Follow TV Tropes

Following

Mythology Gag / Video Games

Go To

Games with their own pages:


Advertisement:

Examples:

  • In Backyard Sports: Sandlot Sluggers, Kiesha Phillips, Pablo Sanchez, and Vicki Kawaguchi have their nicknames from the first games, before the Continuity Reboot.
  • In Baldur's Gate there are merchants selling items belonging to a lot of the companions of the Nameless One in Planescape: Torment, such as Vhailor's helm, Dakkon's zerth blade etc.
    • In Shadows of Amn, Imoen hints that their captor have taken and sold the party's gear. You will thoughout the game come across items you could potensionally have in Baldur's Gate.
  • Battle Zone 1998 opens up with a camera panning around a boxy, green vector graphics tank within a mountain range before zooming out, revealing that it's just a radar display on a Hover Tank. The gag is repeated in the game's main menu background, which has vector graphics versions of the games hover tanks fighting within a mountain range.
  • The name of the Bionic Commando podcast is a mythology gag — it's called "Top Secret", which was the original Japanese name of the Arcade and NES games that started the franchise.
    • The overhead encounters in the Rearmed remake substitute a remix of the Commando theme in place of the NES BGM, which instead plays in the now side-scrolling underground passages. Furthermore, the scenery in the desert overhead stages resembles that of Gunsmoke.
    • Advertisement:
    • Two of 'em in the 2009 game:
      • At the Avenue of Heroes. The statues of "RAD" Spencer and "Super Joe" Gibson are dated 1989 and 1991 respectively — one year after the release of the NES Bionic Commando, and Mercs. (The first game to refer to "Super Joe" by the name Joseph Gibson)
      • Near the end of the game, a frustrated General Armstrong asks Spencer if he thinks he's a "damn fool", in reference to one of Hitler/Master D's lines in the NES game.
    • Bionic Commando Rearmed 2 has a sign for "Club Explod", in reference to an infamous typo in the English translation of the NES game.
  • The good endings' credit sequences in Bubble Memories has Bub and Bob using their parasols, which they've also used in Parasol Stars. Both games are in the Bubble Bobble series. Although both may be Non Linear Sequels, Memories apparently takes place after Parasol Stars but before Bubble Symphony.
  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2's Private Allen, the first playable character and also the first to be killed off, shares his name with a Red Shirt from the first level of Medal of Honor: Allied Assault, by the same developers pre-Infinity Ward.
  • The Spaceship Victory movie in Civilization IV has a black man who looks suspiciously like Nwabudike Morgan falling out of his cryopod and looking out over the new planet.
    • The Spaceship itself is the exact same ship as the one launched in the Civilization III Space Victory.
  • Though the various settings in Command & Conquer are quite different, with confusingly varying timelines, there are often references to events that have taken place in previous games.
    • In Red Alert 2, General Carville remarks that the Soviet Union is sending a naval force to take Pearl Harbor, and then snickers at the thought of anyone ever succeeding at attacking the base. This is a reference to the first Red Alert, which had a completely alternate World War II where the Japanese never attacked Pearl Harbor.
      • But when you actually play the mission, the sunken Arizona, complete with memorial, lays in the harbor...
    • In Red Alert 3, another mission is set at Pearl Harbour... only this time, you're the Japanese, defending it against a surprise Allied strike force. The mission intro even has George Takei expressing his vehement disbelief that anybody would ever attack the heavily fortified Pearl Harbour.
      • Also from Red Alert 3 (which takes place in a different timeline than the earlier games), the last Soviet mission starts by showing Tanya destroying dreadnaughts and talking about "old times", exactly the same way the Allied campaign starts in Red Alert 2.
      • The Allies' Mission Control is always named Eva, as a reference to the mission control AI EVA (or Electronic Video Agent) from the Tiberian series of games. Likewise, she has a rivalry with Allied commando Tanya over the affection of the Allied commander.
      • In the Uprising expansion pack, the challenge mission briefing that showcases the Apocalypse Tank asks "What does he think he's going to do? Strap missile launchers on it?" In Red Alert 2, the Apocalypse Tank - much like its inspiration in the original Mammoth Tank - indeed did have missiles launchers strapped onto it.
    • In Tiberium Wars, though the insidious Tiberium has evolved into completely new forms with new methods of expansion, nods to the original Blossom Trees from earlier Tiberium games can be seen throughout the Red Zone maps, in the form of withered but recognizable Blossom Tree husks.
      • Also, the game's entire Database holds subtle references to characters and events from the previous games. The game also has a statue of Havoc, the commando from Renegade. The Novelization also makes references to Tiberian Sun, even going so far as having the GDI player character, Micheal Mcneil, as a character. In a "criminal dossier" from the game designer's, a subtle reference to Red Alert is made.
    • In Tiberian Sun, you can find an abandoned GDI base made from buildings found in the first game, as well as functional Mammoth Tanks.
      • A plot point late in the Firestorm expansion's Nod campaign has the player capturing a GDI EVA unit to act as a replacement for the rogue CABAL - mirroring the explanation in the original game that Nod used a pirated offshoot of the same EVA units GDI did.
    • In Renegade, an early cutscene shows that the GDI controls their troops with the exact same interface the player used in the original game. In fact, it shows part of an actual mission in the original game, then switches to the game level with the exact same layout. Several audios were also taken over, such as the death sounds of infantry or EVA lines like "reinforcements have arrived". During the credits, the same "news" that were shown during the GDI ending also play here.
    • Many of the same units in the various sequels end up being Expies of themselves — for example, you can pretty much count on any future Red Alert sequel having the Kirov airship, and the Devil's Tongue flame tank down to its name is a link from the first and second Tiberium games in the form of a continuity nod. The Mammoth Tank is a particular series-wide example, showing up in both the Tiberian and Red Alert series.
    • Many commando units in the series will have similar lines to the first commando in Tiberium Dawn, including Havok making a reference in Renegade, "Just doesn't seem fair, does it? Maybe I'll shoot left-handed."
    • The Nintendo 64 port of the original game has a rather sneaky bit of this in its fake installation intro. At one point during it, an "armament history" is supposedly transferred to the player, namedropping several of the vehicles available to both sides - with a note next to the SSM Launcher that its data has been deleted, since it was a multiplayer-only unit that, the port being singleplayer-only, isn't usable.
  • Crescendo (JP) includes a wonderfully self deprecating reference to the company's previous game Kana: Little Sister when two characters watch a film obviously based on it, criticising its emotional manipulation and Deus Angst Machina. Kana sold extremely well and received excellent reviews but later received quite a bit of Hype Backlash over its wangst, something that the developers seem to have taken in good humour.
  • At one point in the game The Darkness, you can hear someone discuss a fictional movie that he idly mentions has "That chick from Witchblade." In the comics, Witchblade and The Darkness are part of the same universe, and have had crossovers.
  • The boss of the Tutorial in Dark Souls is the Asylum Demon, which bears a more than passing resemblance to the Vanguard that ended the tutorial in Demon's Souls. In contrast to the Heads I Win, Tails You Lose near-Hopeless Boss Fight scenario of the Vanguard, after initially having to flee from the Asylum Demon, you come back with a proper weapon and a vantage point for a Dynamic Entry and utterly destroy it — this is hugely satisfying to anyone who played the earlier game.
  • Dark Souls III, as the Grand Finale to the Souls series, is loaded with these.
  • DC Universe Online returns the favor to Smallville by including a Global Alert in its endgame content that takes place in Smallville, Kansas.
  • In one of the first small scenes of Dm C Devil May Cry, an explosion causes a white wig to land on Dante's head, causing him to look like the Dante from the original series, upon which, after a pause, he says "Not in a million years" and shrugs the hairpiece off.
  • Nippon Ichi has managed to include a few small gags in the Disgaeaverse, regarding Etna's standard pose portrait in the original game. Whenever she wasn't talking or was in a neutral mood, the game would show her leaning forwards in a somewhat awkward position; in the PSP port she complains about back pains, and in the prinny games she constantly rubs her back when stunned.
