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While the game may have a universe of its own, it's also a theme park of references to past installments that is sure to get an "a-ha!" from any fan of the series.

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     Characters 

  • Other than the obvious fact that the game's races are based on Final Fantasy XI's, the Garlean Legatus look dangerously similar to Judges. And they use Gunblades and variants such as a Gunhalberd.
    • Goblins, Qiqirn, and Mamool Ja likewise share the same appearance and tendencies as the beastmen in XI.
  • The Echo's ability to dive into someone else's memory is markedly similar to Ellone's powers.
  • One Miqo'te says that she always imagined Cid Garlond would be "older, and shorter. Perhaps a bit less groomed... markedly gruffer... and somewhat more outspoken. Oh, and he would definitely have a pipe... or maybe a cigar."
  • Several of the Pugilist class quests have guildmaster Hamon 'Holyfist' that shares several parallels with Tellah the Sage from Final Fantasy IV in that both are crippled by their age and recover their memories. Hamon's story is a lot less of a Tear Jerker than Tellah's was.
  • During the first phase of his fight, Gilgamesh will pull the exact same I Surrender, Suckers that he pulled in Final Fantasy V by begging for mercy, buffing himself, then ambushing the tank with Jump. He even verbatim quotes his exact same lines from V as he does it. In fact, many of Gilgamesh's lines in this game are taken or paraphrased from his place of origin. Gilgamesh will also inflict Mini, Confusion, and Toad on the party, a nod to the standard debuffs used in the older Final Fantasy titles.
    • The second time you fight Gilgamesh and he initiates his iconic multi-arm form, he'll drop his famous "And now we fight like men! And ladies! And ladies who dress like men!" line. What makes the line even more hilarious is female player characters can wear certain gear that makes them look more fitting on a male, making Gilgamesh's taunt ring true. He even does this yet again on the third battle with him in Kugane, except he genderflips the last part into "men who dress like ladies". While it's in reference to a moment in the Stormblood Hildibrand quests, male player characters can certainly dress like ladies to fit the bill.
    • Also during the 2nd fight, Gilgamesh once again wields weapons that appeared in previous Final Fantasy games. in this case, he wields the Final Fantasy XI versions of Hauteclaire and Ridill swords.
  • The random name generator for Hyur will suggest surnames of past Final Fantasy protagonists, such as Strife, Fair, Branford and Farron.
  • The Immortal Flames and Twin Serpents are named after the Immortal Lions and the Serpent Generals.
  • The Alchemists' Guild quest line centers around the guildmaster and his attempts to bring his lost lover back to life, not unlike a certain treasure hunter. And at the end, he does succeed in doing just that, just long enough to say goodbye.
  • The Warriors of Light in the main story are described as faceless beings shrouded in light that saved Eorzra from destruction, but no one can remember who they were or even remember how they were saved. Eorzea wasn't the only one that also went through a similar experience.
  • 2.3 added class-unique idle animations when a character has their weapon out. A good handful of them are borrowed from protagonists famous for their class or weapon.
  • Similar to the idle battle stances from above, some victory poses and battle stances emotes introduced in 3.2 are shoutouts to past FF characters:
  • Most of the Limit Break skills are a nod to past Final Fantasy titles:
    • Braver (melee DPS): Cloud
    • Final Heaven (Monk): Tifa
    • Chimatsuri (Ninja) and Doom of the Living (Samurai): Yuffie
    • Big Shot and Satellite Beam (ranged DPS and Machinist respectively): Barret
    • Desperado (ranged DPS): Laguna
    • Meteor (Black Mage): Recurring spell, originated in Final Fantasy III
    • Terraflare (Summoner): Bahamut ZERO
    • Healing Wind (healer), Breath of the Earth (healer), and Pulse of Life (White Mage): Aerith
    • Angel Feathers (Scholar): Esper Seraph
    • Astral Stasis (Astrologian): Orran Durai, although the original version caused status effects instead of healing.
    • Mighty Guard (Previous name of Tank's second Limit Break before it was moved to Blue Mage as a normal spell): Recurring Blue Magic spell, originated in Final Fantasy V
  • The fight against Ultros and Typhon takes place in the Dragon's Neck. What's more, the scenario leading up to it involves Ultros working as a receptionist at the Coliseum, just as he did in VI. The battle theme when fighting against them is also directly used from their respective game in its original form, and the Wind-up Ultros minion obtainable from the battle looks just like his overworld sprite.
  • The legendary figure that the Black Mage soulstone is inherited from is named Shatotto and was said to be so powerful by herself that she could take on an entire army and win. Gerolt takes a few tries to get the name right, outright dropping Shantotto as one of them, and the achievement for completing the first level Stardust Rod is Shantotto's Noblewoman's Laugh.
  • At the Chocobo Square, Joe, the infamous difficult opponent to race against in Final Fantasy VII, makes an appearance (though his name is changed to Joseph). Joe even has the same mannerisms as he did in his original appearance and has a feeling he had met you before. To top it off, there's an NPC who is fuming that he can't beat Teioh in the races, which is also another nod to Joe being difficult to beat since it was his chocobo. Finally, you can race against Joseph and his infamous chocobo if he's picked as an NPC to race against, but your chocobo's rank has to be high enough to race him.
