as Powered Armors) and were supposed to be utilized by him, however when Ivan Vanko was hired to work on them, he ended up taking control of them and using them to fulfill his own goals.
  • Mook Chivalry: When some of the drones try to fight the heroes hand-to-hand, for the most part they only go one at a time. Though the others continue to shoot, at least.
  • More Dakka: They all have machine guns mounted in their wrist (and also in their back in the case of the Air Force Drones) that they use to strafe their enemies with plenty of bullets.
  • Mundane Utility: They are high-tech robots equipped with all kinds of weaponry. What does Justin Hammer use them for? Decorate his presentation and respond to War Machine's salute. Justified, as Vanko told him it was the only things they could do.
  • Murder by Mistake: Due to their high number, some of the Hammer Drones that tried to shoot at Iron Man end up killing other drones behind him instead.
  • Navy SEALs: The Navy Drones, of course, are supposed to become the new Navy SEALs.
  • Noisy Robots: Similar to Iron Man's armors, the Hammer Drones make a lot of sounds whenever they move or when they adjust their weapons.
  • 1-Dimensional Thinking / 2-D Space: When Iron Man flew through the Stark Expo's Unisphere, all the Air Force Drones followed him inside rather than simply flying over it, even though he was already out by the time they arrived. This caused all of them to get destroyed.
  • One-Hit-Point Wonder: Any of them can be killed with only one of Iron Man's repulsor blasts, one of his missiles, or even with just a punch.
  • The Pawns Go First: If he had wanted to, Vanko could have joined the drones in the battle against Iron Man and War Machine, but he deliberately chose to wait until they're all destroyed instead. Presumably, he wanted them to soften the two heroes before he fights them himself.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Not as much as Iron Man or War Machine, but they are still capable of causing a great deal of havoc. Especially the Navy Drones, which provoke a lot of destruction in Stark Expo with their missiles.
  • Plot Hole: Even though there were only eight drones per branches of the U.S. military during their presentation, making it a total of of thirty-two drones, they are clearly much more numerous than that a few moments later during the battle against Iron Man and War Machine.
    • Also, the Air Force Drone 0303 apparently gets destroyed twice according to Vanko's computer, the first time when it's accidently shot down by the Army Drones, and the second time when two drones collides with each other and crash into a pillar in the carpark.
  • Powered Armor: They started off as this, but Vanko decided to turn them into drones because, as he explains to Hammer, "drones better".
  • Priceless Paperweight: Each of them is a high-tech robot worth tens of millions dollars, but when Vanko pretends they are not combat-ready, Justin Hammer decides to only use them as little more than background decoration for his presentation. He even refers to them as "overpriced paperweights" at one point.
    Justin Hammer: And now your overpriced paperweights are gonna look like a backdrop to my demonstration.
  • Quantity vs. Quality: Vanko clearly focused them on quantity, while focusing his second armor on quality. Though great in number, the drones have relatively weak firepower compared to the likes of Iron Man and War Machine and are rather easy to defeat, whereas Vanko's second armor is a single model but is way stronger and tougher than all the drones combined.
  • Real Robot Genre: The Hammer Drones mostly qualify as Real Robots. They are mass-produced units built by a weapons manufacturing company, they only use normal firearms (unlike Iron Man or Whiplash), they were given some tests (as seen in the video during the Congress), and they are supposed to be sold to the U.S. militaries to fight during wars.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: It's not their eyes, but each drones' arc reactors turn red when Vanko activates their Self-Destruct Mechanism, warning the heroes (and the audience) they are about to explode.
  • Replacement Mooks: At first, Justin Hammer tried to have henchmen wearing Powered Armors, but they turned out to be rather ineffective (not to mention dangerous for their own pilots). As a result, Vanko decided to replace them with more capable drones, justifying himself by saying that "People make problem. Drone better." (in reality, he mostly wanted to be able to hijack them and send them after Iron Man).
  • Required Secondary Powers: Due to the recoil created by their tank guns, the Army Drones have anchor spikes mounted on their feet that they can use to stabilize.
  • Robo Cam: We're given several shots of their vision, notably when one of them nearly kills a kid with an Iron Man mask.
  • Robot Names: As shown on Vanko's computer, each individual drone has a name, which starts with some figure that is followed by the diminutive of the branch of the U.S. Armed Forces to which it belongs and a number:
    • The Army Drones are referred as lozenge - ARM - 0101 up to 0108.
    • The Navy Drones are referred as barred square - NAV - 0301 up to 0308 (oddly, there are no number 0201 to 0208),
    • The Air Force Drones are referred as triangle - AIR - 0301 up to 0308.
    • The Marine Drones are referred as star - MAR - 0401 up to 0408.
    • Whilpash is referred as a big triangle - HSD - 001.
    • War Machine (whose suit is also known as Variable Threat Response Battle Suit) is referred as a green lozenge - VTRB - 0001.
    • Iron Man is referred as a white circle - IRM - 0001.
  • Robot Soldier: They are an army of robots created to be used by the militaries to fight during wars in place of human soldiers. Although Vanko has other plans for them, but it still involves them participating in a battle.
  • Robots Are Just Better: This is basically the reason given by Vanko to make them Attack Drones rather than Powered Armors (although the real reason is that he's secretly planning to use them for himself).
    Ivan Vanko: Drone better.
    Justin Hammer: What? Drone better? Why is drone better? Why is drone better?
    Ivan Vanko: People make problem. Trust me. Drone better.
  • Rocket Boots: Much like Iron Man, they all have those in their foot. The Air Force Drones also have reactors in their back in order to help them fly better.
  • Russian Language: After the drones are hijacked by Vanko, their systems are written in Russian. In addition, some of them are apparently communicating in Russian language.
    Hammer Technician: Each set of drones is... is communicating in its own unique language.
    Pepper Potts: Choose one and focus on that.
    Justin Hammer: Have you tried Russian? Why don't you try Russian?
  • Sapient Tank: Downplayed as they are still machines, but the Army Drones are essentially humanoid tanks and have a robotic intelligence.
  • Seeing Through Another's Eyes: Everything the drones are seeing through the cameras on their faces is also seen by Ivan Vanko on his computer.
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism: At the end of the battle, it turns out all the drones have one that Whiplash activates as a last attempt to kill the heroes.
  • Semper Fi: The Marine Drones, being huge robots equipped with machine guns, missile launchers, repulsors and everything. That being said, they are not particularly stronger that the other drones...
  • Send in the Clones: The Hammer Drones are of course inspired by Iron Man. Just like several countries were trying to do, Justin Hammer wanted to create mass-produced Iron Men. So, at the movie's climax, the hero basically has to fight an army of knockoffs of himself.
  • Sequel Escalation: At the end of the first film, Tony only had to fight one guy in Powered Armor (Iron Monger). In the second film, he and Rhodey naturally have to fight an entire army of robots plus another guy in Powered Armor (Whiplash).
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: At two different points, Iron Man dodges the shots of some drones, causing them to hit other drones behind him.
  • Shooting Superman: They keep trying to kill Iron Man and War Machine by firing normal bullets at them, even though it clearly has little to no effect on their armors. Granted, from time to time they also use heavier weapons that have better chances to actually harm them, such as tank guns and missiles, but they tend to miss every time they shoot those ones...
  • Shoulder Cannon: The Army Drones have a huge tank gun mounted on their shoulder.
  • Sliding Scale of Robot Intelligence: They are straight Bricks, only capable of obeying their programming and not much more.
  • Somebody Set Up Us the Bomb: Without anyone knowing it, Ivan Vanko installed a powerful Self-Destruct Mechanism inside the drones before they were sent to the expo. He ends up activating it near the end of the film, and the ensuing explosions cause a lot of destruction within Stark Expo, but fortunately the protagonists manage to get to safety.
  • Space Marine: Or rather, robot Marines, in the case of the Marine Drones.
  • Stalker Without a Crush: They ruthlessly hunt down Iron Man and will never stop, ever, until they manage to kill him. Justified, since they are robots and have been programmed to target him.
  • Stompy Mooks: They make quite a lot of noise when they are walking, when they land on the ground, or even when they're just moving.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: Even though they are quite clearly outmatched, the drones keep attacking Iron Man and War Machine over and over, until all of them are destroyed. To be fair, this is only due to their programming, not because they really believed they could win.
  • Superior Successor: While nowhere near as effective as Tony Stark's armors, the drones are still working much better than Hammer's previous Powered Armors.
  • Super-Persistent Missile: The Air Force Drones act like this during the finale, relentlessly following Iron Man all across Stark Expo no matter what's on their way. They don't even let the mere fact of crashing into obstacles (like when one of them bump into an advertising screen) stop them from pursuing him.
  • Superpowered Mooks: Similar to the heroes, the drones have an arc reactor powering them and are equipped with repulsors that allow them to fly, and more importantly with a vast array of weapons that include machine guns, missile launchers and tank guns among others, all of which making them a force to be reckoned with.
  • Super Weight: They are Type 4, just like Iron Man, War Machine, and Whiplash with his second suit.
  • Super Wrist-Gadget: All of them have machine guns, missiles and other types of weapons built into their wrists.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome: Naturally, the Army Drones' tank guns have a lot of recoil, hence why they need to use their foot-mounted anchor spikes in order to stabilize when they shoot with it.
  • Taking You with Me: Just like Whiplash's second armor, they blow themselves up after their defeat as a last attempt to kill the heroes. Needless to say, it doesn't work. While the ensuing explosions cause lots of collateral damages, the heroes manage to escape in time.
  • Tank Goodness: Again, the Army Drones have a shoulder-mounted tank gun that they use againt Iron Man.
  • That Poor Car: During the climactic chase scene, the Air Force Drones (and War Machine) follow Iron Man through a carpark and they set off almost all the cars' alarms.
  • Three-Point Landing: Surprisingly, averted. During the climactic battle in the Oracle Dome, they all land in a standing posture. Presumably, having a good dozen ThreePointLandings in a row would diminish the drama. Also, as drones, they have higher g-tolerances than humans, and don't need to cushion their landings.
  • Throw the Mook at Them: It's easy to miss, but shortly before all the drones get destroyed by the Death Blossom laser during the final fight, one of them gets grabbed by Iron Man and then thrown on another drone, destroying both of them.
  • Time Bomb: Become this after Vanko activated their Self-Destruct Mechanism. While no precise time limit is given, it takes them approximately 30 seconds of movie time to blow up, forcing Iron Man to hurry up to go pick Pepper and put her into safety before the explosions kill her.
  • Tin-Can Robot: Downplayed, but their overall appearance looks a bit like this trope.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Following Iron Man inside the Stark Expo's Unisphere wasn't really a good idea, and led to the destruction of roughly all the Air Force Drones. The other drones don't seem to have a particularly good sense of self-preservation either, as they keep attacking the heroes, including by trying to fight them hand-to-hand, even when it's obvious they don't stand a chance. Justified though, as they are programmed to act this way.
  • Victory by Endurance: It's heavily implied the reason Vanko sent them after Iron Man and War Mar Marchine is to force the heroes to burn most of their energy and ammunition against them (notably Iron Man's one-time use Death Blossom lasers) before he goes fight them himself.
  • Villain Override: They are victims of this during the expo, in which Vanko takes control of all of them to go after Iron Man.
  • Walking Armory: Much like Iron Man's and War Machine's armors, all the drones are equipped with a huge amount of weaponry:
    • The Army Drones have machine gun and multigrenade launcher on their wrists, and a tank gun on their shoulder.
    • The Navy Drones also have machine gun on their wrist, plus two missile launchers on their shoulders and missiles mounted in a pod on each arm.
    • The Air Force Drones have machine guns on their wrist and their back, and two wrist-mounted missile launchers.
    • The Marine Drones have machine gun as well as missile launcher on their wrists.
  • Walking Tank: The Army Drones. They are basically walking tanks with a humanoid shape.
  • We Have Reserves:
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: Due to them being drones, the heroes have absolutely no issues with destroying them in violent ways. Considering they're basically mindless machines, it's hard to blame them.
  • Why Am I Ticking?: As it turns out, Vanko installed a Self-Destruct Mechanism in every drones and activates it at the end, causing all of them to explode after half a minute of ticking.
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: The one that tried to kill the kid certainly didn't hurry to actually fire, which gave Iron Man enough time to show up and blast it into pieces. In addition, when the drones start landing in the Oracle Dome, they wait until all of them have arrived and even allow Iron Man and War Machine to close their helmets before attacking.
  • Would Hurt a Child: During the climax, one of the drones tries to kill a child with an Iron Man mask note . In its defense, it genuinely thought he was the real (and very adult) Iron Man.
  • Wronski Feint: Most of the Air Force Drones get victims of this tactic during the climactic chase scene, with some of them following Iron Man in a carpark and crashing into pillars, another one colliding with an advertising screen a few moments later (although this one manages to recover pretty quickly), and finally all the remaining ones being destroyed after trying to follow Iron Man in the Stark Expo's Unisphere.
  • You Are Number 6: As shown on Vanko's computer, each individual drone has a number assigned to it that follows a figure symbolizing its branch from the U.S. Armed Forces and the diminutive of the branch's name:
    • The Army Drones are referred as lozenge - ARM - 0101 up to 0108.
    • The Navy Drones are referred as barred square - NAV - 0301 up to 0308 (oddly, there are no number 0201 to 0208),
    • The Air Force Drones are referred as triangle - AIR - 0301 up to 0308.
    • The Marine Drones are referred as star - MAR - 0401 up to 0408.
    • Whilpash is referred as a big triangle - HSD - 001.
    • War Machine is referred as a green lozenge - VTRB - 0001.
    • Iron Man is referred as a white circle - IRM - 0001.
  • Zerg Rush: They are clearly a lot weaker than Iron Man and War Machine, with their only advantage being that they vastly outnumber them. Therefore, they try to use sheer number to overwhelm the two heroes in the final battle. This might have worked if Iron Man didn't have the Death Blossom lasers...

