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Main Character Index > Other Individuals and Organizations > Companies > Stark Industries | Pym Technologies | Rand Enterprises

Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

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Stark Industries

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Pym Technologies

See the Pym Technologies page

Rand Enterprises

See the Rand Enterprises page

Advanced Idea Mechanics (A.I.M)

Hammer Advanced Weapons Systems

    Justin Hammer 

Justin Hammer

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hammer_justin.jpg
"I wanna make Iron Man look like an antique."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Sam Rockwell

Voiced By: Jose Antonio Macielas (Latin-American Spanish dub), José Javier Serrano (European Spanish dub), Toshiyuki Morikawa (Japanese dub), Guillaume Lebon (French dub), Gilbert Lachance (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | All Hail the King

"We all know why we're here – in the last six months Anthony Stark has created a sword with untold possibilities, and yet he insists it's a shield. He asks that we trust him as we cower behind it."

CEO of Hammer Industries, and a (self-perceived) rival of Tony Stark. He forges a temporary alliance with Ivan Vanko, but the latter just makes use of his resources - not taking him seriously at all. An all-around obnoxious loser.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics Hammer is much older, originally modelled after Peter Cushing, in the MCU he is played by Sam Rockwell, an actor often seen as sexy.
  • Adaptational Comic Relief: His comics counterpart is more cynical and his hatred of Tony Stark is much more apparent and bitter.
  • Adaptational Nationality: American here, his comic book counterpart is British with a citizenship in Monaco.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics, Hammer is a legit rival and a threat to Stark. Here? Not so much.
  • Age Lift: His comics counterpart is much older.
  • Ambiguously Bi: In Iron Man 2, he is briefly seen with Christine Everhart who seemingly flirted with him... until she left him when Tony told her Hammer lost his contract with the Government. In the short film All Hail the King, Hammer has a new male sidekick who constantly follows him and strokes his shoulder (Justin even calls him "baby"). Such behavior isn't uncommon in prison but Hammer also talks about his "understanding" relationship with Tony that gives his jealousy a possible new meaning.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Thinks he's Tony's rival and is using Vanko to further his plans to show up Tony with the tech Vanko designs for him. The reality is the other way round.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: For all his villainous aspirations, he's just plain weird in what appears to be a failed attempt to appear rich eccentric.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Commissions a felon to help advance his company's projects after springing the aforementioned felon from prison.
  • Driven by Envy: He has people killed just to get Vanko out so he can make his Hammer drones, all for the sake of showing up Tony Stark. Thus, Evil Is Petty.
  • Evil Counterpart: Tries oh-so-hard to be this to Tony, only to fail spectacularly. It's really driven home during his display at the expo where he tries dancing his way onto the stage in an utterly feeble impersonation of Tony's showmanship to a very underwhelmed audience. Hilariously, when Tony shows up in the Iron Man armor, doing nothing more than coming in for a landing on the stage, the crowd goes wild.
  • Evil Plan: Repeat: everything he does is for the sake of showing up Tony Stark.
  • First-Name Basis: He's the only one to call Tony Anthony.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Despite being pleasant and professional, Hammer is not above bombings, prison breaks, and keeping people prisoner.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Even though he's wealthy like Tony, he definitely envies Tony's talent and success. His technology throughout the film is described as a joke and a failed knock-off of Stark's. His jealousy is even shown when he's talking to Stark or mentioning him. Heck, most of his motivation in the film is to upstage Stark.
  • Ignored Enemy: Despite his efforts, Tony barely acknowledges Hammer as a fellow industrialist, let alone a rival.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: His efforts at being either a respected businessman or a crafty villain are both such Epic Fail, it would be hard not to feel sorry for the poor schmuck, except for...
  • Jerkass: ...The fact that he's one of the oiliest, most dickish characters in 21st century movies.
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: He's not as smart as he makes himself out to be.
  • Large Ham: Being an Evil Counterpart of Tony, he still needed to be a man full of himself. All Hail the King even has Hammer complaining about Slattery stealing the spotlight from him too — both represent how Evil Is Hammy, but Hammer does it without effort to overact!
  • The Load: As shown by Luke Cage (2016), he was this to his entire company. With him imprisoned and out of the way, Hammer Industries was capable of producing legitimately threatening weapons like the armor-piercing "Judas" line of ammunition that was capable of even harming Luke Cage.
  • Made of Explodium:
    • His "Ex-Wife" miniature bunker-buster projectile is supposedly extremely explosive. Emphasis on supposedly, because it doesn't work at all. It almost makes you wonder if one of the scriptwriters recently had a nasty divorce.
      Hammer: These are the Cubans, baby. This is the Cohibas, the Montecristos. This is a kinetic-kill, side-winder vehicle with a secondary cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine RDX burst. It's capable of busting a bunker under the bunker you just busted. If it were any smarter, it'd write a book, a book that would make Ulysses look like it was written in crayon. It would read it to you. This is my Eiffel Tower. This is my Rachmaninoff's Third. My Pieta. It's completely elegant, it's bafflingly beautiful, and it's capable of reducing the population of any standing structure to zero. I call it "The Ex-Wife."
    • Luke Cage (2016) shows us that the Judas bullet has exceeded the "Ex-Wife" by penetrating otherwise impervious materials due to being forged out of Chitauri metal.
  • More Dakka: His armors and drones are equipped with massive ammunition. Tony lampshades it about Rhodey's War Machine armor that Hammer outfitted.
    Tony: You have a big gun, you aren't the big gun.
    Rhodey: Tony, don't be jealous.
    Tony: No, it's subtle, all the bells and whistles.
    Rhodey: Yeah, it's called being a Badass.
  • Motor Mouth: Often speaks in fast and rambling sentences in imitation of Tony's own Motor Mouth but his own version is just rambling useless facts and trivia.
  • Never My Fault: As he's being dragged to jail for attempting to kill Tony Stark and allying himself with Vanko, he accuses Pepper Potts of ruining his career and reputation.
  • Pride: It's his sin, he wants to be recognized and admired as the top arms dealer, before Tony.
  • Redemption Promotion: The Ex-Wife doesn't work in Iron Man 2. In the Iron Man 3 Prelude comic, an Ex-Wife is launched at War Machine and temporarily disables it. This is the one Tony made, not the Hammer-downgraded one. Looks like he had something on it after all.
  • Smug Snake: He has the same ego as Tony, but none of the genius to back it up.
  • Sweet Tooth: He stated it when he first met Ivan. He's eating ice cream when he meets up with Ivan and sucking on a lollipop while presenting weapons to Rhodes (pictured above) and confessed to Ivan that "he likes his dessert first".
  • Took a Level in Badass: Not him, but his company. By Luke Cage (2016), Hammer Industries has exceeded in the failures of the past by creating smarter, deadlier weapons, such as the "Judas" bullet, crafted from Chitauri metal and able to penetrate otherwise impervious materials. The bullet is essentially the "Ex-Wife" done right. It's likely that without Hammer's "oversight" the company was actually able to get things done.
  • Unknown Rival: To Tony. It was emphasized thoroughly in the second film.

    Jack 

Jack

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jack_3.bmp
"It's a beautiful bird!"

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jack White

Appearances: Iron Man 2

Justin Hammer's personal assistant and butler.