  • A part of the Heavensward storyline is a huge shoutout to Final Fantasy I, when you meet Y'shtola's former master, Matoya. The music that plays in her cave is an instrumental performance of the music in the FFI version of Matoya's cave, and one of the background touches is an animated broom, several of which were in the FFI rendition's cave. The latter is a double shoutout, as talking to the broom gives you "Evol gnipeews s'tel", which is a reference to a song from "Fun With Weapons" and the backwards talking the brooms did in FFI.
  • There are some wind-up minions that are specifically references to past FF characters, such as the Warrior of Light,Onion Knight and Cloud of Darkness, Kain and Edward (the latter of which is called a Spoony Bard), Relm, and Yuna, Rikku, and Lulu.
    • There is also a Shantotto minion, rewarded as part of the event where she comes to Eorzea.
  • The black chocobo minion is said to do squats if you look away from it, referencing Zack Fair.
  • There are 5 star Triple Triad cards for each of the past main game protagonists, using their Dissidia portraits.
  • A Sharlayan scholar named Krile Mayer Baldesion is close friends with Minfilia and becomes a major part of the main story, joining the Scions. She is a Lalafell, referencing how the original Krile was a child. She even wears the cat-eared hood of the Devout class from the same game and has a grandfather who dies on the Island of Val before we get to meet him.
  • Several hairstyles from the aesthetician are modeled after Class Zero in Final Fantasy Type-0.
    • Likewise, Moglin the Chief of Moghome is named after the MOOGLE representative of Class Zero in the same game.
  • Gigi, the Mammet companion from the Heavensward Hildebrand questline, is an obvious reference to Vivi, the Black Mage from Final Fantasy IX. His appearance is very clearly based on Vivi's, his backstory as an artificial lifeform created to contain a powerful magic mirror's Vivi's. Later on it's revealed that his name actually is Vivi, and that he was created by the Sharlyan arcmagus Quan, who shares his name with FF9!Vivi's adoptive grandfather.
  • The Samurai's level 70 artifact armor takes several visual cues from Auron while the attack style has callbacks to Cyan.
  • The Red Mage's level 70 artifact weapon resembles Genesis's rapier in Crisis Core.
  • The Dark Knight level 70 artifact armor highly resembles Cecil's dark knight armor.
  • Hien, the current heir to the throne of Doma, is a reference to Final Fantasy VI. However, he is not, as might be expected, a reference to Cyan. His father, the late lord Kaien, is a reference to Cyan (bearing the same name that Cyan has in the Japanese version of Final Fantasy VI). Hien, then, would be a reference to Cyan's son, Shun/Owain. A quest midway through the Azim Steppe plot-line reveals that Shun was indeed Hien's childhood name, and that his mother's name was Mina, the Japanese-version name of Cyan's wife Elayne.
    • After defeating the Phantom Train, the spirits of a woman and young boy appear to thank the player for saving Doma. Though they aren't named here, it's clear that they're the Elayne and Owain from VI's world.
  • Players can find a farmer named Hojo on the outskirts of Namai. Fortunately, this version of Hojo only seems to be worried about the rice paddies.
  • Alpha the Chocobo in the Omega - Bend of Time raid resembles the chocobo from Chocobo's Dungeon.
  • As noted below, Ramza and Alma both appear for the Return to Ivalice storyline. Their father, Jenomis, is using an alias. His real name is Araszlam Durai, the descendant of Orran from Tactics who exposes the truth of the game's storyline. In addition, the final raid of the questline has players contend with three of the Zodiac Braves: Mustadio, Agrias, and Cidolfus, before facing off against the final boss of Tactics, the high seraph Ultima (with the real Ramza pulling a Big Damn Heroes moment midway through the fight).
    • Also appearing in Return to Ivalice is Fran, the game's first Viera and a character based on a playable party member from Final Fantasy XII, which is also set in Ivalice (albeit long before the events of Final Fantasy Tactics, from which Ramza hails).
  • Various Miqo'te characters have last names that were carried over from Final Fantasy XI. A list can be found at the FF Wikia
  • Solus Zos Galvus, the emperor of Garlemald from patch 1.0 to 2.4 references quite a number of previous villains in the series, firstly as an elderly bearded emperor of a magitek using empire he references Emperor Gestahl and dies during the events of the game and is replaced by a younger villain. Unlike Gestahl, he doesn't stay dead and returns to life to mock the new Emperor of their powerlessness, much like Emperor Mateus of FF II. Visually both scenes are similar with Mateus and Emet-Selch appearing from the throne to show both the characters and audience that they aren't dead and in a new appearance. Like Ardyn, Emet-Selch is a long lived member of a royal family that they are are at odds with and in Emet Selch's case, a villainous one. And Shadowbringers reveals Emet-Selch's deeper motives of saving his people at the cost of the current living ones which bring to mind both Zemus from IV and Garland from IX.
  • The Gunbreaker's level 60 gear highly resembles Squall's outfit, and his Revolver gunblade comes bundled with the Collector's Edition of Shadowbringers.
  • The Hrothgar, a race of burly feline men, have some facial options that can give them a horn on their head, thus making them a Ronso. On the First, the Hrothgar are called Ronso there, making the connection more obvious. Furthermore, in Amh Araeng there are locations on the map named after famous historical Ronso, such as Mount Biran, Garik, and Kelk.
  • The Stormblood Hildibrand quests feature a Lupin bandit known as the Wolf Burglar. He resembles Lone Wolf, the pickpocket, from Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI. One of the quests creates a situation where both Hildibrand and the Wolf Burglar are dangling from a cliff, and you need to choose who to pull up first. This references a scene in Final Fantasy VI, where the moogle Mog ends a hostage situation by knocking both himself and Lone Wolf to the edge of a cliff, leaving the player to decide which one to rescue.