Associates

    French Prison Guard 

French Prison Guard

Species: Human

Citizenship: French

Portrayed By: Karim Saleh

Appearances: Iron Man 2

A French prison guard who helped Justin Hammer to get Ivan Vanko out of jail.


  • Bilingual Bonus: All of his lines of dialogue are in French.
  • Corrupt Cop: Or prison guard, in his case. Justin Hammer bribes him to break out Ivan Vanko and bring him to him.
  • French Jerk: He is french, and is a Corrupt Cop.
  • Ignored Expert: He's aware of Vanko's unpredictable nature and tries to warn Justin Hammer about it, but Hammer dismisses it.
  • Jail Bake: He helps Ivan Vanko to escape from his cell and fake his death by giving him a meal tray with some plastic explosives hidden in place of the potatoes.
  • Karma Houdini: Despite his complicity in Vanko's prison break, which led to the deaths of at least two people, he's never seen receiving any comeuppance.
  • No Name Given: His actual name is unknown.
  • Only Sane Man: He seems to be the only associate of Justin Hammer who realizes just how dangerous Ivan Vanko really is.
  • Wardens Are Evil: He's a prison guard, and has no problem with letting a prisoner escape and sacrificing another.
  • You're Insane!: Tells Justin Hammer that Vanko is crazy, in the latter's presence.
    French Prison Guard: Je te laisse pas avec lui, il est ouf !Translation 

    Ivan Vanko / Whiplash 
See the Other Supervillains page.

Advanced Idea Mechanics (A.I.M.)

    In General 

Appearances: Iron Man 3 | Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

A scientific research and development company founded and owned by Aldrich Killian. They are the developers of Extremis, an advanced form of gene therapy that heals and regenerates injuries, deformities, and even psychological damage.


  • Action Bomb: The Extremis soldiers can turn themselves into living explosives.
  • Adaptational Wimp: The organization responsible for the creation of such powerful beings such as the Super-Adaptoid, MODOK, and the Cosmic Cube are reduced to a more easily defeated terrorist group albeit with a dangerous formula at their disposal, military subjects and the US Vice President as a mole.
  • Biotech Is Better: The Extremis soldiers are able to easily rip apart Tony's armors.
  • Blessed with Suck: Extremis makes you virtually unkillable, but it also seems to make you a violently unstable drug addict and you might explode if you're not careful.
  • Body Horror: Those who take Extremis have their skin basically turn into magma.
  • Burning with Anger: Extremis grants its users fire powers, with Killian being able to actually breath it.
  • The Cameo: An Extremis soldier appears as a fighter in Xialing's fight club.
  • Corporate Conspiracy: A.I.M. is behind various terrorist attacks falsely attributed to the Ten Rings so Killian can own the War on Terror.
  • Demoted to Extra: A.I.M. in the comics is one of Marvel's premiere villain groups. In the MCU they spotlight as major villains for one movie, their role as Iron Man's usual enemy organization being taken by the Ten Rings.
  • Elite Mooks: The Extremis soldiers, more dangerous than the average henchmen.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: They have soldiers of both genders and various races among their ranks.
  • False Flag Operation: Their ultimate plan, faking attacks by the Ten Rings to gain power within the U.S. government.
  • Flawed Prototype: Extremis can grow back limbs, but also turn people into living bombs.
  • Foil: To Tony Stark's Iron Man technology, Powered Armor of a modular design that can be fitted with a multitude of weapons. Extremis is an organic superhuman enhancement meant to heal injuries with its Required Secondary Powers serving as weapons.
  • Genetic Engineering Is the New Nuke: Killian intends to sell Extremis for military purposes.
  • Healing Factor: The objective of Extremis is to imbue this onto its subjects up to and including regrowing limbs. Extremis-powered agents invoke this to make themselves superhuman (along with being sentient nuclear reactors).
  • Human Weapon: The purpose of Extremis; subjects are superhumanly strong, fast, resistant to damage, and can generate enough heat to melt steel. Killian is so powerful he can breathe fire. Unfortunately, three out of four people end up losing control of their powers and just explode. Human weapon can also mean human bomb.
  • Incendiary Exponent: Extremis, whuch grants its users fire powers.
  • Magic Pants: The Extremis soldiers' cloths seem to magically stay unburned.
  • No Conservation of Energy: The Extremis regeneration works even when the body doesn't have any obvious source of mass to replace destroyed tissue, let alone possess the required amount of energy to do so and release such an immense amount of heat that can melt metal. Extremis users are never seen eating piles of food or taking in some kind of fuel to sustain them.
  • Not Wearing Tights: The organization's iconic beekeeper suits are completely absent from their portrayal here.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Killian and, on a lesser scale, Extremis soldiers can do a lot of damage to a town.
  • Playing with Fire: People upgraded with Extremis can generate enough heat to melt metal. One of them can breathe fire.
  • Power Glows: Extremis superpowers cause users to glow red, lighting up their skeleton and internal organs. At lower power levels, it can look like Volcanic Veins.
  • Power Incontinence: Zig-Zagged. Some Extremis users lose control of their powers due to incompatible genes and/or a willpower deficiency and explode (with their deaths then being explained as Mandarin attacks). Others can control their powers with no such risk.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: One of the effects of Extremis, crossed with Glowing Eyes of Doom.
  • Required Secondary Powers: Extremis is just a tissue-regeneration mechanism whose side effects result in extreme durability and heat generation as requirements for said body-part regeneration. Heat is released by all biological processes (which is the source of living body heat as well as the elevated temperatures of a fever) and the heat that would be released by the body as it is regenerating an entire limb in seconds would be tremendous. Similarly, a body physically capable of generating that kind of heat and withstanding the temperatures would be naturally very durable, which lends the Extremis soldiers their strength and toughness on top of tissue regeneration. So in this case, the Required Secondary Powers become the primary powers of the Extremis troops.
  • Sociopathic Soldier: All the Extremis goons are former soldiers who lost limbs and more than a few of them are rather psychotic. It's never stated whether it's some kind of long-term side effect of Extremis (Pepper doesn't go nuts), or Killian deliberately sought out this kind of person.
  • Super-Power Meltdown: Some of those exposed to Extremis are at risk of exploding.
  • Super Soldier: The Extremis soldiers.
  • Super Strength: One of the benefits of Extremis.

Leadership

    Dr. Aldrich Killian / "The Mandarin" (Usurper) 

Dr. Aldrich Killian

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/akillianprofilepic.png
"I'll own the War on Terror."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): A.I.M.

Portrayed By: Guy Pearce

Voiced By: Alfredo Gabriel Basurto (Latin-American Spanish dub), Luis Posada (European Spanish dub), Masato Obara (Japanese dub), Lionel Tua (French dub), Frédéric Paquet (Canadian French dub), Viktor Neumann (German dub), Duda Ribeiro (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3

"You gave me the greatest gift that anybody's ever given me: desperation."

The founder and CEO of A.I.M., who steals the name of the Ten Rings' legendary leader for his own selfish and shortsighted ends. Seeking revenge against Tony Stark after being stood up by him, Killian crafts an elaborate plan of revenge against Stark that will bring the United States into an international conflict and make A.I.M. the most sought-after company in the defense industry.