  • Ascended Extra: His actor Jack White was originally hired as the food stylist who prepared and served the salmon carpaccio to Vanko in the aircraft hangar, but he ended up appearing in several scenes as Hammer's assistant.
  • Canon Foreigner: He isn't based on any characters from the comics.
  • The Danza: He shares his first name with the actor that portrayed him, Jack White.
  • Evil Counterpart: Being Justin Hammer's assistant and butler, he can be considered as one to either Pepper Potts or Happy Hogan. He isn't that much evil, though.
  • Minion with an F in Evil: He may be working for Hammer, but he doesn't do anything really evil himself and come across as a pretty pleasant guy.
  • Non-Action Guy: He doesn't appear to have any combat skills, and doesn't intervene at all when his boss get tackled by Natasha Romanoff and later taken in custody by police officers.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted. There are plenty of other characters named Jack (or similar names) within the MCU (Jack Taggart, Jack Rollins, Jack Murdoch...).
  • Only One Name: His last name is never mentioned, he's only referred as "Jack" throughout the movie, even in the credits.
  • Old Retainer: It's not clear how long he has been working for Hammer, but he's quite older than him and seems entirely loyal to him.
  • Personal Mook: He serves as Justin Hammer's personal assistant, butler, waiter, porter and possibly driver as well.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: While he has apparently no problem with the fact that his boss has organized the escape of a dangerous criminal which resulted in several people's death, he doesn't seems particularily evil, just happening to work for the wrong person.
  • Reality Ensues: On Hammer's orders, he tried to to fit his head into that of a drone, even though it had no openings and was clearly too small. Predictably, it didn't work.
  • Satellite Character: He is Justin Hammer's assistant, and that's pretty much all there is to say about him. He barely interacts with anyone else during the movie except Vanko on brief occasions.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: He's last seen running away from the premises after Justin Hammer got arrested. It's unknown what happened to him afterwards, and if he got arrested for his complicity or not.
  • Yes-Man: He tends to agree with everything his boss says even when he's blatantly lying, notably when he tried to pass off some random bird as Vanko's pet and (falsely) complimented it.
    Vanko: This is not my bird.
    Hammer: What do you mean? That’s the bird! This is the bird! Yeah! I pulled a lot of strings to get this bird. This is a great bird!
    Jack: It’s a beautiful bird!

    Ivan Vanko / Whiplash 
See the Other Supervillains page.
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    Hammer Drones 

Hammer Drones

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hammer_drones_4.bmp

Species: Drones

Appearances: Iron Man 2

An army of drones created by Hammer Industries to be sold to the military. They started as Powered Armors similar to Iron Man's suits, but Ivan Vanko was recruited to work on them and decided to change them to drones in order to hack them and use them in his plans to take revenge on Tony Stark.