  • The healer role quests in Shadowbringers have the player teaming up with a dwarf named Giott, named after the king of dwarves in Final Fantasy IV. However, this Giott's a female dwarf.
  • In Il Mheg, there are three faeries gathered together in a triangle. As the player approaches they will catch one saying "And we'll call it Delta Attack!". This is likely a reference to the Magus Sisters of Final Fantasy IV, who first coined the name for a strategy involving bouncing magic off of a Reflect spell. A later incarnation of the sisters in Final Fantasy X more closely resemble faeries, with insect wings.
  • Alisaie is told to choose a name for her new familiar, with little hesitation she names it Angelo. Later conversations shows that she named it after a pet dog she and Alphniaud shared when they were younger.
  • In The Rising 2019 event, the gift exchange NPC is using Minfilia's 1.0 model.
  • Godbert is a stand-in for Dio. Both built the Gold Saucer in the middle of the desert and are wrestlers who are constantly in their underwear. Dio is also translated as "God" in a number of romance languages like Italian and Spanish.
  • A cutscene at the end of the Anamnesis Anyder dungeon shows a very important character that sets the entire story in motion and had defected from the people that sided with Zodiark. The character in question is Venat, who was also a major player in Final Fantasy XII where he went against the other gods in order to give man the ability to write their own history.
  • One of the Legatii posted in Dalmasca is Noah van Gabranth, who even shares the helmet of his Final Fantasy XII moniker.
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     Locations 
  • In patch 2.2, several NPCs seek refuge in Eorzea when their homeland was torn apart by war. That homeland just happens to be Doma.
  • The Antitower itself is one to Ipsin's Castle of Final Fantasy IX. An Escherian place which is upside down. i210 weapons still do more damage then i1 weapons though.
  • Costa del Sol makes an appearance as a resort location in Eorzea as well, with music to fit it.
  • The Palace of the Dead itself is a homage to the dungeon of the same name in Tactics Ogre. An underground dungeon filled with undead enemies and is remnant of a magic-related civilization. Like in Tactics Ogre, the Palace of the Dead is set to have 200 floors, with the first set of 100 having a story attached and last set being purely for the challenge. A Necromancer that seeks to resurrect their betrothed even serves as a bossnote . The trailer for the Soul Surrender patch even uses a remix of the theme "Fog of Phantom" straight from Tactics Ogre's soundtrack.
    • It also serves as a reference to the Via Infinito in Final Fantasy X-2, which was also an underground labyrinth filled with the undead. The map of each floor was also randomized.
  • Azys La is heavily based on the Floating Continent from Final Fantasy VI right down to the statues of the Warring Triad at the highest point in the area which is occasionally patrolled by the Proto Ultima Weapon. In addition it can also Be seen as a minor reference to the Flying Fortress from the first game due to Tiamat's presence as well as it being the only place where the player can find Adamantite.
    • To drive the gag further, the final boss in the hard mode version of Fractal Continuum is the Ultima Weapon from Final Fantasy VI
  • Within the Bend of Time - Deltascape V1.0, the battlefield outside of a castle heavily resembles the Final Fantasy V stage from Dissidia Final Fantasy.
  • The Castrum Abania dungeon in Stormblood is one to the Magitek Research Facility from Final Fantasy VI, and its bosses are some of the iconic enemies from it.
  • The Return to Ivalice 24 man raid is basically one huge love letter to the Ivalice Alliance games:
    • The first part of the raid series takes place in the Royal City of Rabanastre, which lie in ruins. You also get to explore the Garamsythe Waterway. The last portion of the raid takes place in the ruins of the Royal City of Lesalia.
    • The second part of the raid series has the player sent to the Lighthouse on the Ridorana Cataract, which is revealed to also be an entrance to the Clockwork City of Goug.
    • The final part takes place in the Orbonne Monastery.
    • Additionally, the theatre troupe that Jenomis is part of uses a traveling airship as their base of operations called the Prima Vista.
    • In the timeline of the game's universe outlined in The Encyclopedia Eorzea, an entry states the Garlemald Empire conquered a small desert nation Dalmasca as a show of force.
  • The city shown in the 2019 fan fest for Shadowbringers bears a very striking resemblance to the city shown in the concept version of Final Fantasy XIV.
  • In Eulmore, there is a strip club called the Beehive which takes its inspiration from the Honeybee Inn of Final Fantasy VII.
    • Eulmore itself is a distilled reference to the city of Midgar, being a vertically oriented city where the rich live at the top while the poor gather in the slums at ground level. This is further enforced by Lord Vauthry's Japanese name, Don Vauthry, a reference to Don Corneo, being a wealthy and powerful overweight man with a thinning hairline.
  • The second half of Ahm Araeng, where a lot of Ronso work as miners, has a number of locations named after Ronso NPCs from Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2, such as Kelk, Biran and Garik.
  • The Deep Dungeon class of instances is a reference to an old roguelike published by Squaresoft. It was also the name of the set of maps in Final Fantasy Tactics.
