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Main Character Index | The Warrior of Light | Tank Classes | Ranged DPS Classes | Melee DPS Classes | Caster Classes | Healer Classes | Scions of the Seventh Dawn | The Eorzean Alliance | Ishgard and Dravania | Othard and Hingashi | Sharlayan and Thavnair | The First | Allies | Antagonists | Raid Antagonists | Ascians | Garlean Empire | Disciples of War | Disciples of Magic | Disciples of the Hand | Disciples of the Land | Primals | Beast Tribes | Seasonal Event NPCs
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As the story has advanced beyond the point of hiding plot twists, there are unmarked spoilers below, you have been warned.


The Player Character / The Warrior of Light / The Warrior of Darkness / Azem

    General Tropes 
An Eorzean adventurer from one of three city states. Those who started in 1.0 witnessed a star shower and met an Archon of the Circle of Knowing and were then gifted with the Echo and became entwined with the war with Garlemald. Players are implied to be from outside of Eorzea entirely (or at least returning from an extended journey abroad), and have come (or returned) to Eorzea for reasons the player may define in the opening. In the process of proving themselves to their adopted city-state, they too meet a (now-former) member of the Circle, discover their possession of the Echo, and become involved in a conflict not only with the Garleans, but with a perhaps older and more sinister power...
  • 100% Heroism Rating: The Warrior of Light is treated with respect and awe throughout Eorzea, and even isolationist, borderline xenophobic nations come to respect them on account of their heroism. Ishgard reveres the WoL for ending the Dragonsong War and mending their relationships with both dragonkind and the rest of Eorzea. Doma and Ala Mhigo both view the WoL as a hero for liberating them from Garlean tyranny, aiding their refugees, and helping to restore their economies and infrastructures following the war.
  • 11th-Hour Superpower:
    • After failing to defeat Nidhogg himself, Hraesvelgr gives you one of his eyes and the incredible aether stored within it, allowing you to fight the elder wyrm and come out victorious. Though since dragon eyes have already proven themselves to be very sketchy, you give it back to him after the danger has passed.
    • To defeat Hades, the final boss of Shadowbringers, the Warrior of Light uses all the absorbed light from the Lightwardens they had defeated during the expansion, in combination with Ardbert rejoining with them, to empower themselves to stand up against Hades' full power, before using it to finish him off.
    • For the final battle with Elidibus the Warrior of Light unlocks the powers of their original self, Azem, letting them summon allies to their side. This even seems to be able to summon the spirits of the departed, as Emet-Selch appears to help midway through the boss fight.
  • The Ace:
    • Eventually you are this, being the go-to person for the Grand Companies and the Scions to solve whichever world-ending issue is plaguing them.
    • This is extremely exaggerated if you also put into perspective all of the various jobs the character can have. Normal people can only have one job, trying to double-task is such a tax on their aether it can easily be fatal. Other Echo users can do better, but still often need to specialize in only a handful safely. The Warrior of Light? They can be everything and have everything, from controlling the Warrior's Inner Beast, to having a Dragoon's Inner Dragon in their soul, to being chosen by Black and White magic (one outright illegal, the other strictly sanctioned on outsiders), to controlling their inner darkness perfectly as a Dark Knight, being able to open all of their chakras as a monk, perfectly learn mudras as a Ninja, and so on and so on. They can very easily become the master par none of every named job - past present and future - known in Hydaelyn.
    • The guildmasters of the Disciple of the Hand and the Disciple of the Land jobs are also quick to note just how much of a natural the Warrior of Light is at any task they put their mind to, going from complete novice to providing salable work within a few moons if not a few hours of in-game time. You can potentially become a master of every artisanal craft in Hydaelyn, from weaving to blacksmithing to alchemy, provided you put in the effort.
    • In Stormblood, Hisui or rather, Kurenai, marvels at the Warrior of Light's ability to be a peerless warrior, a master craftsman, and a skilled gatherer, wondering if there's anything they can't do.
    • In the trailer for Shadowbringers, the Warrior of Light is shown switching between all the jobs we have seen him use in previous trailers in quick succession. Downplayed in that the enemy he is using them against quickly repels each attack, breaking his weapons in the process...at least until he switches to Dark Knight where he delivers a One-Hit Kill to his enemy.
  • Adventurer Archaeologist: While they don't exactly have an archeology degree, they often find themselves helping to uncover the ruins of lost civilizations and has more experience fighting the remnants of those civilizations than anyone else. Cid basically calls them a certified Allagan archeologist because of just how much they've uncovered and encountered over the course of their adventures.
  • Affectionate Nickname: During the Heavensward Miner quests, Haimirich nicknames them "Professor" for being the best educated member of the expedition group out to search the wastes outside of Ishgard for mineral wealth.
  • Almighty Janitor:
    • This can be invoked at your choosing. While you're required to join a Grand Company as part of the story, you aren't actually required to apply for promotions. As a result, you can be a hero and the mightiest warrior in Eorzea... as well as a lowly private in the Twin Adders, Maelstrom, or Immortal Flames.
    • In addition, you lose your rank and must start from the beginning if you choose to change Grand Companies. You can be a lieutenant of the Twin Adders with all of the experience and strength that entails before going back to being a private when you hop ship to the Maelstrom.
  • Amateur Sleuth: Numerous questlines have them solving mysteries and stopping crime on behalf of someone else.
    • The Hildibrand questlines have them helping the good inspector as a Hypercompetent Sidekick, often slaying monsters or stopping bandits in addition to doing some actual detective work.
    • The seasonal Make It Rain campaign has them take on this role for the Gold Saucer, addressing a different crime every year, from thefts to apparent murders.
    • The Heavensward Alchemist questline has them volunteered to act as a crime scene investigator in Revenant's Toll on Severian's behalf since the culprit has been making extensive use of alchemy techniques to facilitate a Locked Room Mystery. The Stormblood questline has them investigate the case of a strange corpse that does not show signs of decay weeks after it has been interred.
    • The Heavensward Scholasticate questline has the Warrior assist Inspector Briarden in investigating allegations of cheating and corruption at Saint Endalim Scholasticate, Ishgard's finest religious academy, all while navigating the rift between highborn and lowborn wrought by the end of the Dragonsong War.
  • Ambadassador: Throughout the story, the Warrior of Light has served as an envoy between the members of the Eorzean Alliance as well as to the nations outside of it. In addition to trying for peace whenever possible, they are also the strongest warrior Eorzea has to offer.
  • Ambiguously Human:
    • During the conclusion of the 3.0 Heavensward plot, a number of your opponents begin to legitimately question whether or not you are actually another mere heroic "Spoken", as you've gone from "doing heroic things" to "performing feats that, by the laws of the metaphysics of this world, should be properly, literally impossible".