  • Action Bomb: They're revealed to be this at the end of the final battle, when it turns out all the drones (as well as Whiplash's armor) have a Self-Destruct Mechanism that Vanko is planning to use as a last attempt to kill the heroes.
  • Airborne Mook: All the drones are able to fly, but the Air Force Drones are the best example as they primarily attack the hero while flying in mid-air, whereas the other drones usually attack from the ground.
  • Alien Blood: Every time they are torn apart by the heroes, they bleed oil. Justified, since they are robots after all.
  • All There in the Manual: Some details about the Hammer Drones not shown in the movie are revealed in the Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, such as the facts that the Navy Drones have fixed-point coil lasers, the Air Force Drones have thermal vision vortex ring guns, and the Marine Drones have high-definition cameras.
  • American Robot: Subverted. At first, Justin Hammer tries to pass them off as this. The drones were built to serve in the U.S. Armed Force, they come in Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine models, and every model has a specialist weapon or device attached to it (a tank gun for the Army, missile launchers for the Navy, high-speed flight systems for the Air Force, and close-range machine guns for the Marines). Too bad Ivan Vanko has different plans for them...
  • Animated Armor: Initially, they were created to be simple armors that have to be piloted by someone inside of them. However, when Ivan Vanko was recruited to work with Hammer, he decided to turn the armors into drones capable of moving on their own, without needing any pilots.
  • Anti-Air: This is pretty much the Army Drones' job, as they are the ones charged with firing at Iron Man while he's flying in the air. They fail to actually hit him though, but they accidentally shoot down one of the Air Force Drones.
  • Anti-Climax: After Justin Hammer and Ivan Vanko spent a large part of the movie building an army of robots supposedly capable of challenging Iron Man, you'd be forgiven for expecting an epic showdown between them and the heroes during the climax... Instead, after the (admittedly pretty cool) Chase Scene, Iron Man and War Machine manage to easily defeat all of them in less than a minute.
  • Arm Cannon: The drones all have machine guns mounted in their arms, as well as missile launchers in the case of the Air Force and the Marine Drones, and also multigrenade launchers for the Army Drones.
  • Artistic License – Gun Safety: All the drones have their weapons fully loaded, despite the fact that they weren't expected to perform any live fire demonstrations during the presentation. Granted, this was probably Vanko's doing, but it's still odd that nobody involved in transporting them to the expo tried to check first.
  • Artistic License – Military: Even though they are supposed to be "the new face of the United States Military", there are only four different lines of drones (one for the U.S. Army, one for the Navy, one for the Air Force and one for the Marine Corps), while there are five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. For some reason, the United States Coast Guard is the only one that was not included (maybe Justin Hammer simply forgot it even existed?).
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: Once they are activated, they do nothing but attack Iron Man over and over, no matter what. Even when one of them crashes into an advertising screen, it immediately gets up and keeps attacking the hero like nothing happened. Justified, as it's in their program to specifically target Iron Man.
  • Attack Drone: They are an army of fully weaponized drones created for combat, and at the climax of the movie, Ivan Vanko remotely controls them to attack the heroes.
  • Backpack Cannon: The Air Force Drones have machine guns mounted on their back, allowing them to shoot at their target while flying.
  • Badass Army: They are an army of flying robots armed with missile launchers and tank guns that are supposed to replace the U.S. militaries. Slightly subverted in that they're not badass enough to defeat Iron Man and War Machine, though (admittedly, this is not exactly an easy task).
  • BFG: All the Army Drones have a shoulder-mounted tank gun that is certainly big enough to qualify.
  • The Blank: Unlike Iron Man's and Whiplash's armors, or even their previous design, the Hammer Drones lack anything resembling a human face, eyes or a mouth.
  • Boom, Headshot! / Your Head A-Splode: During the battle inside the Oracle Dome, War Machine blows off one of the Marine Drones' head with his guns before spraying the rest of its body with bullets.
    • Just before, Iron Man breaks a Marine Drone's head into pieces by kicking it with his knee, then crushes its remaining corpse with his elbow.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Kind of justified, actually. Even though they fire an astonishing number of bullets at the heroes, the fact that they were converted into drones without pilots inside them means the recovered space could have been used to provide them with more ammunition.
    • In addition, the trope is partially averted as the Navy Drones eventually run out of missiles, and the Army Drones never use their tank guns during the battle inside the Oracle Dome, implying they are short of ammunition. Plus, it can be easily assumed that all the drones that tried to fight the heroes hand-to-hand did so because they were out of bullets.
  • Bullet Sparks: In the final battle, they fire plenty of bullets on the heroes, which make lots and lots of sparks.
  • Cannon Fodder: It's implied the drones' real purpose is to get destroyed by Iron Man and War Machine's weapons so that they will be out of ammo when Whiplash arrives.
  • Can't Use Stairs: Averted. Unlike many robots in fiction, the Navy Drones and the Army Drones are shown to have no problems walking down stairs.
  • Chase Scene: The Air Force Drones have a pretty memorable one near the end of the film, where they pursue the protagonist all around Stark Expo, until they get all destroyed thanks to some Wronski Feints.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: The drones have repulsors that leave a blue-ish trail when they are activated, making it easier to differentiate them from Iron Man and War Machine (who both have brighter colors) in scenes where they are all flying.
    • In addition, each of the four line-up of drones has a different color, which also helps a bit to tell them apart.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: Averted. When the Hammer Drones attack in great numbers, Iron Man and War Machine manage to deal with them without too much trouble, and when faced against a single drone, they can defeat it just as easily, as seen with the one that tried to shoot a child.
  • Cool Guns: Of course, they are all filled with cool guns of all kinds. In particular, the Army Drones have a tank gun mounted on their shoulders that is based on the M242 Bushmaster.
  • Cranial Processing Unit: Destroying their heads seems to be a pretty effective way to kill them, as seen on several occasions during the final fight.
  • Crush. Kill. Destroy!: Once Vanko activated them during the expo, they become aggressive killing machines that do nothing but cause destruction and attempt to kill the heroes.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: They didn't do particularly well against Iron Man and War Machine, to say the least. During the battle inside the Oracle Dome, they all end up destroyed in barely a minute.
  • Cyber Cyclops: All of them have a rectangular camera on their face that they use to see, making them look like this trope.
  • Dark Is Evil: They have rather dark colors, and serve as the Big Bad's army.
  • Defeat Equals Explosion: Played with. They all explode shortly after being defeated, however it's due to Vanko activating their Self-Destruct Mechanism rather than because of the defeat in itself (that being said, he activated it because he and his drones lost the battle...).
  • Diagonal Cut: After Iron Man used his Death Blossom lasers to kill the last drones, a couple of them remain standing for a few seconds before collapsing, sliced in half.
  • Disastrous Demonstration: Invoked. Vanko deliberately waits until the Hammer Drones are being displayed at Stark Expo as a big event before taking control of them and letting them cause mayhem.
  • 11th-Hour Ranger: The Marine Drones stay dormant during the majority of the chase scene and are only activated near the end of it, just in time to join the other drones for the final fight against Iron Man and War Machine in the Oracle Dome.
  • Elite Mooks: While they are still defeated without too much trouble by the heroes, the drones are definitely far more powerful and dangerous compared to the Hammer security guards. Heck, with all the firepower at their disposal, they're arguably some of the strongest and most destructive Mooks within the entire MCU.
  • Everyone Chasing You: All the Air Force Drones plus War Machine chase Iron Man for several minutes during the finale, and later the other drones follow him to the Oracle Dome as well.
  • Evil Is Bigger: Downplayed compared to Iron Monger, but the drones are at least one full head taller than human beings, including the heroes when they wear their Powered Armors.
  • Evil Knockoff: The Hammer Drones are low-quality knockoffs of Iron Man's armors, designed to compete with him.
  • Eye Lights Out: Downplayed. Some, but not all, of the drones have the light of their arc reactor fading off when they get killed.
  • Faceless Goons: In comparison to Iron Man and War Machine, they have particularly non-human faces, which serves to dehumanize them and make sure that the audience won't empathize too much with them or feel too bad when they are violently massacred.
  • Family-Unfriendly Violence: In the battle towards the end of the movie, the drones get slaughtered by the heroes in rather brutal ways, such as having their head blown off, getting cut in half or being smashed into pieces. Even if they are not flesh-and-blood, the way their oil is splattering every time they get hurt still makes it look like a bloodbath and can be a little disturbing to watch...
  • Fake Ultimate Mook: Despite being supposed to "make Iron Man look like an antique", they all get beaten by him fairly easily, and are shown to have less efficient firepower and cannot take nearly as much damages as him.
  • Flight: All of them have flight capability due to being designed with repulsor flight technology. The Air Force models in particular are skilled enough to effectively chase Iron Man throughout Stark Expo for a long period of time.
  • Flying Firepower: In addition to having the ability to fly, they all have machine guns built in their wrist and are equipped with missile launchers, tank guns, grenade launchers and other firearms of all kinds.
  • Four Is Death: There are four different lines of drones, each representing a branch of the U.S. Armed Force (even though there are actually five branches...), and they all are equally deadly Killer Robots.
  • Friendly Fire: One of the Army Drones accidently shoots down an Air Force Drone that was chasing Iron Man, while targeting the latter. Shortly afterward, it happens again in the battle inside the Oracle Dome, where one of the drones fires a missile at Iron Man and hits the Marine Drone that was behind him.
  • Glowing Mechanical Eyes: The rectangular cameras on the drones' faces that serve as their eyes are constantly glowing in blue light.
  • Gone Horribly Right: Justin Hammer insisted to Vanko that he wanted the drones to steal the show. Well, they did... by wreaking havoc and causing panic at Stark Expo. Probably not the way he intended, but at least he can be sure that every newspaper is going to talk about it.
  • Gone Horribly Wrong: From Justin Hammer's point of view at least, the drones presentation didn't exactly go as planned. From Ivan Vanko's view, on the other hand, everything went perfectly according to his plans.
  • Grenade Launcher: The Army Drones all have a multigrenade launcher installed on their wrist.
  • Geo Effects: When the drones arrive in the Oracle Dome, they surround Iron Man and War Machine from a much more elevated position, which according to Rhodey give them the advantage over the two of them in the ensuing battle. Subverted, as the drones loose the fight anyway.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: During the final battle, some drones' parts are used by Iron Man to do this to other drones
