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Characters / MCU: Citizens New York City Midtown School of Science and Technology

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Main Character Index > Other Individuals and Organizations > Citizens > New Orleans | New York City > New York City Police Department | Midtown School of Science and Technology

Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

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    General 
  • Adaptation Distillation: Membership includes students from all over the place, including early members (Peter, Flash, Seymour, Tiny, Jason, Charles, Liz, Sally), later members (Cindy), and newcomers (Ned, Abe, Betty, Michelle).
  • Adaptational Intelligence: Nearly every student who originally appeared in the comics gets this as the school has been reimagined as a magnet high school catering to academically gifted teenagers.
  • Adapted Out: Jessica Jones, due to an Age Lift and the school itself being Exiled from Continuity until after her show entered development, was never a member of this school unlike the comics.invoked
  • Adaptation Name Change: In the comics, the school was simply named Midtown High School.
  • Contrived Coincidence: It's admittedly a pretty big coincidence that all of Peter's closest friends happened to be on the bad end of a cosmic coin-flip alongside him. However, several of Peter's other classmates admittedly survived and graduated.
  • First-Name Basis: In the credits, the students (with the exception of Peter Parker) are listed by their first names only. Most of their surnames either come from supplementary material or are educated guesses based on their counterparts in the comics.
  • Killed Offscreen: Ned, Michelle, Flash, Betty, Jason, and various unnamed characters were killed by Thanos's Snap offscreen alongside Peter, and return in Far From Home after Bruce restored the victims with another Snap in Endgame.
  • Mythology Gag: It's established that Midtown was founded in 1962 — the year of Spider-Man's debut.
  • Older Than They Look: On a technicality, Peter, Ned, Michelle, Flash, Betty, and Jason are all at least 16-years-old biologically and legally, but chronologically 21, due to them not aging after being brought back from the Snap.
  • Reimagining the Artifact: In one sense as a group. Most of Spider-Man's initial supporting cast were originally portrayed as white due to artistic conventions of the time. Many of the MCU incarnations of these characters have been given Race Lifts to reflect the modern understanding that given New York's status as a cultural melting-pot with several immigrant communities, it's just more realistic that way.

Faculty

    Principal Morita 

Principal Morita

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_principal_morita.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Kenneth Choi

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

"Parker! My office."

The principal of Midtown School of Science and Technology. Grandson of Jim Morita.


  • Canon Foreigner: Jim Morita never had a son — let alone a grandson — in the comic books, making this an original character. Not only that, but Morita replaces Mr. Harrington as the principal of the school.
  • Famous Ancestor: His grandfather is Jim Morita from Captain America: The First Avenger. Jim's photograph and war medals are even on display in his office.
  • Identical Grandson: He looks exactly like Jim Morita. They are both played by the same actor.
  • Pet the Dog: It's heavily implied that the reason Principal Morita keeps using the Captain America educational videos, even after he became a fugitive, is out of respect for saving his grandfather's life.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Inheriting the noble traits of his grandfather Jim, he's genuinely concerned about Peter when he starts acting out by doing things like ditching class and skipping detention (completely unaware that Peter's Spider-Man) and tries talking it out with him rather than just expelling him from school.

    Mr. Harrington 

Roger Harrington

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_harrington.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Martin Starr

Voiced By: Christian Strempler (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: The Incredible Hulknote  | Spider-Man: Homecoming | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"As you know, we made it out alive. And that's the important thing. I couldn't bear to lose a student on a school trip. Not again."

The coach for the academic decathlon team.


  • Adaptational Job Change: While still in the field of academics and working at Midtown, this version of Harrington is a teacher, with his usual role as the principal now taken by Canon Foreigner Morita.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: A minor example, but Harrington in the comics has never even met Bruce Banner. Here, he allows Bruce to use his computer in exchange for pizza, and debuts in the movie a whole nine years before he returned as a teacher in the Spider-Man movies.
  • Age Lift: His comic counterpart is much older, which befits an experienced principal. Here, he's a lot younger and less experienced, hence his Adaptational Job Change to a teacher.
  • The Bus Came Back: 9 years passed between his debut in The Incredible Hulk and return in Spider-Man: Homecoming.
  • Butt-Monkey: He doesn't exactly have the best luck. His students have no respect for him, his wife pretended to be snapped so she could run away with another man, and every school trip he organizes seems to end in disaster, with him implying that at least one student has died on his watch.
  • Canon Character All Along: That random Culver University student who helped Bruce Banner turned out to be Roger Harrington, a key player in Spider-Man's high school life.
  • Cool Teacher: At least he tries to be, and he really cares about his students and motivates them at every turn. His students like him well enough, but don't respect him much.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Implied, rather comically, when he states that he couldn't stand to lose a student on a field trip... again.
  • Decomposite Character: His role of being the principal of Midtown High from the comics is given to Canon Foreigner Morita.
  • Distressed Dude: Is stuck in the Washington Monument elevator with his students when the Chitauri core blows, requiring a rescue from Spider-Man. And again in London when he, Mr. Dell, and the students are led into a trap by Mysterio's partners and abandoned on a double-decker bus on the middle of the Tower Bridge, right in the middle of the kill zone for Mysterio's illusion.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Mr. Harrington is played by Martin Starr, who played "Computer Nerd" in The Incredible Hulk. Kevin Feige eventually confirmed that they are the same character.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: He suffers from this, as his students don't respect him and blame him for whenever things go wrong, and fellow teacher Mr. Dell tries his best to distance himself from him in those cases by playing the Cool Teacher.
  • Noodle Incident: Something happened during a previous school field trip that resulted in the loss of a student. Enough to give him a Thousand-Yard Stare.
  • Only Sane Man: Has shown to be calm under pressure, most of the time anyway. Compared to Mr. Dell who seems to panic at any given moment when something terrible is happening.
  • Tastes Like Friendship: He let Bruce Banner use some technical resources at Culver University after he offered him free pizza.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: It's pretty obvious him and Dell don't like each other, but as the two teachers responsible for the students' safety and well-being on the vacation, they must work together.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: He seems to like pizza.

    Coach Wilson 

Andre Wilson

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Hannibal Buress

Voiced By: Roberto Mendiola (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

"Thank you, Captain. Pretty sure, this guy's a war criminal now, well, whatever. I have to show you this video; it's required by the state."

The gym teacher for Midtown. He also runs detention.