    • Shadowbringers finally reveals the "Echo" is in fact the same ability that gives the Ascians their power, and the Warrior of Light in a past life was one of the greatest of all the Ascians: Azem, the fourteenth seat of the Convocation of Fourteen, the ruling body of the ancient precursors of Amaurot, and colleague of the likes of Emet-Selch. Further, your abilities are getting so close to that of an unbroken Ascian, when the protagonist reclaims the eighth of fourteen pieces of their previous unbroken soul from Ardbert's sacrifice, Emet-Selch even temporarily sees the protagonist as Azem in full.
  • The Archmage: The Warrior of Light can be an exceptionally skilled mage who quickly masters any school of magic they choose to study, including foreign disciplinesnote  and previously extinct Jobsnote . There’s even a series of achievements which grant the player titles for getting all currently-available magic classes to the current level cap: these titles start with "Archmage"note  and get progressively more grandiose from there.
  • An Adventurer Is You: A mutable Adventurer Be You, in fact, courtesy of the Armoury System.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking:
    • By the end of the main quest in Azim Steppe, you are, regardless of your race, the khagan of the Xaela. While the Mol will rule in your absence (as officially, you fought on their behalf), strictly speaking you're the one in charge and a number of NPCs change their tune to reflect this. And half the reason they respect you is because of the mountains of ass you kicked during the Naadam.
    • Apparently, this was the case back in the original world. As an Amaurotian, they were very powerful, and very high on the ladder in the Ancients' society, as evident that it only takes 8 shards of their soul to contain a world's worth of eldritch light that mutates everything into Sin Eaters. Confirmed when they are revealed to be Azem, the Traveler and Shepherd to the stars of the Convocation of Fourteen. Their very duty, which was to know the whole world and eliminate any threat to the star, demanded them to be this trope.
  • Badass Boast: Byakko warns the Warrior not to hold anything back against him, as he will be naught but a raging beast once he unleashes his aramitama. In response, the Warrior can casually say that he's in good hands, as they've bested kami before.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: Near the end of Heavensward, Tataru has a bunch of tailors jump the Warrior of Light to take their measurements in preparation for making the Warrior a snazzy new adventuring outfit. For the guys, this consists of a white blazer, black slacks, and a neat tie accented by silver accessories along with some High-Class Glass.
  • Berserk Button: Refusal to take responsibility for one's actions seems to be one for the Warrior of Light. When Emmanellain, in his immaturity, ruined the first planned meeting between Ishgard and the Dravanians by ordering a guard to shoot a protester, and afterwards refuses to accept responsibility for the event being caused off, the WoL is visibly furious and moved like they were about to punch him if Thancred hadn't held them back. And when he seems to be shirking responsibility again in a later conversation, the anger quickly returns to the WoL's face before he clarifies his meaning.
  • Big Brother Mentor: Dialogue options allow the Warrior to act as this for Vath Deftarm, a young Vath who aspires to become an adventurer like them. The Warrior can gently encourage and guide Deftarm in his journey to both aid his fellow Vath and cement his purpose in life. The other dialogue option portrays the Warrior as a Stern Teacher or even a Drill Sergeant Nasty, responding to Deftarm's mistakes and grumblings with Quit Your Whining at best.
  • Big Damn Heroes: The finale of 4.5 has them arriving in the nick of time where Hien, Lyse, and Yugiri get beaten by Elidibus possessing Zenos's body. They then promptly start kicking ass.
  • Big Good: Beginning with Heavensward through the end of Stormblood the WoL slowly becomes this for Eorzea and Othard. They have many friendly and influential relationships in all corners of the realm (see 100% Heroism Rating above). They are also the World's Best Warrior / The Archmage and the most important asset in the fight against the Acians, the Primals and the Garlean Empire.
  • Birds of a Feather: With Haurchefant and Hien, the former is Lampshaded by Alphinaud in the Tales from the Dragonsong War, and the latter lampshaded by Lyse.
  • Blood Knight:
    • Heavily implied by Lahabrea, saying they are just simply looking for something to despise so they can fight it. The Dark Knight questline confirms that they often offer to help people just for the chance of fighting a challenge. Zenos is also very fond of the Warrior of Light simply because of their refusal to die and how much bloodshed they can cause in battle. How much it truly applies is, of course, up to the player.
    • During a friendly mock battle between Ishgard and the other members of the Eorzean Alliance, the Warrior of Light winds up in a one-on-one duel against Raubahn, who remarks that he'd hoped it'd come to a battle with such a Worthy Opponent. The Warrior of Light's response is a small, wry smile, showing that they too are eager to challenge themselves against the Flame General.
    • When Alphinaud asks if the Warrior would be willing to participate in the fight at Castrum Velodyna, one of the available responses can be summed up as, "Wherever there's a fight, I'll be there!"
    • In a conversation with the Crystal Exarch, the Warrior of Light can confirm their plans after freeing Norvrandt from the tyranny of the Lightwardens involve, to paraphrase their own words, doing what they always do and finding another, stronger challenge, should you select that option. Other options include settling the score with the Garlean Empire, taking a breather, or thoughtful silence, so how much of a blood knight the Warrior of Light is, is still left up to the player.
    • When beseeched by the leader of a friendly beast tribe clan with the sister clan's summoned primal, they have an option to tell them, "Know that I'll kill your god if I have to. Maybe even if I don't."
  • Broken Bird: The Warrior of Light finally begins to crack after Haurchefant's death. While the whole story and affair in Ul'dah deeply affected them, Haurchefant's demise is what causes the Warrior to start mentally breaking down, which is made apparent in 3.2. The Dark Knight questlines are entirely devoted to delving into this aspect of them, in fact. This is made more apparent in Stormblood when Fordola, who is forced to experience everyone's pasts due to her uncontrollable artificial Echo, accidentally sees the Warrior of Light's past. She questions how on earth you're able to keep going through all the loss and betrayal you've witnessed over your career.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Midgardsormr strips you of Hydaelyn's blessing, wanting you to prove what you're capable of with your own strength, without relying on divine protection. This doesn't slow you down one bit, and over the course of Heavensward you earn back that power fight by fight until even the great wyrm admits that you are truly worthy to be Her champion.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer:
    • In more lighthearted parts of the story, the Warrior of Light can be quite a goofball. One of their responses for getting help moving furniture in the Firmament is to ask their dragon friends for help. They can also declare it their solemn duty to eat their weight in carnival food during the Nier scenario. It doesn't change how they're the Warrior of Light and the mightiest warrior in the land, not to mention an Ambadassador and potentially a master craftsman.