  • Guilt-Free Extermination War: Being robots, they obviously feel nothing about killing the heroes, and unsurprisingly, neither do the heroes have any guilt about destroying them.
  • Hack Your Enemy: They started off as Hammer Industries' products, but Vanko easily manages to hack them to make them become his own Mooks.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: At the end of the battle inside the Oracle Dome, all the remaining drones get sliced in two by Iron Man and his Death Blossom lasers.
  • Heart Light: Just like Iron Man's, Iron Monger's, War Machine's and Whiplash's armors, the Hammer Drones have a glowing arc reactor installed in their chest that powers them.
  • Heavily Armored Mook
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: At least one of the Air Force Drones gets blasted out of the sky by a misplaced shot from an Army Drone.
    • It happens quickly, but during the final fight we can see in the background one of the Marine Drones being blown up by another drone's missile that missed Iron Man.
  • Hollywood Hacking: Ivan Vanko managed to hack into their system with incredible ease. Apparently, Hammer's security systems are just the worst. Lampshaded by Vanko:
    Ivan Vanko: Software shit.
  • Homing Projectile: The Navy Drones and Air Force Drones both have guided missile launchers mounted on their arms. During the chase scene in the carpark, one of the Air Force Drones fires two of its missiles at Iron Man, only for him to manage a High-Speed Missile Dodge.
  • I Have the High Ground: As noted by Rhodey, in the final battle the Hammer Drones take the high ground by landing on a higher position than the two heroes and surround them, thus trapping them in the "kill box". Not that it helps them to actually win the fight, though.
  • Immune to Bullets: Surprisingly averted, unlike Iron Man's and War Machine's and even the second Whiplash's armors, they are totally vulnerable to bullets. Rhodey is notably able to take down several of them with any of his different types of guns in the final battle.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Downplayed, as they actually manage to hit the heroes when they're firing normal bullets with their machine guns, but they completely miss every time they try to use a weapon that may have a chance to seriously hurt them such as the tank guns or missile launchers.
  • Incredibly Obvious Bomb: They become these in the end, with their arc reactors ticking and flashing red light faster and faster, making it clear to everyone (except Pepper Potts, surprisingly) that they are going to self-destruct.
  • Informed Ability: According to Justin Hammer, the drones are supposed to "make Iron Man look like an antique" and to be capable of replacing not only him, but also the U.S. militaries. However, they are clearly shown to be far less powerful than any of Iron Man's armors, and they can't even withstand bullets particularly well, making Hammer's claims extremely doubtful at best.
  • Infrared Xray Camera: Apparently, some of the drones have thermal vision cameras.
  • In-Series Nickname: Tony Stark refers to them as "Hammeroids" at one point. The term became very popular among fans.
    Tony: I will formally apologize when I am not fighting off a Hammer-oid attack.
  • Instant Awesome: Just Add Mecha!: They are the first humanoid-shaped robots of large size introduced in the MCU, but certainly not the last ones.
  • It's Raining Men: Near the end of the movie, the drones go after Iron Man and War Machine inside the Oracle Dome. Once there, they all drop from a certain height and land around the two heroes one-by-one, surrounding them. Since they are robots made of metal and they slightly used their Rocket Boots to slow down their descent, the fall doesn't hurt them at all.
  • Job-Stealing Robot: Justin Hammer is planning to make them replace the U.S. militaries in order to reduce human casualties (he still says he consider human presence as necessary though, but he's only talking about men in Powered Armors), as well as Iron Man himself. In a sense, when they are turned into drones they also technically stole the job of whoever was supposed to pilot them as Powered Armors.
  • Killer Robot: They are heavily armed robots designed for the sole purpose of destroying their enemies.
  • Kinetic Weapons Are Just Better: Even though they have similar technology to Iron Man, who has Repulsors, Chest Blaster and Frickin' Laser Beams, and were created by Vanko, who is capable of creating Electro-whips, the drones only use relatively common weapons, such as machine guns, missiles and grenade launchers. It didn't really help them win against the heroes during the climactic battle, though.
  • Law of Inverse Recoil: Justified. The Army Drones utilize rather huge tank guns, but they manage to avoid being Recoiled Across The Room every time they shoot by using foot-mounted anchor spikes that serve as outriggers.
  • Let's Split Up, Gang: While chasing Iron Man through the carpark, a few Air Force Drones split up from the others in order to lure him back to Stark Expo. Also, when the four lines of drones are activated they all go on separate directions, with the Air Force Drones following Iron Man through the sky, the Navy Drones going at the exit to fire their missiles, the Army Drones accompanying them outside and placing themselves at the stairs to shoot at Tony, and the Marine Drones staying where they are.
  • Light Is Not Good: Despite having a Heart Light and a glowing camera on their face, they are definitely not good guys. Instead, they're dangerous Killer Robots used by the Big Bad to try to kill the heroes.
  • Losing Your Head: Due to them being robots, Hammer can remove one of the drones' head and shows it to Vanko when asking what it was without it being a problem. Vanko himself did the same thing the first time he comes face-to-face with them, while they were still Powered Armors.
    Justin Hammer: What is that? Ivan...What’s this? Is that a helmet? It doesn’t look like a helmet to me. How are you supposed to get a head in there? Jack, could you put your head in there? Try to put your head in there. Go ahead. Try to put your head in there. See, Ivan? He can’t put his head in there. That’s...That's... That’s not a helmet. It’s a head.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: This trope is the Navy Drones' speciality, as they all have two shoulder-mounted missile launchers, each of them carrying six missiles, plus three others mounted in a pod on each of their arms, making a total of eighteen missiles per drones. The Air Force Drones and the Marine Drones also have missiles inside their arms.
  • Made of Plasticine: Compared to Iron Man's and War Machine's as well as Whiplash's armors, at least. During the final battle, the two heroes manage to tear them apart as easily as if they were made of cardboard.
  • Mecha-Mooks: The Hammer Drones are a typical example of this trope. They are non-sentient robots sent by the Big Bad to kill the heroes, attack them in large number, but are quite easily destroyed in various manners. Good thing Vanko made them drones rather than men in Powered Armors, this way the audience has no problem when they are brutally slaughtered by the heroes.
  • Military Salute: Vanko tells Justin Hammer that "make salute" is the only thing they are ready do for now. Of course, he was lying and the drones can do much more than that, but it turns out they can indeed make a military salute and they all do one at the same time in response to Rhodey's during the presentation at Stark Expo.
  • Missile Lock-On: Vanko locked all of them on Iron Man, causing the Air Force Drones and War Machine to chase him unrelentingly through Stark Expo while the other drones are firing at him from the ground.
  • Mistaken Identity: One of them mistakes a kid wearing an Iron Man mask for the real deal and tries to shoot him. Fortunately, the real Iron Man shows up just in time and blast the drone down as it realises its mistake.
  • Mook Carryover: Sort of. They were first created by Justin Hammer (as Powered Armors) and were supposed to be utilized by him, however when Ivan Vanko was hired to work on them, he ended up taking control of them and using them to fulfill his own goals.
  • Mook Chivalry: When some of the drones try to fight the heroes hand-to-hand, for the most part they only go one at a time. Though the others continue to shoot, at least.
  • More Dakka: They all have machine guns mounted in their wrist (and also in their back in the case of the Air Force Drones) that they use to strafe their enemies with plenty of bullets.
  • Mundane Utility: They are high-tech robots equipped with all kinds of weaponry. What does Justin Hammer use them for? Decorate his presentation and respond to War Machine's salute. Justified, as Vanko told him it was the only things they could do.
  • Murder by Mistake: Due to their high number, some of the Hammer Drones that tried to shoot at Iron Man end up killing other drones behind him instead.
  • Navy SEALs: The Navy Drones, of course, are supposed to become the new Navy SEALs.
  • Noisy Robots: Similar to Iron Man's armors, the Hammer Drones make a lot of sounds whenever they move or when they adjust their weapons.
  • 1-Dimensional Thinking / 2-D Space: When Iron Man flew through the Stark Expo's Unisphere, all the Air Force Drones followed him inside rather than simply flying over it, even though he was already out by the time they arrived. This caused all of them to get destroyed.
  • One-Hit-Point Wonder: Any of them can be killed with only one of Iron Man's repulsor blasts, one of his missiles, or even with just a punch.
  • The Pawns Go First: If he had wanted to, Vanko could have joined the drones in the battle against Iron Man and War Machine, but he deliberately chose to wait until they're all destroyed instead. Presumably, he wanted them to soften the two heroes before he fights them himself.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Not as much as Iron Man or War Machine, but they are still capable of causing a great deal of havoc. Especially the Navy Drones, which provoke a lot of destruction in Stark Expo with their missiles.
  • Plot Hole: Even though there were only eight drones per branches of the U.S. military during their presentation, making it a total of of thirty-two drones, they are clearly much more numerous than that a few moments later during the battle against Iron Man and War Machine.
    • Also, the Air Force Drone 0303 apparently gets destroyed twice according to Vanko's computer, the first time when it's accidently shot down by the Army Drones, and the second time when two drones collides with each other and crash into a pillar in the carpark.
  • Powered Armor: They started off as this, but Vanko decided to turn them into drones because, as he explains to Hammer, "drones better".
  • Priceless Paperweight: Each of them is a high-tech robot worth tens of millions dollars, but when Vanko pretends they are not combat-ready, Justin Hammer decides to only use them as little more than background decoration for his presentation. He even refers to them as "overpriced paperweights" at one point.
    Justin Hammer: And now your overpriced paperweights are gonna look like a backdrop to my demonstration.
  • Quantity vs. Quality: Vanko clearly focused them on quantity, while focusing his second armor on quality. Though great in number, the drones have relatively weak firepower compared to the likes of Iron Man and War Machine and are rather easy to defeat, whereas Vanko's second armor is a single model but is way stronger and tougher than all the drones combined.
  • Reality Ensues: Naturally, the Army Drones' tank guns have a lot of recoil, hence why they need to use their foot-mounted anchor spikes in order to stabilize when they shoot with it.
  • Real Robot Genre: The Hammer Drones mostly qualify as Real Robots. They are mass-produced units built by a weapons manufacturing company, they only use normal firearms (unlike Iron Man or Whiplash), they were given some tests (as seen in the video during the Congress), and they are supposed to be sold to the U.S. militaries to fight during wars.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: It's not their eyes, but each drones' arc reactors turn red when Vanko activates their Self-Destruct Mechanism, warning the heroes (and the audience) they are about to explode.