  • 90% of Your Brain: Downplayed, but still there. When showing off the "live feed" of his brain, he makes a point to show off a small chunk of his brain that doesn't seem to be used very much. At least, not while he isn't using any Extremis powers.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: A vengeful scientist that Tony was a massive dick to in the past. Lampshaded when Tony points out that one of the major themes of the movie is how we all create our own demons.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: He's way better looking here than he is in the comics.
  • Adaptational Badass: Never had powers in the comics.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, Aldrich Killian felt guilty about creating Extremis and killed himself at the start of the story. In the movie, he is instead the very much alive founder of the villainous A.I.M. organization and impersonating the MCU version of the Mandarin.
  • Animal Motifs: Dragons. He has them tattooed on his chest and he can breathe fire like one.
  • Ascended Extra: Aldrich Killian was a minor character written out within the first few pages of the "Extremis" arc in the comics. The Iron Man 3 version is the main antagonist.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: The leader of A.I.M., and the only Extremis Super Soldier who fights Tony to a stand-still in the Final Battle.
  • Ax-Crazy: Only when his blood is really up. Normally, he's rather friendly and calm.
  • Badass Boast: Near the end of the film, Killian gives us this (albeit he's lying):
    "No more false faces. You said you wanted 'The Mandarin'...you're looking right at him. It was always me, Tony, right from the start. I AM THE MANDARIN!"
  • Badass Bookworm: He was always a brilliant scientist, but he also became an outstanding martial artist after embarking on his quest. He also has super-strength from Extremis.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: After his rise to power, Killian takes to wearing business suits.
  • Beard of Evil: Had one during the early stages of Extremis trials, as video evidence shows.
  • Beneath the Mask: Killian managed to rebuild himself, both physically and psychologically, into a good-looking, wealthy, confident ubermensch. In the scene where he admits Pepper is imprisoned as his trophy, the mask slips, and we briefly see the nervous, weak Stalker with a Crush he's always been.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: Subverted. At the beginning of the third film, it's not clear how much he is working with the Mandarin, but they clearly both have the same general "destroy Tony Stark" goal. In reality, while the Mandarin does exist (as revealed in All Hail the King), the one we see here is a fake, and Killian is behind the whole thing, using the fake Mandarin to cover up his illegal experiments.
  • Big "NO!": Twice. First, when Tony Stark seals him in the Mark 42 armor to blow him up. Second, his last words as Pepper sends one of Tony's missiles at him.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Played with. He does call himself the Mandarin, but he's an impostor, and only one of three people known to use the name. He's much closer to Mallen, but never uses that name.
  • Composite Character:
    • He invents Extremis like comics Aldrich Killian, but also has the fiery powers of Mallen (the villain of the "Extremis" storyline), and the dragon tattoos, martial arts skills, and Social Darwinist mindset of the Mandarin's modern comic book incarnations.
    • His blonde hair and elitist attitude also bear many similarities to Edwin Cord, Simon Krieger, and Gregory Stark. In the earliest drafts of the movie, he was actually meant to be Krieger (with Edwin Cord assisting him much like Vice President Rodriguez does in the final film), but his name was ultimately changed to Aldrich Killian.
    • A few aspects of his character come from M.O.D.O.K., head of A.I.M. in the comics. Fittingly, in the non-canon video game sequel, he becomes M.O.D.O.K. after his "death" in the film.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: Unlike Stane and Vanko who relied on advanced suits of armor to kill Tony Stark in the previous Iron Man films, Killian utilized the Extremis virus that granted him superhuman powers.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: What with being the founder of A.I.M. (terrorist sponsor!) and all.
  • Create Your Own Villain: It's Tony Stark's petty joke back in 1999 that sets Killian on his Start of Darkness.
  • Diabolical Mastermind: The true mastermind of the film, leading the criminal organization A.I.M. in drumming up fake terrorist attacks.
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation: He is killed by an Extremis-afflicted Pepper Potts, while in the comics, Killian's death is a suicide.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: His whole vendetta is because Stark blew him off once thirteen years ago. His real crime spree is more of a combined cover-up for the failures of A.I.M.'s Extremis technology and scam/racket to create demand for the super-soldiers A.I.M. can supply. Tony's decision to investigate and openly oppose him brings him even more directly into the line of fire.
  • The Dog Bites Back: It's not Tony who finishes him off. It's Pepper, whom he kidnapped and injected with Extremis.
  • Evil Counterpart: Killian is a brilliant and arrogant weapon designer like Tony Stark, who is attracted to Pepper and has experimented on his own body. However, he uses his creations for evil instead of atoning for past mistakes. Also, in contrast, Killian was insecure and fragile, whereas Tony was just a jerk and so full of himself that he didn't notice his glaring problems.
  • Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor: He's obviously trying to be the kind of villain who has a horribly and memorably sadistic sense of humor. The problem is that his jokes are dull and labored, even given their sadism.
  • Evil Is Burning Hot: Can generate temperatures of up to 3000 degrees with his skin (see Touch of Death below) and in one scene he breathes fire.
  • Evil Is Petty: Goes to extreme lengths to spite Tony just because the guy was a jerk to him back on New Year's Eve of 1999.
  • Evil Makeover: Became much more sharp-dressed after his Start of Darkness.
  • Evil Plan: The payoff of his plotting in Iron Man 3 is to monopolize the War on Terror by supplying both terrorists and the military that hunts them. On a personal level, he wants Pepper to be his trophy and Tony to suffer.
  • Expy: His status as a character who steals the mantle of the Mandarin makes him one of Xin Zhang from Iron Man: Armored Adventures.
  • Fanservice Pack: Thanks to the Extremis, he's gotten buff.
  • Faux Affably Evil: His initial charming demeanor only makes his true spiteful insanity all the more disturbing.
  • Foil: Tony is incredibly smooth, born into wealth, and has a heart of gold. Killian used to be a loser, had to work his way up to the top, and is a sociopath.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: Goes from being a nerd to a Corrupt Corporate Executive who's the head of A.I.M., and it turns out that this trope is the MO of his plan — to everyone besides the audience and Tony, he's still just a nobody.
  • Genius Cripple: Before he co-created Extremis, he needed a cane to walk.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Averted with regards to the Iron Man trilogy. Co-writer Drew Pearce revealed that Killian's line "It was me, from the very start." just refers to his being the mastermind of the Extremis scheme. He was never the real Mandarin — he stole the name from the Ten Rings.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: His hatred for Tony comes from his jealousy over Stark's successes.
  • Healing Factor: The main power given to him by Extremis. It's powerful enough that he can regrow limbs in seconds and can even recover, albeit severely weakened, from being caught in an explosion.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: His development of Extremis backfires big time when Pepper offs him for good.
  • I Have Your Wife: He kidnaps Tony's girlfriend Pepper, and the President so that the heroes will stay out of the way.
  • Karmic Death: He is killed by Pepper, who was given Extremis powers because of him.
  • Kick the Dog: He murders Maya, his chief Extremis researcher, for no reason other than to pile more misery on Tony.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Is this due to Extremis. During the final battle, he's able to keep up with an armored-up Tony in hand-to-hand combat (and at one point, dodge a rapid-fire barrage of repulsor blasts from Shotgun, Tony's fastest armor, with ease), and strong enough to easily rip Tony's armors apart with nothing but his red-hot hands.
  • Loony Fan: He was Tony's big fan back in 1999, but Tony saw him as a nuisance. He wasn't actually loony, but Tony, being a jerk at the time, just blew him off.
  • The Man Behind the Man: He's been preparing for this role for years, ever since Tony snubbed him. His ego means it's pretty clear from the start that he's behind some of the things happening to Tony. In fact, he's the real Big Bad behind all of the things that happen to Tony in Iron Man 3, and assumes the mantle of the Mandarin at the climax (though he's actually not the real one). The apparent Mandarin is just an actor he hired.
  • Meaningful Name: A Mandarin was the name for an ancient Chinese "advisor to the King". As "the power behind the throne", this makes the name sort of fitting for Killian, even though he turns out in All Hail the King to have merely stolen it from the real Mandarin. He was likely aware of the meaning behind the name and decided that it suited him well.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: His last name sounds like "Kill" + "Villain" and his first name sounds like "Eldrich".
  • Nerd: In 1999, he had buck teeth, wore big glasses, and was socially awkward. By 2013, he's an attractive, svelte man who also runs a scientific brain trust.
  • Nightmare Face: After surviving getting blown up by the Mark 42 armor, his face is horribly burnt with Glowing Eyes of Doom and Throat Light.
  • Playing with Fire: Killian is the closest thing to a fire-elemental supervillain in the Marvel Cinematic Universe thus far, which is especially notable given that past Iron Man villains tended to have no superpowers and instead used Powered Armor, much like Tony.
  • Psychopathic Manchild: When you think about it, Killian dragging the entire world into his petty vendetta against Tony resembles a kid setting someone's house on fire for stealing his favorite toy.
  • Race Lift: He's a Caucasian man based on modern incarnations of the Mandarin, who's half-Chinese and half-white, although All Hail the King reveals that he himself was never actually the Mandarin.
  • Revenge Before Reason: He targets Tony Stark in retaliation for Stark's scorning of him and his projects in 1999, even though it's to the detriment of his main plans.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: After his Start of Darkness, he starts wearing business suits.
  • She Cleans Up Nicely: Pepper didn't recognize him at first; he says he spent five years with a personal trainer. Except that he actually gave himself a Super Serum makeover with Extremis.
  • Shrinking Violet: Originally, he was a shy and socially awkward guy.
  • The Sociopath: The only clear-cut one in the Iron Man series. Charming, in a superficial, Faux Affably Evil way. Manipulative, lack of morals or empathy (just look what he did to poor Maya). Grandiose sense of self-worth? The guy was trying to own the War on Terror and in a sense thought himself a god. Poor impulse control? He had that largely under control until Tony kinda blew him up — then again, poor Maya.
  • Suddenly Shouting: During his last words: "I AM THE MANDARIN!!!" Though he's really not.
  • Super Prototype: He uses one against Tony. Specifically, himself. The A.I.M. videos Tony watches imply Killian was the first human test subject of Extremis. Later, Killian is the only one who manages to take Iron Man one-on-one.
  • Tattooed Crook: He has a set of dragon tattoos on his chest.
  • Throwing Off the Disability: He doesn't need his cane to walk in the present day, thanks to over a decade of physical therapy and/or his Extremis upgrades.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Went from a meek cripple to an unfettered Visionary Villain and a fire-breathing One-Man Army.
  • Two Decades Behind: In 1999, he has hippie-esque long hair and John Lennon glasses. In 2013, he wears a plaid suit and slicked-back shoulder-length hair.
  • The Usurper: He steals the identity of the Mandarin for himself and conducts terrorist attacks under the mantle of the Ten Rings. Needless to say, the real Mandarin is not happy about this.
  • Villainous Breakdown: Goes from a calm Manipulative Bastard to a raging madman who screams, "I AM THE MANDARIN!!!"
  • Villainous Crush: Has a thing for Pepper, who previously shunned him but now finds him charming.
  • Visionary Villain: Claims he wants to use the dangerous Extremis virus to change science, medicine, and war as we know them.
    Tony: You're a maniac...
    Killian: No. I'm a visionary. But I do own a maniac, and he takes the stage tonight.
  • War for Fun and Profit: What he's trying to accomplish by offloading his deeds onto a fake terrorist. He seeks to insert himself between the two conflicting sides and profit from the gains he can create via manipulation.
  • Wicked Pretentious: He tries to play the part of a worldly, urbane businessman, but it's undermined by his tacky clothes and tattoos, his failure to understand Slattery's Shakespearean background, his general Psychopathic Manchild tendencies coming out when challenged, and most importantly, his bastardized depiction of the Mandarin.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Downplayed considering the petty, sociopathic asshole we see in the film, but he has shades of this, especially during the flashback to 1999, where he was shown as a Wide-Eyed Idealist who wanted to use his genius to aid the world, but his nervous, awkward demeanour and crippled physique made most people blow him off as a loser or a nuisance. It's not hard to imagine how difficult his life was up to that point and it's heavily implied to have fed into his Start of Darkness. He even recalls to Tony that after he realized he was never going to meet him on the rooftop, he was seriously contemplating committing suicide then and there.
    Killian: If you think back to Switzerland, you said you'd meet me on the rooftop right? Well, for the first 20 minutes, I really thought you'd show up. And for the next hour... I considered taking that one-step shortcut to the lobby.
  • Would Hit a Girl: He doesn't hesitate to murder Maya when she's about to perform a Heel–Face Turn. He also tries to kill Pepper, despite his feelings for her, when she breaks free from his control. Unfortunately for him, he's too slow.

Scientists

    Dr. Maya Hansen 

Dr. Maya Hansen

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/maya_hansen_im3_3628.png
"I need Stark alive! He's the only one who can improve on the Extremis, make it into what I want, and you want!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): MIT, A.I.M.

Portrayed By: Rebecca Hall

Voiced By: Graciela Gámez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Esther Solans (European Spanish dub), Kanako Tojo (Japanese dub), Marie Zidi (French dub), Pascale Montreuil (Canadian French dub), Manja Doering (German dub), Maíra Góes (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3

A scientist Tony Stark met (and slept with) in 1999. Her works with plants helped create Extremis.


Operatives and Test Subjects

    Eric Savin 

Eric Savin

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/savin_eric_0.jpg
"You should've pressed the panic button."
Click here to see him impersonating Iron Patriot 

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): US Army, A.I.M.