    • During the Stormblood raid questline, they can whine about not getting a Garlond Ironworks uniform of their own after Jessie outfits Alpha with one. Jessie scoffs at them, pointing out that the (likely tomestone-bought) gear they're wearing is worth as much as a house, not to mention that the Ironworks' uniform isn't durable enough to handle whatever Physical God or Eldritch Abomination they throw themselves against.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday:
    • Averted for mortal enemies, as proven in the Dark Knight quests, but played straight for Primals of all things by the time they've reached Eden. Outside of traumatic signature skills, the Warrior of Light's attempts at summoning their own Leviathan and Titan come out distinctly different from the ones fought on the Source due to poor recollection of them and pulling in traits of similarly aspected enemies. Leviathan is close, being merely far larger and having a second head but with a fighting style more in line with Shinryu, while Titan comes out more like a Transforming Mecha with its only similarity being that it is prone to attacking with landslides.
    • During one Letter from the Producer it was mentioned that this lack of clarity is partially the cause of the Wandering Minstrel's exaggerated versions of events, he was already getting an incorrect version of the story before even getting to his dramatic additions. In the new Titan's case specifically, it was due to the Warrior of Light momentarily mixing up Kobolds and Goblins.
    • The Warrior of Light also has numerous heroic examples of this trope. In later expansions, they are approached by NPCs they had previously rescued/assisted. But they've assisted and helped so many people throughout their journey that they cannot for the love of Hydaelyn recognize them, even though the Warrior of Light's heroic actions changed their lives. You may not remember pulling that injured soldier from the rubble, but he remembers.
  • Call to Adventure: The player character begins mid-call of being an adventurer already, the Warrior of Light starts off as a fresh adventurer looking for work and is basically a wandering mercenary before meeting the Scions. It's only when the Warrior starts to fight off demons repeatedly and with ease is when you earn the attention of the Scions and begin the story proper.
  • Catch-22 Dilemma: Nearly averted in Shadowbringers. The only way to rid the First of the Light is by killing a Lightwarden, which causes its nascent corruption to glue itself onto the nearest living person, namely the one who killed it and transform them into the next Lightwarden in its place. At first, the Warrior of Light seems to immune to it and is able to disperse the aether and return night to the sky but as Y'shtola and later Ryne discover, the Warrior has been unwittingly been absorbing excess amounts of Light corruption. Killing the one in Rak'tika causes them to exhibit slight pangs, and the second-to-last one in Amh Areng causes excruciating pain as their very soul starts to crack at the seams. Because its the only way to rid the First of the Light, the Warrior is forced to kill Innocence, and the corruption becomes so bad that they're turning into a Lightwarden so strong that it brings everlasting light to every region in Norvrandt just by being there, making everything they've done worthless. In the end, the only reason why the Warrior didn't turn was because Ryne was using all her strength to keep the transformation at bay and and later Ardbert merges his soul with the Warrior to give the Light something to channel the excess Light through. This in turn gives the Warrior enough raw Light to survive against Hades and burn the rest of it away to kill the Ascian.
  • The Captain: As of 4.4, if the player has met all the requirements, this is their rank in their respective Grand Company.
  • Casual Danger Dialogue: Some of their dialogue options come across as them being rather flippant in the face of danger. After suffering their first major defeat against Zenos and being sent sprawling across the field, Raubahn asks if they're alright. One of the Warrior's responses is, "I think my pride just took a hit."
  • The Champion: When Alphinaud and Tataru are accused of heresy in Ishgard, the Warrior of Light volunteers to act as Tataru's champion and fight the knights of the Heavens' Ward in her stead.
  • Character Development: At the beginning, they're just a simple adventurer going along for the ride and rarely emote anything beyond a nod or something similar. They also do what they're told without complaint. As the story progress, the Warrior of Light becomes a lot more expressive and the replies they can give can range from a variant of the usual "yes" to the more sarcastic or jerkass nature. They will also frequently lampshade the situations that they get themselves into and they can even snark from time to time. The Warrior of Light also becomes more invested with their relationship with the Scions and other major characters and are willing to fight for what's right and defending the weak rather than doing it for the sake of glory.
    • This is reflected in the CGI trailers. In the original 1.0 trailer, the WoL was a short-haired and clean shaven young man, and by the time of the Calamity, his hair has grown out and he's become slightly taller. In the Heavensward trailer he switches from Warrior to Dragoon to emphasize the new relationship he has with Ishgard. The Stormblood trailer shows him first as a Monk with a new, shorter haircut, before switching him to Samurai and growing his hair out to near Blinding Bangs levels. The Shadowbringers trailer shows his hair growing out even more, his complexion darkening considerably, and developing a much more obvious beard as he switches to Dark Knight. This crosses over with Expository Hairstyle Change.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome:
    • Along with their ability to use the Echo, the Scions of the Seventh Dawn specifically seek out the Warrior of Light for this reason. They repeatedly act in service of others without a desire for reward, such as when they intervene on a refugee's behalf against Ungust and his goons. This tendency is what convinces the Scions that the Warrior of Light would be an invaluable addition to their cause.
    • Their willingness to help others goes so far as to make them an Extreme Doormat, helping virtually anyone if they so much as ask nicely (or not). This is pointed out as not being a good thing, with others reminding the Warrior repeatedly to assert themseves more. During the Dark Knight storyline, Fray points this out to them, but the Warrior can simply respond with, "It's what we do."
    • Following Minfilia's decision to become one with Hydaelyn and later guide the Warriors of Darkness back to their world to help them save it, the Scions debate who should lead them, if they need an overseer at all. Thancred notes that in terms of sheer competence, the Warrior of Light would be near the top of the list of candidates. But the responsibilities that come with leadership would get in the way of their usual duties, namely killing primals, kicking the Empire's ass, and helping the poor and hungry.
    • Subverted regarding the Namazu. Due to an awful first impression courtesy of Gyodo, the Warrior's first response to seeing a distressed Namazu at the edge of the Azim Steppe is to essentially go Screw This, I'm Outta Here! until the Namazu chastises them for leaving him to his own devices. They can even respond to the Namazus' request for aid with a hells no for emphasis, only going along with it at Temulun's behest and Because Destiny Says So. This is all Played for Laughs, of course.
  • The Chosen One: The player is chosen by Hydaelyn to be her blade against the darkness. While there are others in possession of the Echo, and thus capable of fighting a primal, the Warrior of Light is consistently said to be both stronger and more skilled in the Echo than them, to the point where, by Stormblood, they are able to project it as a barrier to shield others from tempering. Even after Shadowbringers explains once and for all that the Echo is more or less a literal echo of a person's original power as their Ancient self the Warrior of Light is still well above everyone else as their original Ancient self was so powerful they held the seat of Azem on the Convocation, charged with protecting the world from whatever might threaten it and its people.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: The more the story progresses, the more opportunities arise for more.. unique responses in dialogue, ranging from simply being a Naïve Newcomer to veering straight into Idiot Hero territory, and then this trope. It's the only way to describe some of the actions the Warrior of Light performs in certain sequences, particularly the Hildibrand quest line as it progresses when they're not the Only Sane Man.