  • In the Disgaea 3 DLC, one of Gig's Evilties (abilities) is that he can Magichange into a weapon, and then when his turn runs out; he turns back into a humanoid; while the person who wielded him is temporarily replaced. In Soul Nomad & the World Eaters Gig spends most of his time as a magic weapon trying to do this.
  • Being a reboot to the classic franchise and and a Genre Throwback to 90s shooters, DOOM (2016) is filled with these.
    • One of the first lines you hear in the game is 'Rip and tear', a line from the infamously cheesy 90s Doom comic.
    • Several from Doom 3: One of the fingerprint scanners you have to use requires Z-Sec clearance, and you can find the (sadly unusable) Soul Cube in Olivia's office. You can also find a playable Super Turbo Turkey Puncher 3 arcade cabinet.
    • The illustration of the Doomguy fighting demons has them drawn very similarly in appearance to the original game's cover art.
    • The doors in the foundry level make the classic Doom Doors sounds.
    • Later in the game while in Hell, there's an arena based off the "Dead Simple" level in Doom II.
    • The Doom 2 manual states that the Spider Mastermind isn't equipped with a plasma gun, and thank god for that. Guess what the Spider Mastermind has in this game.
    • The theme for the game that plays in both the opening and the ending, as well as part of various tracks, is a very heavy synthetic remix of the iconic "At Doom's Gate" song from the first Doom. The ambient music that plays after returning to the destroyed Argent facility sounds much like the opening notes of "The Imp's Song" from E1M2 as well.
    • The way the demons finally trapped the Doomguy before the events of the game? They got him stuck by dropping the ceiling upon him.
    • The Icon of Sin is back (albeit dead), and even plays the original message from Doom II (and spits out a collectible) if you fire a rocket into its forehead.
  • Dragon Age: Origins has, among other things, "When in doubt, go for the eyes!" in the otherwise serious hints section on the loading screens and a piece of paper sitting around near the end of the Deep Roads mission containing clear Mass Effect references.
    • Near the end of Leliana's romance arc, you can tell her "You're cute when you're embarrassed," if you feel like making a Knights of the Old Republic reference.
    • There is also a woman by the name Edwina running a tavern in Denerim, which is a reference to Edwin's ending in Baldur's Gate 2, In which he gets turned into a woman by Elminster and ends up running a tavern under the name Edwina
    • Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening has party banter involving Oghren hitting on Sigrun in an increasingly more crude and unpleasant manner. This seems to be a reference to exactly the same situation from Baldur's Gate II involving Korgan and Mazzy.
  • Dragon Age II contains a dwarf named Varric bearing a crossbow by the name of Bianca. One of the designers commented in an interview that Mirabelle was already taken.
    • This made it into a bit of party banter; Merril asks about the origin of the name, and says she must have been named after someone. Varric replies that Mirabelle was already taken.
    • During Merrill's romance in Dragon Age II, she interjects "is it getting hot in here?" into her dialogue in the exact same way Tali does in similar circumstances in Mass Effect 2.
    • When telling Bethany about her sexual escapades, Isabella lists men, women, elves... and a dwarf in drag, referencing one of the surprise options at The Pearl in Dragon Age: Origins.
  • Dragon Quest:
    • Every game in the series contains some variation on either "No response. Looks like a corpse." (Translations for Dragon Quest VII and earlier), or "No reply. It's just a corpse." (Newer translations, because consistency in mythology gags is for losers) This is a call back to the original Dragon Quest I, where, during the now-traditional Playable Epilogue, you could visit a soldier who had been injured for the rest of the game and receive this response — the one downer element of the Happily Ever After.
    • Dragon Quest II: In Japan, Tonnura (トンヌラ) was one of Prince of Cannock's possible names in the Famicom version. Supposedly, the name sounds "odd and stupid" to several Japanese people, which fit how weak the Prince was on the FC. It became an in-joke as a "weak and uncool" name (but not "hated"), and popped up in a few later games. It is speculated that Yuji Horii came up with this from Ernest Tonnelat.
    • Dragon Quest III: In the mobile phone version, the inhabitants of Alefgard speak in fake old English, a homage to the original English translation of Dragon Quest I.
    • The English translation of the Nintendo DS version of Dragon Quest IV features some mythology gags regarding the name changes in the translation of the original Nintendo Entertainment System version. The character Ragnar, who was named Ryan in the Japanese, now has the full name Ragnar McRyan, while the full name of Torneko, who was renamed to Taloon in the NES version, is now Torneko Taloon.
  • Dynasty Warriors 5 had a nod back to the previous installment during the Wu Zhang Plains stage: After seeing Zhuge Liang's star fall, Sima Yi gleefully rushes the Shu camp, but stops when he gets there, spooked at the sight of Zhuge Liang. Unlike the last game, it's not just a ploy; he shakes his head, and realizes it's actually Jiang Wei, who has taken up Zhuge's mantle.
    • You were told in the third game 'Do not pursue Lu Bu.', which became a bit of a meme. The achievement for beating him the first time he appears in number seven is 'Ok, you can pursue Lu Bu.'
  • During the ending of Earthbound, Ness' mother refers to Giygas using an incorrect name that bears resemblance to prototype names for Gyiyg/Giegue/Giygas for back when Mother was going to be officially released in English.
  • Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future features occasional references to the original games; Hanging Waters in particular is packed with them. The level itself is the 3D version of the Skyway, the squid may be referencing both the Eight-Arms and the flying medusa all in one go, and the giant bird towards the end calls the helpful pteranodon to mind, right down to how he's summoned with song.
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • M'aiq the Liar is the series' recurring Easter Egg Legacy Character. M'aiq is a known a Fourth-Wall Observer (and Leaner and Breaker) who voices the opinions of the series' creators and developers, largely in the form of Take Thats, to both the audience (given the ES Unpleasable Fanbase) and isn't above above taking some at Bethesda itself. Some of his comments are regarding features present in previous games in the series which have been removed.
    • Oblivion simplifies Morrowind's armor system by combining the pauldron slot (shoulder armor) with the cuirass. They nod to this in the Shivering Isles expansion, where a local smith's shop is called "The Missing Pauldron". In a twofer example, this also refers to how Morrowind's Daedric armor set was, in the vanilla game, missing one of its pauldrons. (This would be rectified in the Bloodmoon expansion.)
  • Early in Fallout 3, a bully and his gang demand you turn over a sweetroll you received as a present. This is a recurring situation from the The Elder Scrolls's character generation process.
  • In Japan, the Fatal Fury series is known as Garou Densetsu. However, official Japanese artwork of Terry Bogard often features him wearing a baseball cap with the Fatal Fury logo on its crown.
  • Fate/hollow ataraxia has some references to other works in the Nasuverse. For example, there's a Lampshade Hanging of how Tohsaka is pretty clearly an expy of Tohno Akiha, though it isn't stated outright. There are also two new movies playing, both of them nonsensical. They're called NEKOARC and TIGERDOJO. In allcaps.
  • Fire Emblem's arena themes are for the most part, remixes of the main battle themes of previous games. For example, the 11th game (Shadow Dragon) uses the 9th game's (Path of Radiance) while the 8th (Sacred Stones) uses the 2nd's (Gaiden).
  • Fist of the North Star: Twin Blue Stars of Judgment lets the player recreate some of the anime series' most famous events. For example, if Shin is losing to Kenshiro on the Southern Cross stage, Shin can pull off a self-inflicted Fatal KO, a recreation of Shin's death in the series.
    • There are others, as well. Ken's timed-death move does not work on Souther, Rei's instant kill is different when done to Juda or Mamiya, Mamiya's instant kill is different when done to Rei, Jagi's instant kill is different when done to Ken, Ken's instant kill is different when done to Jagi, and so on. But then, considering that about 75% of the special moves are taken from specific scenes in the series (such as Raoh's foot-stab or Jagi's pillar attack), the whole game really is a series of massive shout outs and mythology gags.