  • All There in the Manual: The Daily Bugle ARG shows that he was one of the victims of the Snap, though he is as apathetic to this fact as he is to everything else. It also reveals his first name, which is never spoken in the films.
  • Apathetic Teacher: He's clearly only there to do the bare minimum. As long as his students aren't causing any trouble, he'll leave them alone.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Hannibal Buress gets some memorable comedic lines.
  • Gym Class Hell: Averted. Coach Wilson really doesn't seem all that interested in teaching. Even in detention, when Peter leaves, he barely notices.
  • Named by the Adaptation: Supplemental material for Far from Home gives him the first name Andre, while his comic self's first name was never revealed.
  • Race Lift: In the comics, "Whiz" Wilson was white.
  • Shout-Out: His first name may be a reference to one of Hannibal Buress's other well-known roles.
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    Ms. Warren 

Ms. Warren

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_warren.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Selenis Leyva

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

Another one of Peter's teachers at Midtown.


  • Gender Flip: She's presumably an adaptation of Raymond Warren, Peter's science teacher in the comics, who was male.
  • Race Lift: Raymond Warren was also white in the comics.

    Mr. Dell 

Julius Dell

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: J.B. Smoove

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A teacher who attends the field trip and leads the class alongside Mr. Harrington.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Dell here is rather handsome courtesy of J.B. Smoove, whereas his comic counterpart is visibly overweight.
  • Adaptation Name Change: His comics counterpart is a science teacher named Hugh Del (with a single L).
  • Cool Teacher: He passes himself off that way, mainly to shift the blame entirely to Mr. Harrington when things go wrong.
  • Hypocritical Humor: He claims to be a "man of science," but the moment that the Elementals show up he blames it on witchcraft and encourages his students to do the same.
  • Nervous Wreck: Not as bad as some, but Dell does seem to panic more than anyone else and Screams Like a Little Girl when he is panicked.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: It's pretty obvious him and Harrington don't like each other, but as the two teachers responsible for the students' safety and well-being on the vacation, they must work together.

Current Students

    Peter Parker 
See the Spider-Man page.

    Ned Leeds 

Edward "Ned" Leeds

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_ned.png
"Can I be your Guy in the Chair?!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jacob Batalon

Voiced By: Ricardo Bautista (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"Okay, okay, I'm going to level with you: I don't think I can keep this a secret, this is the greatest thing that has ever happened to me!"

Peter Parker's best friend in high school.


  • Adaptational Nice Guy: While he is not a villain in the comics (though he was temporarily made out to be the Hobgoblin, but this was retconned as him being Brainwashed and Crazy after he was killed), he was a bit of a Jerkass and certainly wasn't an ally of Spider-Man. Here, he is Peter's best friend and when he discovers he is Spider-Man, saves his life at one point and helps him track down and battle the villains as Mission Control.
  • Age Lift: In the comics, Ned was an adult reporter who worked at the Daily Bugle before Peter even got a job there. Here, he's Peter's age.
  • Amicable Exes: On the plane ride back from England, he and Betty break up with apparently no ill will towards one another.
  • Audience Surrogate: Once he discovers Peter's secret, he's absolutely giddy about the fact his best friend is a superhero and bombards him with fanboy questions.
  • Back from the Dead: Since he is still Peter's age despite Peter clearly being one of the victims of Thanos's Badass Fingersnap in Infinity War, he had to have been killed as well and then resurrected as a result of Endgame.
  • Badass Bystander: When Spider-Man is about to be finished off by Schultz, Ned picks up the dislodged web shooter and fires it at Shultz. It's a direct hit and gives Spidey the chance to grab the web line and use it to defeat him.
  • Bad Liar: Almost as bad as Peter, usually leading him to Digging Yourself Deeper or coming off as Suspiciously Specific Denial.
  • Big Fun: He's quite rotund and is the primary comic relief of his films.
  • The Cameo: Makes a brief appearance in Avengers: Infinity War where he creates a distraction for Peter to sneak off their field trip bus by alerting their class to the alien ship. He gets another in Avengers: Endgame, where he greets Peter Parker after the world returns to normal.
  • Character Development: He goes from being enamored over the idea of Peter being a vigilante to cautiously concerned about how being Spider-Man is slowly eroding his friend's life at school and at home.
  • Composite Character: While he may be named after Ned Leeds, his role, mannerisms, and looks are more related to Ganke Lee, the best friend of another Spider-Man, Miles Morales. Interestingly, this isn't the first time Ned Leeds got an Asian Race Lift.
  • Crack Ship: In-Universe, Peter has no idea what to make of Ned’s sudden romance with Betty.
  • Eagleland: He’s under the impression that Europeans love American visitors, and that he’d be able to re-invent himself as a ladies’ man during his two weeks in Europe.
  • Fat Best Friend: Due to Composite Character, he is this to Peter here.
  • Genius Ditz: Ned can come across as a bit... silly, but he's an excellent hacker, and repeatedly breaks into Stark tech without batting an eye.
  • The Millstone: On some occasions his attempts to "help" Peter or attempt to cover for him end up making situations worse, such as opening him up to humiliation when he randomly blurts out that Peter knows Spider-Man in Homecoming (and then blaming Peter for the party not going well afterwards when Ned was the one claiming Spider-Man would show up), or on the plane trip to Europe in Far From Home attempts to get Peter to swap seats with Betty by saying Peter has a perfume allergy (which causes Peter to have to sit next to Mr. Harrington) and then coming up with the Atrocious Alias "Night Monkey" while attempting to persuade Betty that Spider-Man is not in Europe with them.
  • Mission Control: Or as he and Peter refer to it, "The Guy in the Chair." Ned initially wants to be this in Spider-Man: Homecoming, but is refused by Peter already having Happy and Karen. Later in the climax, when left without both Peter has Ned assist him by cellphone while Ned is on two computers getting important information like tracing Peter's phone and finding the headlight button in Flash's car.
  • Mythology Gag: His romance with Betty in Far From Home alludes to their comics counterparts, who are husband and wife.
  • Nice Hat: He has an Indiana Jones-esque fedora he wears when he wants to feel "confident”, and several hats of various styles worn throughout Far From Home.
  • Oh, Crap!: Upon seeing aliens in New York, Ned's first — and only — words in Avengers: Infinity War is to panic about how they're all about to die. Endgame confirms that he was one of the casualties of the snap before being resurrected five years later.
  • Out of Focus: After a prominent role in Homecoming, Ned's prominence to the story takes a backseat in Far From Home in favor of MJ getting a larger part.
  • Playful Hacker: Ned is pretty talented with computers, being able to override the "Training Wheels" protocol is Peter's suit and act as mission control in the school's computer lab during the climax.
  • Proud to Be a Geek: He absolutely delights in his less-than-mainstream interests like Legos, fedoras, and video games. However, while cornered in the Tower of London and fearing that he’s about to die, he admits that, on some level, he’s worried that he’s wasting his life on these things.
  • Race Lift:
    • Ned Leeds is white in the comics, but Filipino in the movie.
    • If we're looking past the name and into the Composite Character aspect of his personality, Ganke Lee (his inspiration) is Korean American, while Ned is played by Filipino American Jacob Batalon.
  • Secret Keeper: Peter unwittingly takes off his mask while Ned is present. Ned's at least a decent enough guy to keep Peter's Secret Identity an actual secret. Ironically, Ned does a better job of keeping Peter's secret than Peter himself.
  • Sickeningly Sweethearts: He and Betty go all in on the lovey-dovey stuff in Far From Home.
  • Sidekick: He's essentially Spider-Man's closest ally who helps him out in anyway he can, even when no else can/will.
  • Tears of Joy: In Avengers: Endgame, he's seen tearfully greeting Peter Parker when they both go back to school.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Him getting Peter invited to Liz's party and taking the explosive Chitauri energy core with him for safekeeping during his academic decathlon team's tour of the Washington Monument provide Toomes with humongous clues as to Spider-Man's identity, as Liz innocently brings up how Peter was conspicuously absent during both these instances when the wall-crawler was in those areas.
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    Eugene "Flash" Thompson 