  • Closest Thing We Got: The reason they're dispatched as an envoy to send word for the planned memorial service at Carteneau is that their heroic deeds in so short a time makes them the closest thing to the Warriors of Light around. It's not until well after the memorial services that they're granted the title of "Warrior of Light" in earnest.
  • Combat Clairvoyance: This is why you can see AoE markers before a big attack lands. The Echo allows you to sense your own impending doom (or at least severe injury) with just enough forewarning to avoid it.
  • The Confidant:
    • The Warrior's naturally quiet and open-minded personality makes them an ideal confidant for their companions' worries. Alphinaud, Alisaie, Yda, Estinien, and many others trust them enough to confide their deepest secrets and insecurities, while the Warrior is able to listen intently and offer encouragement and advice.
    • Nanamo considers the Warrior one of the few people she can open up to. Not only is the Warrior an outsider unbound by Ul'dah's hierarchy, but they are also a doubtlessly trustworthy hero who has risked their life for Eorzea countless times. Because of this, Nanamo is willing to share her desire to Abdicate the Throne with the Warrior even before her most trusted advisor and ally, Raubahn, and enlists their counsel in deciding how best to help the Ala Mhigan refugees following the events of Stormblood.
  • The Conscience: The Warrior of Light doesn't just fight primals and liberate subjugated lands. They have an uncanny knack for inspiring people to become better versions of themselves.
  • Cultured Badass: In addition to being a One-Man Army who punches out an Eldritch Abomination every other moon, they can also be a master artisan, a Supreme Chef, a musical virtuoso, a talented dancer, a Professional Gambler, and an Adventurer Archaeologist.
  • Dark Is Not Evil:
    • Outside of the Dark Knight class, a Duskwight, Xaela, or Hrothgar Warrior of Light is this. In the Duskwight's case, they are discriminated in part because of their dark appearance and stereotyped as criminals. For the Xaela, they have a Proud Warrior Race reputation as well as having a dark theme to them as a whole, having dark scales and being created by the Dusk Mother according to creation tales. The dark scales also give them a particularly demonic/voidsent appearance for the males, while females resemble succubi. As for Hrothgar, they are the newest addition to the game and are the first truly monstrous race to become playable, whose first contact with the rest of the Eorzeans was met with fear and panic, but managed to stifle all-out conflict by learning the language of the other races. Nevertheless, outside of RP, a Duskwight, Xaela, and Hrothgar Warrior of Light is as heroic as any other race.
    • Inside of jobs, the Warrior of Light can be a Black Mage (illegal because of its raw destructive power and reputation for demon summoning and human sacrifice), Dark Knight (demonized for, again, tapping into void powers and known as murderers to the public despite actually being vigilantes. The art itself also takes a toll on the user's mind) and Warrior (controls a rage that if control slips, can turn them into an indiscriminate and unstoppable tornado of destruction and collateral damage) while still being Eorzea's near-worshipped champion of the smallfolk and hero of the Mothercrystal.
    • Shadowbringers is all about them becoming the "Warrior of Darkness" of the First, which - since Light is now the overwhelming force threatening to destroy the world and Darkness the underdog barely holding out - entails being exactly as heroic and helpful as they always were.
  • Dented Iron:
    • Late in Heavensward and in Stormblood, it's implied that between being backstabbed several times, the early massacre of the Scions proceeded by the loss of Moenbryda, Haurchefaunt, Ysayle, Minfillia and Papalymo, and all of the fighting, bloodshed and death left in their wake that the Warrior of Light is just simply tired, but they have to keep fighting anyway, because Hydaelyn still needs them, and to protect this world that those they've lost died protecting. The Dark Knight storyline for Stormblood makes it explicit, as Myste is some form of amalgamation of the Warrior's grief over their lost friends, and guilt over the fields of blood left in their wake.
    • As we proceed through the expansions, their optional responses start to provide choices that include options which are increasingly belligerent from frustration and outright threats to sarcasm and a disregard for safety.
    • As of Shadowbringers, they no longer cheer at the end of a dungeon, instead looking forlone and contemplative. Given their past trauma and the escalating tragedies and struggles they face during the expansion, its no wonder they're hitting the limits of their endurance.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: The Warrior of Light has personally slain every primal on the face of Eorzea and beyond, destroyed the Ultima Weapon, Omega, and any other number of Physical Gods that have threatened the world for decades if not centuries. While they usually aren't alone in this endeavor, their martial strength becomes the stuff of legend, and there is no one else more trusted to take on the latest monster threat than them.
  • Do Not Call Me Sir: Tahla Molkoh christens the Warrior "Griffin's Bane" for defeating the Griffin atop the walls of Castrum Oriens. Given how emotionally heated that confrontation was, the Warrior is understandably not fond of being reminded of it despite Tahla's insistence. While introducing Alpa to her, Tahla again calls them that, which confuses the Ananta and asks if they should call them that. The Warrior vehemently denies this, with the implication that they'd much rather be called by their name.
  • Dragon Rider: At the end of Heavensward, they return to Ishgard on Midgardsormr's back, a truly historic moment given the enmity between dragons and Ishgardians. "Dragon Rider" subsequently becomes one of their many titles.
  • The Dreaded:
    • Late into the main story questline, imperial soldiers will start displaying reluctance to face you during cutscenes due to your rising power. This is especially notable just before the fight with Rhitahtyn sas Arvina, where one of the soldiers with him appears visibly shocked and frightened when he learns that you're the one responsible for defeating the primals.
    • Your reputation is starting to become this to your enemies by Heavensward; this is perfectly exemplified after killing The Knights of the Round, where the leader of the group sees your character's face masked in shadows as he dies and asks in genuine terror "Who...what are you?!" And also, you've become so powerful with the blessing of light restored that even the Ascians are worried about you, to the point Lahabrea is beyond words after you defeat him for the second time.
    • You also become this to the faction of Crystal Braves who betrayed you and the Scions. While ordered to arrest you on sight; many of them who walk around Revenant's Toll are shaken even just by talking to you. While they play it off as not worth their time; it's very apparent that they really don't want to fight a well known Godkiller and Demonslayer.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: One of the things that seems to consistently frustrate the Warrior of Light as the story carries on is having their good deeds turned back around on them or barely be acknowledged. Fray in the Dark Knight quest chain notes this themself and is actually the physical incarnation of these feelings born from the Crystal Braves' betrayal and the Wandering Dramaturge with his inane fetch quests and little to no respect for their hard work makes the Warrior of Light nearly hit a Rage Breaking Point.