  • In the Geneforge series, servant minds are immobile creatures that act somewhat like organic Magitek computers. Since the first game takes place on an island abandoned for about two hundred years, you would frequently have to find preserved jars of nutrient paste and feed the minds for them to be able to interact with you coherently. In the fourth game you can find a cupboard full of jars of mind food, and the narration notes that
    You consider taking one of them with you, but decide against it. What use could a self-respecting adventurer have for this stuff?
  • Genshin Impact has some references to the Honkai Gakuen universe of miHoYo, particularly in the form of expies to Honkai Impact 3rd characters, or reused concepts overall:
    • With the Unknown God's long flowing white hair, a crescent-shaped Idiot Hair and yellow eyes with cross-shaped pupils, not to mention her power over space and theatrical speeches, you'd be forgiven to think that Herrscher of the Void somehow made her way into this game.
    • Venti is basically themed after Wendy, who has a similar color scheme and ability to control the winds. Both characters also have titles that allude to their powers and godly status (Anemo Archon and Herrscher of Wind, respectively), and they lose their "power sources" (Gnosis and Herrscher Core) to mature blonde ladies affiliated with an enemy group (Signora and Cocolia).
    • Likewise, Zhongli giving his Gnosis to the Tsaritsa is a reference to the Herrscher of Earth (Owl) giving his Herrscher Core to the Herrscher of Ice (Ana).
    • In this game's supplementary manga, Murata is known as the "Lady of Fire", the Pyro Archon worshipped by a tribe with their characteristic red hair. In HI3, there's a character named Himeko Murata, who has red hair and Himeko's Previous Era counterpart was known as the Herrscher of Flames.
    • Diluc is also very similar to Himeko Murata. Both are red-headed, fiery greatsword wielders associated with alcohol. The twist is that while Himeko is The Alcoholic, Diluc actually hates alcohol.
    • In a similar vein to the Pyro Archon's Himeko Murata reference, the Electro Archon Baal has the title of "Raiden", referencing Raiden Mei, the Herrscher of Thunder from HI3. In fact, one of HI3's supplementary comics "Escape from Nagazora" has a chapter titled "The Wrath of Baal", which showcases Mei's time as a Herrscher.
    • One of the in-game books, titled "Vera's Melancholy (I)" has Vera mention that "there is a world currently in a war against doomsday, where the noble and elegant souls of fourteen Valkyries burn bright, if only for a brief but magnificent moment". Savvy Honkai Impact 3rd players will understand that words like "doomsday" and "fourteen Valkyries" are referring to the Honkai threats and playable characters of HI3 respectively; although, for the latter, there are 13 characters in the roster at its current state.note 
    • The Cecilia flower that only grows naturally in the heights of Mondstadt is a clear reference to Cecilia Schariac, the mother of Kiana Kaslana. The stigmata set modeled after Cecilia in Honkai Impact 3rd prominently features similar flowers in its art, and the blooming petals of the actual flower in Genshin Impact are modeled after the Schariac family crest.
    • During Chang the Ninth's daily commission, the NPC mentioned that he wants to participate a literary competition hosted by Yae Publishing House, an Inazuma-based publishing company. Many Honkai Impact 3rd players will understand that the publishing company's name is an obvious reference of Yae Sakura, one of the playable characters.
    • From the "Marvelous Merchandise" event, the NPC named Liben carries a sachet of blue crystals from HI3 on his back.
    • The CEO of miHoYo, Forrest Wei Liu had an Author Avatar in Honkai Impact 3rd known as "Dawei".note  In that game, his avatar's face is only a pair of eyebrows and the hanzi for "Wei". He returns in Genshin Impact as the "Unusual Hilichurl", complete with the same "face", and the exact standard (albeit tattered) 3-piece suit of a CEO. He also throws "crystals" and the plush bunny HOMU from that game as attacks, and when defeated, he drops cabbages, a reference to Ai-chan, another mascot of the game (who's often called "cabbage" because of her hair).
    • Xiao's story quest mentions that the fallen gods' lingering hatred created miasma, plagues, mutations and monsters to spring forth. They are all also how the Honkai can manifest; in particular, the "major" Honkai Beasts are named after gods and tend to cause corruptions and gathering of minor beasts by their presence alone.
  • Ghostbusters: The Video Game includes tons of subtle references to the past movies — for instance, you can find Vigo's painting and listen to him talk smack to you — as well as other Ghostbusters-related media: If you look closely at the computer at the Ghostbusters' headquarters, you can see the infamous A Winner Is You ending screen from the Ghostbusters NES game on the monitor.
    • All of the trophies/achievements are references to lines from the movies, as well.
  • In the The Godfather game there is a character called the Trojan who gives you hits to carry out and then vanishes without a trace after the last contract hit. In The Godfather Part II, the Trojan's name (not his real one though) briefly appeared on a diagram of the Corleone family tree and he is listed as serving time in jail.
  • The only commercial for the GBA game Golden Sun had nothing to do with the game. Fast forward ten years, to the DS game and everything makes sense.
  • Goosebumps: The Game uses a more down-tempo version of the television series' theme for the main menu.
  • A literal example occurs in Grim Fandango, when Manny can examine a statue of the first boss at the Department of Death, who was before his time, but supposedly a "real slave driver." Since the game takes place in a very strange version of the Aztec afterlife, this first boss would be Mictlantecuhtli, who was, to put it mildly, a greedy, sadistic Manipulative Bastard.
  • The Halo series is rife with references to other Bungie games and meta-elements. In the words of former Bungie public liaison Matt Soell, "Anyone can enjoy Halo, but it will be the old-school Bungie fans who enjoy it the most."
    • The Marathon logo is visible in many places, particularly in the first game, but most notably on the eye/lens of 343 Guilty Spark and the other Monitors.
    • The Covenant cruisers look just like the Pfhor ships from Marathon.
    • Any time an NPC in the game yells "They're everywhere!" or "Thank god it's you!" is a reference to the first Marathon's limited NPC reactions.
    • Several mid-mission chapter names are also references to older Bungie games, such as "If I Had a Super Weapon..."
    • Visible from Halo 3 onward is the logo of the in-universe company Traxus Heavy Manufacturing, named for an AI in Marathon.
    • The Security armor variation is heavily based on the protagonist of Marathon, with the logo just above the visor for good measure.
    • Several of the mining facilities in Halo: Reach are owned by the BXR company, a reference to a well-known exploitable glitch in Halo 2 that involved pressing several controller buttons at once.
  • Hometown Story is a shop-running game made by the creator of the Harvest Moon farming simulation games. The game itself has farms as the reliable sources of fresh produce, but they are nowhere near big enough to produce what the owners sell the player. The dairy/egg farm runs with one chicken and one cow and the fruit/vegetable one sells fruit from trees the yard clearly doesn't have. Both are exaggerations of the Acceptable Breaks from Reality Harvest Moon has in regards to real life farming.
  • A running gag in Hyperdimension Neptunia Re;Birth1 is that most people have inexplicable difficulty pronouncing Neptune's name. On one occasion, it's accidentally rendered "Neptunia." This is a Mythology Gag rather than a form of Title Drop because it's also the case in the original Japanese voice track, where Neptunia isn't part of the title — the last word of the Japanese title for the series is simply "Neptune", after the protagonist, but it was changed to "Neptunia" for overseas release, which this references.
  • I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream includes a mention of the insane supercomputer AM torturing one of the protagonists by coaxing him into walking through a thousands of kilometers of ice to reach a pile of canned fruit, only to discover that AM didn't give him a can opener. This is nearly the entire plot of the original short story the game is based on.
    • At the beginning of Ted's scenario, an enormous bird can be seen flying past. The short story had AM manifesting itself as great, bird-like monsters to torment the humans as they crossed the frozen wastes.