  • Replacement Mooks: At first, Justin Hammer tried to have henchmen wearing Powered Armors, but they turned out to be rather ineffective (not to mention dangerous for their own pilots). As a result, Vanko decided to replace them with more capable drones, justifying himself by saying that "People make problem. Drone better." (in reality, he mostly wanted to be able to hijack them and send them after Iron Man).
  • Required Secondary Powers: Due to the recoil created by their tank guns, the Army Drones have anchor spikes mounted on their feet that they can use to stabilize.
  • Robo Cam: We're given several shots of their vision, notably when one of them nearly kills a kid with an Iron Man mask.
  • Robot Names: As shown on Vanko's computer, each individual drone has a name, which starts with some figure that is followed by the diminutive of the branch of the U.S. Armed Forces to which it belongs and a number:
    • The Army Drones are referred as lozenge - ARM - 0101 up to 0108.
    • The Navy Drones are referred as barred square - NAV - 0301 up to 0308 (oddly, there are no number 0201 to 0208),
    • The Air Force Drones are referred as triangle - AIR - 0301 up to 0308.
    • The Marine Drones are referred as star - MAR - 0401 up to 0408.
    • Whilpash is referred as a big triangle - HSD - 001.
    • War Machine (whose suit is also known as Variable Threat Response Battle Suit) is referred as a green lozenge - VTRB - 0001.
    • Iron Man is referred as a white circle - IRM - 0001.
  • Robot Soldier: They are an army of robots created to be used by the militaries to fight during wars in place of human soldiers. Although Vanko has other plans for them, but it still involves them participating in a battle.
  • Robots Are Just Better: This is basically the reason given by Vanko to make them Attack Drones rather than Powered Armors (although the real reason is that he's secretly planning to use them for himself).
    Ivan Vanko: Drone better.
    Justin Hammer: What? Drone better? Why is drone better? Why is drone better?
    Ivan Vanko: People make problem. Trust me. Drone better.
  • Rocket Boots: Much like Iron Man, they all have those in their foot. The Air Force Drones also have reactors in their back in order to help them fly better.
  • Russian Language: After the drones are hijacked by Vanko, their systems are written in Russian. In addition, some of them are apparently communicating in Russian language.
    Hammer Technician: Each set of drones is... is communicating in its own unique language.
    Pepper Potts: Choose one and focus on that.
    Justin Hammer: Have you tried Russian? Why don't you try Russian?
  • Sapient Tank: Downplayed as they are still machines, but the Army Drones are essentially humanoid tanks and have a robotic intelligence.
  • Seeing Through Another's Eyes: Everything the drones are seeing through the cameras on their faces is also seen by Ivan Vanko on his computer.
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism: At the end of the battle, it turns out all the drones have one that Whiplash activates as a last attempt to kill the heroes.
  • Semper Fi: The Marine Drones, being huge robots equipped with machine guns, missile launchers, repulsors and everything. That being said, they are not particularly stronger that the other drones...
  • Send in the Clones: The Hammer Drones are of course inspired by Iron Man. Just like several countries were trying to do, Justin Hammer wanted to create mass-produced Iron Men. So, at the movie's climax, the hero basically has to fight an army of knockoffs of himself.
  • Sequel Escalation: At the end of the first film, Tony only had to fight one guy in Powered Armor (Iron Monger). In the second film, he and Rhodey naturally have to fight an entire army of robots plus another guy in Powered Armor (Whiplash).
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: At two different points, Iron Man dodges the shots of some drones, causing them to hit other drones behind him.
  • Shooting Superman: They keep trying to kill Iron Man and War Machine by firing normal bullets at them, even though it clearly has little to no effect on their armors. Granted, from time to time they also use heavier weapons that have better chances to actually harm them, such as tank guns and missiles, but they tend to miss every time they shoot those ones...
  • Shoulder Cannon: The Army Drones have a huge tank gun mounted on their shoulder.
  • Sliding Scale of Robot Intelligence: They are straight Bricks, only capable of obeying their programming and not much more.
  • Somebody Set Up Us the Bomb: Without anyone knowing it, Ivan Vanko installed a powerful Self-Destruct Mechanism inside the drones before they were sent to the expo. He ends up activating it near the end of the film, and the ensuing explosions cause a lot of destruction within Stark Expo, but fortunately the protagonists manage to get to safety.
  • Space Marine: Or rather, robot Marines, in the case of the Marine Drones.
  • Stalker Without a Crush: They ruthlessly hunt down Iron Man and will never stop, ever, until they manage to kill him. Justified, since they are robots and have been programmed to target him.
  • Stompy Mooks: They make quite a lot of noise when they are walking, when they land on the ground, or even when they're just moving.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: Even though they are quite clearly outmatched, the drones keep attacking Iron Man and War Machine over and over, until all of them are destroyed. To be fair, this is only due to their programming, not because they really believed they could win.
  • Superior Successor: While nowhere near as effective as Tony Stark's armors, the drones are still working much better than Hammer's previous Powered Armors.
  • Super-Persistent Missile: The Air Force Drones act like this during the finale, relentlessly following Iron Man all across Stark Expo no matter what's on their way. They don't even let the mere fact of crashing into obstacles (like when one of them bump into an advertising screen) stop them from pursuing him.
  • Superpowered Mooks: Similar to the heroes, the drones have an arc reactor powering them and are equipped with repulsors that allow them to fly, and more importantly with a vast array of weapons that include machine guns, missile launchers and tank guns among others, all of which making them a force to be reckoned with.
  • Super Weight: They are Type 4, just like Iron Man, War Machine, and Whiplash with his second suit.
  • Super Wrist-Gadget: All of them have machine guns, missiles and other types of weapons built into their wrists.
  • Symbolic Blood: The way their oil is spurting every time they are injured during the fight against Iron Man and War Machine makes it very reminiscent of blood.
  • Taking You with Me: Just like Whiplash's second armor, they blow themselves up after their defeat as a last attempt to kill the heroes. Needless to say, it doesn't work. While the ensuing explosions cause lots of collateral damages, the heroes manage to escape in time.
  • Tank Goodness: Again, the Army Drones have a shoulder-mounted tank gun that they use againt Iron Man.
  • That Poor Car: During the climactic chase scene, the Air Force Drones (and War Machine) follow Iron Man through a carpark and they set off almost all the cars' alarms.
  • Three-Point Landing: Surprisingly, averted. During the climactic battle in the Oracle Dome, they all land in a standing posture. Presumably, having a good dozen ThreePointLandings in a row would diminish the drama. Also, as drones, they have higher g-tolerances than humans, and don't need to cushion their landings.
  • Throw the Mook at Them: It's easy to miss, but shortly before all the drones get destroyed by the Death Blossom laser during the final fight, one of them gets grabbed by Iron Man and then thrown on another drone, destroying both of them.
  • Time Bomb: Become this after Vanko activated their Self-Destruct Mechanism. While no precise time limit is given, it takes them approximately 30 seconds of movie time to blow up, forcing Iron Man to hurry up to go pick Pepper and put her into safety before the explosions kill her.
  • Tin-Can Robot: Downplayed, but their overall appearance looks a bit like this trope.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Following Iron Man inside the Stark Expo's Unisphere wasn't really a good idea, and led to the destruction of roughly all the Air Force Drones. The other drones don't seem to have a particularly good sense of self-preservation either, as they keep attacking the heroes, including by trying to fight them hand-to-hand, even when it's obvious they don't stand a chance. Justified though, as they are programmed to act this way.
  • Victory by Endurance: It's heavily implied the reason Vanko sent them after Iron Man and War Mar Marchine is to force the heroes to burn most of their energy and ammunition against them (notably Iron Man's one-time use Death Blossom lasers) before he goes fight them himself.
  • Villain Override: They are victims of this during the expo, in which Vanko takes control of all of them to go after Iron Man.
  • Walking Armory: Much like Iron Man's and War Machine's armors, all the drones are equipped with a huge amount of weaponry:
    • The Army Drones have machine gun and multigrenade launcher on their wrists, and a tank gun on their shoulder.
    • The Navy Drones also have machine gun on their wrist, plus two missile launchers on their shoulders and missiles mounted in a pod on each arm.
    • The Air Force Drones have machine guns on their wrist and their back, and two wrist-mounted missile launchers.
    • The Marine Drones have machine gun as well as missile launcher on their wrists.
  • Walking Tank: The Army Drones. They are basically walking tanks with a humanoid shape.
  • We Have Reserves:
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: Due to them being drones, the heroes have absolutely no issues with destroying them in violent ways. Considering they're basically mindless machines, it's hard to blame them.
  • Why Am I Ticking?: As it turns out, Vanko installed a Self-Destruct Mechanism in every drones and activates it at the end, causing all of them to explode after half a minute of ticking.
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: The one that tried to kill the kid certainly didn't hurry to actually fire, which gave Iron Man enough time to show up and blast it into pieces. In addition, when the drones start landing in the Oracle Dome, they wait until all of them have arrived and even allow Iron Man and War Machine to close their helmets before attacking.
  • Would Hurt a Child: During the climax, one of the drones tries to kill a child with an Iron Man mask note . In its defense, it genuinely thought he was the real (and very adult) Iron Man.
  • Wronski Feint: Most of the Air Force Drones get victims of this tactic during the climactic chase scene, with some of them following Iron Man in a carpark and crashing into pillars, another one colliding with an advertising screen a few moments later (although this one manages to recover pretty quickly), and finally all the remaining ones being destroyed after trying to follow Iron Man in the Stark Expo's Unisphere.
  • You Are Number 6: As shown on Vanko's computer, each individual drone has a number assigned to it that follows a figure symbolizing its branch from the U.S. Armed Forces and the diminutive of the branch's name:
    • The Army Drones are referred as lozenge - ARM - 0101 up to 0108.
    • The Navy Drones are referred as barred square - NAV - 0301 up to 0308 (oddly, there are no number 0201 to 0208),
    • The Air Force Drones are referred as triangle - AIR - 0301 up to 0308.
    • The Marine Drones are referred as star - MAR - 0401 up to 0408.
    • Whilpash is referred as a big triangle - HSD - 001.
    • War Machine is referred as a green lozenge - VTRB - 0001.
    • Iron Man is referred as a white circle - IRM - 0001.
  • Zerg Rush: They are clearly a lot weaker than Iron Man and War Machine, with their only advantage being that they vastly outnumber them. Therefore, they try to use sheer number to overwhelm the two heroes in the final battle. This might have worked if Iron Man didn't have the Death Blossom lasers...