Portrayed By: James Badge Dale

Voiced By: Carlo Vázquez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Toni Mora (European Spanish dub), Takuya Kirimoto (Japanese dub), Jean-Baptiste Marcenac (French dub), Louis-Philippe Dandenault (Canadian French dub), Léo Rabelo (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3

An Extremis-powered henchman working for Aldrich Killian.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, he's the cybernetic Anti-Hero known as Coldblood. Here, he's Killian's second-in-command and enforcer.
  • Bald of Evil: Notably, he's one of the only bald characters in Iron Man 3, and sadistically cruel.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: He doesn't go by the Coldblood alias like in the comics. However, he poses as the Iron Patriot.
  • Composite Character: While based on Coldblood, he is given physical traits and powers akin to Mallen just like Killian was.
  • Character Tics: Often chewing gum when wreaking havoc.
  • The Dragon: Serves as the villainous Killian's right-hand man.
  • Empowered Badass Normal: An ex-soldier turned Extremis supersoldier. Then he wears the Iron Patriot armor on top of it all.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Savin could be engaging in brutal combat while joking around, as such in the case when he asked Harley what he wanted for Christmas while holding him hostage, ready to kill him.
  • Healing Factor: Courtesy of Extremis. Doesn't save him when Tony blasts his midsection with a Unibeam.
  • Oral Fixation: Gum. He's almost always chewing it unless he needs to speak.
  • Slasher Smile: He quite clearly enjoys fighting.
  • Slouch of Villainy: Seated in the Stark Industries building, he has one leg dangling over one armrest and his head leaning on the other.
  • Smug Snake: He's quite arrogant, to say the least.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: When using his Extremis powers.
  • Torso with a View: Tony inflicts this on him via Chest Blaster.
  • Touch of Death: His Extremis powers let him generate temperatures in excess of 3000 degrees Celsius from his skin, allowing him to destroy anything he touches.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Casually takes Harley hostage to get something from Tony.

    Ellen Brandt 

Ellen Brandt

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ellen_brandt_im3_5212.png
"That's all you got? A cheap trick and a cheesy one-liner?"

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): US Army, A.I.M.

Portrayed By: Stephanie Szostak

Voiced By: Gwendolyne Flores (Latin-American Spanish dub), Mar Nicolás (European Spanish dub), Miki Yamazaki (Japanese dub), Audrey Sablé (French dub), Catherine Hamann (Canadian French dub), Gabriella Bicalho (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3

A war veteran who becomes an assassin after her exposure to Extremis.


  • Ax-Crazy: She doesn't even bother to hide the fact that killing people is a ton of shits and giggles for her.
  • Blood Knight: She refers to "the smart way" and "the fun way." Her "fun way" is gruesomely murdering anyone who prevents her from capturing Tony.
  • Blown Across the Room: Is sent flying into a power line after Tony causes an explosion by microwaving a pair of dog tags in a room with an open gas valve.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Tony accidentally walks into her five minutes before they meet again to deal each other more injuries.
  • Dark Action Girl: She's quite efficient when it comes to hand-to-hand combat.
  • Deadpan Snarker: She lampshades Tony's own snark with more snark.
    Ellen Brandt: That's all you got? A cheap trick and a cheesy one-liner?
    Tony Stark: Sweetheart, that could be the name of my autobiography!
  • Empowered Badass Normal: An ex-soldier turned Extremis supersoldier.
  • Evil Redhead: Her hair's scarlet, and she's definitely got the evil part down. "Fiery" could be a more accurate word.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: If you look closely enough at the above image, you can see a scar on the side of her mouth.
  • Mythology Gag: The scars are probably a reference to her face in the comics having been burned off by Man-Thing.
  • Impersonating an Officer: She tries to impersonate Homeland Security after "arresting" Tony. Once the local sheriff doubts her, she decides to screw it and show her true colors.
  • Nightmare Face: After she walks through a fire started by Tony, especially since she took far more damage than her boss. Sweet dreams.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: Somehow manages to move from several feet outside the coffee shop to right next to Tony, who was behind the counter inside the shop, in seconds.
  • Oh, Crap!: It takes a minute for her to realize what Tony's planning before she and the building go boom.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: When using her Extremis powers.
  • Scars are Forever: The scars on her face are still there despite Extremis giving her a Healing Factor powerful enough to regrow her lost hand. Maybe she wanted to keep them around.
  • Sadist: Takes a moment to burn the sheriff's face before killing him.
  • Super Strength: Punches a hole in the Rose Hill sheriff's body when he gets in her way
  • Touch of Death: Her Extremis powers let her generate temperatures in excess of 3000 degrees Celsius from her skin, allowing her to destroy anything she touches.

    Jack Taggart 

Jack Taggart

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/88c4e121_a25f_44ab_a025_c4246e99abe8.png
"Yes, I can regulate."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): US Army, A.I.M.

Portrayed By: Ashley Hamilton

Appearances: Iron Man 3

A U.S. Army veteran who becomes addicted to Extremis.


  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: He doesn't go by Firepower, his alias in the comics.
  • Race Lift: In the comics, Jack Taggart is African American. In the MCU, he's caucasian.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: His Extremis powers flare when angered or alert.
  • Super-Power Meltdown: Consumes several doses of Extremis at the same time, causing him to explode and die in the process.
  • Touch of Death: His Extremis powers let him generate temperatures in excess of 3000 degrees Celsius from his skin, allowing him to destroy anything he touches.

    Unnamed sweat shop agent 

Unnamed sweat shop agent

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/143fc12e_eb5a_4869_8ef7_2441cefd5026.png
"Savin, I've acquired the Iron Patriot armor."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): A.I.M.

Portrayed By: Rebecca Mader

Appearances: Iron Man 3

An A.I.M. agent.


  • Disguised Hostage Gambit: Invoked. She poses as a worker at a sweat shop in Pakistan to capture Rhodey Rhodes and get the Iron Patriot armor.
  • Evil Redhead: She has red hair and had no problem murdering Rhodey Rhodes to get the Iron Patriot armor.
  • No Name Given: She goes unnamed and is credited only as "Sweat Shop Agent".
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: When she activates her Extremis powers, her eyes flare orange red.
  • Touch of Death: Her Extremis powers let her generate temperatures in excess of 3000 degrees Celsius from her skin, allowing her to destroy anything she touches.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Her whereabouts after acquring the Iron Patriot armor for A.I.M. are unknown. She's never seen afterward.

Collaborators

    Trevor Slattery / "The Mandarin" (Usurper) 

Trevor Slattery / "The Mandarin"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stmb_specialod_4825x72_trevor_slattery_v4_sm.png
"Don't hurt the face, I'm an actor!"
Click here to see him as the Mandarin 

Species: Human

Citizenship: British, Ta Loan

Affiliation(s): A.I.M. (formerly), Ta Lo

Portrayed By: Ben Kingsley

Voiced By: Paco Mauri (Latin-American Spanish dub), Mario Gas (European Spanish dub), Mugihito (Japanese dub), Féodor Atkine (French dub), Vincent Davy (Canadian French dub), Sérgio Fortuna (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3 | All Hail the King | Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

A washed-up British actor whom Aldrich Killian hires to impersonate the mysterious leader of the international terrorist organization known as the Ten Rings. In his persona as the Mandarin, after years of plotting in the shadows, he seems to come after Tony personally in Iron Man 3.