  • In Inazuma Eleven 3, several of the original Raimon team members from the first game get Put on a Bus early on by not getting picked for the Inazuma Japan team. Starting in Chapter 5, a team of four of the aforementioned characters become one of the mini-battle Random Encounters in Liocott Island's Japan Area. If they show up to challenge you, the ensuing battle will have a couple cosmetic elements revert to the first game's style, particularly the background music.
  • In The Jackbox Party Pack 3, during the login screen for Guesspionage, two co-workers can be heard discussing a portal apparently visible behind a Burger King. One of the two happens to be voiced by developer Arnie Niekamp, host of Hello, from the Magic Tavern, which happens to start with Arnie following a portal behind a Burger King.
  • ''JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Heritage for the Future': Most notably, Young Joseph is one big Mythology Gag for Part 2, in a game based off of Part 3.
    • His Hamon Crossbow special is the same weapon he used when fighting Wham. The H version of the move where he fires it backward and the ball whirls around the arena, hitting the opponent from behind, is the same trick he used against Wham.
    • His Hamon Cola special is the same move he used to punish a racist New York cop at the stat of Part 2.
    • He uses the Red Stone of Aja in his Hamon Beam super to amplify his Hamon ability and fire a really powerful, unblockable beam.
    • His "Master's Teachings" super flashes an image of Caesar Zeppeli if the first punch hits, complete with Joseph screaming "CAEEEEEEESAAAAAAAAR!!" and the rest of the super shows images from their training and other Part 2 moments.
    • Oddly, Polnareff has a super in JJBA onward where a Stand Arrow from Part 4 flies in, hits Silver Chariot, causing it to turn into its Requiem form from Part 5 and put the opponent to sleep. A Part 3 game with a super move that references to Parts 4 and 5. At least Polnareff's not in a wheelchair or a turtle this time.
    • The attract mode sequence also flashes manga panels from parts 1 and 2.
    • One of Dio and Shadow Dio's special moves is Space Ripper Stingy Eyes, the same Eye Beams he used to fatally wound Jonathan at the end of Part 1 (And used by Straights in Part 2)
    • When hit by Alessi's Stand, Old Joseph becomes Young Joseph. When Young Joseph is hit, he gets even younger and is reading a Superman comic, just how he was in a flashback in Part 2.
    • Nena (One of Dio's Stand assassins) cameos in one of Hol Horse's intros where he dismounts an elephant and bids her farewell. ("Jada, aishiteru ze."translation )
    • Old Joseph says his signature "Your next words will be..." to Dio in his ending. And Dio walks right into it.
  • Kingdom of Loathing:
    • Before making their aforementioned Sleeper Hit satirical MMORPG, Asymmetric Publications made a game called Krakrox the Barbarian. Not only is Krakrox a historical figure in the Kingdom, but several of the early items game from that game as well, such as the Ring of Half-Assed Regeneration. They also formerly ran a blog, which they reference from time to time. The palindromic haiku you perform to get the Pagoda came from there.
    • Some of the things you can dig out of the garbage pits of Hobopolis are obsolete items from early versions of the crafting system, or now-useless items from some of the first in-game events. The "Baby Bugged Bugbear" can glitch some other such items back into existence, including a feather-headdress that was part of the original tutorial quest.
  • The back wall of the pawn shop in King's Quest VI holds many items that would have been very helpful to players of previous King's Quest games.
  • In the "Kirby Quest" minigame in Kirby Mass Attack, Escargoon from Kirby: Right Back at Ya! makes an appearance if King Dedede gets a chance to attack.
    • Other minigames also contain references to past Kirby games and the anime such as the Night Mare Enterprises Salesguy appearing on the game over screen of "Strato Patrol EOS", Max Flexer, and Chef Shiitake appearing in "Kirby Quest", and one of Kirby's attacks in the minigame being Kabuki Kirby from Kirby 3D. This is just the tip of the iceberg if you're a longtime Kirby fan.
    • The Dedede Doodle sticker in Kirby: Planet Robobot is a crude Stylistic Suck drawing of King Dedede taken directly from the Kirby: Right Back at Ya! episode "Cartoon Buffoons". ("Oh, come now, Li'l old me, a hero? Surely you jestin'!")
    • In Kirby Star Allies, the difficulty level for the subgame "The Ultimate Choice" is represented by a change in Kirby's facial expression. The Soul Melter difficulty level shows him with a demonic Slasher Smile — the same face he makes when possessed by the Demon Frog in the Right Back At Ya! episode "Frog Wild".
  • Knights of the Old Republic is absolutely in love with this:
    • Held captive and asked where the Jedi enclave where you received your Jedi training, you can say it's on Alderaan, when it's really on Dantooine; an inversion of Leia claiming the Rebel base was on Dantooine in an attempt to spare her home planet of Alderaan.
    • At one point a character mentions that her husband's Sith-killing days were "a long time ago, in a war far, far away."
    • On Tatooine, you need to use bantha fodder to lure banthas into a cave as bait for the Krayt dragon living inside, and you can tell the NPC you're working with, "Look, I have your fodder."
    • In the sequel, you can at one point say "A lie is a lie, even from 'a certain point of view'."
    • The sequel was created by former Black Isle Studios employees. It contained the line "The weak suffer. The strong endure", echoing a line in the Black Isle game Planescape: Torment.
    • "My name is [Your name here]. I'm here to rescue you."
    • There is also an easter egg (after getting the Light Side and Dark Side endings, then starting another game as a female character) where Atton says something like "Are you an angel? Wow that was bad, I hope some poor kid doesn't end up using it." when you enter the cell block on Peragus.
      • There was another one that was cut from the game, where Atton says he shouldn't even be in the game and was meant to star in a spin-off of Jedi Knight — namely, Jedi Academy, which came out around the same time, and whose protagonist was originally given Atton's name.
    • Once you've trained Mira to be a Jedi, it is possible to tell her that she has "taken [her] first step into a much larger world," which is the same thing Obi-Wan says to Luke in Episode IV.
    • When you've influenced Handmaiden to become a Jedi, she says "I want you to teach me the ways of the Force. To become a Jedi Knight like my mother," which is very similar to a line spoken by Luke.
    • Also in the second game, when General Vaklu expresses his shock that you are still alive, one of the possible replies is "You'll find I'm full of surprises" (a reference to The Empire Strikes Back).
    • In the comic, Mandalore has the same mask which the random Mandalorian soldier was seen picking up in the last pages of the penultimate Tales of the Jedi story arc.
    • On Taris, you have the chance to fight a Mandalorian going by "Bendak Starkiller".
    • At various points on Paragus, the player has an option to quote lines Luke, Han, or Leia made in the original movie. You can ask a droid if he can "teleport me off this rock" (Luke), ask Atton if he would prefer it back in his cell (Han), and comment on going into danger that "somebody has to save our skins" (Leia).
  • Whenever a playable character in League of Legends receives a complete rework, there is usually a reference to their old design somewhere in their new one:
    • Karma and Trundle's Traditional skins resemble their previous appearance.
    • Janna's old voice had a sound effect applied to it so it sounded like a wind was blowing whenever she spoke. One of her joke emotes has her begin to speak like this again, before coughing and wondering what came over her.
    • Evelynn's Boss Subtitle (every character has one) is the name of her previous ultimate ability, Agony's Embrace. Upon activating Demon Shade there is a chance she will also say 'The night is my veil', her old character selection quote.
    • Galio's Shield of Durand ability is taken from the name of his old ultimate, Idol of Durand.
    • Poppy's passive, Iron Ambassador, is her old Boss Subtitle.
    • Swain's joke emote has him look at the birds that gather around him. One of the possible voice lines is 'Which one of you is Beatrice, again?', which references his former pet.
    • Taric will occasionally reference some of his old dialogue lines, such as remarking 'Vigor, eh?' when buying the Ruby Crystal item from his old line 'Ruby for vigor'.
