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Characters / MCU: Mysterio

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Main Character Index > Villainous Individuals and Organizations > Other Supervillains > Ultron | Ego the Living Planet | Hela | Erik Killmonger | Mysterio (Quentin Beck)

Spoilers for Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home are unmarked.

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Mysterio's team

    As a Whole 
  • Collective Identity: While Beck might be the face of the character, they all have a hand at creating the Mysterio character. In fact, after they take a liking to the Mysterio name, they seem to call the group "Mysterio."
  • They Look Just Like Everyone Else!: With the exception of Quentin Beck, all the members of Team Mysterio look ridiculously average and unnoticeable, which they exploit. Hell one of them was in one of the previous MCU movies in a memorable scene and it's unlikely the viewer will notice until it's pointed out.
    Quentin Beck / Mysterio 

    William Ginter Riva 

William Ginter Riva

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Peter Billingsley

Appearances: Iron Man | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"Well, I'm sorry. I'm not Tony Stark."
A Stark Industries scientist working under Obadiah Stane to recreate Tony's arc reactor technology. Years later, he finds himself working under Quentin Beck as the chief programmer for the Mysterio Crew.
  • Ascended Extra: Has only a minor role in a single scene in Iron Man, but becomes Quentin Beck's Evil Genius in Spider-Man: Far From Home.
  • Beleaguered Assistant: He used to be one when he was working for Obadiah Stane.
  • The Bus Came Back: The guy first appeared as a minor character in just one scene in the movie that began the MCU. Then, 11 years and 22 movies later, he appears as an actual antagonist who has a huge role in the plot as one of Quentin Beck's men.
  • Canon Foreigner: He does not have a direct counterpart in the comics.
  • Celebrity Paradox: During Iron Man 3, Tony tells a little boy who resembles Ralphie from A Christmas Story that he loved him in the movie. Riva was played by the real Billingsley.
  • Collective Identity: Quentin Beck may be the "face" of the group, but William is the chief programmer, ensuring all of their piecemeal tech comes together to form the Mysterio persona.
  • The Dragon: He fill this role to Beck as the one controlling the drones that are the basis of his plan.
  • The Evil Genius: His role in both Iron Man and Spider-Man: Far From Home is working as the head of the technology branch for the bad guys. It's downplayed in Iron Man as he admits to Stane that he's not as good as Tony Stark and thus wouldn't be able to recreate his arc reactor technology, but he has far better success working as part of the Mysterio Crew under Quentin Beck, serving as their chief programmer. He may not be able to replicate Tony's more esoteric tech (like the Arc Reactor), but his skills piece together Beck's B.A.R.F. holograms with the E.D.I.T.H. network to form a deadly combination.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: From a disgruntled ex-Stark Industries employee being looked down upon by his boss to the second-in-command of one of Spider-Man's most threatening enemies. And it may have began as early as when he basically stood up to his boss yelling in his face by simply replying how he's not Tony Stark.
  • Karma Houdini: Isn't arrested at the end of the movie.
  • Lack of Empathy: Given that he's completely willing to go along with Quentin Beck's plan, which involves mass-murder, he and the other people going along with Mysterio's act are just as complicit as he is.
  • Long Bus Trip: One of eleven long years, which beats the previous record-holder Mr. Harrington at nine years (from 2008's The Incredible Hulk to 2017's Spider-Man: Homecoming).
  • The Man Behind the Man: Is responsible for the illusions and the destruction the drones cause.
  • Misplaced Retribution: It's implied that he joined Mysterio's crew because he wanted to take revenge on Tony Stark and his legacy, but it was Obadiah Stane who made his life hell. Granted, Obadiah did treat him badly for not being as smart as Tony Stark, but still, the man himself didn't do anything to wrong him, yet he still chose to go along with Quentin Beck and other disgruntled ex-Stark Industries employees in their petty revenge scheme anyway.note 
  • Mistreatment-Induced Betrayal: Mysterio and the rest of the crew mainly consist of disgruntled former Stark Industries employees, so it's not hard to swallow from his last appearance that he at least got fed up with how Obadiah Stane treated him.
  • Not-So-Harmless Villain: By the time he appears in the MCU again, after last being seen in Iron Man 11 years ago, he is anything but harmless.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: In Iron Man. Conversely, Far From Home has him being actively malicious instead of just working for an evil boss.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The last we've seen of him in Far From Home is him escaping with Beck's computer files. It's implied that he's the one who sends Beck's edited footage to J. Jonah Jameson at Daily Bugle, outing Peter Parker as Spider-Man.