Roxxon Corporation

See the Roxxon Corporation page.

Cybertek

    Carlo Mancini 

Carlo Mancini

Species: Human

Portrayed By: T.J. Ramini

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Cybertek head of security transporting.


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He's a corporate executive collaborating with the similarly corrupt Ian Quinn.
  • You Have Failed Me: The Clairvoyant (John Garrett) has Mancini executed by Deathlok after Mancini's men unwittingly attracting S.H.I.E.L.D.'s attention.

    Sofia 

Sofia

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Emily Baldoni

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A member of Mancini's team.


  • Number Two: To Mancini.
  • You Have Failed Me: The Clairvoyant (John Garrett) orders Deathlok to kill her after Mancini's men unwittingly attracting S.H.I.E.L.D.'s attention.

    Kyle Zeller 

Kyle Zeller

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Josh Daugherty

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Cybertek forced employee used by John Garrett as Deathlok's handler.


  • I Have Your Wife: Or as Cybertek calls it, the "Incentives Program": his wife has been kidnapped to ensure his cooperation.
  • Mission Control: Forced to act as Deathlok's handler and mission control.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: He serves Garrett not out of villainy or corruption, he simply wants to keep his wife alive.
Advertisement:

    Joseph Getty 

Dr Joseph Getty

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Mark Fite

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A scientist forcibly recruited into Cybertek to do research into Gravitonium.


  • I Have Your Wife: HYDRA threatened his family to ensure his cooperation with Cybertek.

IGH

See the IGH page.

X-Con Security Consultants

    Luis 

Luis

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/luis_mcu.jpg
"Are we the good guys?"

Portrayed By: Michael Peña

Voiced By: Luis Alfonso Mendoza (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Ant-Man | Ant-Man and the Wasp

"Oh no, no, Daddy don't get scared."

Scott's friend and former cellmate. Later, the head of X-Con Security Consultants


  • Adorkable: His goofball Motor Mouth tendencies are really endearing.
  • The Alleged Car: It becomes a Running Gag in the franchise for people to call his van ugly.
  • Badass Normal: Has no superpowers but is a reliable sidekick to Scott. He even gets to be a Badass Driver operating a shrinking car in the sequel.
  • Bumbling Sidekick:
    • Subverted; despite how silly he is, he's more than capable of holding his own, and is useful — his only issue during the heist being that he didn't know who the security chief was, and takes him out anyway.
    • He's far more useful in the sequel, even getting into a car chase where he uses a shrinking car.
  • Canon Immigrant: Originated in the MCU, but made his way into the mainstream comics.
  • Chekhov's Skill:
    • Claims to be the only person to have knocked out Peaches, a hulking convict that not even Scott could meaningfully harm. This seems to be a lie for most of the movie, but come the heist he quickly knocks out several of Cross's guards when he gets the chance.
    • In the sequel, when he gets injected with a Truth Serum, he's able to get around being unable to lie by using his Motor Mouth habit to tell a long story with the implications being he was trying to buy time for it to either wear off, or for the criminals using it on him concluding that he doesn't know anything. Unfortunately, he gets cut off before he can progress far enough and is forced to admit the information.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: The guy may be a Motor Mouth goofball, but he has a really mean punch and is a rather good driver, using the streets of San Francisco and Hank Pym's tech to evade Sonny Burch and his men.
  • Cultured Badass: When not punching out people in a single hit, he frequents wine tastings, art museums with abstract expressionism exhibits (though he's more a Neo-Cubist kind of guy), and so on.
  • Exact Words: Gets asked where Scott Lang is while under truth serum, so he goes on a long story about how he met Scott and ends up explaining where Scott was emotionally at.
  • Good Feels Good: Feels "weird" more like, but he still enjoys being the "good guy" for once. Come the sequel, he and the gang have created a business and swore off criminal activity, and help out Scott when they can because they want to.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: He is Scott's longest and most trusted friend.
  • Hidden Depths: Enjoys wine tasting and modern art when not committing crimes. The sequel also shows that he has surprisingly good leadership skills despite being a bit rough about office rules.
  • Leitmotif: Roy Ayers' "Escape" is played whenever he is story telling.
  • Knows a Guy Who Knows a Guy: His signature scenes are about him chatting with a friend who chatted with a friend who...
  • Motor Mouth: He can talk really fast when he gets excited. If anything, he's even faster when he's answering questions under Uzman and Burch's (chemical that they insist is not) truth serum, no doubt due to being forced to be accurate about his stories.
  • Nice Guy: He may be a thief, but he is very nice to his friends.
  • One Degree of Separation: All those stories of his are a chain of people and rumors.
  • One-Hit KO: Luis can knock out a man with one punch, and does so repeatedly during the Pym Tech heist and against Sonny Burch.
  • Perpetual Smiler: He is remains cheerful and always keeps a smile on his face even during dire situations.
  • Pet the Dog: Goes back to save the guard he knocked out so he doesn't die in the Pym Tech implosion.
  • Phrase Catcher: His stories tend to be go on such twisty tangents that after he is done the only thing anyone has to say is "What".
  • The Pollyanna: Part of his Establishing Character Moment in his first scene: since he got out of prison his girl left him, his mother died, and his father got deported. But he got the van! The guy's eternally upbeat.
  • Reformed Criminal: He opens a security consultant company in Ant-Man and the Wasp with Scott, Dave and Kurt.
  • Shipper on Deck: While he also say she's beautiful, he refers to Hope as Scott's girlfriend.
  • Shout-Out: His stories with people lip-syncing his exact words is exactly how Drunk History tells stories.
  • Team Chef: No, really. Belgian waffles count, right?
  • Uncertain Doom: Averted. His fate after Thanos' Badass Fingersnap was left unclear, but he did not retrieve his van, meaning he might have been snapped out of existence. But since the events of Endgame brought everyone back, he'll certainly be alive.
  • Unreliable Narrator: His dialogue in one of the trailers suggests that Ghost wanted to Take Over the World. Her actual motivation was simply to cure her own terminal condition.