    • Warwick's taunt to Soraka is 'Eat your heart out...'. In his old lore, Warwick needed to eat Soraka's heart to stabilise his transformation and stop him turning feral.
    • Nunu's updated voice lines contain several references to old versions of the Summoner's Rift map, such as how the wraith camp in the jungle was replaced by a group of raptors and how Brambleback and Sentinel used to have two little helpers with them.
    • Ivern and Nunu both reference "the Kumungu incident"—named after the jungle region in the old lore, which has been thematically succeeded with the region of Ixtal.
    • In a skinline universe example, it's mentioned in the third K/DA comic that K/DA Evelynn was seen at one point at the Sunfire Film Festival. Her abilities at one point included a long-duration invisibility that didn't go away upon damaging someone with the (then stackable) Sunfire Cape, leading to an infamous build that revolved around burning people to death while being completely unable to interact with her if you lacked a Vision Ward.
    • The Teamfight Tactics autobattler mode will sometimes draw inspiration from removed features of a champion for abilities—for example, Zed's ability in sets 3 and 4 steals attack damage, something that he was able to do for a time by getting kills with his ultimate after the Assassin class update.
    • In the card game spinoff, Legends of Runeterra, the champion Lee Sin's leveled up form can kick enemies into their own Nexus to damage it. This was something his League incarnation's ultimate could do in his intentionally overpowered April Fool's Champion Spotlight.
  • If you get a chance to look closely at the back of one of the "Chocobites!" cereal boxes in Left 4 Dead, you'll notice it advertises a six-inch Team Fortress 2 action figure inside. "Collect all 10!"
    • And of course the "I love steam" line in "Crash Course."
    • In development, Bill was to share his last name with Half-Life's Barney Calhoun.
  • Aside all the Legend of Mana references in Sword of Mana there are twins in the town of Ish practicing summonings. One speaks "Klnka Irma Myron Tinqua" which are the words in the original Final Fantasy Adventure to reverse the Waterfall. The book the kid lost in Topple is about Magical Vacation which was another game produced by the developers. Finally in game there is the Brown Brownie which gives the Brownie Ring a staple item in game produced by Brownie Brown that is often dummied out.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • Phantom Hourglass's plot begins with Link waking up on an island after falling off a boat and he must save a spirit that looks remarkable like a whale from an evil force with ambiguous motives. Link's Awakening anyone?
    • The final battle of Spirit Tracks begins with Link protecting Zelda from the attacks of the boss while she charges up her magic power like in Four Swords Adventures. The second half of the battle involves Zelda stunning the boss with Light Arrows so Link can attack, similar to the final battle of The Wind Waker.
    • A Link Between Worlds has Majora's Mask hanging on the right wall of Ravio's shop.
  • All LucasArts games had Star Wars references.
    • For example, in Full Throttle, nosey reporter Miranda begs main character Ben to help her:
      Miranda: Well, I tracked the guy to Melonweed. But I'm not going near the place! They'd kill me! Get my editor! He's got to get me out of this! Take one of these fake IDs to get through the roadblocks. My career is riding on those pictures! Help me, Ben, you're my only hope!
    • And the man who drives the fertilizer truck has the Imperial insignia tattooed on his arm.

  • The Alternate Continuity remake Lufia: Curse of the Sinistrals has quite a few throughout:
    • In Elcid, instead of using lemon to flavour the foul navaroa fish, they instead use herbs, a la the herbs used by the Wizard of Taste in Lufia & The Fortress of Doom.
    • Several areas take their names from towns in Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals. The Tanbel Abandoned Mine, named for Guy's hometown in the original (he and Jessy are moved to Parcelyte in this version), is where Jessy is taken by Idura after she's kidnapped.
    • When seeking out the Treasure Sword in Lufia II, the party has to split up to fight the bosses of the dungeon. This time around, the party gets split up at the beginning of the dungeon and then reunites in time for the boss fight.
    • Taking a page from his appearance in Lufia: The Legend Returns, the Sinistral of Chaos's power is used to turn a bride-to-be against her groom.
  • Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga and Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door both had Luigi infiltrate an enemy hideout by wearing a dress, which is derived from the Super Mario Adventures comic in the Nintendo Power magazine. The first Paper Mario also took the idea that Bowser kidnaps Peach all the time because he has a crush on her from this comic.
  • Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds has this in friggin' spades. From Captain America and Iron Man referring to Civil War, to She-Hulk telling Deadpool that she'd be attacking him with a health bar if the game was set in the right era, this game really gets its jollies off on continuity and mythology.
    • In a reference doubling as a reference to Devil May Cry 3 and to itself, Vergil's opening line if Dante is the lead on the opposing team says "Sorry I'm late to the party", referencing the pre-boss banter from their first fight in DMC3, and to the fact that Vergil was not present in the original game, only being added in Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3.
    • In the game's bio section, the Sentinel's real name is its serial number: COTA-1994. This is a reference to Capcom's first Marvel fighting game, X-Men: Children of the Atom, released in 1994.
  • In Kasumi's DLC mission for Mass Effect 2 there is a statue of a Dragon Age Ogre in an art-filled vault.
    • The same room also has the head of the Statue of Liberty. "Damn you, Hock!"
    • Also, several of Tali's battle quotes are "Go for the Optics, Chiktikka!" which is a Shout-Out to the Baldur's Gate character Minsc, who sometimes will shout, "Go for the Eyes, Boo" before battle, as well as "Nothing is faster than Chiktikka vas Paus", which is a pun on one of Aerie's, another Baldur's Gate character, battle quotes, where she says "Nothing is faster than Chiktikka fastpaws." Another gag is found on the Citadel, where one can purchase a "Space Hamster", which is the name of the species which Boo (purportedly) belongs too. The hamster even gets a special appearance in the Citadel DLC for Mass Effect 3, assuming you caught it on the Normandy...where, if you interact with it enough, Shepard will advise it to go for the eyes if anyone messes with it.
    • Another example: If importing a Mass Effect character to Mass Effect 2, when Shepard first reunites with Liara on Ilium, she will tell the man she is speaking to "Have you ever faced an asari commando? Few humans have!" which is the same thing Matriarch Benezia tells Shepard when you faced off against her in the first game.
    • Miranda's loyalty mission contains a scene in which she punches the control panel in a slow cargo elevator and demands to know why it won't go faster, a reference to the infamously slow elevators in the first game.
      • Similarly, Garrus will reminisce with Tali about the long elevator rides and the conversations they used to have, to which Tali threatens him with her shotgun. The final DLC for Mass Effect 3 confirms that Garrus was the only member of the original squad to enjoy the elevator talks. The rest share Tali's opinion.
  • In Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots, the description of the Five-seveN states that it was Snake's main weapon 'when he infiltrated Galuade in 2003'. Galuade is the fortress from Metal Gear: Ghost Babel, a non-canon "alternate sequel" to the original Metal Gear.
  • Might and Magic X is filled with references to pre-Ubisoft works in the franchise. Though the Receding Horizons and Jassad's Bestiarynote  quests might not count, as they imply that Ashan might be in the New World Computing verse, which would make those quests closer to Call Backs than this trope.
    • Sorpigal is a repeating reference in the series: in the very first game, you start in the town of Sorpigal. VI, on a different world and starting an entirely new story arc, starts you off in New Sorpigal. X, set in Ubisoft's Ashan setting, starts in Sorpigal-on-the-Sea.
  • Minecraft: Story Mode:
    • The Order of the Stone's name comes from Minecraft's original title of "Minecraft: Order of the Stone". It was changed in order to avoid confusion/mixup with the webcomic The Order of the Stick.
    • In Episode 3, when Lukas struggles to figure out what to call a herd of Endermen, one of the dialogue options is to call them a "Haunting". Word of God says that you call a herd of them "a Haunting of Endermen".