    Guterman 

Guterman

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Nicholas Gleaves

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A member of Mysterio's crew who came up with the idea and story behind the character of Quentin Beck.


  • Crazy Enough to Work: Beck credits his story of "a soldier named Quentin from another dimension" as being "exactly the kind of thing people will believe right now".
  • Evil Brit: A plot-relevant fact, as it allows him to impersonate the tour bus driver when Peter's classmates arrive in London.
  • Karma Houdini: Isn't arrested at the end of the movie.
  • Stylistic Suck: He is the one writing all of Beck's backstory and dialogue, which is filled with sci-fi cliches and narmy lines that he has to come up on the fly as Beck makes his performances. Eventually his whole narrative gets so over the top that Fury sees through it.
    Fury: Now that is some bullshit.
  • Would Hurt a Child: While he doesn't pull the trigger himself, he drives the students' bus onto Tower Bridge before cheerfully informing Beck that "the children are in the kill zone".
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    Victoria 

Victoria

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Clare Dunne

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A member of Mysterio's crew, who devised the idea of using localized EMPs to fool S.H.I.E.L.D.'s satellites into confirming Mysterio's story.


  • Flat Character: Gets the fewest lines and least development of any named member of "Team Mysterio".
  • Karma Houdini: Isn't arrested at the end of the movie.

    Janice 

Janice

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Claire Rushbrook

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A member of Mysterio's crew, who discovered that the E.D.I.T.H. glasses were being handed over to Peter Parker.


  • Karma Houdini: Isn't arrested at the end of the movie.
  • The Mole: In order to discover that control over E.D.I.T.H. was being given to Peter Parker, she had to have been working for Stark Industries until almost before the events of the film, feeding the others inside information.
  • Skewed Priorities: During the final battle, whenever obstacles to Mysterio's plan comes up, Janice asks Beck whether he still needs his cape ironed, much to his frustration.

Mysterio's creations

    The Elementals 

The Elementals (Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Cyclone)

Species: None

Portrayed by: N/A

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

"You don't want any part of this!"
Quentin Beck / Mysterio, Spider-Man: Far From Home

A group of elemental giants that attack various cities throughout Europe during Peter Parker’s supposedly quiet vacation. Their arrival leads to Spider-Man and Mysterio teaming up.