  • In Norvrandt, there was an ancient empire named Ronka, whose ruins and Lost Technology are a major part of various storylines. The name Ronka is taken from Final Fantasy V, where it was similarly a long-dead society whose technology has long outlived them. The questline featuring the Great Serpent of Ronka might be inspired by Archeoaevis, the flying serpent who protected the Earth Crystal within the Ronakn Ruins in FFV. The most intact Ronkan ruins are found in the Rak'tika Greatwood. In the same forest can be found the much more recently ruined Fort Gohn, once inhabited by the Night's Blessed. In FFV, Gohn is a ruined and abandoned village, built directly above the ruins of Ronka.
  • The arena you summon and fight Ramuh for Eden's Verse: Fulmination is the Gandof Thunder Plains, straight out of Final Fantasy X. The buildings in the background are even the same design as the buildings in the Thunder Plains.

     Enemies 
  • The battle theme used on the battle against King Moggle Mog XII? The moogle theme. His strongest attack? Crystalline Flare.
  • In the last wing of Crystal Tower, Cloud of Darkness' appearance is based on her original sprite, but all her particle beam variations are, right down to their names and appearance, based on her HP attacks from Dissidia Final Fantasy. The minion you can rarely get as loot for beating her also takes her appearance from Dissidia.
  • The Ultima Weapon is based on the series' recurring superboss, and shares many details with its predecessors.
  • Ahriman bosses use an attack called Eyes On Me.
  • During the battle with Shiva, she will summon a group of Ice Soldiers to aid her. This is reminiscent of the fight with Shiva in Final Fantasy V.
  • About Shiva again, Ysayle transforming into Shiva, looks very similar to Shiva's summoning animation from Final Fantasy X.
  • Bahamut's act of unfolding his wings, as seen during the End of an Era movie and fight with Bahamut Prime, is taken exactly from Final Fantasy IX. Specifically, Bahamut's attack on Alexandria.
  • Some dungeon bosses are named after and clearly inspired by various bosses from other games, such as the Demon Wall from Final Fantasy IV in Amdapor Keep and Karlabos from Final Fantasy V in Sastasha (Hard).
  • In the Fractal Continuum, an Allagan warship turned museum, you can find a set of (still functioning) artificial soldiers called Manikins, the same name for the Mooks of Dissidia Final Fantasy.
  • The first boss of the Keeper of the Lake is called Einhänder, and even emulates the titular ship's gimmick of swapping between different gunpods to attack the party.
  • The final boss of the Void Ark is Echidna, a female monster that was originally from Final Fantasy III. Notably she was the only boss from that game's final area to not be part of the Dark World raid in the Crystal Tower Dungeons. Like her original counterpart, she loves spamming huge Earthquake spells which can spell doom even for the massive party of 24 players.
  • An enemy in Pharos Sirius (Hard), is a golem machine type named Construct 8. Also within the same dungeon, the second to final boss is a reference to the Mom Bomb, and she spawns 3 Grey Bomb and 3 other Bombs after exploding, like in that game.
  • In the Diadem, one of the notorious monsters is a Brachiosaur and like in its original incarnation, it can use extremely devastating attacks that can wipe out several alliances. It's armed with Spin (cleaving physical attack to everyone in front of it), Disaster (removes several of your buffs and can cause Paralysis, Slow, and Blind), and the highly fatal Meteor spell.
  • The boss of the third floor of Alexander, Living Liquid, is a reference to Liquid Flame. Aside from the switch of element from flame to water, the boss strongly resembles Liquid Flame, and has the same ability to switch between a humanoid shape, a hand shape, and the form of a tornado.
    • Liquid Flame itself appears as the second boss of the Great Gubal Library (Hard).
  • Yet another Final Fantasy IV boss that makes an appearance is Calcabrina, the infamous Creepy Doll. Here, it is the final boss of the Antitower dungeon and has similar mechanics and music from its original game. Calca and Brina are two minions that players can get from defeating her.
  • The Warring Triad has a showing in the game as well, 3.2 introduces one of the members Fiend as an optional trial boss, who's first stage boss theme is a remix of the "Fierce Battle" theme. Sophia the Goddess and Zurvan the Demon have appeared as well.
    • The names of the three are also a reference to the originally planned names for the Warring Triad in Final Fantasy VI.
  • The Achievement for defeating Sephirot, the Fiend, is "Veni Veni Venitas", A Line from the Ominous Latin Chanting from "One-Winged Angel", the music associated with Sephiroth. The achievement pokes fun at the similarities between the two's names, and the fact that, in the original concept work, the Fiend was flat-out named "Sephiroth"note  - our famous white-haired villain just inherited a discarded name from the previous title.
  • Kottos, the hecatoncheir and first boss from Copperbell Mines, is named after another giant from Final Fantasy II.
  • During the fight against the 2nd phase of Sephirot, part of the lyrics will say "The seven hells become the seventh heaven".
  • The Weeping City of Mhach features Ozma and Calofisteri as its penultimate and final bosses, respectively.
  • Ymir appears as a boss in Hullbreaker Isle (Hard) with a few new tricks up its shell, namely the ability to switch its elemental affinity between lightning and ice.
  • The 2nd boss of The Weeping City of Mhach uses a spell called Mega Death, which will instantly kill anyone unless they are under the Gradual Zombification or Zombie status. This is a nod to Yunalesca's Mega Death attack in Final Fantasy X where the mechanics are exactly the same.
  • The boss of Alexander - The Heart of the Creator is Cruise Chaser. While the name of the boss is a nod to another game by Square, the design of said boss closely resembles Ark, the Dark based airship summon from Final Fantasy IX and it also uses Eternal Darkness (which is empowered by the presence of lapis lazuli jewels), Photon, and Propeller Wind as it did in that game. Fittingly, the boss uses the name of the game to which Ark was originally a reference.