Eugene "Flash" Thompson

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_flash.png
"Spider-Man follows me? I saved us, guys!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tony Revolori

Voiced By: Miguel Ángel Leal (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"He's just awesome, OK? He protects the neighborhood, and... you know, is inspiring. He inspires me to be a better man... 'Sup, dickwad?"

In contrast to his other versions, Flash is an academic rival in Peter Parker's class.


  • Abandoned Catchphrase: While having no shortage of insults for Peter, he no longer uses the especially immature "Penis Parker" insult in Far From Home.
  • Adaptational Intelligence: Zig-Zagged. This version is an academic rival to Peter while his comic counterpart was never smart enough to be considered Peter's equal intellectually and certainly couldn't operate a DJ rig. However, while he may be smarter he's certainly not wiser, and tends to be too quick to answer a question to answer it correctly, if he knows the answer at all.
  • Adaptational Jerkass:
    • In Homecoming. While comics Flash had a Freudian Excuse for his bullying note , Flash is just petty, rude, spoiled, and has no problem throwing his peers under the bus in his first appearance. In a sense, he kind of has more in common with the Ultimate Marvel version of Flash than the original version (personality-wise).
    • Far From Home subverts this by revealing that he does have a neglectful family (giving him a Freudian Excuse in-line with the comics), and Flash himself is making an effort to be less of an asshole to his peers.
  • Adaptational Wimp: The Flash of the comics was taller and more muscular than Peter and was pretty good at football, in keeping with being a walking bully stereotype. This Flash is about the same height and build as Peter, and doesn't seem to be any stronger or faster than his build suggests, in keeping with his reimagining as a fellow nerd. This even applies to his perception by Peter, who sees him as more of an annoyance than a true bully.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: In the comics, he's a Jerk Jock who physically bullies and humiliates the nerdy Peter Parker because he can. Here, because Midtown is a science school, he's a wealthy, academic-minded Nerdy Bully who resents that Peter is smarter than he is and constantly tries to one-up him.
  • Always Second Best: To Peter, which fuels his animosity.
  • Appropriated Appelation: Throwaway dialogue in Homecoming suggests that the "Flash" nickname apparently stems from his desire to answer first — even if he does so incorrectly at times. He prefers it over his actual first name.
  • Back from the Dead: Since he is still Peter's age despite Peter clearly being one of the victims of Thanos's Badass Fingersnap in Infinity War, he had to have been killed as well and then resurrected as a result of Endgame.
  • Butt-Monkey: Nothing goes right for him. In Homecoming he’s constantly one-upped by Peter and eventually gets his dad's Audi "borrowed" by Spider-Man, who proceeds to crash it during the climax. Then in his first scene in Far From Home, MJ gets a flight stewardess to confiscate his martini and characters roll their eyes at his obsessive live-streaming throughout the trip.
  • Catchphrase Insult: "Penis Parker."
  • Composite Character: As a rich classmate of Peter's with neglectful parents, he's implicitly adopted traits of Harry Osborn.
  • Dirty Coward: Puts his own safety above his fellow classmates.
  • Embarrassing Nickname: He's called "Flash" because he's always rushing to be the first to answer but is usually wrong. He's so full of himself, however, that he's taken on the moniker for himself.
  • Everyone Has Standards: As much as he likes seeing Peter humiliated, he thinks that Brad attempting to do so by taking a picture of him in the bathroom is just weird.
  • Fanboy: Of Spider-Man — as revealed in Far From Homebut not Peter.
  • Freudian Excuse: Far From Home indicates that Flash's parents are neglectful towards him (as evidenced first when he texts his mother saying he hasn't heard from her or his father in days, and second when he's visibly disappointed that his butler went to pick him up from the airport instead of his parents - considering he spent five years dead and other students had their families calling Mr. Harrington to end the trip earlier, and it begs the question of if his parents even noticed he was gone), and that he consequently acts out to get attention. When he and the others are cornered by Beck's drones, Flash admits that he posts stupid videos on the Internet so people will like him.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: No one seems to particularly like him — Abe in particular enjoys poking fun at him — and Mr. Harrington is more than happy to welcome Peter back onto the academic decathlon team when he asks to despite Flash pointing out how selfish that is, and immediately bump Flash back down to substitute. The film hints that other people merely tolerate being around him because his father is incredibly wealthy. In a deleted scene, Abe flat out tells him that everyone prefers Peter to him. Far From Home shows he's aware of this and his livestream videos are an effort to get people to like him.
  • Groin Attack: At the receiving end of one in Far From Home, courtesy of one of his classmates interested in taking him down a peg as he livestreams from "Saint Marco Polo".
  • Hate Sink: In Homecoming, where he's just a mean-spirited, petty, spoiled, and selfish Jerkass with no redeeming qualities. Even Toomes is shown to have a family and crew that he looks after. Subverted by the time of Far From Home. While he's still a tool to his friends (mostly Peter), it's revealed that his family is neglectful to him, which actually makes him sympathetic. Furthermore, he states that his admiration of Spider-Man is making him reevaluate his life, so he can become a better person by following his hero's example.
  • Hero Stole My Bike: Spider-Man steals his dad's Audi to catch up to the Vulture towards the end of the film. It ends up getting wrecked. Flash gapes at the sight of this and squeaks.
  • Hidden Depths:
    • While he ends up not being the smartest kid in class, Flash appears to have some skill as a DJ who can successfully invoke Audience Participation. He's so good at it, in fact, that he successfully uses it to make the whole crowd chant "Penis Parker".
    • In Far From Home, it's revealed that a big reason why he's an Attention Whore — in class, at parties, and online — stems from being neglected by his family.
  • Insult Comic: Improvises himself as one during the party at Liz's home while also DJing there, with Peter "Penis" Parker as his target, of course.
  • It's All About Me: At the Washington Memorial, he pushes the rest of the kids aside to be rescued first out of the elevator, showing more concern for the decathlon contest trophy than his classmates.
  • Jerkass: In Homecoming, he's a petty rich kid who picks on Peter. He also shows no concern for the lives of his classmates when in a dangerous situation, just himself and a trophy he didn't even earn.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: In Far From Home, he starts taking efforts to be less of a dick to everyone in order to be more like his hero, Spider-Man. He's got an awfully long way to go given that his idea of complimenting Peter on his new glasses (left to him by Tony Stark) is to express disbelief that he was able to afford such a high end pair, but hey, it's a start!
  • Loves My Alter Ego: As is traditional for the character, a platonic version with Peter; he greatly admires Spider-Man despite having no respect for Peter himself.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: Far From Home indicates that he's very insecure and has a distant relationship with his too-busy parents.
  • Kick the Dog: The speed and degree of relentlessness he shows to insult and belittle Peter at every turn is nothing short of awfully amazing.
  • Nerdy Bully: He's a physically-nonthreatening faux-intellectual who verbally bullies Peter Parker by calling him names and putting him down in front of their classmates.
  • Pet the Dog: While Flash is always a Jerkass to Peter, at one point in Far From Home, he snatches away the EDITH glasses and tries to give a genuine compliment to Peter after realising how cool the glasses look, however Peter accidentally knocks him out.
  • Phoneaholic Teenager: In Far From Home, he's always live-streaming something to post online. He later admits that he makes these videos to get people's attention so that they will like him, and it's through the livestream that Spider-Man realizes where his classmates are so he can save them. He's thrilled when he hears that his hero watches his videos.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: He's maybe still a jerk, but he's become a comedic jerk in Far From Home.
  • Race Lift: Flash is a white blond in the comics, but is Latino in the film.
  • Reimagining the Artifact: The original Flash started as a collection of old-timey ideas of how The Bully looked and acted — a stereotypical blonde-haired, white-skinned, underwear-yanking meathead of a Jerk Jock. Making Flash a dark-skinned Nerdy Bully with rich parents reflects new understandings of how bullies look and operate, as well as the understanding that they can come from any walk of life. Plus, given that Flash and Peter both attend a school specializing in science, an academic bully would make more sense than an athletic one.
  • Rich Bitch: This version of the character comes from a wealthy family and mocks Peter for his middle-class upbringing.
  • Skewed Priorities: Has a few that show how much of a jerk he is. First, during the Washington Monument incident, he shoves his classmates out of the way and brings the decathlon trophy with him so they can be rescued first. Next, when Spider-Man saves the class, he asks him whether he really knows Peter instead of thanking him like everyone else.
  • Smug Snake: While he's a lot smarter than he is in the comic books, he's still arrogant and deludes himself into thinking he's better than Peter.
  • Social Media Before Reason: In keeping with being a livestream-obsessed Phoneaholic Teenager in Far From Home, he's even livestreaming being trapped in a museum vault and being chased by deadly drones. Happy is unimpressed.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Not by much, but in Far From Home he shows likable traits compared to him having none in Homecoming. The first is that he's a Fanboy of Spider-Man like in the comics, being unimpressed by this so-called "Mysterio". Second, even he is weirded out by Brad taking a picture of Peter in the bathroom with him looking like a pervert. Also, he's revealed to have neglectful parents, gaining him a degree of sympathy.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: An unusual academic-decathlon version. He can give answers quicker than his peers, but doesn't have the patience to find the right ones.
  • Upper-Class Twit: He's a preening jerk who's relying on his father's money to try and build his reputation at school, to mixed results.