  • Acting in the Dark: In-universe, he wasn't told the full details of Killian's plot. From what he tells Tony, while the latter is holding him at gunpoint, he was simply a struggling actor in need of a breakthrough role, and he was given a range of luxuries, including various drugs, to keep him ignorant of the true situation. Until Tony explains that the attacks were real, Trevor simply believes that he's on a film set.
    Trevor: The producer told me he worked for the BBC but, ironic twist, it turns out he in fact was a terrorist, and I wasn't playing a character at all.
  • Actually Pretty Funny: The true Mandarin originally wanted to kill him for such a ridiculous impersonation, but after capturing him, realized that an insane British thespian impersonator was really more ridiculous than insulting, and kept him as a sort of Court Jester.
  • Addled Addict: His acting career, such as it was, got derailed by his drug and alcohol problems which led to him falling into working for Killian. He eventually got clean while in prison, although he's still a massive Cloud Cuckoolander.
  • Adaptational Mundanity: In the comic, the Mandarin's rings are alien weapons that give him various superpowers. In the movie, they're just regular rings that serve no purpose except to look cool. Although it is a bit justified since Trevor Slattery is not the real Mandarin and he is just an actor, and the ten rings that he wears are fake and only part of his acting, and also the true ten rings of the Mandarin appear in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.
  • Adaptational Wimp: He's missing his magic rings from the comics, and overall comes across as a Non-Action Guy. This is because he's just a figurehead set up by Killian, and Trevor is a coked-up narcoleptic drunken actor. From what we hear in All Hail The King, the real Mandarin was insulted by how useless this guy was as an impostor, although Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings reveals that he was still impressed at the effect he had on the States.
  • Affably Evil: Trevor turns out to be pretty friendly, if kooky as hell and more than a tad amoral.
  • Ambiguously Brown: In-universe, no one is quite sure about his ethnicity, since his name, tactics, clothes, and accent all come from markedly different cultures. Justified; he's deliberately designed to be the embodiment of what Americans consider an evil anti-American terrorist. While this trope still applies even after The Reveal, due to Kingsley's mixed heritage, one can say that the false Mandarin's mishmash of various cultural motifs was meant to play on this trope.
  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: Befitting his immature personality, Trevor has a really short attention span. He falls asleep all the time and promptly interrupts his own reveal of A.I.M.'s plot to Tony and Rhodey to cheer on the soccer game he's watching on TV.
  • Attention Whore: As should be expected of someone who appears on TV to threaten an entire country. He can be seen waving to his "fans" even as he's taken away by the police at the end.
  • Bait-and-Switch Boss: All the buildup to fighting Killian is thrown out the window when Tony breaks into the Mandarin's hideout, skipping the middleman and going straight for the top. However, it's revealed "the Mandarin" is just an actor playing a fictional terrorist to keep the good guys distracted. Killian is the real Diabolical Mastermind and Big Bad.
  • Beard of Evil: Has one very much styled like Colonel Gaddafi or Osama bin Laden. It also doesn't look like it's been well maintained, which makes even more sense once you find out that he's just a drug-addicted actor working for Aldrich Killian, and Slattery generally doesn't look after his health as well as he should.
  • Blue-and-Orange Morality: He invokes this early on with his "What Is Evil?" moment. It somewhat applies when he's out of character, as the only things that really matter to him are his acting, drugs, and women. It barely seems to occur to him that he's doing something wrong.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: He can be silly when he's not being threatening. This is because he's an actor, but he's talented enough that Aldrich Killian is willing to overlook that. In Shang-Chi, he's still a somewhat scatterbrained loon, but is able to understand Morris and successfully guide the heroes to Ta Lo.
  • The Bus Came Back: Reappears in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, nearly eight real-world years (and at least ten in-universe, as Shang-Chi takes place post-Blip) since All Hail the King. Surprisingly, he's still alive, and even helps guide Shang-Chi and company to Ta Lo.
  • Canon Foreigner: Trevor Slattery doesn't exist in the main Marvel comics universe. Even before he was revealed as a fake, how this Mandarin related to the comics Mandarin was up for debate. He seemed like he should be considered the same character, but his blurrier origin story made it questionable at best.
  • Catchphrase: Tends to exclaim, "Bloody hell!" when he gets surprised, which is something that "the Mandarin", as he's presented, would never say.
  • Classically Trained Extra: Referenced by him in his speech to Tony. It's explained later that Trevor was quite a respected Shakespearean actor back in England. As Killian says, "His Lear was the toast of Croydon, whatever that means." This was presumably before drug addictions made him nigh-impossible to handle. More likely this is a case of Small Name, Big Ego, since whilst Croydon, a large town in South London, does have a theatre scene, it would be considered much lower in terms of prestige than playing King Lear onstage in Stratford or even London's own West End; compare the difference between On and Off-Broadway.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Outside of the Mandarin persona, he's a drug-addicted loon. Several years later, he's gotten clean thanks to his time in prison, but is still a bit of a weirdo when Shang-Chi, Xialing, and Katy meet him. In particular, he genuinely believes that the ape characters in Planet of the Apes were portrayed by real apes, and he's relieved when others confirm to him that Morris (a faceless furball with wings that speaks in cute chirping sounds) is, in fact, real.
  • Comically Missing the Point: When he was a child his mother told him that what happened on Planet of the Apes was not real, but acted, what Trevor understood is that apes were actors.
  • Cool Shades: In some of his videos, he wears sunglasses that make him look like an eccentric warlord in the vein of Muammar Gaddafi. The poster of him reclining with them on looks a lot more hilarious after The Reveal, at which point it just looks like Trevor had too much fun the night before and was still a bit high or drunk when he came in to pose for the photo.
  • Court Jester: The real Mandarin spares his life because he found him funny. After hearing this, Shang-Chi compares him to a jester.
  • Decomposite Character: Trevor's "Mandarin" design is taken from the comics, where he wears mostly green and has ten rings on his fingers. The real Mandarin wears more utilitarian clothes and the real Ten Rings are a set of heavy metal bracers that line his forearms.
  • Decoy Leader: Despite pretending to be the Mandarin, he's nothing more than a patsy Killian created to distract everyone from himself.
  • Diabolical Mastermind: The self-styled leader of the terrorist organization known as the Ten Rings — except he's not. There is a Mandarin who is the head of the Ten Rings, and he's not happy that Trevor stole his identity.
  • Dirty Old Man: He enjoys hiring prostitutes. He offers them to Tony in a desperate attempt to save his own ass.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Played up as the mastermind behind events, but actually a total patsy who barely qualifies as a villain. The true mastermind is Aldrich Killian.
  • Disney Death: During the final battle in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, Trevor appears to have been killed, with his companion Morris beginning to mourn, only for Trevor to briefly wake up and reveal that he's playing dead. He then tells Morris to do the same.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Any of his broadcasts could count, but his "I consider myself a teacher" is the big one; however, that's just a role he plays. Trevor's real moment is when he rushes out of the bathroom, giggling like a kid, and tries to impress his prostitutes with the trivia about how fortune cookies aren't Chinese.
  • Evil Brit: While he's really more amoral than evil, Trevor is a British actor who sports a Scouse accent and uses colloquialisms when not acting as the Mandarin.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: He sports a deep, booming, gravelly voice. It's just the voice Trevor uses as the false Mandarin; in reality, he has a stereotypical "crazy old man" voice with a Scouse accent.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Despite how politely he may speak, he still engineers terrorist attacks, plane crashes, and the burning of Tony's home to the ground — or so it seems. All of the aforementioned weren't his idea, and he turns out to be more Affably Evil.
  • Genius Ditz: This appears to be his real personality. Despite being a washed-up substance-abusing mess, Trevor is a skilled enough actor to at least play the role of a Diabolical Mastermind convincingly.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Subverted. The Mandarin is the leader of the Ten Rings, who are antagonists in the first Iron Man movie, but he doesn't get mentioned by name, let alone seemingly confront Tony, until the third movie. However, Trevor Slattery is not the Mandarin, leaving the real one still in the shadows.
  • Hidden Depths: There's a lot more to him than is visible at first glance. Or a lot less, depending on your point of view. Regardless of his copious flaws, he certainly is an astonishing actor.
  • Hookers and Blow: He tries to tempt Tony this way; it makes sense, as Killian tempted Trevor himself with drugs and prostitutes.
  • In the Hood: Wears an ornate hooded coat when he's in-character as the Mandarin.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: Zigzagged. On the one hand, he was imprisoned for his complicity in Killian's plot and being the face for a new terrorist group. Both Tony and Rhodey scared the bejeebers out of him, and his prostitutes. He also received international attention for it because people ate up his performance and complimented it. Then a journalist who comes to interview him is revealed to be a Double Agent for the real Mandarin. Norris says the boss is not pleased about the impersonation. Said agent proceeds to hold him at gunpoint and kidnap Trevor, where he is then brought before Xu Wenwu and nearly executed.
  • Knight Templar: His Mandarin persona oozes this mindset: "Some people call me a terrorist. I consider myself a teacher."
  • Large Ham: Ben Kingsley at his best and Killian lampshades it. A Justified Trope, since he's a stage actor in-universe. It's even a plot point in Shang-Chi: when he was about to be executed by the actual Mandarin and the Ten Rings, Trevor started doing a hammy performance of Macbeth, and everyone loved it so much they decided to just keep him prisoner, doing regular shows for their entertainment.
    Trevor: [as the Mandarin] You'lll neverrr seee meeeee cominggggg.
  • Master Actor: He's an incredibly talented actor when he wants to be. This is why he was chosen to play the role of the Mandarin persona in the first place, as the propaganda he spews legitimately terrifies Tony Stark and the U.S. government. Even after being imprisoned by Xu Wenwu for several years in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings hasn't dulled his edge, as he successfully manages to play dead and fool Morris into believing he didn't make it until he clarifies it for him.
  • Mean Character, Nice Actor: In-universe example. Outside of the Mandarin persona, he's harmless and fairly friendly. Subverted in the short All Hail The King, where it's revealed that he missed his own mother's funeral because he was waiting for his "big break" in America, cheerily admits to being a pathological liar, acts completely self-absorbed, and overall comes across as an amoral idiot. However, by Shang-Chi, it seems he Took a Level in Kindness.
  • Mouth of Sauron: He's a mouthpiece for Killian, who writes his scripts to help inflame the US State Department's war on terror fears.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The Mandarin gets many lines in trailers and ads that are never said during the actual film. This is most likely to hide his true nature even further, and implies that the Mandarin footage that we saw in the trailer is just B-roll footage that Killian has filmed for the video packages he then broadcasts on the air. Oh, and by the way, have you seen his Evil Overlooker status for the movie's poster in the main page of Iron Man 3? It's also to make you believe he is the Big Bad.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: He has the name of an imperial Chinese official, a samurai-style haircut, a Middle Eastern-looking beard, brown skin, wears East Asian clothing, wields modern weapons, and talks like a Baptist preacher. Apparently, his tactics are a mishmash of Chinese Art of War, South American guerillas, and Middle-Eastern terrorism, essentially being a hybrid of all of America's enemies in modern history. This is because, as an actor, he's taking cues from various movies. (the Iron Man 3 writers even noted the character's nature as a mishmash of threatening foreign archetypes created by a think tank)
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed:
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Both inverted and played straight. Trevor is a scatterbrained nobody who pretends to be a terrorist mastermind. However, a deleted scene on the Blu-ray disc shows that Trevor's smarter than he acts (though still not very bright), and also wrote some of his own dialogue.
  • Obliviously Evil: He makes use of this more than once. He uses the fact that "the Mandarin" is just a role to beg for mercy; he honestly had no idea that people were being killed. This is probably why he's in a low-security prison in All Hail the King.
  • Once Done, Never Forgotten: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings implies that Trevor does regret portraying the Mandarin as a generic Middle-Eastern terrorist when he discusses what he did to the man's son. Notably, he never tries to pretend to be the fake Mandarin at all during the film.
  • Oop North: As stated in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, Trevor is from Liverpool, even sporting a Scouse accent in the movie.
  • Old Shame: In-Universe. By the events of Shang Chi, Trevor has come to regret his time playing the Mandarin persona, noting that it was a facile and offensive caricuature even before he found out that he was working for real terrorists.
  • Playing Possum: While Shang-Chi and his allies are battling the Dweller-in-Darkness and the Soul Suckers, Trevor pretends to be among the people who had their souls sucked out to throw off attention from himself. Morris follows his lead after discovering him.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: After The Reveal, he serves up comedy to contrast with Killian taking center stage. It's also the case in Shang-Chi, as the protagonists are forced to get his help, and he's gotten so wacky that even the quirky Katy Chen looks perfectly reasonable next to Trevor.
  • Puppet King: It's believed that some of the earlier Ten Rings leaders served as this to him, but it proves to be more the inverse. He's just a figurehead used to divert attention from Killian's plans, and the real Mandarin is still out there.
  • Race Lift: In the comics, the Mandarin is half-British and half-ethnic Mongolian, while Ben Kingsley is half-white and half-Indian. Subverted, however; this Mandarin is just an actor impersonating the real one.
  • Red Herring: He's just a patsy hired to divert attention from the real threat, Killian. Once a poor, struggling alcoholic actor, Trevor merely poses as the Mandarin in exchange for all sorts of amenities from Killian, including a mansion and a speedboat. Although he's an amoral sleazebag, he's far from truly evil. He even lends his speedboat to Tony and Rhodey, albeit through force.
  • The Reveal: The Mandarin as he makes it doesn't exist; he's a Red Herring for Killian, who claims to be the real Mandarin. However, in All Hail the King, it's revealed that both Trevor and Killian only stole the Mandarin's name. The real one, Wenwu, is still out there.
  • Ring of Power: Invoked with his ten rings. In the comics, they give him alien technological energy attacks. In this version, they serve as a symbol of his leadership over the terrorist organization the Ten Rings. In truth, they are merely part of his costume.
  • Rogue Agent: Claims to be a former Western intelligence officer who ran morally questionable ops on behalf of the West, before he went "off the reservation" and started his own private war against America. He's actually a British actor.
  • The Scapegoat: Technically, Trevor wasn't responsible for the Extremis plot; it was Killian who came up with the idea to play on people's racism and fear of terrorists. The real Mandarin, however, doesn't care; apparently he was insulted by the fact that a drunk and Addled Addict was stealing his name, and image. He sends Jackson Norris to kidnap Trevor and reassure him that he's not going to die, not now at least… but he'll be wishing he was dead.
  • Scheherezade Gambit: After being captured by the Ten Rings and slated for execution, he managed to impress Wenwu with a spontaneous rendition of Macbeth, enabling him to survive as the Ten Rings' court jester.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: Once he is revealed just to be a drunk, washed-up actor and Tony gets information about Killian from him, the comedy leaves with him for the rest of the movie, which changes the format drastically. This also applies to his role in Shang-Chi, where Trevor doesn't take part in the intense final battle and spends it playing dead.
  • Short Hair with Tail: He has very short hair except for a topknot, which, surprisingly, he retains even when he's not in-character.
  • Stupid Evil: In All Hail The King, this is how he comes across. He is superficially charming but incredibly shallow and self-absorbed, doesn't seem to be bothered by the deaths of those around him (including his own mother), and is genuinely clueless as to why anyone would want to kill him even after they explain their reasons to his face. "Evil" might be a stretch, perhaps, but Trevor is certainly, at the very least, a Jerkass at his core.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: In All Hail the King, he's let fame go to his head and becomes an egotistical in-house celebrity with an attitude. It comes back to bite him hard. To the point years as a prisoner of the Ten Rings make him return to being a nice person when he's brought back.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Being imprisoned by the actual Ten Rings for over a decade seems to have made Trevor a significantly kinder person, as he acts quite chummy with Shang-Chi and his friends when they meet him and serves as a Translation Buddy for Morris, thus helping them find his mother's village.
  • Too Kinky to Torture: For a drunken British actor, he's remarkably composed and unfazed even while being repeatedly threatened with a gun shoved in his face. All the alcohol and drugs he's taken probably helped with that.
  • Villain Episode: He's featured as the lead character of the Marvel One-Shot All Hail the King (an extra feature on the Thor: The Dark World Blu-Ray), taking place after the events of Iron Man 3.
  • Visual Pun: At one point, he's seen with a fruit bowl full of, you guessed it, Mandarin oranges.
  • Walking Spoiler: Knowing too much about him spoils the reveal that he's just an actor whom Killian hired to serve as a Red Herring. And he's still a surprise presence when brought back in Shang-Chi, as the trailers and posters didn't want to even hint at it.
  • What Is Evil?: He pulls the moral relativism card during his ultimatum in the first trailer.
    "The Mandarin": Lesson number one: Heroes. There is no such thing.
  • Wicked Cultured: He's quite cultured for a terrorist. It's not really surprising, since he's just an actor. Then again, he spends most of his time worrying not about intelligent matters, but about drugs, alcohol, sex, and football games...
  • Would Hurt a Child: Subverted. In his first appearance as the Mandarin, he mentions that his attack on the air base in Kuwait specifically targeted the spouses and children of military personnel who were away on orders. Trevor himself doesn't know that this attack actually happened, since he's only acting, and he shows no indication of wanting to harm children as his true self.