  • Embarrassing Nickname: When Hancock meets you in Kugane, he delivers various titles with one oddball title: "Stealer of Pants". If you haven't done the Heavensward Hildebrand storyline, it's something of a Noodle Incident, but if you have, it's one of the Warrior of Light's lowest moments according to their journal for the relevant quest (specifically, the Warrior lures a senile knight out into the middle of nowhere filled with bears and morbols, massages him to sleep, and then steals his clothes to help Hildebrand disguise himself as the old man).
  • Everybody Knew Already: In the finale of Shadowbringers, everyone in the Crystarium reveals that they'd already figured out that the player is the vaunted "Warrior of Darkness", despite the Exarch's attempts to keep it secret. They felt it was rather obvious that the mysterious stranger that arrived from the same world as the Exarch, who was personally welcomed to the city by said Exarch shortly before night returned to Lakeland, and whose travels to each region of Norvrandt invariably preceded the defeat of their respective Lightwardens was the most likely candidate.
  • Evolving Weapon: In every expansion, each combat class can forge a Relic weapon which can then be permanently upgraded to more and more powerful forms as part of a lengthy quest chain. The weapon's appearance and name change each time it gets upgraded: for example, the A Realm Reborn Paladin relic weapon Curtana becomes Curtana Zenith, then Curtana Atma, then Curtana Animus, then Curtana Novus, then Curtana Nexus, and is then renamed entirely to Excalibur (and then, finally, Excalibur Zeta).
  • The Exile: Being falsely accused of murder, the player character is forced to seek asylum within Ishgard since the other city-states would likely cause trouble if they showed up.
  • Extreme Doormat: No matter how demeaning or pointless as task may be, the Warrior of Light will do it—even if the only reason someone asks them to is mistaken identity! In fact, other Scions will even tell them to be more assertive, and the Dark Knight 30-50 quest focuses on how their inability to say no has led to them bottling up a lot of frustration on being taken for granted and treated without respect.
  • Facepalm:
    • When Khloe accidentally reveals who the owner of the Hard Place is to an Au Ra stranger, the Warrior of Light (who was trying to keep that information secret from said Au Ra), can only facepalm as the little girl blabbers on.
    • When the Namazu essentially tell the Warrior of Light that they will be helping the Namazu with their seven-year festival (when all the WoL did at this point was bring one of them back to their house from the Steppe), the Warrior of Light just gives a resigned look before facepalming as the camera pans away.
  • Famed in Story: If you decide to have small talk with some of the NPCs, you'll notice that your fame grows over the course of the story. You go from a novice getting advice to the talk of the town and then a Living Legend. That said, many others will hardly notice you and boss you around as if you'd just started adventuring, every so often causing amusing moments when they realize just who you are.
    • Save Ala Mhigo and all the thAla Mhigan NPC's spread across every region of Eorzea (pre-existing from ARR or otherwise) will know who you are and what you have done for them.
  • Family of Choice: The Fortemps family becomes this to them, having been named a ward of the house, meaning that they're pretty much unofficially adopted. In Shadowbringers, when Ardbert talks to them about the home he wanted to protect, the place that comes to the Warrior of Light's mind is Ishgard, and the Fortemps family waiting for them there.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: With the Scions of the Seventh Dawn and Garlond Ironworks.
    • Especially, it's implied, with the Scion from the player's respective city-state, since when they arrive in Minfilia's office, they greet either Yda and Papalymo (Gridania), Thancred (Ul'dah) or Y'shtola (Limsa Lominsa) with a smile, and the Scion in question offers an additional line about expecting the player to come.
    • This often happens during individual class/job storylines; as seen below, everyone's opinion of the player improves as more quests are completed.
  • For Great Justice: In the opening cutscene, the Warrior can say they're becoming an adventurer to seek power, not for its own sake, but for the sake of protecting others.
  • For Want of a Nail: According to Urianger in Shadowbringers, their going to the First was literally the only thing that stopped the Empire from ending the war then and there with the Black Rose.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • In the opening for A Realm Reborn, they dream of falling meteors. Four real-life years later, Patch 5.2 reveals that such a sight is what triggers the Echo; it's a response to a form of PTSD from reminding their soul of the Final Days of Amaurot. In essence, it is an echo of their original incarnation's trauma.
    • After the meteors fall, Hydaelyn speaks to them for the first time. Or rather, they hear Her for the first time. She's always talking in case anyone is listening, but the Echo is a prerequisite for hearing Her, not Her gift or sign of favor.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: Despite being a Heroic Mime, the player forms one with Alphinaud (Realist), Estinien (Cynic), and Ysayle (Optimist) throughout 3.0. The group is traveling throughout Dravania together. The player serves as the Apathetic, not really getting involved in the arguments with the others.
  • Friend to All Children: The Warrior of Light tends to get on pretty well with kids, whether regaling the Doman refugee children with stories about their adventures to telling tales to children for the Starlight Festival (in the 2016 event). Alisaie also mentions that the Warrior of Light enjoys telling stories about their adventures to kids when they aren't out doing everything else in one of the Tales from the Storm.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: A heroic variant. From the Garlean and Ascian perspectives, among many others, the Warrior of Light is some nobody adventurer that came out of the woodwork among many, many identically capable individuals, only to rise up above all impossible odds and thwart their plans at every step while leaving their armies and gods dead in the aftermath like some unstoppable, vengeful entity. Archbishop Thordan found this out the hard way, explicitly planning around the Warrior's intervention only to still be slain after he became a Primal. All he could do at that point was be terrified and ask what they were as he dies.
    • Even the Ascian's plans over plans, where they manipulate heroes and count on them being predictably heroic and thus unwittingly perpetuate the cycle the Ascian's established, eventually come crashing down in the case of this particular Warrior of Light.
  • Genius Bruiser:
    • Most people unaware of the Warrior of Light's achievements, and even some that are aware, dismiss them as simple Dumb Muscle. Even disregarding the fact that the WoL can be a master Astrologian, Scholar, Arcanist and/or Machinist, they are an active part of an organization comprised of some of the best in the most educated nation in the world, and the WoL gets to show many times that they can be just as intelligent inside or outside the battlefield as some of their colleagues, even if not as well-educated.
    • Shadowbringer's Role Quests furthers this. It's implied that, in the absence of people capable of teaching them more advanced abilities, the WoL invented the new techniques they use in the expansion. In most cases this just dabbles in the bruiser side of things, inventing new techniques for martial purposes, but certain Jobs show some astonishing brilliance from the WoL such as the Ninja note , the Astrologian note  and the Machinist note .