    Michelle Jones 

Michelle "MJ" Jones

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_michelle_jones.png
"You guys are losers."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Zendaya

Voiced By: Erika Ugalde (Latin-American Spanish), Kazumi Makabe (Japanese)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"What are you hiding, Peter? ...I'm just kidding, I don't care. Bye."

A classmate of Peter Parker who has a tendency to keep an eye on him from a distance.


  • Action Survivor: Near the end of Spider-Man: Far From Home, when she is trapped in the Tower of London with Happy and her classmates and the drones are closing in on them, she picks a mace and clubs a drone with it.
  • Adaptation Name Change: She is more-or-less Mary Jane Watson, but her name is "Michelle Jones" in the MCU, although she has the same initials and nickname as MJ.
  • Adorkable: Shows shades of this around her crush, Peter, especially in Far From Home.
  • All There in the Manual: Her last name, Jones, is not revealed in Spider-Man: Homecoming, but only through supplementary material. And for good reason — it logically spoils the "MJ" reveal.
  • Awesomeness by Analysis: Like Vulture, she's able to figure out that Peter Parker is Spider-Man with a few context clues... Although when Peter fesses up, she notes that she was only "67% sure" and didn't completely know — and is giddy realising that she was right. She’s also the one who pieces together that Mysterio’s been lying to Peter when she finds one of his projectors.
  • Ascended Extra: She gets a lot more to do in Far From Home than she did in Homecoming.
  • Back from the Dead: Since she is still Peter's age despite Peter clearly being one of the victims of Thanos's Badass Fingersnap in Infinity War, she had to have been killed as well and then resurrected as a result of Endgame.
  • Black and Nerdy: Has her nose buried in a book in almost every scene she's in.
  • Bookworm: Has a stack of paperbacks with her in the lunch room and is later seen reading Of Human Bondage during gym class.
  • Brainy Brunette: Has curly dark hair, is an avid reader, and currently the captain of Midtown Tech's academic decathlon team.
  • Brutal Honesty: MJ straight-up says that the truth matters more to her than building connections with others, though she admits that she regrets isolating herself because of it.
  • Bully Hunter: Twice in Far From Home, MJ stands up to someone being a jerk to Peter. First, she gets an airline stewardess to confiscate Flash's martini after Flash made a snide comment about Peter's lower middle class background. Then after landing in London, Brad bursts about seeing Peter half-naked with a mystery woman and complains that no one's interested in "the truth"; MJ responds with a George Orwell quote and then asks Brad why he was taking pictures of people in the bathroom.
  • Cannot Spit It Out: She admits that she doesn't have the easiest time connecting with other people, and as such she has trouble navigating her feelings for Peter Parker. Throughout Homecoming, she mostly just snarks at him, and misleads him into believing that she only pays attention to him because she's figured out his secret identity. She's gotten better by the end of Far From Home, and admits to Peter that she actually does care about him, culminating in their First Kiss.
  • Canon Character All Along: Her nickname is "MJ", the same as Mary Jane Watson, and that's treated as a major reveal in the movie. Kevin Feige tried to downplay the significance, indicating that it's more suggestive than literal, about Michelle Jones' role in the MCU. In either case, in the second film she is referred to as exclusively "MJ" and never once called Michelle, while also taking on more aspects of her comics alter-ego's characteristics and becoming the Love Interest to Spider-Man.
  • Canon Foreigner: Michelle was specifically created for the films and, "MJ" namesake aside, is not based on any established Marvel character.
  • Carry a Big Stick: She grabs a mace in the climax of Far From Home and whacks an attack drone with it.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Has a fairly minor role in Homecoming, but becomes more prominent in Far From Home as Peter starts to reciprocate her crush on him.
  • Composite Character: She seems to be a combination of various characters from Peter Parker's supporting cast:
    • Her nickname is an explicit Shout-Out to Mary Jane and she shares some of MJ's background (Mary Jane who didn't go to high school with Peter in the comics admitted later that she was a class clown in high school and was a loner in that period, much like Michelle is shown for much of Homecoming). The fact that she seems to be Peter's main love interest in Far From Home and addressed in the movie as just MJ makes this more apparent, as does her taking on more parts of her background.
    • She also incorporates elements of the comic book version of Jessica Jones, who went to Midtown High with Peter and also had significant social problems. There's also the obvious fact that she shares Jessica's last name. Though Jessica otherwise wasn't friends with Peter during high school or ever had any romantic connection to him.
    • While Betty Brant has the classic look of Gwen Stacy, Michelle possesses more of Gwen's intelligence, as she's a member of the academic decathlon team and clinches a win for them in Homecoming, eventually becoming their leader, similar to how Gwen was shown in The Amazing Spider-Man Series as opposed to her classic 616 (where she met Peter in college and her high school life was summarized by Harry as "the beauty queen of Standard High") or Ultimate version (where she was a goth).
    • She possibly takes her first name from Michelle Gonzalez in the comics, who was a minor character appearing in various Spider-Man titles during Brand New Day.
  • Conspiracy Theorist: A deleted scene shows that she thinks the story that Captain America destroyed the helicarriers in Washington D.C. to save the world from HYDRA is a lie. In Far From Home, she also cites the Eiffel Tower as her favorite monument after she read that it had been invented as a mind control device to use on France’s mentally ill population.
  • Covert Pervert: At the end of the film, when Peter goes to check on the message to meet with Happy she is not-so-subtly looking at Peter's butt. She tries to be more respectful in Far From Home when she’s alone with Peter as he’s undressing, but she’s clearly tempted.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Her defining character trait is making snide remarks at other characters in a tone that implies she couldn't care less.
  • Disappeared Dad: Her text from the bus that EDITH picks up suggests that neither she nor her mother have had any contact with her father for some time, which Broad Strokes-wise lines up with Mary Jane's background in the comics as the child of a broken home.
  • Eating the Eye Candy: When Peter changes into his Spider-suit, he asks Michelle to turn around. Flushed, Michelle can't help but sneak a few peaks.
  • Expy: Of Allison from The Breakfast Club, in keeping with Word of God's claims of Homecoming taking inspiration from John Hughes' films. Physically, both characters dress and style themselves in dowdy clothing that make them appear to not care about how they look. Personality-wise, both come across as Deadpan Snarker Cloudcuckoo Landers whose actions often contradict their claims. In what is also a Shout-Out, Michelle is in detention not because of anything she did, but because she felt like it, during which she would draw to pass the time, much like Allison did.
  • First Kiss: With Peter on the Tower Bridge in London after Mysterio's defeat.
  • First-Name Basis: She's only referred to as Michelle in the marketing for Homecoming and in the movie itself (except in her last scene, where she requests that her friends call her "MJ"). Her surname, Jones, is only mentioned All There in the Manual, and not even listed in the credits. In Far From Home, she’s almost exclusively called MJ.