  • The final boss of Alexander - The Soul of the Creator is Alexander Prime and looks like how it did in Final Fantasy VI. In phase 2 of the fight, it grows wings as it did in Final Fantasy IX. Its ultimate move is Divine Judgement.
  • The current final boss of the Palace of the Dead is Nybeth Obdilord, a recurring necromancer enemy who appears in Tactics Ogre : Let us Cling Together, and is also fought on the 100th floor of that game's version of the Palace of the Dead even using the same themes. The Palace of the Dead as a whole is also an extended shout out to a bonus dungeon in the same game. He even makes callbacks referencing the "Wheel of Fate" and his unique spell that summons monsters from the Dark. Finally, defeating him gives you the title "Corpse Dancer" which was also a title rewarded for defeating in the first time in Tactics Ogre.
  • The recurring enemy Deathgaze shows up as a boss in Dun Scaith - and it is even fought on top of a moving airship just like in the classic battle in Final Fantasy VI, while the model and skyline are most similar to the fight with it in Final Fantasy IX (where it was called "Deathguise").
  • Yojimbo is the final boss in the Kugane Castle dungeon, being the same character from Final Fantasy X and using similar mechanics.
    • Similarly, Ixion is introduced as a mega-FATE boss and a mount for players to ride.
  • Several monsters in the Castrum Abania dungeon are taken from Final Fantasy VI's Magitek Research Facility. Notably the Magna Roader enemies, Number 024 (as Number XXIV and unlike its original counterpart, hitting it with the wrong element reflects damage back) and Number 128 (named Inferno, after its recolor found in Kefka's Tower).
  • The first boss in the Ala Mhigo dungeon is the Magitek Scorpion, which is modeled after the same robot scorpion from Final Fantasy VII and has similar attacks. In a blink and you miss it moment, an NPC before the fight will tell you to "attack while its tail is up", which is also a nod to Cloud's mangled advice for fighting the boss in Final Fantasy VII. Luckily, the boss here doesn't counterattack if you do attack it when the tail is raised.
  • The final boss in the 4.0 main story quest is based on the superboss Shinryu from Final Fantasy V. It even opens up with its signature party wiping Tidal Wave which can induce a party wipe due to being thrown off the edge of the arena.
  • The bosses of the Omega: Deltascape Raid are taken straight out of Final Fantasy V; up to and including Exdeath himself.
  • The boss fights in the Return to Ivalice raid have Mateus and Hashmal. The final boss is Argath Thadalfus, who transforms into a Lucavi (although he never did transform in the original game). One of his attacks involves sending out ten clones of his human form to attack random party members, which is something he did in the PSP remake of Tactics. Talking to an NPC after the fight and asking him about Argath will have him mention Argath's other name, Algus Sadalfus, which was his name in the Playstation version of Final Fantasy Tactics and he even says either name depends on which version of it you were told. The Lucavi he turns in to, Duma, as well as the penultimate boss of the raid, Rofocale, are named after dummied out Lucavi from Tactics.
    • Part 2 of the raid, Ridorana Lighthouse, features Belias, Famfrit, and Yiazmat, along with Construct 7.
    • Yiazmat in particular has a mechanic that references the infamously mind-numbingly high HP threshold it had, which later gets worse via a permanent defense buff. However, part of that mechanic here involves breaking its armor so your attacks can do their full damage.
    • Part 3 of the raid sends players to the Orbonne Monastery, which has a portal leading to the Necrohol of Mullonde, just as it did in Tactics. The bosses of this dungeon are Mustadio Bunansa, Agrias Oaks, and Thunder God Cidolfus Orlandeau - three important story characters from Tactics, with Ultima herself occupying the final boss role.
      • Her now memetic phrase ("Denizens of the abyss! Through ink of blackest night!") is taken near verbatim from something Nybeth Obdilord, himself already represented as a boss in the Palace of the Dead, once said in the PSP remake of Tactics Ogre.
  • Patch 4.2 introduces the Sigmascape wing to Omega, which features bosses taken from Final Fantasy VI; ending with Kefka.
    • The Guardian in Sigmascape V3.0 goes further by using the same gimmick it had in VI: Copying abilities from other bosses, namely Dadaluma, Air Force, Ultros, with the Everliving Bibliotaph taking the place of Ultima Weapon; which it also summons as adds during the fight.
  • Why is the Ultima Weapon missing from Guardian's list of programs? Because it serves as the final boss of the Fractal Continuum (Hard), under the name Ultima Beast.
  • Fafnir from Final Fantasy XI returns in Eureka and is once again a Notorious Monster. Likewise, Pazuzu, who is the hardest NM in Eureka, comes directly from Final Fantasy Mystic Quest.
  • Chaos, the final boss of Final Fantasy I, starts off the the Alphascape raid tier. Additionally, one of his attacks is called "Knock Down", a reference to the Good Bad Translation in the original release.
  • The final boss of the Alphascape tier has Omega take on both male and female human forms in an effort to grasp the Warrior of Light's strength. These forms are the male and female heroes on the Yoshitaka Amano box art of the original 1.0 release.
    • The final boss of the Savage version has Omega further evolve into a centaur-esque form reminiscent of the Weapons, which would make it this world's incarnation of Omega Weapon.