  • Minty Fresh Adventure!:
    • A hidden area in the cave near the entrance holds a statue of Megan. Interacting with it makes your meter recharge instantaneously for the rest of the game.
    • Minty shows up in a sidequest where you rescue her from a hidden prison. It's in the pit next to the sock.
    • One achievement is named a line from the show the game is based on "I Didn't Put These in My Bag".
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000 Presents "Detective" has a few references to the show it's based on:
    • Quitting the game prompts it to respond "KEEP CIRCULATING THE GAME!", referencing the original series (at the time) ending several episodes' credits with "Keep Circulating the Tapes".
    • One joke references the lengthy transitions to and from the theater segments:
    You are in the hallway. You see many doors...1...2..3...4...5...6...7
    Mike: [looking behind him] Huh? Are the theater doors closing?
  • If you're a Japanese who's huge lover of classic Shoot Em Ups and Konami, you might claim Parodius to be actually the Smash Bros of Shoot Em Ups, with lots of Japanese craziness and LSD, and is also a huge tribute to Konami's Shoot Em Ups as well as its other famous game series. At first it was meant to parody Gradius, but as the series evolved on, characters like Goemon and Ebisumaru, Twinbee and Kid Dracula started to show up, each equipped with weapon sets taken from many Shoot Em Ups of the time. The inclusion of some bosses and villains from other Konami games and classic music medleys along with Konami's music (mainly from Gradius) doesn't help.
  • The Peanuts iPhone/iPad game "Snoopy's Street Fair" has plenty of these, especially with regard to minor characters who have their own booths. Frieda has a cat-petting booth featuring her cat Faron (who disappeared after only a few strips), Emily (who met Charlie Brown at a dance studio) is selling dance supplies, Lydia (the girl who constantly changed her name) has a "Guess the Name" booth, and Shermy, who sold root beer in one of the early strips, is back in business.'
  • Pokémon:
    • In the games, certain character elements have been brought over from the anime, along with other stuff. Brock asks for a Bonsly in the remakes of Pokémon Gold and Silver, Togepi cry whenever they enter Misty's Gym and you talk to them, Misty acts Tsundere in the Johto games, etc.
    • In Pokémon Sun and Moon, the Alolan variation of Exeggutor heavily resembles the one featured on the Jungle booster box for the Japanese trading card game, which has a long body and is drawn closer in size to an actual palm tree.
    • The Alolan Raichu's depiction as a blue-eyed surfer is almost definitely a reference to Puka, the blue-eyed surfing Pikachu from the anime episode "The Pi-Kahuna".
    • Also from Sun and Moon, in the Pokemon Graveyard off Route 2 you can fight a Pokemon Breeder named Ikue, who fights with a Pikachu and goes "Pikaa..." when you defeat her. This is a reference to Ikue Otani, who provides the voice of Pikachu in the anime (and in the games since X and Y).
    • Yet another one from Pokémon Sun and Moon, we have the final battle, surprisingly enough! The final battle of the main game is the Alola region's own Professor Kukui! This is a nod to a Dummied Out fight with Professor Oak back in Pokémon Red and Blue, which can be accessed via the famous Missingno glitch.
    • An Easter Egg from My Pokémon Ranch (developped by Ambrella) features Munchlax, Pikachu, Bulbasaur, Meowth, and Teddiursa racing one another. These species all appeared in one of Ambrella's previous games, Pokémon Dash.
    • Pikachu's Gigantamax form in Pokémon Sword and Shield turns it back into its original chubby design from early in the series' run.
  • Prince of Persia (2008) begins with the Prince looking for his donkey, Farah; Farah is the name of the Action Girl love interest in Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time.
  • While filming Raiders of the Lost Ark in Cairo, the producers had everyone take down their TV antennas so they wouldn't show up anachronistically in a rooftop scene. In the corresponding level of the Lego Indiana Jones video game, you can find a secret room filled wall-to-wall with satellite dishes.
    • The sequel instead has ten satellite dishes scattered around the accompanying hub. Destroying all of them causes one of the red bricks to appear.
    • Similarly, in Lego Star Wars, there is a secret room where you can put on Indy's fedora. Naturally, Han Solo can do this as Harrison Ford played both characters.
  • In Resident Evil Gaiden, Barry Burton comments on the darkness in his boss's office, only to be told that the the closet the lightbulbs are in a closet locked by a missing crest. Several of the Resident Evil games involve searching for crests to unlock doors.
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider:
    • In the Blood Ties DLC, there's an old phonograph that plays "Venice Violins", the same tune that can be played in Lara's mansion from Tomb Raider II.
    • You can also find a Jade Dragon, one of the secrets from that game.
    • Several diary entries are written by Winston, with one of them detailing how a young Lara used to lock him in the freezer as a prank. In Tomb Raider II and Tomb Raider III, players would often lock him in the freezer to stop him following them around.
  • Ristar was originally called "Feel" during development. In the Japanese release of the game, "FEEL" is one of the various cheat codes which can be entered on the password screen, and doing so enables level select, hidden item indicators, and invincibility simultaneously; that particular code is one of several which were removed from the US version, however.
  • Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song has these in the Children's Section in the Melvir Library. One tale references the infamous Saw glitch from The Final Fantasy Legend, another one reference the 7 heroes from Romancing SaGa 2, and another possibly referencing one of the SaGa Frontier games or Romancing SaGa 3.
  • Saints Row 2, as seen in one of the advertising screenshots, has a billboard advertising a military-themed restaurant called "Company of Gyros".
  • Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse features a scene inside Max's inventory. The inventory room contains several items from earlier parts of the series, but also from Sam & Max Hit the Road. It's a nice nod and establishes that games from both companies are in the same continuity.
    • Sam & Max Beyond Time and Space has a Max puppet made out of a paper bag and glued-on bits of white paper pinned to the message board in Sam's office. The Max puppet was from a No Fourth Wall make-and-do segment from the comics; it was later adapted for the ending of one of the episodes in the Sam & Max: Freelance Police animated series.
    • The office in the Telltale games is full of references to Hit The Road, aside from looking very similar to its predecessor.
    • In the Season 1 episode "Reality 2.0", when Sam and Max get flattened, Sam remarks, "This seems familiar..." Just to drive the point home, their movements will also change to match the animations from Hit the Road.
    • Not to mention characters mentioning that they sounded different in the past.
  • In Scribblenauts, typing "scribblenaut" will call up the original player character design, which is also unlockable to play as.
  • One of the secrets linked to an achievement in Serious Sam 3: BFE is Sam's "classic outfit". Said classic outfit consists solely of the bright red Converse-like sneakers Sam wore in every other game.
  • In Silent Hill 3, the player is given the option of having the protagonist reach into a filthy (even by Silent Hill standards) toilet to search for anything useful. She refuses to, and a cutscene plays in which she looks directly at the camera and says "Who could do something so disgusting?", referencing the protagonist of the previous game who did do without hesitation, which remains a frequent joke at his expense among the fandom.
    • For those who wish to see this scene, it occurs only if the memory card you're using also contains Silent Hill 2 save data.
    • In Silent Hill 4, when Henry notices something in his seemingly ordinary toilet and wonders if he should grab it, he'll balk and say "I'm not brave enough to do it..." if the player picks yes, despite the many other dangerous and/or disgusting situations he's willing to face.
  • Silent Scope 2: Dark Silhouette references classic Konami games in at least two instances:
  • The "BFF" trio of Liberty Lee, Summer Holiday, and Travis Scott in The Sims 4 share their names, appearances and personality traits with Liberty, Summer, and Travis from MySims. A Love Triangle between the three friends is also a plot point in MySims Kingdom.
    • The Get Together expansion introduces a perky DJ named Candy Behr, who takes her name from long-time recurring MySims character DJ Candy "Supergroove". Her sister, Yuki, has no connection to her MySims analogue, but MySims dolls for both characters can be found in their respective bedrooms.