  • The Gadfly: She spends most of Homecoming doing some low-key trolling of Peter and Ned. She even goes to detention, despite not being in trouble, simply to observe and document other students' pain and suffering. Or because she has a crush on Peter. Or both.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: She does care for Peter and the other members of the academic decathlon, but she buries it underneath a mountain of snark. This briefly shows when she outright tells Spider-Man that her friends are in danger, since up until that point she'd only been snarking at them; Peter is briefly taken aback at this statement before climbing up the Washington Monument to rescue them.
  • Holier Than Thou: She frequently acts superior to everyone else, since they tend to enjoy things and pursue a social life whereas she sits in the back of class and makes snide comments.
  • Hollywood Nerd: Even with frumpy clothes, unkempt hair and no makeup, she's still played by the gorgeous Zendaya Coleman.
  • Huge Schoolgirl: At 5' 10" (178 cm) she is the tallest named character in the school with the exception of Brad. And unless Scully Box is used in future installments, she is one of the tallest female MCU main cast members, second only to Karen Gillan (who plays Nebula, an alien).
  • Hypocritical Humor: Smugly criticizes Peter and Ned for things she does herself.
    Michelle: I can't believe you two are here at this lame party.
    Ned: You're here too!
    Michelle: (beat) Am I?
  • I Just Want to Have Friends: Underneath her aloof, loner exterior. Despite calling Peter and Ned losers, she seems to follow them around wherever they go, even to the point of accompanying Peter to detention, despite not having detention herself. She seems to grow a bit as she eventually openly refers to her classmates as friends.
  • Insufferable Genius: She's very smart and endlessly sarcastic to just about everyone. One of her hobbies involves sitting in detention periods so she can sketch all the people stuck there.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: She is unapologetically snarky and a bit of a troll, but underneath it all, she does care about Peter and the other students. In Far From Home, she started showing more of her kind side, especially towards Peter.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: She briefly manages to make use of a mace to destroy one of Mysterio's drones.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: She is the aloof and cynical Masculine Girl to Peter's optimistic and sensitive Feminine Boy.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: MJ has a passion for the macabre and a dark sense of humor. She recommends ghost tours and sites of historical tragedies during the Europe trip, and her favorite flower is the black dahlia, after the infamous murder of the same name.
  • No Social Skills: Throughout Homecoming, she mostly just reads her books and snarks at anyone in earshot. She even admits that Peter and Ned, two of her favorite targets, are the closest she has to any real friends. After nearly losing them in the Washington Monument crisis, she begins to warm up to her classmates, telling them she prefers to be called "MJ" and taking pride in being the Decathlon captain. In Far From Home, Peter and Ned regard her as a genuine friend, but still, she brings up odd conversation topics like murders and conspiracy theories, teases anyone once the opportunity presents itself, and Cannot Spit It Out to Peter.
  • The Not-Love Interest: In Homecoming, she's just a Strange Girl that happens to be a "friend" of Peter's and nothing more, though she becomes one as of Far From Home.
  • Not So Stoic: Her normally cold and aloof persona starts crumbling in Far from Home in the confession night scene, and that's before she goes web-slinging with Spidey in the end.
  • Official Couple: By the end of Far From Home, she's with Peter.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: When Spider-Man arrives on the scene of the Washington Monument incident, Michelle is terrified and tells him that her friends are in danger, showing both how serious the situation is as well as her Hidden Heart of Gold.
  • Reimagining the Artifact: While she takes some cues from other characters like Jessica Jones, she's a modern reimagining of Mary Jane more than anything. She's essentially what Mary Jane would be like if she was a teenager today rather than in the 60s. Mary Jane was created as a free-spirited hippy which made her an outsider among her peers. Michelle stands out from her peers because she's an off-kilter social activist feminist which is in line with Generation Z.
  • Rule of Symbolism: Of Human Bondage, the book she reads, is about an orphaned boy living with his Aunt as he adjusts to his life in a new school. The story more or less applies to Peter Parker's situation on multiple levels. Likewise here initials MJ are symbolic of the Story Arc that she might take in the MCU version.
  • Secret Secret-Keeper: She figures out that Peter Parker is Spider-Man (well, she is 67% sure) and keeps that information to herself.
  • Single Woman Seeks Good Man: She fell for Peter, a kind, smart sweetheart, long before she realized he was Spider-Man, if the fact she’s already been paying attention to him for a while by her first scene in Homecoming is any indication.
  • Smitten Teenage Girl: Displayed in the most sarcastic, dry way possible, but it's painfully obvious she's taken with Peter, even if she's a good sport about his liking another girl.
    Michelle: I'm not obsessed with him, I'm just very observant.
  • Soapbox Sadie: As the MSST academic decathlon team welcomes Peter back, she impatiently asks if they can leave for Washington D.C. so she can have time to protest at the foreign embassies (and it's implied she just wants to protest for the sake of protesting). She also refuses to go up the Washington Monument, saying she'd "rather not celebrate something that was built by slaves."note , but it seems less something she's doing for attention as much as an excuse to keep reading her book. She also teases Peter about a perceived gendered double standard when he compliments her. Her feminism is played up in supplementary material, she makes lists of admirable historical women like Mary Seacole and Sophia Duleep Singh and owns T-shirts of Toni Morrison, Joan of Arc, and Marsha P. Johnson.
  • Stalker with a Crush: Downplayed example. She's constantly hanging around Peter, despite supposedly not being his friend. She also appears to keep a close eye on his activities, aware that he's quit numerous school clubs. When this draws attention, she claims to just be observant. It's not like she likes him or anything.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: When the others notice how much attention she's paying to Peter and his life, she quickly insists she's not obsessed with him (and visibly loses her icy calm when saying so)... even though no one said she was.
    Michelle: "I'm not obsessed with him. Just very observant."
  • Took a Level in Kindness: After spending most of Homecoming snarking at Peter and his friends, she starts treating them more like real friends after they nearly die in the Washington Monument mishap. She's much more open and friendly (if still unapologetically snarky) in Far From Home.
  • Translator Buddy: She’s apparently the only student on the class trip who understands Italian, and corrects Mr. Harrington and her classmates a few times.
  • Tsundere: Peter is a total loser and Michelle really doesn't care at all about where he's going or what he's doing... Cue Longing Look as Peter leaves to be Spider-Man.
  • Victorious Childhood Friend: Downplayed, but it’s implied she’s been longing for Peter for quite a few years. She finally gets the guy at the end of Far From Home .
  • You Are in Command Now: At the end of the film, she is made captain of the Midtown AcDec team after the sudden departure of Liz.