  • The final boss of The Burn is the Mist Dragon from Final Fantasy IV, complete with the ability to turn into mist. When the dragon does so, there is battle narration taken directly from the encounter in Final Fantasy IV, explaining that "Striking the mist is futile! To do so only incurs the dragon's wrath!"
  • The second boss of the Ghimlyt Dark is Prometheus, based on the enemy of the same name from Final Fantasy VI. The machine's burrowing capabilities are taken from the enemy's palette swap, Tunnel Armor.
  • The hobgoblin enemies found in Norvrandt are based on the goblins of the non-MMO Final Fantasy entries. The A-Rank mark Li'l Murderer is named for a type of goblin found late into Final Fantasy IV.
  • The FATE boss Archaeotania is a direct recreation of the original Twintania from Final Fantasy V, and its name is a portmanteau of that and its stronger Palette Swap from the Updated Re-release, Archeodemon. It even uses Twintania's moves: Tidal Wave, Mind Blast, Wind Slash, Snowstorm, Atomic Ray, and Mega Flare before charging up Giga Flare when below 10% health.
  • The final boss of Akadaemia Anyder is Quetzalcoatl. To drive the point home further, the boss's title is "Guardian Force".
  • The final boss of The Twinning, a replica of Alexander is The Tycoon, similar to King Alexander Highwind Tycoon.
  • Anamnesis Anyder is in-universe a repository for ideas. Anamnesis means "remembering things of a past existence", so it should be no surprise that a lot of the enemies found there are based on ones from previous games:
    • The dungeon begins with you fighting various sea life, including an Xzomit, a Yovra, and a Phuabo. Later on, the player can fight Panopts.
    • The first boss is a horrific slab of flesh called "Unknown" found at the end of a sea trench, with its appearance based on one of the Unknown enemies from Final Fantasy VII.
    • The second boss is the Cyclops summon from Final Fantasy Tactics, called "Kyklops" here.
    • The final boss is an Ondo matriarch who has a turtle-like shell on her back, similar to the sahagin enemies from VII and IX.

     Miscellaneous 
  • In 1.0, servers were named after towns and kingdoms from previous FF games, such as Figaro, Wutai or Besaid. During its beta, they were named after famous villains and bosses in the series. Once A Realm Reborn rolled around, the server names changed to also include iconic weapons, summons, and monsters from the series such as Ragnarok, Garuda, and Moogle.
  • One of the major changes planned for version 2.0 (see Nothing Is the Same Anymore) is a total revamp of the game map, which will be explained in game by a major catastrophe that will bring the "Seventh Umbral Era". This major catastrophe was basically Meteor. It then turned out to be Bahamut.
  • Your reward for completing the main scenario is a Magitek Armor mount. What's more, the trailer showing it off featured VI's opening music and three characters modeled after Biggs, Wedge, and Terra. Though it didn't do it at first, fan demand caused them to change it so Terra's theme plays while you're riding it.
  • During a fight scene in the main plot in Ul'dah, a certain piece of music plays, complete with partial samples from the NES original.
  • Arcanists resemble Evokers, and are also a stepping stone to the proper Summoner job class.
  • The 2014 Heavensturn seasonal event featured NPCs who referred to chocobos as "horsebirds", a translation which caused no small amount of controversy in 1.0. (See the Lost in Translation entry above.)
  • When Thancred calls out Ungust for allying with the Amalj'aa to line his pockets, Ungust tells him to "blame yourselves or the gods," a nod to Final Fantasy Tactics' mistranslations.
    • On the subject of Tactics, the process of upgrading your relic weapon from Atma to Animus involves undergoing the trials of the Zodiac Braves. There's also a minor group of bandits called the Corpse Brigade.
    • The "blame yourself or the gods" line gets revisited once more by Ba'gamnan in the Return to Ivalice raid, making it much more fitting considering the locale they're in.
  • The entire Crystal Tower is one massive homage to Final Fantasy III. The first half, Labyrinth of the Ancients, is based on the penultimate dungeon, the Ancients' Maze, and Phlegethon on its boss Titannote . The second half is called Syrcus Tower, which was an alternate name for the Crystal Tower itself in III, and nearly every enemy is a direct homage to the enemies and bosses found in that game. Several characters related to the events of the Crystal Tower in its original incarnation also make an appearance, adapted to fit the lore of XIV. The backstory involved the process of cloning, and you fight Doga's Clone, Unei's Clone, and Xande's Clone throughout the various raids, referencing enemies found in the Crystal Tower and World of Darkness. Xande's Clone is even found inside a treasure coffer, as he was in III.
  • One of the Paladin's actions is named "Spirits Within"
  • The Sixth Umbral Era was caused by a massive war between three nations of magical power, which would go down in history as the War of the Magi.
  • A somewhat removed one, but a mythology gag nonetheless, as the games share a character designer, publisher, and overall style. One late game quest is called Let Us Cling Together.
    • And in Heavensward, the "Valerian" armor sets that drops in Neverreap and Fractal Continuum also reference several of the classes from Tactics Ogre: Shaman, Wizard, Rogue, Smuggler, Fusilier, Dragoon, and Terror Knight.
    • For April Fools, Square released a fake trailer for Tactics Alexander which portrayed the game using a style that looks like the original Tactics Ogre.
  • Karasu's or rather, Gekkai's squadron of Garlean ninja are known as Imperial Shadows, which was the name of an enemy in Final Fantasy II (an undead doppelganger of The Emperor).
  • When fighting Nabriales, he'll cast Double and Triple, followed up by another spell that hits twice and thrice respectively. Final Fantasy VIII had a similar concept for its magic system as well.