    Kurt 

Kurt

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/kurt.jpg
"Eyes in the sky."

Portrayed By: David Dastmalchian

Voiced By: Víctor Ugarte (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Ant-Man | Ant-Man and the Wasp

"That's Kurt. He was Folsom for five years. He's a wizard on that laptop."
Luis

A friend of Scott Lang and Luis. A hacker and computer expert.


  • Big Damn Heroes: He and Dave save Luis from Sonny by knocking out his men.
  • Meaningful Name: All his lines tend to be short and direct, or in a word, curt.
  • Mother Russia Makes You Strong: Inverted; he's got the deep Eastern-European accent, but he's a skinny technician.
  • Playful Hacker: His role during the heist is breaking into computers, summed up as "eyes in the sky".
  • Politically Incorrect Hero: During his freaking out over learning about the Ant-Man suit, he declares its abilities "the work of Gypsies". "Gypsy" is a slur for the Romani people that has been used to persecute them for a long time. However, Kurt is genuinely a good person so his use of the term either comes from ignorance or small town superstition rather than from genuine racism.
  • Reformed Criminal: He opens a security consultant company in Ant-Man and the Wasp with Scott, Dave and Luis.
  • Tattooed Crook: Has a circle tattoo on the back of his hand.
  • Those Two Guys: He is rarely seen without Dave at his side.
  • Uncertain Doom: His fate after Thanos' Badass Fingersnap is left unclear.

    Dave 

Dave

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dave.jpg
"Wheels on the ground."

Portrayed By: Tip "T.I." Harris

Voiced By: Abraham Vega (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Ant-Man | Ant-Man and the Wasp

"There was a black guy who looks exactly like me knocked us out and locked us in the back of this disgusting van!"

A friend of Scott Lang and Luis who served as the driver in charge of the getaway vehicle. Later joined X-Con Security


  • Awesomeness by Analysis: Upon spotting a Crown Vic parked in front of Pym Technologies, he immediately knows that it is a car commonly used by undercover cops.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • Distracts Paxton and his partner by hijacking their car, preventing Hank from getting arrested.
    • In the second movie, he and Kurt knock out Sonny's men right before they kill Luis.
  • Getaway Driver: He's the "wheels on the ground". He can also hijack other people's cars.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Immediately after successfully giving the cops the slip, he accidentally hits the very distinctive "La Cucaracha" horn of the van, revealing his and Kurt's position to the cops and their identities to Paxton.
  • Reformed Criminal: He opens a security consultant company in Ant-Man and the Wasp with Scott, Luis and Kurt.
  • Those Two Guys: He is rarely seen without Kurt at his side.
  • Uncertain Doom: His fate after Thanos' Badass Fingersnap is left unclear.

Isodyne Energy

    Calvin Chadwick 
See the Council of Nine page

    Jason Wilkes 
See the Stark Industries page

    Jane Scott 

Jane Scott

Species: Human

Portrayed By:

Appearances: Agent Carter

A particle physicist at Isodyne.


  • The Mistress: She had an affair with Calvin Chadwick.
  • Posthumous Character: She first appears as a corpse. She died after being exposed to Zero Matter a.k.a. the Darkforce, at the Isodyne particle acelerator.

Anvil Security

Cheng Consulting & Risk Management

    Pryce Cheng 

Pryce Cheng

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Terry Chen

Appearances: Jessica Jones

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2018_03_14_21h55m44s588.png

The head of Cheng Consulting Management. He's a private investigator who wants to absorb Alias Investigations and hire Jessica Jones to attract superhuman cases.


  • The Ace: He's a very accomplished Private Investigator, self-made man and former Marine.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: He isn't seen again in Jessica Jones Season 3 and Malcolm works for Hogarth instead of him, with no explanation given.
  • Fantastic Racism: Hates Jessica just for being a super.
  • Hypocrite: Calls Jessica out on breaking the law to get results then immediately resorts to just that when Jeri won't help him sue Jessica.
  • I Was Beaten by a Girl: Implied to be the main reason he escalates things with Jessica. When he wants to sue Jessica for his injuries Jeri tells him to get over the fact that a woman managed to manhandle him like Jessica did, hinting that he simply can't stand the idea of getting outdone in any way by women given his being The Ace.
  • Jerkass: Extremely full of himself. Decides to put Jessica out of business just because she refuses to work with him and promptly starts poaching her clients, makes fun of her trauma to her face, and then has one of his people break into her office and steal all her files and even her PI certification.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • As much as an asshole he might be, he correctly points out that Jessica has some serious issues, and not the cleanest of slates (as opposed to him).
    • He also is right when he tells Jessica to turn in her mother for murder. He quickly forgives Jessica for kidnapping him (though he earlier accidentally shot her, so they are even), but he can't ignore the person that killed his partner. Jessica eventually agrees and calls the police.
  • Revenge: Tries assassinating Jessica (only her mother actually) after his friend, Nick, was murdered.
  • Semper Fi: He's a former Marine Corps captain.
  • Smug Smiler: Even gets mentioned by Jessica.
  • Smug Snake: Jessica even describes him as such due to his unrepentant jerkassery and insistence.

    Nick Spanos 

Nick Spanos

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Maceo Oliver

Appearances: Jessica Jones (2015)

One of Pryce Cheng's fixers and best friends.


  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Alisa kills him by throwing him in the back of his van, beating him senseless, and tearing off one of his arms.
  • The Fixer: He's sent by Cheng to steal files and information from Jessica's apartment.
  • Semper Fi: He served in the Marines alongside Cheng.

    Malcolm Ducasse 
See the Defenders Allies page

Momentum Labs

    Joseph Bauer 

Joseph Bauer

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Kerr Smith

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The head of Momentum Labs and the husband of Lucy Bauer.


  • Canon Foreigner: He has no comic book counterpart.
  • For Science!: Lucy and him were delighted by what the Darkhold could do and how it could be used to help others, but the book corrupted their intentions.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: He became increasingly corrupted after reading the Darkhold.
  • Mad Scientist: As a result of the Darkhold's corruption, he becomes more and more obsessed with creating matter using the information gained from the tome.
  • Mind Rape: He's awakened by Lucy Bauer and suffers from the same paranoia effect that infected May until he dies.

Midland Circle Financials

    Alexandra 
See the Hand page

WHiH World News

    In General 

A cable news network.


    Christine Everhart 

Christine Everhart

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/christine_everhart_im1_7294.png
"All I'm looking for is a straight answer."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Leslie Bibb

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Ant-Man and Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

"And what do you say to your other nickname, the Merchant of Death?"

A reporter from Vanity Fair. She has strong feelings against Tony Stark's weapons development, and feels he is a war profiteer. Despite this, sexual tension pops up between the two. She later transitions to television and new media as the host of WHiH World News.