  • The Gift: The player possesses the power of the Echo, allowing them to witness past events and rendering them immune to primal tempering, making them The Heretic to The Empire. It also provides a measure of prescience; it's what allows the player to see attack indicators and AOE markers, and in-universe every wipe is explained as being a vision of what could go wrong provided by the echo. Visiting past dungeons, trials or raids is also explained as meditating on previous adventures and growing stronger as a result.
  • Ghost Memory: The Echo allows the Warrior of Light to dive into another person’s memories and witness key moments of that person’s life. While doing so, the WoL will also experience the emotions that the person felt at the time of the memory. In Stormblood we learn this can have severe psychological effects if you can experience the memories of everyone around you with no way to turn it off.
  • Going Native: The Warrior can be interpreted as having come to Eorzea from the lands outside of it, potentially looking for money,fame, or for reasons that they prefer to keep to themselves. But in any case, they soon adopt the continent as their own, standing with the Eorzeans in all their major battles and more or less declaring themselves an Eorzean, regardless if they are one or not, with their allegiance to the Scions and one of the Grand Companies.
  • Good Is Not Soft: It should be remembered that the Warrior of Light is a killer, having ended many lives both important and not. Their guilt over ending so many lives manifests itself during the Dark Knight level 70 questline. The Warring Triad plot also involves Unukalhai realizing he's been putting the Warrior of Light on a pendastal and sneaking off to do "the dirty work" himself rather than stain the purity of his idol. The rest of the Scions confront him on this and emphasize that the Warrior of Light is just as aware as the rest of them that the only thing to do for primal thralls is to put them down and they've done it before.
  • Got Volunteered:
    • While trying to foil the phantom thief threatening to strike Ul'dah's Coliseum, the heroes debate which of them will be the "poor chump" who has to go fight in order to win and secure the treasures. All eyes quickly fall on the Warrior of Light, whose face more or less says, "Who? Me?"
    • This is how you get the Anima Weapons - you go to speak to Rowana, only to encounter Ardashir and Gerolt in an argument. Their arguments and your arrival leads Rowana to declare the creation of the Anima Weapons and that you should be the one to test them, much to your displeasure.
    • The Alchemist story questline has them volunteered to act as a CSI in Revenant's Toll in place of Severian. The Warrior of Light is particularly surprised by this, since they were told that they were only going to be a messenger until the actual consulting alchemist showed up. But since they're the best the guild has to offer, they got sent instead.
  • He's Back: After an expansion's worth of heartbreak and implied depression for the Warrior of Light and the scattered Scions, Patch 3.4 sees the Scions of the Seventh Dawn reunited, the Warriors of Darkness defeated, and the Scions, despite all the hardships up till now, having their resolve restored and their hearts lifted.
  • Heartbroken Badass: The deaths of Moenbryda, Ysayle and Haurchefaunt weigh heavily on the Warrior of Light by the time of Gears of Change.
  • Hello, [Insert Name Here]: You are free to name your character however you want, as long as your name doesn't infringe the rules of the game (i.e. no rude names, insults or other tasteless things).
  • Heroic Build: Implied. Whether or not you actually make your character brawny-looking, the characters in the story will instantly comment on how you have the sturdy look of an adventurer. Mogleo calls you brawny outright, Haurchefant fantasizes about your chiseled body in the original Japanese script, and numerous other characters will comment on how much stronger you look after training.
  • Hero Does Public Service:
    • When they're not romping through dungeons or saving the world, the Warrior of Light can often be found assisting with reconstruction efforts in the Firmament, Doma, and Ala Mhigo, helping Zhloe Aliapoh fund her orphanage and make gifts for the kids, or aiding the beast tribes in their efforts to build and make peace. Their willingness to take up any task, no matter how small, has people shocked that a world-famous hero would stoop to being an errand runner if asked nicely.
    • That said, the Warrior has done so much for so many people with nary a complaint that they start to get antsy when people impose on them. It's one thing for the Warrior to help out in their spare time and out of the goodness of their heart, it's another entirely to be bogged down by their own Chronic Hero Syndrome when others come crying to them for help. It gets to the point that they start to feel Heroic Fatigue from so rarely having the freedom to do as they please because of their fame and prowess. The Dark Knight questline in particular has their buried resentments take form as an Enemy Without.
  • Heroes Love Dogs: One of the sidequests involves feeding, soothing, and eventually befriending a wolf pup.
  • Heroes Prefer Swords: While your Weapon of Choice will vary based on what job you're using, you will always wield a "Blade of Light" to finish off the Ascians. Even weapons like a spear or a rod will be swung like a sword.
  • Heroic Fatigue:
    • This becomes more and more apparent in the level 30 to 50 Dark Knight quests where Fray, or the Warrior of Light rather, become sick and tired of always having to save everyone and doing things they could have done themselves, all without any thanks. This boils over to the point where the Warrior of Light's inner desires and frustrations become their own entity and fight to control them when they refuse to give in to their own desires.
    • By the time you're reunited with Yda and Papalymo in 3.4, Papalymo remarks in some side dialogue that the Warrior of Light looks, pardon his wording, more rugged and world-weary than the last time they saw one another.
    • At the end of the Level 70 Dark Knight quest, Sidurgu remarks that few people have hearts that have bled as much as the Warrior of Light's. To the point that the living embodiment of the regrets they feel for having killed so many people in the name of "justice" manifests as an Enemy Without in a desperate attempt to bargain for forgiveness.
    • The trailer for Shadowbringers shows the Warrior of Light looking extremely haggard as they cross a wasteland as well as looking more scruffy and older.
  • Heroic Mime:
    • Your character's lips move and they gesture animatedly, but only the NPCs can hear what you're saying. The only actual lines assigned to you are menu choices. Gilgamesh makes note of this tendency in the 2.1 Hildibrand quest line, asking himself what role you were to play in the investigation and noting that he'd initially settled on "a silent guardian, content to watch events unfold with minimal interaction".
    • Starting from Heavensward, a few NPCs will take note that the Warrior of Light will just nod in agreement whenever spoken to. For example, Serendipity considered making a Mammet fashioned after the WoL, which would only nod when spoken to.
    • Funnily enough, this was also lampshaded in the original 1.0 launch trailer, which averts the trope by having the protagonist stand-in speak at the end, to the surprise of his party members.
  • Heroic Resolve: When they're on a warpath, almost nothing can stop them. They will rout an army, penetrate the most heavily guarded fortresses, and slay gods and demons alike if it means protecting the people and world they care about. Time and again, they're given Breaking Speeches on the futility of their actions in the face of the latest Physical God they're pitted against. Only to punch out whoever gave it to them in due time.