  • The final Trial of the Heavensward Expansion involves an elaborate endphase where the titular Heavens' Ward attack you in a manner very similar to the Knights of the Round summon of VII, culminating in the final attack of the phase 'Ultimate End'.
  • The Golden Saucer not only shares its name with the Final Fantasy VII location, but also remixes its theme and includes activities such as Chocobo racing like the original. Although the Triple Triad cardgame is taken straight from Final Fantasy VIII and plays a remix of the match theme from that game as well.
  • Ishgard's Hunt is overseen by Clan Centurio.
  • The 2015 Rising Event gives a big shout out to Final Fantasy IV in the form of The 18th floor, or more specifically, the developer's room. You get to meet several key members of the development team and learn what they do. To top it all off, the entire team thanks you for playing the game and are happy that you enjoy their work.
  • A recurring Dialogue Tree response the player can give throughout the main storyline is, "Where the wild rose blooms." It is, fittingly, used as a passcode for the Scions of the Seventh Dawn.
  • During the Level 54 Dragoon quest, Heustienne, the dragoon you are training, is given a lance named Peregrine. The name and design is similar to that of the Dragoon Lance that's part of the Artifact I set (or AF1) from Final Fantasy XI.
  • For the Level 40 Bard quest, Bard's-eye View, your instructor has a unique phrase of his own.
    Jehantel: 'Tis good to see you return, [Player Name], and more seasoned still for your time in the world. Call me a spoony bard, but as a man in the winter of his years, it gives me great joy to observe an adventurer in the spring of his life.
  • Another Vanu Vanu daily quest is called "The Binding Soil". Does it count if a work offers a Mythology Gag within itself?
  • The Eorzean airship routes are maintained by Highwind Skyways. The Chairman, Tatabaru, has a personal airship called the Blackjack.
  • A golden saucer quest is called "So You Think You Can Ride This Chocobo", a reference to the lyrics from the heavy metal Chocobo theme from Final Fantasy XIII-2.
  • The Garlean Empire refers to their machinery as machina.
  • Equipping soul crystals to learn the specialized abilities of jobs is a call back to Final Fantasy V where you equip shards of the crystals in order to learn jobs, and is frequently featured throughout the series in; Tactics' opening explanation of jobs, Bravely Default, and later Bravely Second's asterisk system, Final Fantasy 7's materia system, Final Fantasy X & X-2's Sphere grid and Dress sphere grids.
    • They are most similar to X-2's memory spheres in that XIV's soul crystals' powers draw off of their previous owners' memories.
  • The Palace of the Dead has its interface stylized in the form of the classic Final Fantasy titles with a blue window background, equipment slots, and sprites of your character. There's even save slots to save your progress in the dungeon, just like the in the old days.
  • The Rising 2016 event has a troupe that are named the Crystal Caravan. The event also has a retelling of the Calamity by the use of puppets and a narrator with the Warrior of Light taking the leading role at the last minute. If you flub up your stage directions, the play takes an unexpected and weird turn of events, such as a fat cat emerging from Dalamud instead of Bahamut and said fat cat got the empire and the alliance to stop fighting because it was cute and cuddly. This is a nod to the play scene from Final Fantasy VII where you could also choose hilarious options to end the play in different ways.
  • Omega and Shinryu are at it again, where they have been put together as foes as they were throughout previous appearances in the series. The new raid in Stormblood, Omega - Bend of Time, will focus around them. Well, rather, it'll focus on Omega and Midgardsormr, as "Shinryu" is defeated at the end of the SB MSQ, but even in 4.0 there are a number of hints that the Doman "Shinryu" may well be another name for Middy...
  • The Angel of Mercy minion bears a striking resemblance to the tiny angels that appeared in the 2D Final Fantasy titles whenever a revive or auto-revive spell was cast.
  • The Garlean train supply line is called the Phantom Train.
  • One of the Main Scenario Quests in the Peaks is called The Price of Freedom.
  • A quest chain in the higher level area of The Fringes involves M'zhet Tia, of the M' tribe Seeker of the Sun Miqo'te who live in the eastern portion of the region who seeks to challenge M'rahz Nunh for the title of Nuhn of the tribe. Part of it, is because M'zhet's own father was once also nuhn of the tribe, when the M were large enough to require two nuhn's and had supposedly been exiled when the tribe grew smaller during the Garlean occupation, only to then abandon his son. What follows, is a retelling of events of Cosmo Canyon, Red XIII, and his father. Namely, that M'zhet's father had peacefully forfeited his title of nuhn, and chose to guard the tribe's home of Peering Stones from afar. A sickness one day caused the wildlife to enter a frenzy and they were about to swarm and attack the M tribe. M'zhet's father, M'aht, left his son in the care of the Vira Ananta and fought alone against the frenzied beasts. Though he drove the beasts into a cave, he was afflicted with a petrification poison, and so M'aht willingly sealed the cave's entrance with his own body before the transformation completed. Further more, M'zhet's facial features, hair style, color, and hair clip, evokes the image of a Miqo'te version of Red XIII.
  • During the scenes in the early credits of Stormblood, Lyse observes that even Zenos began as an innocent baby, and that he was made what he was by the system created by Garlemald and his family. This is an echo of a similar, famous line from an otherwise unimportant character in Final Fantasy IV, who notes that all humans, even Golbez, begin as innocent babies and that something else must have made him evil.