    Betty Brant 

Elizabeth "Betty" Brant

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_betty_brant.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Angourie Rice

Voiced By: Itzel Mendoza (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Spider-Man: Far From Home

"Rise and shine, Midtown Science and Technology, I'm Betty Brant."

A classmate of Peter Parker's who co-anchors the school news program.


  • Adaptational Job Change: In the comics, Betty works at the Daily Bugle to support her family after dropping out of school in Philadelphia. It should be noted she's the same age as Peter there, too, meaning she was a secretary there at fifteen. Here, she attends school with Peter, most likely because the comics version is rather improbable in today's world. Her job in the comics is nodded towards by her work as a reporter for the school's news program.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Sports long blonde hair as opposed to comic Betty's brunette page cut.
  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: Betty never dates Peter here, and instead is a Shipper on Deck of Liz's relationship to him, and later, his relationship with MJ.
  • Adorkable: Acts like a giddy school girl during her relationship with Ned.
  • Amicable Exes: She and Ned break up by the end of the trip, but they're still on very good terms afterwards.
  • Ascended Extra: While not a main character in Far From Home, Betty is more prominently seen here than in Homecoming due to becoming Ned's girlfriend.
  • Back from the Dead: She explicitly states she was one of the victims of Thanos's Badass Fingersnap in Infinity War who was resurrected as a result of Endgame, and she is none too happy about having to redo the entire school year when, from her perspective, she had just completed midterms.
  • Characterization Marches On: She starts off as a one-note character who, alongside Jason Ionello, does a very mediocre job at being a student news reporter. As of Far From Home, they've both matured from shy kids who can barely read the teleprompter to committed anchors with much higher energy.
  • Composite Character: She appears to be a mix of two of Peter's Love Interests from the comics.
    • From Betty Brant, the personal secretary and later reporter working for J. Jonah Jameson, she gets her name, connection to journalism, and romance with Ned Leeds.
    • From Gwen Stacy, she gets her physical appearance (long blonde hair with a black headband) and attending the same school as Peter Parker.
  • Crack Ship: In-Universe, Peter is utterly baffled by the relationship Ned and Betty formed over the course of a flight.
  • Decomposite Character: In the comics, Betty was Peter's first girlfriend (and first friend, ever). This role instead went to Liz.
  • Girl Posse: She seems to hang around with Liz.
  • Give Geeks a Chance: In Far From Home, she starts a relationship with Ned of all people. Peter is completely shocked by this development.
  • Hidden Depths: Far From Home shows her to be more capable in a life-or-death situation than one might expect. With a little quick thinking, she distracts a drone by shoving over a suit of armor, giving MJ an opening to take it out.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Her romance with Ned in Far From Home alludes to the relationship between their counterparts in the comics, who are married.
    • She's a news anchor for Midtown's student news program; in the comics, she's a prominent employee at the Daily Bugle.
  • Nice Girl: Is a loving girlfriend to Ned, is friendly with Peter, and even her break-up with Ned is civil.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted with Elizabeth Allan, but downplayed as they're Only Known by Their Nickname with both Betty and Liz being equally applicable shortenings of the name.
  • School Newspaper News Hound: She's the co-anchor of the school's closed-circuited TV news program, and is much more invested in the presentation than her co-anchor Jason.
  • Shipper on Deck:
    • She immediately catches on that Liz likes Spider-Man.
    • She also remarks that Peter and MJ make a cute couple.
  • Sickeningly Sweethearts: She and Ned go all in on the lovey-dovey stuff in Far From Home.

    Jason Ionello 

Jason Ionello

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jorge Lendeborg Jr.