  • Heroic Self-Deprecation: While their cheerfully stoic face to their friends doesn't betray much, their journal entries in the Dark Knight questline underscore just how badly the title of "Warrior of Light" is weighing on them. Losing so many people they care about and being forced to shoulder the responsibility to protect and end so many lives leaves them wondering how people still see them as a "good person".
  • Heroism Won't Pay the Bills: Inverted. It's noted that their work as an adventurer pays quite well, nevermind their many accolades as the Warrior of Light. When Alphinaud uses the Scions' coffers to buy back Gosetsu's sword, the Warrior can offer to foot the bill despite it costing as much as a furnished estate. During the Stormblood Hildibrand quest, they're able to to bid 900,000 gold koban to try and outbid a merchant after the inspector is mistaken for a statue. When they whine about not having a Garlond Ironworks outfit of their own, Jessie says that the gear they're wearing is expensive enough to buy a house.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Subverted. Although they're framed for the assassination of Nanamo, the Warrior of Light's name isn't tarnished due to Gridania's and Limsa Lominsa's leaders convincing the Syndicate to keep things under wraps until decisive evidence of the Scions' alleged crimes could be found. Kan-E-Senna, Merlwyb, and Rauban are quick to say that they never doubted any of the Scions for a second and move to clear the Warrior of Light's name completely as soon as they are able.
  • Hey, You!: Due to being named via Hello, [Insert Name Here], their name is never spoken in voiced cutscenes. They're instead only ever referred to as "you", "Warrior of Light", "Scion", or one of their many, many titles.
  • Hidden Depths:
    • Despite being a hero renowned throughout Eorzea, they despise both the title and the fact that they have to help almost everyone for little more than a thank you, and sometimes not even that, and feel extremely guilty for all the lives they've been forced to take throughout their adventures.
    • Almost paradoxically however, they love fighting, to the point that they actively seek out someone that they won't feel guilty about fighting against, and cannot stop themselves from helping other people even in matters that they don't want to help. They also seem to love traveling and adventuring in general; it is one of the few things that neither Fray nor Myste criticize, and is one of the few things that seem to give them joy. It turns out that they already loved traveling and adventuring as Azem, whose role in the Convocation of Amaurot demanded them to live that kind of nomadic life.
    • On a less serious note, the WoL's ability to master styles of fighting goes well with them learning other trades, and they have proved themselves quite skilled with matters of business, mining, gardening, crafting, alchemy, cooking, or even fishing.
    • What triggers the Bard job quest isn't some need to learn more archery techniques from a legendary master, but rather the fact that they seem genuinely fond of singing and poetry. Similarly, they don't even see Troupe Falsaime do any fighting before approaching Nashmeira about becoming a Dancer, they seem interested in the dancing in and of itself. In the level 80 finale quest, they look delighted to have a chance to dance a duo with Ranaa even without any fighting involved.
    • Dialogue from Aymeric in the Heavensward patch quests suggests they're a skilled (or at least animated, despite their appearance) storyteller. Alisaie is similarly impressed by the Warrior's stories, while "Tales of the Storm" state that the Warrior spends some of their downtime regaling chlldren with them. The quest chain "The Paths We Walk" also has the Warrior of Light take a trip down memory lane, narrating eloquent descriptions of the people they've met and the things they've seen over the course of their journey through Ishgard.
  • Hope Bringer: A theme throughout the story, the Warrior of Light's ability to routinely achieve what is thought impossible and otherwise bring about the greatest good possible, to the point of uniting people from all walks of life behind one cause. Lord Haurchefant even describes them as "hope incarnate", which Count Edmont dismissed as him waxing lyrical until he sees what the Warrior of Light is capable of.
  • Horrible Judge of Character: You recruit Laurentius, a Wood Wailer who willingly sold out to the Garleans for profit, to join the Crystal Braves. Surprisingly, he's among the Crystal Braves who betray you for the Monetarists, though it's implied that the Warrior was trying to help Laurentius turn over a new leaf.
  • Hot-Blooded: Played for Laughs. Upon joining the Order of the Twin Adders, one of your dialogue choices allows you to swear to slaughter your enemies and drink deep of their blood. The officers present to swear you in are clearly unnerved by your fervor.
  • Humble Hero:
    • Their interactions in the story show that they don't place much personal stock in the title of "Warrior of Light", as they're simply doing what they feel is right, only using their title and fame as a means of helping others. During the Heavensward Leatherworker questline, the bard Aubrenard sings the Warrior's praises as a master craftsman, prompting the Warrior to blush and try to wave off the praise.
    • At the start of the Stormblood Culinarian quests, Lyngsath calls the Warrior in because of a customer dying to meet the Bismarck's most decorated chef. He rolls his eyes at their "sickenin' modesty", calling them a "daft sod" for not realizing that he's talking about them.
    • But for as much as they hate being the target of reverance, the Warrior is (rightfully) confident in their skills as a combatant. When Byakko warns them not to hold anything back against him, they can simply reply that he's in good hands, as they have bested kami before.
  • Hypercompetent Sidekick: To Hildibrand Manderville, as the one doing most of the actual detective work on top of handling most of the bad guys they inevitably encounter.
  • I Choose to Stay: Brutally denied in "Griffin, Griffin on the Wall"; you can choose to stay with Papalymo when he decides to perform a Heroic Sacrifice to contain the emerging Shinryu, but Papalymo decides to blast you onto the escaping airship to get you out of there.
  • Idiot Ball: Grabs hold of a small one during the Hildibrand questline. They are told that the weapon thief they are looking for is a man in garish red clothing. Moments later Gilgamesh, clearly the man they are looking for, shows up. Hildibrand forgot exactly what the description was except that the perp was wearing ridiculous clothing and doesn't realize he's looking for Gilgamesh. This is in character for him, but the Warrior of Light either doesn't make the connection as well, or is just so apathetic as to let the farce of a search continue for a while.
  • Immune to Mind Control: The Echo renders the Warrior of Light immune to a Primal's tempering. Both Ifrit and Garuda try to enslave the Warrior, only to fail, the former claiming it was because another (Hydalyn) has already claimed them. This is foreshadowing of the reveal that Hydalyn and Zodiark are the first primals
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: They can hit a fully armored soldier between his the chinks of his plate with a blowgun from atop a cliff at well over 300 yalms away.
  • Inexplicably Awesome: On top of the Warrior of Light's rather vague pre-game backstory, once you enter Shadowbringer content, you learn all of your new techniques essentially by yourself. Some are logical, such as Black Mage learning new ways of manipulating aether they had already been using, but others, such as Machinist building up an arsenal of incredibly powerful weapons like the Automaton Queen and the Summoner obtaining an entirely new Demisummon, seem to be nothing but the Warrior literally making up new techniques wholesale because they can.