    Vice President Rodriguez 

Roxxon Corporation

    In General 

Roxxon Corporation

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/c90gedgv0aasg64.jpg

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Iron Man 3 | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. | Agent Carter | Daredevil | Iron Fist | Cloak And Dagger | Loki note 

One of the largest oil conglomerates, founded by Hugh Jones and active at least since the 1940s. In 1952, it absorbed Isodyne Energy.


  • Big Bad: Of the first season of Cloak And Dagger.
  • Company Town: The town of Haven Hills, Alabama, is owned by Roxxcart in the future.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: All of the Roxxon executives shown so far are involved with some corrupt activity or a criminal enterprise.
  • Cutting Corners: This is a recurring problem with Roxxon and the Corrupt Corporate Executives running it. They skimped on extra safety equipment that Tandy's father and Ivan Hess requested, which led to the Rig exploding, and in the present, a junior executive relocates a crucial valve to an unsafe location simply so he does not have to spend the money on a crane. What makes this really stupid is that if they ever manage to successfully tap into the new fuel source under the seabed, they stand to make billions. However, they sabotage themselves to save a few thousands dollars. By the end of the season, this comes back to bite them when their unsafe practises cause the valves to release the pent up Darkforce and Lightforce they were harvesting, which infect the citizens of New Orleans and almost destroyed the city. Once the city is saved, the company is held responsible and put under investigation.
  • Evil, Inc.: Roxxon was tied to the Council of Nine through its founder Hugh Jones. In the present day they are employed by the Hand to cover some of its illicit activities. They also have ties to A.I.M. through its accountant, Thomas Richards. They also countersue a former employee who developed cancer after working at a Roxxon plant, because he shared information about the plant to the doctor treating him, arguing that the man had violated Roxxon patents.

    Hugh Jones 

    Thomas Richards 

Thomas Richards

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tom Virtue

Appearances: Iron Man 3

A high-level accountant for Roxxon kidnapped by "the Mandarin".


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: After the transmission of his execution ends, he stands up and shakes hands with the Mandarin, showing he's aware that the whole thing is a ploy to undermine President Warren Ellis.
  • Faking the Dead: He goes along with his own fake execution.

Asano Robotics

    Hirochi 
See the Hand page

    Stan Gibson 
See the Hand page

Roxxon Gulf

    Peter Scarborough 

Peter Scarborough

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Wayne Pére

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

The Chief Executive of Risk Management for the Roxxon Corporation and de facto head of Roxxon Gulf based in New Orleans.


  • Alternate Self: Has a variant named Lloyd Emerson in another world's San Francisco.
  • Ambition Is Evil: One of his hopes, as discovered by Tandy, is getting more money, even if he gets his employees killed in the process.
  • Bad Boss: The other executives at Roxxon Gulf hate him. One of them fantasizes of getting served by him, another of getting serviced (sexually), and a third one of killing him.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Of Cloak and Dagger Season 1, along with Connors. Scarborough was responsible for the platform that Tandy's father Nathan Bowen designed, and when it collapsed, he placed the blame on Nathan, causing Tandy and Melissa's lives to go into a downward spiral. The explosion also caused Connors to startle and shoot Tyrone's brother Billy. So while ultimately responsible for both Tandy and Tyrone's problems, he isn't connected with Connors.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Scarborough's pathological inability to not cut corners and Too Dumb to Live character traits mean that most of his threat comes from pure incompetence, as his screw-ups create increasingly bigger problems to deal with.
  • Bullying a Dragon: He knows full well that Tandy has superpowers and when they met she effortlessly kidnapped and nearly killed him. So naturally, he decides the best thing to do is to send a hitwoman after her mother.
  • Canon Foreigner: Has no basis in the comics, though corrupt Roxxon executives are a dime a dozen.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Probably the most evil executive at Roxxon within the MCU, and given Roxxon was a tool of both the Council of Nine and the Hand, that's an accomplishment. Even if using Nathan Bowen as a scapegoat for his Cutting Corners wasn't bad enough, his deepest hope is to get at whatever Roxxon was drilling for, even if it means murdering every one of his employees.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: His fate at the end of season 1 of Cloak and Dagger is very fitting: his reckless cost cutting measures led to the Rig exploding, drove most of his employees there insane and trapped Ivan Hess into a mental loop for eight years. At the end of the season Tandy uses her powers to trap Scarborough in the very same mental loop leaving him catatonic. And even if he does escape his loop, thanks to New Orleans almost being destroyed thanks to Roxxon's actions, he will almost surely be arrested for life if he wakes up.
  • Narcissist: His greatest desire is to be God itself.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain: Tandy was all set to give up on investigating Roxxon and take his deal, since she no longer cared about clearing her father's name. But then Scarborough decides that's not enough and tries to kill her and her mother to cover it up, and Tandy is back in the game.
  • Too Dumb to Live: He is seemingly incapable of putting a project together without cutting corners. He was responsible for the original oil rig explosion because he didn't want to foot the bill for the heat shielding and now he's done the same thing all over again with the pipes except all over the city. For further examples, see Bullying a Dragon above.

    Nathan Bowen 

Nathan Bowen

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Andy Dylan

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

A scientist at Roxxon and father of Tandy Bowen.


    Ivan Hess 

Ivan Hess

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tim Kang

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

Senior Engineer in Fluid Dynamics for Roxxon. He's been catatonic ever since the rig explosion.


  • And I Must Scream: Trapped in an endless mental loop for nearly 8000 years. He has to abandon most of his memories just to cope.
  • Honest Corporate Executive: Unlike his higher-ups, he's a humble man who works hand-by-hand with workers under his authority.
  • Orphean Rescue: Tyrone and Tandy go into his mind to try to break him out of his catatonia.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Doesn't know how truly corrupt Roxxon really is.

    Mina Hess 

Mina Hess

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ally Maki, Hannah Hardin (young)

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

An enviromental engineer for Roxxon, following in her father's foodsteps.


  • Friend to Bugs: She likes bumblebees, having written her thesis on colony collapse and makes a point of looking out for them on her walks. When Tandy starts taking people's hopes, including Mina's, the first sign of how badly this affects them is Mina immediately killing a bee.
  • Nature Lover: Comes with the territory of being an environmental engineer. Tandy's vision of her greatest hopes shows her tending a very beautiful garden.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Her new drilling system is spread out across the entire city rather than one concentrated spot, making it safer to use and more environmentally friendly than the original rig. Unfortunately, her Roxxon superiors don't care about her precautions and cut corners on vital parts of it, and now the entire city is at risk.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Doesn't know how truly corrupt Roxxon really is.

    Stan Bartlett 

Stan Bartlett

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Preston Vanderslice

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

An employee at Roxxon.


  • Pointy-Haired Boss: He is an incompetent low-level executive that prefers to cut corners.

    Ashlie 

Ashlie

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Vanessa Motta

Appearances: Cloak and Dagger

A hitwoman in the employ of Peter Scarborough.


  • Beneath Notice: She uses the guise of a water delivery worker to approach her targets without arising suspicion.
  • The Dragon: She's Scarborough's go-to hitwoman to eliminate those he deems as threats.
  • Professional Killer: She's a contract killer under the guise of a water delivery woman.

Cybertek

    Carlo Mancini 

Carlo Mancini

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: T.J. Ramini

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Cybertek head of security transporting.


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He's a corporate executive collaborating with the similarly corrupt Ian Quinn.
  • You Have Failed Me: The Clairvoyant (John Garrett) has Mancini executed by Deathlok after Mancini's men unwittingly attracting S.H.I.E.L.D.'s attention.

    Sofia 

Sofia

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Emily Baldoni

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A member of Mancini's team.


  • Number Two: To Mancini.
  • You Have Failed Me: The Clairvoyant (John Garrett) orders Deathlok to kill her after Mancini's men unwittingly attracting S.H.I.E.L.D.'s attention.

    Kyle Zeller 

Kyle Zeller

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Josh Daugherty

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Cybertek forced employee used by John Garrett as Deathlok's handler.


  • I Have Your Wife: Or as Cybertek calls it, the "Incentives Program": his wife has been kidnapped to ensure his cooperation.
  • Mission Control: Forced to act as Deathlok's handler and mission control.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: He serves Garrett not out of villainy or corruption, he simply wants to keep his wife alive.

    Joseph Getty 

Dr. Joseph Getty

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Mark Fite

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A scientist forcibly recruited into Cybertek to do research into Gravitonium.


X-Con Security Consultants

See Scott Lang's Allies for Luis, Kurt, and Dave

Isodyne Energy

    Calvin Chadwick 

    Jason Wilkes 
See Stark Industries

    Jane Scott 

Jane Scott

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By:

Appearances: Agent Carter

A particle physicist at Isodyne.


  • The Mistress: She had an affair with Calvin Chadwick.
  • Posthumous Character: She first appears as a corpse. She died after being exposed to Zero Matter a.k.a. the Darkforce, at the Isodyne particle acelerator.

Anvil Security

Cheng Consulting & Risk Management

    Pryce Cheng 

Pryce Cheng

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2018_03_14_21h55m44s588.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Terry Chen

Appearances: Jessica Jones

The head of Cheng Consulting Management. He's a private investigator who wants to absorb Alias Investigations and hire Jessica Jones to attract superhuman cases.


  • The Ace: He's a very accomplished Private Investigator, self-made man and former Marine.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: He isn't seen again in Jessica Jones Season 3 and Malcolm works for Hogarth instead of him, with no explanation given.
  • Fantastic Racism: Hates Jessica just for being a super.
  • Hypocrite: Calls Jessica out on breaking the law to get results then immediately resorts to just that when Jeri won't help him sue Jessica.
  • I Was Beaten by a Girl: Implied to be the main reason he escalates things with Jessica. When he wants to sue Jessica for his injuries Jeri tells him to get over the fact that a woman managed to manhandle him like Jessica did, hinting that he simply can't stand the idea of getting outdone in any way by women given his being The Ace.
  • Jerkass: Extremely full of himself. Decides to put Jessica out of business just because she refuses to work with him and promptly starts poaching her clients, makes fun of her trauma to her face, and then has one of his people break into her office and steal all her files and even her P.I. certification.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • As much as an asshole he might be, he correctly points out that Jessica has some serious issues, and not the cleanest of slates (as opposed to him).
    • He also is right when he tells Jessica to turn in her mother for murder. He quickly forgives Jessica for kidnapping him (though he earlier accidentally shot her, so they are even), but he can't ignore the person that killed his partner. Jessica eventually agrees and calls the police.
  • Revenge: Tries assassinating Jessica (only her mother actually) after his friend, Nick, was murdered.
  • Semper Fi: He's a former Marine Corps captain.
  • Smug Smiler: Even gets mentioned by Jessica.
  • Smug Snake: Jessica even describes him as such due to his unrepentant jerkassery and insistence.

    Nick Spanos 

Nick Spanos

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Maceo Oliver

Appearances: Jessica Jones

One of Pryce Cheng's fixers and best friends.


  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Alisa kills him by throwing him in the back of his van, beating him senseless, and tearing off one of his arms.
  • The Fixer: He's sent by Cheng to steal files and information from Jessica's apartment.
  • Semper Fi: He served in the Marines alongside Cheng.

    Malcolm Ducasse 

Momentum Labs

    Joseph Bauer 

Joseph Bauer

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Kerr Smith

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The head of Momentum Labs and the husband of Lucy Bauer.


  • Canon Foreigner: He has no comic book counterpart.
  • For Science!: Lucy and him were delighted by what the Darkhold could do and how it could be used to help others, but the book corrupted their intentions.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: He became increasingly corrupted after reading the Darkhold.
  • Mad Scientist: As a result of the Darkhold's corruption, he becomes more and more obsessed with creating matter using the information gained from the tome.
  • Mind Rape: He's awakened by Lucy Bauer and suffers from the same paranoia effect that infected May until he dies.