  • All of the armor dropped from the Royal City of Rabanastre raid in the Return to Ivalice storyline references specific characters or units in Final Fantasy Tactics.
    • Ditto for Ridorana Lighthouse and Orbonne Monastery, with the armor sets in the latter being based on Ramza, Agrias, Balthier, and the Oracle/Mystic unit.
  • The final boss of the first Return to Ivalice raid is able to stack a debuff on raid members called "Unnerve", which will eventually transform them into a chicken unable to fight if it gets too high. This references the Brave mechanic from Final Fantasy Tactics, a measure of a unit's valor that can be increased or decreased by a variety of different abilities and dialogue choices. If it ever drops too low in a given battle, the unit will literally transform into a chicken and automatically move as far away from any fighting as possible.
  • After clearing Royal City of Rabanastre, Ba'Gamnan will paraphrase the infamous "Blame yourself or God" line from the original translation of Final Fantasy Tactics.
  • Eureka is one big love letter to Final Fantasy XI:
    • Loss of EXP and leveling down is a mechanic used from the game.
    • The Eureka weapons are ones to 11's highest level weapons as well that could be obtained at level 75 or 99, and some for multiple classes.
      • Antaea for Paladins is for Red Mage, Blue Mage and Paladin.
      • Brunello for Red Mage for Red Mage, Blue Mage and Paladin.
      • Circinae for Bard is for Ranger.
      • Daboya for Dragoon.
      • Dumuzis for Monk and Puppeteer.
      • Kasasagi for Ninja.
      • Molfrith for Machinist is for Corsair.
      • Paikea for Black Mage is for Black Mage, Scholar and Summoner.
      • Rose Couverte for White Mage.
      • Shamash for Warrior.
      • Torigashira for Samurai.
      • Xiphias for Dark Knight.
    • Notorious Monsters spawning by chain killing certain enemies is also a mechanic fromm that game.
    • The Strider Boots increases your Sprint buff duration inside cities, which is a nod to the original version which boosted your movement speed. It's also a nod to the Hermes' Shoes in 1.0 which had similar effects.
    • Beating Fafnir can get you a wind-up minion of him, whose description makes a reference to the infamous drop rate for the Ridill weapon. The Japanese version gives a different reference to the weapon by saying it occasionally attacks three times. Fafnir itself was also a Notorious Monster in Final Fantasy XI and it also uses most of its attack from that game.
    • The Scorpion Harness is an obtainable drop from the Serket Notorious Monster, which is a nod to the gear of the same name from Final Fantasy XI and also the fact that for a long time one of the ingredients to craft it could only be obtained from Serket on XI.
    • Wind-up Mithra and Tarutaru minions can be obtained from Anemos and Pagos, respectively. Their flavor text implies that they're considered the ancestors of the Miqo'te and Lalafell. Which, in a sense, they are.
  • The Lifestream is basically a one to one recreation of the one from Final Fantasy VII; all life is created from it and beings that die have their souls return to the lifestream where it is assimilated and is eventually reborn. The aether (which is what XIV's lifestream is composed of), is under threat by the primals that sustain themselves by eating it, which is similar to what Shinra did in VII by pumping out the lifestream to power machines and create materia while Sephiroth tried to absorb the lifestream to become a god.
  • One of the cutscenes in the village of Fanow is similar to that of a cutscene in Final Fantasy XII in which Vaan asks a rather faux pas question to Fran. It even includes the tension of everyone staring at the one who asks the question.
  • Dwarves, a recurring race in Final Fantasy, hail from The First as helmeted miners, down to carrying over their "Lali-ho" greeting. And like the previous games, you can learn the Lali-ho to use in the form of an emote.
  • The Shadowbringers trailer/opening uses the Overworld Theme from Final Fantasy III, both using the same premise of bringing back the balance of Light and Darkness. The Warriors of Darkness use Job names used in III (Devout instead of White Mage).
  • In Shadowbringers, the Facet of Crafting story involves a lute owned by the late crafting master Harig. Harig recieved this lute from the Crystal Exarch, and the end of the story reveals that it was originally crafted by the archmagus Noah. This is a reference to Noah's Lute, a key item from Final Fantasy III. In addition, the party in Final Fantasy III finds the lute in a temple at the bottom of the ocean. Master Harig disappeared searching for material to repair the lute, which could also be found at the bottom of the ocean.
  • The title of patch 5.1 is "Vows of Virtue, Deeds of Cruelty". This is the patch that adds first of the NieR: Automata raids to the game. The title may be a reference to the weapons wielded by 2B and 9S, albeit with parts of the names exchanged. The weapons in question are Virtuous Contract and Cruel Oath; a deed and a vow.
  • At the end of the Copied Factory raid 2P pushes 9S to a corner of the platform during their fight, leading 9S to fall off while giving 2P a scornful look, mirroring a similar scene in NieR: Automata where he gave A2 the same look before falling off a cliff.
  • The Mining and Logging minigames at the Gold Saucer are based off their original Disciple of Land class's gathering system.
  • When you defeat the Ruby Weapon, the pilot activates Oversoul mode, which grants them extreme power while being assimilated by the memory data of Nael van Darnus. Oversoul was a Final Fantasy X-2 gameplay mechanic where monsters could enter an Oversoul state to become much more dangerous and gaining new attacks.
  • The duty finder name for fighting the Guardian is called "Won't Let You Pass!", which is what the Guardian in Final Fantasy VI says when you encounter it in battle.

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