  • A Storm Is Coming: Ned, MJ, Betty, Flash, Mr. Harrington, Mr. Dell, and the rest of Peter's classmates are the first to sense a change in the weather pattern before the fifth and final elemental, one that resembles a giant tornado emerges and towers over Tower Bridge. This isn't its only appearance in the film as it previously appeared as a hologram projection Beck was fighting. This realization is soon lamp shaded by Peter after he gets his first look at the wind elemental and it's then and there that MJ and Peter agree that Mysterio is not what he seems which is what prompts him to move forward with the next phase of his plan and summon the Elemental Fusion.
  • Adaptation Name Change: The Elementals of the film — Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Cyclone — were respectively called Magnum, Hydron, Hellfire, and Zephyr in the comics. This trope is at least partially averted if you see them as adaptations of the Elementals of Doom, which were called the Earth, Water, Fire, and Wind Elementals — which is how they're referred to in-movie, but not in the marketing, which uses the Spider-Man villain names instead.
  • Adaptation Species Change:
    • The Elementals are either extradimensional Human Aliens or magical beings in the comics. Here, they're holographic projections set up by Mysterio.
    • This also applies to Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Cyclone, being enhanced humans in the source.
  • Advertised Extra: Sandman appears prominently in the trailers despite only having one scene and never being encountered by Peter.
  • All There in the Manual: The names of each of the individual Elementals are not spoken in the film, but were confirmed via merchandise and interviews with the cast and crew.
  • All Your Powers Combined: The Elemental that attacks Tower Bridge is actually all four of them merged together.
  • Arch-Enemy: To Mysterio for killing his fellow super-soldiers, murdering his family and burning his world to cinders. Subverted in that they're actually holographic props he created to play that role.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: For Spider-Man: Far From Home. Or so it would seem, at first. Technically, none of the "Elementals" even exist.
  • Blow You Away: The wind Elemental, Cyclone.
  • The Cameo: Sandman is only seen for a brief shot at the beginning of the film. Cyclone is accidentally discovered by MJ and Peter when they unwittingly activate one of Mysterio's drones.
  • Composite Character:
    • Though collectively known as the Elementals, they are much more closely based on some classic and lesser-known Spider-Man villains: Sandman (who previously appeared in Spider-Man 3), Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Cyclone.
    • In addition, the characters also bear much more resemblance to the lesser-known Fantastic Four villains the Elementals of Doom, being element-based monsters that are summoned by another villain (Diablo instead of Mysterio, in this case) rather than Human Aliens from another dimension (as the regular Elementals are in the comics). The fact that they sort of merge together to form an even bigger threat has precedence in the comics as well, with their combined form being known as the Elematrix instead of being a nameless monster. Given that the Disney-Fox deal didn't complete until after the movie had wrapped post-production, their presence can be considered a clever case of Writing Around Trademarks — and with a third party (Sony) involved, no less.
  • Decomposite Character: Throwaway dialogue reveals that (according to BuzzFeed) Morris Bench, the Hydro-Man from the comics, exists within the MCU and has an origin close to his comic book counterpart. However, he's never seen in Far From Home.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Shortly after Molten Man is defeated, the Elementals are revealed to be little more than illusions of the movie's true villain: Mysterio.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: The earth Elemental, Sandman.
  • Elemental Embodiment: They are each the embodiment of fire, water, wind, and earth.
  • Elemental Powers: Naturally, given the previous trope. They each command their respective elements in combat.
  • Engineered Heroics: They're all tech-based illusions created by Mysterio to allow him to pretend to be a hero, causing very real collateral damage in the process.
  • Four-Element Ensemble: Their classic grouping.
  • Fusion Dance: Near the climax of the film, Mysterio dumps them all together into one gigantic hybrid, declaring them to be an "Avengers-level threat" to tear up London.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: All of them don't have a clear personality beyond wanting to destroy the world. This trope ends up being justified in that their backstories are left deliberately vague because they were completely made up by Mysterio's crew, who spent more time coming up with a sympathetic backstory for him instead.
  • Hijacked by Ganon: Set up as the main antagonists of Far From Home, they're actually the handiwork of the true Big Bad, Mysterio.
  • Magma Man: The fire Elemental, Molten Man.
  • Making a Splash: The water Elemental, Hydro-Man.
  • Monumental Damage: They tear up various well-known locations across the world, with the final Elemental's assault on Tower Bridge being the most infamous. Turns out it's actually drones causing the damage in step with the movements of intricate holograms.
  • No Name Given: The final Elemental, which attacks Tower Bridge, does not have a listed name, unlike the others.
  • Odd Name Out: Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man... and Cyclone. Interestingly, there's no consistency with the naming of all the "-Man" villains, either, like in the comics. note 
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Mysterio takes down Cyclone entirely offscreen, and managed to beat Sandman in front of Nick Fury and Maria Hill (a fight that the audience only sees the beginning of). After the reveal that they're illusions, that makes Beck's smoke and mirrors display considerably less awesome.
  • Rogues-Gallery Transplant: No version of the Elementals are Spider-Man villains, which fits the major plot of Spider-Man: Far From Home taking Peter Parker out of his typical sphere. Of course, they do resemble some classic Spider-rogues, as shown in Composite Character. Except they're actually Mysterio's creations.
  • The Worf Effect: They're stated to have destroyed Mysterio’s Earth and Beck says he and the last battalion on his Earth only delayed them. When they come to the MCU-Earth, Mysterio manages to destroy all but one of them all on his own... Which is the first hint that the situation isn't quite as he alleges it to be. It turns out Mysterio actually deliberately engineered them to evoke this trope for the sake of creating a reputation for himself as a powerful hero.
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