  • In the intro of Sim City 2000 you'll see a UFO flying into the centre of a spiral galaxy. Fast forward to Spore, where you explore a galaxy in the last stage. If you manage to navigate to the centre of that galaxy, you'll be greeted by that same UFO, who refers to itself as "Steve" and gives you a congratulatory speech.
  • Sorcery Saga kicks off with the main character having to climb a magic tower and retrieve a magic orb as part of the final exam for her school, in a direct reference to the plot of the original Madou Monogatari.
  • The Spider-Man 3 movie game has references to the Baxter Building (HQ of the Fantastic Four in Marvel canon) and the classic ads in which superheroes would Deus ex Machina their way out of trouble with Hostess Twinkies and Hostess Fruit Pies.
    • In the second Mad Bomber mission, Spider-Man stops a subway train the same way he did in the Spider-Man 2 film.
    • Spider-Man catches a helicopter filled with Dragon Tail thugs by making a giant web between two buildings, a nod to the original teaser trailer for the first film.
    • One of the quips Kraven can throw at Spidey during their battle is a suggestion for what to put on his gravestone — "How about, 'here lies Spider-Man, slain by the hunter!'"
  • StarCraft has Jim Raynor seeing the purple goo stuff that emanates from Zerg colonies and saying "What the hell is that!? Looks like the ground there is alive!". Warcraft III, meanwhile, has Jaina seeing the corrupted stuff that emanates from Undead colonies and saying "It looks like the land around the granary is... dying.".
  • In Star Fox Command, one possible ending references the planet Papetoon, from the Canon Discontinued Nintendo Power comic series.
    • Papetoon was mentioned in the Japanese manual for Star Fox 64.
  • Star Wars: Battlefront II has some of these in the random dialogue that comes up during battles. Of note are:
    • Imperial Stormtrooper: "It's Obi-wan! Shall we put a disturbance in his Force?" (A reference to his famed 'disturbance in the force', of Episode 4)
    • Imperial Stormtrooper: "It's Solo! And he's shooting first! That's not fair!" (A reference to the Han Shot First debate)
    • Clone Trooper: "It's Darth Maul! What's he going to do, bleed on us?" (A reference to Maul's unfortunate demise before doing anything more significant than killing one maverick Jedi, as well as being a Shout-Out to Monty Python's Black Knight)
    • Imperial Officer: "You Rebel scum!" (direct quote from Return of the Jedi)
    • Rebel Soldier: "Rebel scum this!" (a rebuttal to the above)
    • Clone Trooper: "It's Jango Fett! And he's brought his head!" (A reference to Jango's likewise-unfortunate demise via beheading)
    • The frequency of the line "I can't shake him!" is also mocked, where one of the random radio messages heard in Rebel starfighters during space battles is "I can't shake— oh, wait, nevermind."
  • In Star Wars: Rebel Assault II, while Rookie One and Ru Murleen are Dressing as the Enemy on board the Super Star Destroyer, he asks her "Hey, aren't you a little short for a Stormtrooper?" Later, Darth Vader says to Admiral Sarn: "You have failed me for the last time", as he Force chokes him.
  • Cody in Street Fighter Alpha 3 mentions that "It's good to know more than two moves", a reference to his role as the hero in Final Fight.
    • Cody's Super in the same game is a reference to his game breaking infinite-stun loop punch glitch from Final Fight.
      • Another end battle quote by Cody is "No matter what happens, this will not be my Final Fight!"
    • In the same game, Sakura Kasugano says she likes "street fighting" as compared to "sparring in rival schools". Sakura made a playable cameo appearance in the first Rival Schools.
    • Dan Hibiki also claims that "I hate the art of fighting, but I want to be king of fighters!" In a previous game, he asked Ken whether he knew "the art of fighting", as well. Dan is based on Ryo and Yuri Sakazaki and Robert Garcia of SNK's Art of Fighting and The King of Fighters games.
      • Street Fighter IV's incarnation of Dan features him performing the Hao Sho Kou Ken motion from Art of Fighting very slowly if he is left standing still long enough. And in Super Street Fighter IV he gets an Ultra move that is a blatant copy of the HSKK.
    • One of Chun-Li's winquotes in Street Fighter III 3rd Strike has her spout the random and rather pointless phrase "Leave me alone! I'm a fighter, not a news reporter!" In the live-action film of Street Fighter, Chun-Li was just that, a news anchor.
    • Another reference to Chun-Li being a news anchor is on the opening scene from Mega Man 9 when Chun-Li appears... as a news anchor.
    • A translation error in the original Street Fighter II arcade game had one of Ryu's win quotes as "You must defeat Sheng-Long to stand a chance." Sheng Long is the Chinese reading of the first two characters in Shōryūken, one of Ryu's signature techniques, and Sheng Long was turned into an April Fools' joke by EGM. In a trailer for Super Street Fighter II Turbo: HD Remix, at the end, after Ryu attempts to chase Akuma, it shows a cryptic, soundless piece of text, simply saying, "You must defeat Sheng-Long to stand a chance..."
      • And then when Ryu and Ken's actual master, Gouken, was added as a playable character in the home versions of Street Fighter IV, he ended up having, in one way or another, every single move the original April Fools' joke claimed he had.
    • In the Street Fighter movie, Blanka and Charlie were turned into a Composite Character. In X-Men vs. Street Fighter, Blanka appears in the background of one stage, but if you play as Charlie, Blanka is replaced with Beast.
    • The alternate costumes in Street Fighter IV are occasionally Mythology Gags. For example, Zangief's alternate costume is Mike Haggar. Super Street Fighter IV seems to be going even further into it: Zangief gets Mecha-Gief, and, one of the most clever connections in the series, Bruce Lee homage Fei Long gets Kato as an alternate costume.
  • In the intro of Super Mario 64 DS, Yoshi is first seen sleeping on the roof of the castle. The roof was where Yoshi was found in the original Super Mario 64.
  • Super Smash Bros. is an entire game series built on Mythology Gags, to the point where each installment is worthy of its own page. Many of them are obvious, but the sheer amount of reference to the history and origins of each character and Nintendo as a whole is baffling. Everything from random items in the background of stages, to the particular designs of items and character movesets. Just look at this Youtuber's History Behind Smash Bros series, which covers Melee and Brawl, or this Youtuber's "Know Your Moves" series that covers Nintendo 3DS/Wii U.
    • In Brawl, Snake's Codec conversations are full of references to Metal Gear Solid that weren't present in his stage. In addition to whole slew of other things, he compares Ness to Psycho Mantis, Pikachu's electricity to Revolver Ocelot's torture device, and references Big Boss and Liquid when talking about Link's Legacy Character status. His alternate colours are all camouflage patterns used in Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater. To top it all off, if Snake is KO'd during a Codec conversation, the person he's talking to (including Slippy) will yell the ever-iconic, "Snake? Snake?! SNAAAAAKE!"
    • In the Subspace Emissary mode of Brawl, Ness uses PK Flash to blow up the seemingly invincible King Statue in a cutscene. This is a nod to the fact that said move was one of the few ways it could actually be defeated in Mother 3.
    • In Metroid: Other M, one of Ridley's attacks involves grinding Samus against the wall. This is how he introduced himself in Brawl, released at least a year prior.
    • Little Mac's trailer includes him standing next to Samus, where she compares her size with his. When you look at his Assist Trophy page on Brawl's Dojo, it mentions how short Mac is, and standing right behind him for a comparison is Samus. His artwork for the fourth game shows him in a Punch-Out!! arcade machine fighting Donkey Kong, who was the bonus boxer in the series' Wii reboot.
      • The mobs found in Smash Run draw from almost every game represented in Super Smash Bros., plus a few other games not represented. These include (but most certainly do not limit to) Kremlings, Eggrobos, Mettools, Sneaky Spirit, and even a few enemies from Brawl 's Subspace Emissary.
    • One of Mega Man's victory poses is a match for the pose he struck on the title screen of the original Japanese version of Mega Man.