  • Ascended Extra: After having a few minutes of screentime in the first two Iron Man movies, she takes a role as the host of the Web Original WHiH World News videos on YouTube.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: It takes just a minute and a half of arguing with Tony to pull her into bed with him. However, it doesn't go anywhere past that night.
  • The Bus Came Back: After a five year absence in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, she reappeared in this video marking the MCU's first foray into Web Original content.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: After she realizes Tony used her for a one-night stand in the first movie, she feels pretty damn upset. Upset enough, in fact, to take it out on Pepper, who had only showed up to provide her with a fresh change of clothes and a ride to wherever she wanted to go.
    After all these years, Tony still has you picking up the dry cleaning.
  • Fanservice Extra: She's in Iron Man for just five minutes and two of those minutes are spent in a Modesty Bedsheet or just a shirt.
  • Good Is Not Nice: She's quite rude, but she knows what's right and what's wrong.
  • Intrepid Reporter: Played with; Christine clearly wants to be this, but the fact that she ends up sleeping with Tony not long after self-righteously calling him out as the 'Merchant of Death' alone indicates that she's probably not as intrepid as she wants people to think. She generally comes off as being a bit smug and incompetent. Then again, she is the one to reveal to Tony that his company is selling weapons to the villains.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: After Tony escapes from capture, he agrees with her that his weapons development has gotten out of hand.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Pretty rude to both Tony and Pepper, yet has a strong sense of right and wrong.
  • Operation: Jealousy: It's implied she started dating Justin Hammer in order to make Tony jealous. By then he doesn't care.
  • The Resenter: After she realizes Tony used her for a night, she decides to take it out on Pepper. She's clearly out of her league.
    Christine: After all these years, Tony still has you picking up the dry cleaning.
    Pepper: I do anything and everything Mr. Stark requires. Including occasionally taking out the trash. Will that be all?
  • Romantic False Lead: She's introduced before Pepper, who ends up being Tony's true love.
  • Stealth Insult: Often the victim of this, especially from Pepper. In addition to the above "trash" one...
    Hammer: [Christine]'s actually doing a big spread on me for Vanity Fair. I thought I'd throw her a bone, you know. Right?
    Pepper: Right. Well, she did quite a...spread on Tony last year.
    Tony: And she wrote a story as well.
  • Strawman News Media: During her coverage of Scott Lang robbing VistaCorp, she says that there is no proof to back up his claims that VistaCorp was stealing from its customers. The station that airs her show is owned by VistaCorp, which Scott is quick to point out when he is interviewed. After the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, she says the Avengers should be held accountable for the damage caused during their fights even though Will Adams points out if that it weren't for them, everyone on Earth would be dead.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Seems to throw her Good Is Not Nice and Hidden Heart of Gold side out of the window after she became Strawman News Media. Her resentment on Tony may play a part on this and extend to the other heroes. Even before that, she tried so hard to make Tony jealous by dating his Butt-Monkey so-called "rival", which fails miserably.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Her first meeting with Tony turns from interviewing to accusing, calling him the Merchant of Death and a war profiteer. When he returns from capture and tells her he's stopped Stark Industries weapons manufacturing, she tells him that's still not enough, because there are still plenty of Stark-built weapons already in the hands of terrorists. Of course that was Obadiah Stane's doing, not Tony's. Though it does give Tony the idea of going to Afghanistan to deal with this problem.
  • You Just Told Me: "I never said you were a superhero."

    Chess Roberts 

Chess Roberts

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Olivia Munn

Appearances: Iron Man 2

A reporter at WHiH.


  • Adaptational Skimpiness: She wears more revealing and casual clothing than her comic books counterpart. Justified because the nature of the events the comics and film versions cover.

    Will Adams 

Will Adams

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/will_adams_mcu.jpg

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Al Madrigal

Appearances: Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

A political correspondent and analyst at WHiH.


  • Canon Foreigner: Has no counterpart in the main Marvel Universe.
  • Intrepid Reporter: He's sent to cover a confrontation between the Avengers and Crossbones in Lagos, Nigeria.
  • Only Sane Man: He seems to be the only one at WHiH to side with the heroes and their necessity just by pointing out obvious facts, while Christine Everhart takes a Strawman News Media approach. After the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, when Christine says the Avengers should be held accountable for the damage caused during their fights, Will points out if that it weren't for them, everyone on Earth would be dead.

    Jackson Norris 

Jackson Norris

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Unknown

Appearances: Newsfront With Christine Everhart (Captain America: Civil War viral marketing)

A reporter at WHiH News.


  • Decomposite Character: The comics Jackson Norriss is made into this character and Ten Rings member Jackson Norriss (with double "s")
  • Intrepid Reporter: He's sent to cover a confrontation between the Avengers and Crossbones in Lagos, Nigeria.

Callisto Aerospace

    Louise Fisher 

Louise Fisher

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_louise.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Ellen Woglom

Appearances: Inhumans

A (human) scientist at Callisto Aerospace who meets the Inhuman Royal Family.


  • Audience Surrogate: She serves this purpose in the main cast.
  • Canon Foreigner: Louise doesn't exist in the comics.
  • I Want My Jet Pack: Louise's motivation. She actually carries her father's ashes in a necklace shaped like an Apollo rocket.
    He spent his entire life wanting to go to the Moon, and NASA, they didn't know if they were gonna pick pilots or scientists. But guess what? They picked pilots. And my father, the scientist, he never got to go.
  • Smart People Wear Glasses: She's a scientist, and wears glasses to signify it.
  • Token Human: Of the main cast.

    George Ashland 

George Ashland

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Tom Wright

Appearances: Inhumans

Louise's supervisor at Callisto Aerospace.


  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Despite the many, many, many incidents of alien involvement in the MCU, he does not believe Louise's theory that a hoof stomped the rover.

Declan Research

    Evan Declan 

Doctor Evan Declan

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/evandeclan.jpg

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Henry Ian Cusick

Appearances: Inhumans

A geneticist specialised in Inhumans that collaborates with Maximus.


  • Distressed Dude: Got taken as a hostage by both Auran and then later the Royal Family.
  • For Science!: Has no ill intentions and does all of his research for genetic studies.
  • Killed Off for Real: A mindless Gorgon kills the poor guy accidentally when he happens to be at the wrong place at the wrong time.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Maximus supported his research without telling him who or what he really was.

Atreus Plastics

    In General 

  • Adaptational Heroism/Adaptational Wimp: In the mainstream comics, Atreus Plastics produces (plastic) explosives, not actual plastics.
  • The Cameo: Atreus Plastics's logo shows up in the first season finale Daredevil, on a truck employed by a Fisk's goons to break him out of police custody.

    Mark Higgins 

Mark Higgins

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jeorge Bennett Watson

Appearances: Luke Cage

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2018_07_04_10h38m02s007.png

The CEO of Atreus Plastics, largest black-owned plastics company in the world.


  • Category Traitor: According to Mariah Dillard, he never collaborated with any cause for the development of Harlem or the African-American community. That being said, he refused to sell Atreus to Glenn Industries because he wanted to company to remain black-owned.
  • Decapitation Presentation: Bushmaster kills him and puts his severed head, along with Cockroach and Ray-Ray's heads, on display in the entrance of Mariah's clinic.
  • Dirty Old Man: If only he had remained faithful to his wife instead of letting himself get seduced by a girl young enough to be his daughter, Mariah would've been unable to blackmail him.
  • Honey Trap: The victim of one, as Mariah has new hostess Stephanie Miller seduce Higgins, then blackmails him into voting for Atreus to be bought out by Glenn Industries.
  • Your Cheating Heart: He's cheating on his wife with a hostess who Mariah is using as part of her plans to blackmail him.

Testament Industries

See the Testament Industries page.

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