Voiced By: José Antonio Toledano (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Spider-Man: Far From Home

A classmate of Peter's who is the other co-anchor of the school news program.


  • Abhorrent Admirer: Tries asking Betty out to the homecoming dance during their news broadcast, which creeps her out.
  • Back from the Dead: He explicitly states he is one of the victims of Thanos's Badass Fingersnap in Infinity War who was resurrected as a result of Endgame, and finds it quite weird that his chronologically younger brother is now biologically older than him.
  • Big Little Brother: In Far From Home, he reveals that his younger brother is now older than him due to him being blipped from existence and his brother aging over the course of five years afterwards.
  • Captain Obvious: He annoys Betty with his observation that his younger brother is now older than him; she points out that of course that's the case since his brother didn’t Blip.
  • Only Sane Man: In the eight months between Endgame and Far From Home, everyone has more-or-less adjusted to the new status quo except for him. He's weirded out by the fact that his kid brother grew up during his own temporary death, and derails the morning announcements to freak out about something like the Blip happening again.
    Jason: Does anyone even have a plan?!
  • Race Lift: White in the comics, Black/Hispanic in the movie.

    Brad Davis 

Brad Davis

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/brad_davis.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Remy Hii

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A newer student of Midtown who acts as a rival to Peter for Michelle's affections.


  • Adaptation Origin Connection: Brad Davis wasn't Peter's classmate in the comics.
  • Ascended Extra: While not a main character in the movie, Brad's comic counterpart appeared in a single issue in a minor role. Here, he's a secondary antagonist for Peter who poses much less threat than the Elementals but still tries to make Peter's life more difficult.
  • Asian Rudeness: He's half-Chinese and a Jerk Jock.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: He starts out as a seemingly nice Lovable Jock, Ned even classifying him as such, always has a pleasant smile on his face, and no real animosity towards Peter. After he makes it clear to Peter that he likes MJ too, he begins sinking to some lows to discredit and humiliate Peter.
  • Chick Magnet: Possibly. Ned remarks that Brad has all the girls swarming him, but it's never really proven.
  • Didn't Think This Through: He tried to humiliate Peter with the photo he took of him in the bathroom with another woman but Peter manages to end up deleting the photo. When Brad tries to oust him without the photo, he ends up embarrassing himself and ends up becoming The Friend Nobody Likes.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: He ends up as this. When he tries to humiliate Peter with an embarrassing photo everyone is weirded out by him. Even goddamn Flash.
  • Hate Sink: He's basically Flash without the funny and entertaining qualities and Freudian Excuse. He may be even worse considering how even Flash himself is appalled by him. Even the Faux Affably Evil Beck is presented as more of a Love to Hate villain than Brad's slimy, superficial Nice Guy charm.
  • He Is All Grown Up: Prior to the Blip, he was an awkward-looking kid, but after puberty, he's a Hunk.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: He takes a picture of what seems to be Peter in the bathroom with a prostitute. When he reveals this information to the entire class (although without the photo itself, as Peter had erased it beforehand), they all believe he's a pervert who takes pictures of people in the bathroom.
  • Hopeless Suitor: He likes MJ, but she doesn't seem to return any of his affections. Plus she already has eyes for Peter.
  • Informed Attribute: Ned says that all girls swoon for him. In the actual movie, this isn't shown. Michelle isn't nearly as interested in him as she is in Peter, none of the other girls seem to want to date him, he comes across as being petty when he tries to reveal a picture taken out of context where Peter seems to be with a prostitute, and everyone (women included) are disgusted when Brad tells them for coming across as both a liar and a creep. If anything, he's The Friend Nobody Likes.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: While needlessly antagonistic towards Peter, Brad is justified in voicing his concerns over Peter's inexplicable behavior.
  • Jerk Jock: He's a basketball-playing asshole who antagonizes Peter, tries to reveal an embarrassing photo out of context, and in general comes across as being petty. When even Flash thinks this of you, you know you're a dick.
  • Mythology Gag: In the comics, Brad was a fling of Mary Jane Watson's during a time she had broken up with Peter; Here, he has romantic inclinations towards Michelle, who has Mary Jane's nickname and also acts as a love interest to Peter.
  • Nice Guy: Deconstructed. When he is introduced he seems to tick all the boxes of the archetype, being friendly and charismatic to everyone in the group and seemingly oblivious to Peter's dislike of him. After he takes the photo of Peter in the bathroom this is revealed to be a ruse he's intentionally invoking to charm girls and that he's fully intending to embarrass Peter to have MJ for himself.
  • Only Sane Man: By the climax of the film, Brad believes himself to be this, asking why nobody is acknowledging Peter's odd behavior and constant disappearances. In reality, he's the only one who cares, and MJ's subsequent call-out of his behaviour makes him look less than sane to his classmates. This is partially justified in the fact that Brad wasn't snapped away while most of the other named characters were, so he lacks the context for Peter's actions (being a Secret Keeper in Ned and MJ's case and nice, but perpetually flaky for everyone else). This leaves him completely flabbergasted at the fact that no one else cares about Peter's tendency to disappear.
  • Properly Paranoid: He’s actually right that something fishy is going on with Peter due to his strange and constant disappearances. Too bad no one would believe him because he unintentionally revealed his true Jerkass behavior at the same time and he lacked the proper evidence to prove it.
  • Race Lift: He's fully white in the comics, while here he's presumably half Chinese like his actor.
  • Replacement Flat Character: Brad in Far From Home is essentially what Flash was back in Homecoming, who had no redeeming traits. Contrasting the Flash in Far From Home, who not only is a little more likable and sympathetic this time, but even he was disgusted by the idea of Brad taking pictures of Peter in the bathroom.
  • Rightly Self-Righteous: Downplayed. When he photographs Peter with his pants down in front of a SHIELD Agent, he assumes that Peter is courting MJ for his own selfish reasons. A potentially noble sentiment even if Brad is doing it to sabotage his rival. Though by movie's end, intentions or no, nobody's particularly happy that Brad took a photograph of Peter in the bathroom without his consent.
  • The Rival: He spends Far From Home as Peter's primary romantic rival for MJ's affections.
  • Unknown Rival: At first, he seems to be a Nice Guy who's oblivious to Peter's worries about him possibly wooing over Mary Jane. Utlimately Subverted, as he reveals to Peter that he's well aware of what a threat he see's Brad as, and starts acting spiteful to Peter from then on.

Alumni

    Liz Allan 

Elizabeth "Liz" Allan/Toomes

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_liz_allan.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Laura Harrier

Voiced By: Jessica Ángeles (Latin-American Spanish), Karen Miyama (Japanese)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

A classmate and crush of Peter Parker.