Midland Circle Financials

    Alexandra Reid 
See the Hand page

Vistacorp

    Geoff Zorick 

Geoff Zorick

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Ant-Man - Scott Lang: Small Time | Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Ant-Man viral marketing) note  | Ant-Man note 

The CEO of Vistacorp.


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He knows that the Vistacorp payment systems are illegally overcharging Vistacorp's clients and wants to keep it so, even ordering Scott Lang not to install the update that would fix the bug.

WHiH World News

    In General 
A cable news network. It is a subsidiary of Vistacorp

    Christine Everhart 

Christine Everhart

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/christine_everhart_im1_7294.png
"All I'm looking for is a straight answer."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Leslie Bibb

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Ant-Man and Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

"And what do you say to your other nickname, the Merchant of Death?"

A reporter from Vanity Fair. She has strong feelings against Tony Stark's weapons development, and feels he is a war profiteer. Despite this, sexual tension pops up between the two. She later transitions to television and new media as the host of WHiH World News.


  • Ascended Extra: After having a few minutes of screentime in the first two Iron Man movies, she takes a role as the host of the Web Original WHiH World News videos on YouTube.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: It takes just a minute and a half of arguing with Tony to pull her into bed with him. However, it doesn't go anywhere past that night.
  • The Bus Came Back: After a five year absence in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, she reappeared in this video marking the MCU's first foray into Web Original content.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: After she realizes Tony used her for a one-night stand in the first movie, she feels pretty damn upset. Upset enough, in fact, to take it out on Pepper, who had only showed up to provide her with a fresh change of clothes and a ride to wherever she wanted to go.
    After all these years, Tony still has you picking up the dry cleaning.
  • Fanservice Extra: She's in Iron Man for just five minutes and two of those minutes are spent in a Modesty Bedsheet or just a shirt.
  • Good Is Not Nice: She's quite rude, but she knows what's right and what's wrong.
  • Intrepid Reporter: Played with; Christine clearly wants to be this, but the fact that she ends up sleeping with Tony not long after self-righteously calling him out as the 'Merchant of Death' alone indicates that she's probably not as intrepid as she wants people to think. She generally comes off as being a bit smug and incompetent. Then again, she is the one to reveal to Tony that his company is selling weapons to the villains.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: After Tony escapes from capture, he agrees with her that his weapons development has gotten out of hand.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Pretty rude to both Tony and Pepper, yet has a strong sense of right and wrong.
  • Operation: Jealousy: It's implied she started dating Justin Hammer in order to make Tony jealous. By then he doesn't care.
  • The Resenter: After she realizes Tony used her for a night, she decides to take it out on Pepper. She's clearly out of her league.
    Christine: After all these years, Tony still has you picking up the dry cleaning.
    Pepper: I do anything and everything Mr. Stark requires. Including occasionally taking out the trash. Will that be all?
  • Romantic False Lead: She's introduced before Pepper, who ends up being Tony's true love.
  • Stealth Insult: Often the victim of this, especially from Pepper. In addition to the above "trash" one...
    Hammer: [Christine]'s actually doing a big spread on me for Vanity Fair. I thought I'd throw her a bone, you know. Right?
    Pepper: Right. Well, she did quite a... spread on Tony last year.
    Tony: And she wrote a story as well.
  • Strawman News Media: During her coverage of Scott Lang robbing VistaCorp, she says that there is no proof to back up his claims that VistaCorp was stealing from its customers. The station that airs her show is owned by VistaCorp, which Scott is quick to point out when he is interviewed. After the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, she says the Avengers should be held accountable for the damage caused during their fights even though Will Adams points out if that it weren't for them, everyone on Earth would be dead.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Seems to throw her Good Is Not Nice and Hidden Heart of Gold side out of the window after she became Strawman News Media. Her resentment on Tony may play a part on this and extend to the other heroes. Even before that, she tried so hard to make Tony jealous by dating his Butt-Monkey so-called "rival", which fails miserably.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Her first meeting with Tony turns from interviewing to accusing, calling him the Merchant of Death and a war profiteer. When he returns from capture and tells her he's stopped Stark Industries weapons manufacturing, she tells him that's still not enough, because there are still plenty of Stark-built weapons already in the hands of terrorists. Of course that was Obadiah Stane's doing, not Tony's. Though it does give Tony the idea of going to Afghanistan to deal with this problem.
  • You Just Told Me: "I never said you were a superhero."

    Chess Roberts 

Chess Roberts

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Olivia Munn

Appearances: Iron Man 2

A reporter at WHiH.


  • Adaptational Skimpiness: She wears more revealing and casual clothing than her comic books counterpart. Justified because the nature of the events the comics and film versions cover.

    Will Adams 

Will Adams

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/will_adams_mcu.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Al Madrigal

Appearances: Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

A political correspondent and analyst at WHiH.


  • * Alternate Self: Has a variant named Alberto Rodriguez in Sony's Spider-Man Universe.
  • Canon Foreigner: Has no counterpart in the main Marvel Universe.
  • Intrepid Reporter: He's sent to cover a confrontation between the Avengers and Crossbones in Lagos, Nigeria.
  • Only Sane Man: He seems to be the only one at WHiH to side with the heroes and their necessity just by pointing out obvious facts, while Christine Everhart takes a Strawman News Media approach. After the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, when Christine says the Avengers should be held accountable for the damage caused during their fights, Will points out if that it weren't for them, everyone on Earth would be dead.

    Jackson Norris 

Jackson Norris

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: N/A

Appearances: Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

A reporter at WHiH News.


  • Decomposite Character: The comics Jackson Norriss is made into this character and Ten Rings member Jackson Norriss (with double "s")
  • Intrepid Reporter: He's sent to cover a confrontation between the Avengers and Crossbones in Lagos, Nigeria.

Callisto Aerospace

    Louise Fisher 

Louise Fisher

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_louise.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ellen Woglom

Appearances: Inhumans

A (human) scientist at Callisto Aerospace who meets the Inhuman Royal Family.


  • Audience Surrogate: She serves this purpose in the main cast.
  • Canon Foreigner: Louise doesn't exist in the comics.
  • I Want My Jet Pack: Louise's motivation. She actually carries her father's ashes in a necklace shaped like an Apollo rocket.
    He spent his entire life wanting to go to the Moon, and NASA, they didn't know if they were gonna pick pilots or scientists. But guess what? They picked pilots. And my father, the scientist, he never got to go.
  • Smart People Wear Glasses: She's a scientist, and wears glasses to signify it.
  • Token Human: Of the main cast.

    George Ashland 

George Ashland

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tom Wright

Appearances: Inhumans

Louise's supervisor at Callisto Aerospace.


  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Despite the many, many, many incidents of alien involvement in the MCU, he does not believe Louise's theory that a hoof stomped the rover.

Declan Research

    Evan Declan 

Doctor Evan Declan

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/evandeclan.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Henry Ian Cusick

Appearances: Inhumans

A geneticist specialised in Inhumans that collaborates with Maximus.


  • Distressed Dude: Got taken as a hostage by both Auran and then later the Royal Family.
  • For Science!: Has no ill intentions and does all of his research for genetic studies.
  • Killed Off for Real: A mindless Gorgon kills the poor guy accidentally when he happens to be at the wrong place at the wrong time.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Maximus supported his research without telling him who or what he really was.

Atreus Plastics

    In General 
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the mainstream comics, Atreus Plastics produces (plastic) explosives, not actual plastics.
  • The Cameo: Atreus Plastics's logo shows up in the first season finale Daredevil, on a truck employed by a Fisk's goons to break him out of police custody.

    Mark Higgins 

Mark Higgins

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2018_07_04_10h38m02s007.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jeorge Bennett Watson

Appearances: Luke Cage

The CEO of Atreus Plastics, largest black-owned plastics company in the world.


  • Category Traitor: According to Mariah Dillard, he's never collaborated with any cause for the development of Harlem or the African-American community. That being said, he refused to sell Atreus to Glenn Industries because he wanted the company to remain black-owned.
  • Decapitation Presentation: Bushmaster kills him and puts his severed head, along with Cockroach and Ray-Ray's heads, on display in the entrance of Mariah's clinic.
  • Dirty Old Man: He lets himself get seduced by a girl young enough to be his daughter, allowing Mariah to blackmail him.
  • Honey Trap: The victim of one, as Mariah has new hostess Stephanie Miller seduce Higgins, then blackmails him into voting for Atreus to be bought out by Glenn Industries. Since Stephanie is a plant by Bushmaster, it also makes Higgins an immediate target for him to kill when declaring war on Mariah.

Testament Industries

    Anderson & Eliza Schultz 

Anderson & Eliza Schultz

Species: Humans

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Corbin Bernsen (Anderson) & Annette O'Toole (Eliza)

Appearances: The Punisher

The married heads of Testament Industries.


  • Asshole Victim: Anderson's one redeeming trait was caring for his son and John Pilgrim's kids. When he holds Pilgrim's kids hostage and kills himself because he's so ashamed of his son, that one redeeming factor disappears and nobody misses him.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: With Billy Russo in The Punisher Season 2, while in a Big Bad Duumvirate with each other with Pilgrim as their Dragon-in-Chief.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: While certainly dangerous, the two are only a threat with Pilgrim doing their dirty work. Once he turns on them, Amy and Frank quickly track them down and kill them.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Frank shoots Eliza in the head before she can stab Amy with a table knife in the Season 2 finale.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Anderson knows all too well what Frank Castle is capable of, and he still thinks it's a good idea to berate and threaten him.
  • Canon Foreigner: The two have no counterparts in any of the comics.
  • Churchgoing Villain: In contrast to her husband, Eliza appears to actually believe in her conservative Evangelical Christian faith. This does not stop her from ordering horrible crimes.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: The two use the wealth their company provides to buy politicians and outright murder anyone who stands in the way of their family.
  • Driven to Suicide: Anderson shoots himself with a pistol, using a bullet and gun Frank left behind for that exact purpose after Frank shoots Eliza and drives him into despair in The Punisher's Season 2 finale.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Despite how monstrous they are, the two truly love each other.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: The duo behind Pilgrim who want Amy dead, but they doesn't get involved with the hunt for her themselves.
  • Heteronormative Crusader: Self-righteous and extremely disapproving of their son's orientation.
  • Hiding Behind Religion: In public, Anderson is a deeply religious conservative Evangelical Christian and uses this to manipulate John Pilgrim. In private, however, he values power and his own family’s status and image above all else.
  • Lady Macbeth: While Anderson is by no means a pushover, Eliza is significantly more ruthless, often making the hard decisions that he won't, as well as being more likely to keep her cool.
  • Leave Behind a Pistol: Frank leaves a pistol and one bullet with Anderson in the Season 2 finale after killing Eliza, telling him he needs to die and end his influence over his son. Anderson obliges and shoots himself as Frank and Amy leave.
  • Unholy Matrimony: The two are married and force Pilgrim to be their assassin.

    Robert / John Pilgrim 

Robert / John Pilgrim

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/177555_1548144967_4.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Josh Stewart

Appearances: The Punisher

A born-again hitman who does the dirty work for the Schultz family.