    • The trophy description of Luigi contains a reference to his Memetic Mutation nickname Weegee.
    • Cloud's alternate costumes include the SOLDIER 2nd Class and SOLDIER 3rd Class uniforms as seen in the original Final Fantasy VII (not the ones from Crisis Core, which changed the colours), and his redesign from Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. His attack sounds are recreations of his PSX sound effects and his taunts include his PSX spell-casting animation and his 'SOLDIER pose' Character Tic from the original game's field mode.
    • There are very few alts in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate that aren't mythology gags. For example, Ridley's default skin is based on his in-game palette from Super Metroid, while his alts include his red-colored depiction on that game's box art, his bright purple and green palette from Metroid, his Golden Statue from Super Metroid and Metroid: Zero Mission, Ridley-X from Metroid Fusion, his green palette from Zero Mission, his Meta Ridley form from the Metroid Prime Trilogy and Brawl with an alternate palette similar to the Ridley Robot from Zero Mission, and an unused purple and orange palette resembling his coloration in Prime and Brawl.
  • Taming Dreams has the occasional reference to MARDEK. Near the beginning of the third chapter, Mardek is asked whether he's actually three blokes. In the same chapter, Elwyen mentions she'd like to be pretty and blue, a reference to her color scheme (including her hair) in the original game.
  • The Team Fortress 2 short "Meet the Sniper" begins with Sniper poking a bobblehead in his van. Many people mistake the bobblehead for G-man, but it's actually Civilian from Team Fortress Classic, which had ten classes instead of nine.
    • The absence of the Civilian class is also referenced in-game. When playing on Harvest during the month of October, you will find a gravestone which reads "R.I.P. The tenth class".
    • Demoman wears an eyepatch and knit cap just like the TFC Demoman did.
    • The Engineer Update showed us that TFC Engineer is TF2 Engineer's father.
    • Team Fortress Comics #3 has (nearly) the entire TFC team form Team Gray, with the only missing member being the Medic, whom has been replaced by the Team Fortress 2 one. The TFC logo is even added to drive the point across.
  • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants In Manhattan, while this April O'Neil is meant to be based off of her IDW comic book counterpart, her design is very similar to the 2012 animated April, her hair tied back in a ponytail, a yellow t-shirt and prominent freckles on her face.
  • Transformers: War for Cybertron has some G1 nods. At one point, in the Kaon prison, an Autobot prisoner is pronounced guilty and thrown into a casket. He responds with "Spare me this mockery of justice!", the same quote from when the Quintessons sentenced Kranix the Lithone to Sharkticons in the original movie.
    • In the Soundwave boss fight, Rumble repeats one of his lines from the original movie: "First we crack the shell, then we crack the nuts inside!"
    • When Optimus and company have a face-to-face encounter with a space slug (It Makes Sense in Context... sort of.), Ironhide tries the Universal Greeting.
    • More or less every line and every achievement in the game is a reference to some previous character, characterization, line, song, toy gimmick, or storyline. Every slagin' one.
  • In Trinity Universe, upon hearing that Lucius and Violet are not into anime, Flonne tries to introduce them into one. The series in question? Disgaea.
  • In the 2012 Twisted Metal game, the second boss will occasionally tell the player Mr. Grimm that when he's dead, she might use his skull for a helmet. This alludes to Twisted Metal: Black, where the incarnation of Mr. Grimm in that game was a Vietnam veteran who ate his dead squadmate and did the same thing with his skull.
  • All over the place in Twisted Wonderland, with details referencing not only Disney Animated Canon but also the original fairy tales the works were based on.
    • This is most prominent with the main cast as they are based on pre-existing Disney characters. To note:
      • Heartslabyul is one for Alice in Wonderland with Riddle based on the Queen of Hearts and Trey, Cater, Ace and Deuce based on the card soldiers.
      • Savanaclaw is one for The Lion King (1994) with Leona as Scar and Ruggie as the hyenas. The lone exception is Jack.
      • Octavinelle is one for The Little Mermaid (1989) with Azul as Ursula and Floyd and Jade as Flotsam and Jetsam.
      • Scarabia is one for Aladdin with Kalim as the Sultan and Jamil as Jafar.
      • Pomefiore is one for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs with Vil as the Evil Queen, Epel as the poisoned apple, and Rook as the huntsman.
      • Ignihyde is one for Hercules with Idia as Hades.
      • Diasomnia is one for Sleeping Beauty with Malleus as Maleficent.
      • The school's alchemy teacher, Divus Crewel, is one for 101 Dalmatians, as his character is based on Cruella de Vil.
      • Ashton Vargas, the P.E teacher, is based on Gaston from Beauty and the Beast.
      • The magic history teacher Mozus Trein and his cat Lucius are based on Lady Tremaine and Lucifer from Cinderella.
      • Sam the shopkeeper is based on Dr. Facilier from The Princess and the Frog.
    • Outside of the main seven Disney Animated Canon movies, Yuu's bedroom in Ramshackle dorm resembles Mickey's in the 1936 short Thru the Mirror.
    • The 'blots' that form The Corruption are a reference to either the Phantom Blot or the Shadow Blot.
    • Vil speaking into his phone to find out who is the "most beautiful" only for it to reveal that it's Neige, the boy twisted from Snow White, is a reference to the Evil Queen doing the same with her Magic Mirror in the original film.
      Vil: Mira, Mira. In my phone. At this moment, who is the most beautiful one of all?
      Mira: Searching the web for the account with the most mentions of "beautiful"... Results: "Neige LeBlanche".
    • The game's first event, Happy Beans' Day! Reclaim the Golden Harp!, brings to mind Mickey and the Beanstalk from Fun and Fancy Free.
    • The fairies that appear in the Fairy Gala event are a clear reference to the Disney Fairies franchise, as the fairies are charged with changing the seasons within the school. Malleus also references the other kinds of fairies there are, calling back to the other fairy roles seen in the films. As further reference, the fairies make tinkling bell sounds in place of speech, as seen in Peter Pan. Malleus also mentions that fairies are rather stubborn and get angry at the littlest things, which is a possible reference to Tinker Bell’s original characterization.
    • Eliza, the ghost bride from the Ghost Marriage event, resembles the Beating Heart Bride from The Haunted Mansion.
    • According to Ace Trappola's SR Lab Coat homescreen lines, the rude talking flowers from Alice in Wonderland live in the schools botanical garden.
    • The Wish Upon a Star event prologue is a complete reference to Pinocchio, with the event proper being mixed with Tanabata. Even the Rhythmic music is taken from "When You Wish Upon a Star" from the same movie, which was also sampled to create the tune heard in Disney's Vanity Plate.
    • In the Scary Monsters Halloween event, Diasomnia decorates Ramshackle dorm with a Chinese aesthetic to match Diasomnia's chosen costume theme, complete with a giant Mushu just inside the front gate.
    • Outside of Disney, several character tics and plot points are inspired by and/or a nod to the original fairy tales and stories the movies are based on. One example is Jade's SSR dorm uniform Groovy art where he helps put red heels on Vil, who is twisted from the Evil Queen. This is a nod to the original Snow White tale, where the Evil Queen is punished by being forced to dance to her death in red-hot iron shoes.
    • Malleus never being invited to things is a reference to Maleficent not being invited to the christening of Aurora, which lead to her placing a curse on the infant.
  • Ultima Underworld 2 has the Trilkhai, who share their felinity, their backstory and the letters in their name with the Kilrathi of the Wing Commander series.
  • Wario is often seen using an Ultra Hand as a special attack because Nintendo engineer Gunpei Yokoi invented the device.
  • Game & Watch: Mickey and Donald, with Mickey and Donald Duck tasked with putting out a fire in a burning building, is strongly reminiscent of the Classic Disney Shorts cartoon "Mickey's Fire Brigade". To further drive this home, Mickey's sprites are based on his classic 1930's design.

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report