  • Adaptational Nice Guy: In the comics, Liz was an Alpha Bitch who made fun of Peter Parker as much as Flash did, before she warmed up to Peter and gained a crush on him. Here, she's a Nice Girl who's always kind to Peter and gains a interest in him sooner.
  • Affectionate Nickname: Her devoted father calls her "Gumdrop".
  • Age Lift: Downplayed, but unlike her comic book counterpart, who was in Peter’s grade, Liz is in her senior year of high school while Peter is a sophomore.
  • Brainy Brunette: Dark hair and the captain of the academic decathlon team.
  • Break the Cutie: Sweet, lovely Liz is devastated when, in quick succession, she’s stood up at the school dance, learns her father is a super-villain, and says goodbye to her friends as she and her mother move to Oregon.
  • Composite Character: With Valeria Toomes (the Vulture's daughter in the 616 universe), the Liz Allan of the Ultimate Universe (who also had a super-villainous father that supported her family from afar), and Betty Brant (Peter's first canonical girlfriend). She also has some traits in common with Katie Bishop, the girlfriend of Miles Morales, since like Ultimate Liz, Ultimate Katie had connections to a supervillain.
  • Dating What Daddy Hates: Played with. Her father turns out to be grateful to Peter for saving her life, and encourages him to have a good time with her at homecoming... It's Spider-Man that he doesn't like, though still a lot of respect for.
  • Hidden Depths: At first glance Liz looks to be nothing more than the attractive popular girl. However, she's also the captain of the academic decathlon team at a magnet school for gifted students, a role that she takes very seriously.
  • Huge Schoolgirl: At 5' 9 1/4" (176 cm) she towers over every other student in the school other than Michelle and is One Head Taller than her best friend Betty.
  • Loves My Alter Ego: Liz is a Spider-Man fangirl and has a crush on him. A downplayed example since she later goes out with Peter without realizing that they are the same person.
  • Nice Girl: Even after being constantly ditched by Peter throughout the film, she still wishes him the best.
  • Nom de Mom: Subverted as she's never actually referred to as "Liz Allan" anywhere, and her name may actually be "Liz Toomes", which would make her a Walking Spoiler.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted with Elizabeth Brant, but downplayed as they're Only Known by Their Nickname with both Liz and Betty being equally applicable shortenings of the name.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: Liz had a crush on Peter in the comics, but nothing really came of it.
  • Put on a Bus: By the end of the film, she and her mother move away to Oregon after her father's arrest.
  • Race Lift: A white blonde in the comics but half-black, half-white brunette in the movie.
  • Related in the Adaptation: Adrian Toomes is her father.
  • Romantic False Lead: She's set up as Spider-Man love interest, even attending the titular homecoming dance with him - but her dad's arrest forces her to end things with him and leave town.
  • She's Got Legs: Liz usually wears short skirts that show off her legs. There's also one scene where she's shown wearing a bathing suit.
  • Ship Sinking: By the end of the movie, Liz is still heartbroken over Peter ditching her at the prom and she and her mother are forced to moved to Oregon in light of her father's arrest.
  • Single Woman Seeks Good Man: In her first scene, she outright says she has a crush on Spider-Man because he's a good person who helps people. It's then revealed later that despite his constant flaking, Liz does reciprocate Peter's crush on her and agrees to go out with him.
  • Slow-Motion Pass-By: In her first scene in the movie, she passes Peter in the hallway to this effect, establishing Peter’s infatuation with her.
  • Spoiled Sweet: Liz is the most popular girl at Midtown, surrounded by friends and admirers, and is very well-off, living in a very nice house and able to throw lavish parties thanks to her dad Adrian’s lucrative weapons cabal. She doesn’t show a hint of malice, and is always a genuinely sweet and kind girl.
  • Uncertain Doom: Unlike the rest of her classmates who briefly were turned to dust by Thanos's finger snap during the events of Avengers: Infinity War up until the events of Avengers: Endgame, Liz's fate was left unclear. As Homecoming took place during her senior year anyway, she’s no longer a part of anyone’s Midtown-related life.

    Sally Avril 

Sally Avril

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Isabella Amara

Voiced By: Valentina Souza (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War

A classmate of Peter's.


  • Big Beautiful Woman: Chubbiest portrayal of the character.
  • Race Lift: Downplayed. She's white both in the comics and movie, but the comics make no mention of her ethnicity while she's Latina in the movie.

    Abe Brown 

Abraham "Abe" Brown

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_abe.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: Ghanaian

Portrayed By: Abraham Attah

Voiced By: Abraham Vega (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

"Flash is wrong!"

A classmate of Peter's.


  • Adaptational Nationality: In the comics, he's an African-American from Harlem. Here, he's a Ghanaian who is living in the United States. Truth in Television as NYC has a sizable African immigrant community.
  • Black and Nerdy: A member of the academic decathlon team.
  • The Gadfly: Enjoys using the decathlon buzzer for comedic purposes, which Mr. Harrington has had to ask him not to do. Also takes the opportunity to poke fun at Flash for Peter replacing him.
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis: He really doesn't like Flash. A deleted scene has him flat out tell Flash that everyone on the decathlon team prefers Peter to him.

    Seymour O'Reilly 

Seymour O'Reilly

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Josie Totahnote 

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

A classmate of Peter's. He was part of Liz's clique of friends.


  • Ambiguously Gay: He has some stereotypically gay characteristics, but they're mostly superficial.

    Cindy Moon 

Cindy Moon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_cindy.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tiffany Espensen

Voiced By: Nycolle González

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War

A classmate of Peter's.


  • Adaptational Wimp: It's apparent that she doesn't have spider powers like Peter does and is just a mere civilian student.
  • Adaptation Origin Connection: Played with. In the comics, she was bitten by the same spider as Peter, but beyond that, they didn't interact with one another until they were adults. Here, she's a schoolmate of his and member of the same academic decathlon team, with no indication that she actually has superpowers.
  • Asian and Nerdy: A member of the academic decathlon team.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Whilst she was shown in Infinity War on a bus trip, she is not shown to be one of the people were Snapped. Moon was one of the survivors of the Snap and graduated from Midtown School of Science and Technology by 2023.

    Charles Murphy 

Charles Murphy

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Michael Barbieri

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

A classmate of Peter's and a member of the academic decathlon team.



    Tiny McKeever 

Brian "Tiny" McKeever

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ethan Dizon

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War

A classmate of Peter's.


  • Adaptational Nice Guy: A downplayed example. In the comics, Tiny bullied Peter alongside Flash, but grew out of it after Peter helped him in school, partly to cope with his abusive father's treatment of him. Here, there is no such relationship to begin with, meaning this Tiny never picks on Peter.
  • Race Lift: White in the comics, Asian (Specifically Chinese and Filipino if going by Dizon's background).
  • Smart People Play Chess: All of the students at Midtown are smart by default, and his most significant appearance shows him playing chess.
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