  • Adaptational Curves: Inverted. His comic counterpart, the Mennonite, is much larger and better built.
  • Adaptational Name Change: His comic counterpart's name isn't revealed.
  • Adaptational Villainy: The Mennonite was a mafia hitman in the past, while Pilgrim was a white supremacist. Following their respective Heel–Faith Turn, the Mennonite became a pacifist for years who only took a job for the mafia as his wife was dying, and even then tried to adhere to his religious edicts to not use firearms, while Pilgrim was a member of the Aryan Brotherhood before working for the Schultzes.
  • Affably Evil: He's impeccably polite, speaks softly and treats everyone including his victims with courtesy. He's also a loving husband and father, does not enjoy any of his work and bears his targets no ill will. In fact, he absolutely hates his job and would prefer living a peaceful life with his family if the Schultzes weren't practically holding them hostage to begin with.
  • Anti-Villain: Type IV. Only does Anderson and Eliza's dirty work because they were funding his wife's medical treatment and later it turns out were implicitly holding his sons hostage.
  • As the Good Book Says...: He's fond of quoting and referencing scripture. He tends to paraphrase or draw comparisons more often than outright speak the gospel verbatim.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: With Billy Russo in Season 2. While John is merely The Heavy working for a Greater-Scope Villain, he poses the greatest danger to Frank and his associates in the first 6 episodes of the season and remains in the shadows as Russo becomes more and more of a threat in the later episodes. They are more or less on equal footing as the season draws to a close.
  • Churchgoing Villain: Despite committing horrible crimes in service of the Schultz family, he is very sincere in his faith.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Par for the course for the series, Pilgrim is quick to fight dirty.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: With Billy Russo. Russo is handsome and charismatic, whereas Pilgrim is plain, soft-spoken, and somewhat awkward. Russo is defined by his close relationship with Frank, while Pilgrim was a total stranger with no connection to him at all and never even talks to him until the last episode. Russo used to be a good person before turning bad, Pilgrim is a Retired Monster trying to make amends. And while Russo is unable to give up on his vendetta with Frank, ultimately costing him his life, Pilgrim eventually makes a Heel–Face Turn and parts ways with Frank amicably.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: As dark as his work for the Schultz family can get, it is still peanuts compared to the life he used to live before his conversion.
  • The Determinator: On a level rivaling the likes of Frank and Billy. He seeks and chases leads for his mission relentlessly and patiently, and takes a beating nearly as well as the Punisher to boot.
  • Dragon-in-Chief: Anderson Schultz's main enforcer and hitman. He's the one actively hunting down Amy and fighting Castle, and is the only reason the Schultzes are an immediate threat. Tellingly, once he turns on the Schultz family, they're killed off in short order.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: He is entirely devoted to his wife Rebecca and his sons Michael and Lemuel.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: There's one of the moments when Pilgrim is annoyed to have the police lieutenant clean up the mess at the bar when Marlena caused an unnecessary bloodbath while she was suppose to retrieve Amy; also, he seems to be sincere when he offers to spare the Sheriff and Deputies if they handed Amy over.
  • Forced into Evil: He is a reformed criminal who wants to devote his life to God and to take care of his family. But his wife's illness and the Schultzs threats against his sons forces him to become their hitman.
  • The Heavy: Of the Testament Industries conspiracy portion of the plot. He may simply be a hitman on retainer, but his masters remain in the background and keep their hands clean. Pilgrim does the legwork, the information gathering, puts out the bounties, and does all of the dirty work.
  • Heel–Face Turn: He had one when he found religion, and has another when Frank spares his life and rescues his children.
  • Hitman with a Heart: Zig-zagged. He has no qualms with maiming or killing anyone in his way, yet he seems to find doing so unpleasant. He does not enjoy or take pride in his work, but accepts his lot and makes no excuses for it. He only does the work he does for the love of his family, and tells both Curtis and Amy that he'd prefer not to have to hurt them, and if he had a choice, he would be leaving them alone.
  • Karma Houdini: Despite all the bodies he left behind, Frank lets him go in the end to look after his two sons.
  • Nothing Personal: He holds no animosity for his targets, let alone the people he interrogates along the way, and often says as much. He is completely civil and non-violent with anyone who cooperates or stays out of his way. But when he finds his targets or meets opposition, he doesn't hesitate to harm or kill.
  • Off the Wagon: He's heavily implied to be have been pretty wild in the past, but now is clean, sober, and faithful in marriage. But after a serious beating, a confrontation with his past demons, and the mounting stress of his line of work and his wife's condition, he goes on a bender with booze, cocaine and prostitutes.
  • One-Man Army: Pilgrim may be one of the few people capable of matching Frank Castle in sheer lethality and badassery.
  • Named by the Adaptation: He is based on the Mennonite, who was never named. His real first name is given as Robert, and has taken the name John after his religious rebirth.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He was a member of the neo-Nazi gang known as the Aryan Brotherhood.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: He's only hunting down Frank and Amy because he was ordered to. He takes no pleasure in it, holds no grudges against the two, and even says that he doesn't want to do this. He also has a family back home and wants to be reunited with them after he completes his mission.
  • Reformed Bully: He was once a proud white supremacist and Blood Knight, and admits more than once that he used to hate people for the color of their skin and hurt others for his own desires. He may still be a killer, but he takes no pleasure in it and only wants to get his work over with.
  • Resignations Not Accepted: When he runs into his old friends from the Aryan Brotherhood, he tells them he put that life behind him. Unfortunately, that answer doesn't sway the Brotherhood's intolerance for defectors.
  • Retired Monster: The fact that he still qualifies despite doing wet work for the Schultz family is a clear indication of just how bad he was back in the day. Even moreso since Pilgrim used to be a member of the Aryan Brotherhood before he found religion.
  • The Stoic: Nothing really phases him, even injuries and wounds he has sustained.
  • Straight Edge Evil: Since his conversion, he gave up alcohol, drugs and random sex.
  • Stronger Than They Look: He has an unassuming physique, somewhat paunchy and slim compared to other fighting men like Frank, Curtis, and Billy. But he can take down an entire gang single-handedly and go toe-to-toe with Frank while severely wounded.
  • Suppressed Rage: When Eliza insists that he continue his mission of hunting Frank instead of returning home to his family, John has an Imagine Spot where he trashes the room in a blind rage while in reality he is quietly agreeing with Eliza.
  • Those Wacky Nazis: Prior to his conversion, he was a member of the Aryan Brotherhood.

Associates

    Marlena Olin 

Marlena Olin

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Teri Reeves

Appearances: The Punisher

A mercenary tasked by John Pilgrim to search for Amy Bendix.


  • Asshole Victim: No one's gonna miss her when Pilgrim murders her sorry ass after she broke free from her jail cell.
  • Butt-Monkey: Nothing seems to go well with her when she was brutally beaten by Castle in a fistfight, knocked out by again by Castle, and shot in the leg outside of the Motel. By the time she was broke free from her jail cell, she ends up getting choked to death by Pilgrim due to her failures.
  • The Brute: She leads the mercenaries hired by Pilgrim.
  • Dark Chick: Better-than-average skills in gunfighting and close combat, though not as good as she thinks she is. The only reason she survives the Tides Motel ambush is that Frank needed a live prisoner to question.
  • It's Personal: After going up against Castle on two separate occasions she develops a personal animosity towards him.
  • Jerkass: "Arrogant bitch" is putting it mildly.
  • Moral Myopia: She has the audacity to say Pilgrim and his methods give her the creeps, and she'd much rather solve the "Castiglioni" problem on her own so she doesn't have to involve him, even if it means turning a bar into a bloodbath.
  • Private Military Contractors: After leaving the United States Army she became a mercenary and isn't particularly picky about choosing her employers.
  • Smug Snake: Thinks she can tango with Frank when she is way out of her league and overestimating her usefulness given her failures to deal with Frank and capture Amy, which ends up getting herself killed in the process. She is thoroughly condescending to everyone she meets in an "I can kill you if I feel like it" kind of way.
  • You Have Failed Me: She really doesn't seem to know her place when she's been given a specific task when she was suppose to retrieve Amy unscathed, but ends up getting into a fight with Castle and causing a massive shootout within the bar that killed several innocent bystanders, and failed to retrieve her the second time which landed her in a jail cell and the moment she got free, just as she is planning on going to get a third round against Castle, she ends up being unceremoniously killed by Pilgrim, who has had it with both her failures and her messy collateral damage.

    Marlena Olin's crew 

Marlena Olin's crew

Species: Humans

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Adrian Alvarado (Eddie), Todd Jones (Davy)

Appearances: The Punisher

A team of mercenaries under Olin's command.


  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: Marlena hires both men and women in her crew.
  • Knife Nut: While members like Eddie and Davy seem to have a preference for guns, most of them use or at least possses a knife on their person as seen in their fights at Lola's Roadhouse.
  • Mooks: Their purpose in the story is to give Frank a bunch of nobodies to fight and kill.
  • No Name Given: There's no mention of a particular name, so they are identified as Marlena Olin's crew because she's their leader.
  • Private Military Contractors: Their job.

    Ferrara 

Ferrara

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Michael Pemberton

Appearances: The Punisher

A Michigan police detective that collaborates with John Pilgrim to cover up his and Olin's string of dead bodies.


  • Bald of Evil: No hair on his dome and he is complicit in the cover-up of several murders committed by Pilgrim as well as other hired killers.
  • Dirty Cop: He's a corrupt police detective helping with the cover up the string of murders carried out by a hitman and a group of mercenaries.
  • Karma Houdini: He never gets any comeuppance or punishment from his collaboration with Pilgrim.

U-GIN Genetics Infinite R&D

    Dr. Helen Cho 

Dr. Helen Cho

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cho_helen.jpg
"Unlike you, I don't have a lot of time for parties... Will Thor be there?"

Species: Human

Citizenship: South Korean

Affiliation(s): U-GIN, S.H.I.E.L.D.

Portrayed By: Claudia Kim

Voiced By: Xóchitl Ugarte (Latin-American Spanish dub), Laura Pastor (European Spanish dub), Kanako Sakuragi (Japanese dub), Anne Tilloy (European French dub), Lise Martin (Canadian French dub), Adriana Torres (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Avengers: Age of Ultron

"This is the next thing, Tony. Your clunky metal suits are going to be left in the dust."

A world-renowned South Korean geneticist and friend of Tony Stark who aids the Avengers.


  • Ascended Extra: Helen Cho is an extremely minor character in the comics, and was introduced as a Posthumous Character to boot. The idea of making her a famous scientist and ally of the Avengers was created exclusively for the film.
  • Asian and Nerdy: She's a South Korean Hot Scientist.
  • Brainwashed: Ultron uses Loki's scepter and hypnotizes her into creating a synthetic body he can upload himself into, using a new fusion material composed of vibranium and her synthetic tissue. Wanda uses her powers to snap Dr. Cho out of her trance when she finds out Ultron's true plans.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: She hasn't appeared since Age of Ultron.
  • Composite Character: Her intelligence seems to come from Amadeus Cho, her son in the comics, and her lab work with Banner suggests a hint of Kate Waynesboro. She also takes Professor Horton's role as the Vision's creator.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Snarks at Tony for spending the majority of his time partying and not on his work. She even makes a quip at Ultron!
  • Locking Macgyver In The Store Cupboard: Helen is seriously wounded by Ultron when the latter breaks into her lab, leading some viewers to think that she died. However, she is briefly spotted with the Avengers at the movie's end, which may seem like an Unexplained Recovery, until you realize she was right in the middle of her lab with tissue regeneration equipment.
  • The Medic: Helen serves as an in-house physician of sorts at Avengers Tower, with the help of her biology and genetics research.
  • Not So Above It All: When Tony asks her if she's attending the evening party, she snarks that unlike him she has priorities and doesn't spend all of her time partying... Until she asks if Thor is attending, which made her reconsider.
  • Remember the New Guy?: She's a close friend of Tony and Bruce, but has never been seen or mentioned in any of the prior films.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Despite her comic counterpart being a Posthumous Character, Helen survives the movie and goes on to help found the new Avengers compound.
  • Uncertain Doom: Unlike everyone else on Earth affected by Thanos's snap, it is unknown whether or not Helen survived the snap or if she was dusted off-screen like Shuri was.


Alternative Title(s): MCU Hammer Industries, MCU Advanced Idea Mechanics, MCU Roxxon Corporation, MCU Companies Pym Technologies, MCU Companies Rand Enterprises, MCU Testament Industries, MCU Companies Stark Industries

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