  • Instant Expert:
    • It doesn't take them long at all to pick up anything they put their mind to, becoming great at any number of skills and professions. This is particularly noticeable in the Machinist storyline, as the introduction quest has you outshooting your own marksmanship teacher in a one-on-one duel.
    • While getting ready to throw a concert in Lord Francel's honor, it takes even a non-Bard warrior just two practice sessions to be mistaken for a piano virtuoso by passerby in the Firmament.
    • Though they have help from the Soul of a Dancer, the Warrior only needs a few practice steps with Nashmeira to segue into a full-fledged performance that leaves even the members of Troupe Falsaime in awe. Soul Crystal or not, everyone recognizes the Warrior's prodigious talent, and Nashmeira specifically seaks them out for the poise and grace they carry themselves with.
  • In the Hood: The "Scions Traveler's Outfit" that Tataru makes for the Warrior just prior to Shadowbringers includes a hood and mask that completely hides one's hair and eyes.
  • Irony: The single greatest foe of the Ascians is themselves the reincarnation of one of the greatest and strongest of their race. A Warrior of Light that is an Au Ra of the Raen clan doubles on this, seeing as Azim is a legend seemingly based off of Azem, meaning they're reincarnated as a member of the race thought to be made by Azem themselves that unwittingly originated their clan's nomadic ways with their adventuring.
  • It Began with a Twist of Fate: This is how A Realm Reborn's story starts. Rather than being immediately hailed as a Warrior of Light the player character starts off as a simple mercenary just looking for work. It's only after accepting a seemingly simple request does it progress into meeting the Scions of the 7th Dawn, and eventually becoming a world renowned hero.
  • It's Personal: The player character is visibly hit hard by Haurchefant's death, and one dialogue option has them swear vengeance upon Zephirin — and by extension, the rest of the Heavens' Ward — for killing him.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: You are definitely heroic no matter how you play your character, but as the story goes on you get an increasing amount of opportunities to be kind of a jerk to people. Usually they laugh it off as you not being serious.
  • Kindhearted Cat Lover: After helping Aleport with its rampant coeurl and jackal problem, the Warrior can take in the last remaining coeurl kitten as a pet not long after taking in a wolf pup.
  • Legacy of the Chosen: It's not a coincidence the Echo awoke in the Warrior of Light nor that Hydaelyn chose to support them. Shadowbringers reveals the Warrior of Light in a past life was Azem, the fourteenth seat of the ruling body of the Ascians of Amaurot. The Ascians in fact being the ancient precursor race from which all life on the Source and the Shards descend. Azem was tasked with protecting the world from all that may threaten it, and often clashed with the other seats over their methods, including their decision to summon Zodiark. Further, it's implied even after the Sundering split their soul into fourteen pieces, on every world, in every life, Azem rose again and again to fight against the Ascians attempts to destroy the new worlds to bring back the old one.
  • Leitmotif: While "The Maker's Ruin" has been acknowledged as their battle theme for a while, their proper character theme appears in Shadowbringers, named "More than Truth".
  • Living Legend:
    • By the time you defeat Ramuh, your character's become so well known around Eorzea and you reputation is even spreading to the rest of the world that you're attributed with single-handedly inspiring an entire generation to become adventurers in service to the good of the country.
    • The entire sequence of events in post-Stormblood and all of Shadowbringers (and by extension everything that comes after) is due to their story inspiring the future survivors of the 8th Umbral Calamity. To the point where despite the extremely bleak, hopeless and unrepairable post-apocalypse setting the survivors find themselves in, the story of the Warrior's deeds persists long LONG after their demise to inspire multiple generations to commit themselves to earnestly work on unwriting the calamity itself by throwing a light into the past. Urianger comments that for such a complex and vulnerable plan to have not fallen apart over such a long period of time is nothing short of miraculous, to which the Crystal Exarch cites the hero's inspiration as the major contributing factor.
  • Light Is Good: In the grand tradition of the franchise, the player once again takes on the mantle of Warrior of Light and, regardless of class, is able to use Light to save the day. (Though mostly in cutscenes.)
  • The Lost Lenore: What Haurchefant becomes to them. While the deaths of all the allies they lost clearly hurt, Haurchefant's is repeatedly shown to be the one that breaks them. Unexpectedly, they do not get better over time.
  • Luckily, My Shield Will Protect Me: Whether or not they actually choose to wield it as a Gladiator or a Paladin, the end of Heavensward has Count Fortemps gift them a kite shield emblazoned with his house's coat of arms.
  • Made of Iron: The Warrior of Light can endure truly ludicrous amounts of punishment in the process of fighting Ascians, the Garlean Empire, Primals and other similarly strong adversaries. In A Realm Reborn alone, the one attack they explicitly cannot endure on their own or through the use of in-battle devices is the Ultima Weapon's Ultima spell, for which Hydaelyn herself has to shield the Warrior.
    • Notably in Heavensward, Thordan expresses disbelief at your continued survival after he launches his ultimate attack. At least while fighting Nidhogg, the Warrior has the excuse of being powered up by Hraesvelgr's eye. Ravana, Bismark, the Warring Triad, all of Alexander's fights, and the entirety of the Shadow of Mhach raid enemies have no such excuse.
    • In Stormblood, the more notable things the Warrior endures include, in no particular order, falling at terminal velocity (Byakko's fight), a gigantic sword swinging down on them (Susano), having copies of other Primals' ultimates striking down on them one after another (Shinryu), and having "Optimized" versions of their own level 2 DPS Limit Breaks thrown at them.
    • By the time of Shadowbringers, the Warrior is almost, but not quite, tough enough to single-handedly take on the overflowing Light that threatens to destroy an entire world. Exaggerated in the Eden raid, as the very first fight against Eden Prime lets them survive being thrown by a planetary beam into a nearby galaxy that then explodes. They also can survive Ruby Weapon's use of Optimized Ultima - with only normal Trial healing, no shields from Hydaelyn - which the Weapon will spam.
  • Magic Knight: While not all classes will use MP, all forms combat in Eorzea do use magic and aether to achieve their superhuman feats. Every class/job has at least one aspect that is considered supernatural or magical. This is especially true with jobs. Even if they learn nothing too flashy as a base class, the magic starts to pick up as the job it follows into. Not even the Machinist is spared this trope. Their bullets are made of aether.
  • Magnetic Hero: Ironically for someone who barely speaks the Warrior of Light may very well be the most social of the Scions, whether it was the rest of the Scions, Garlond Ironworks, the people they meet during the class quests, or the people they meet and befriend during their many, many, adventures, the WoL always has a friend somewhere, no matter what part of Eorzea or Doma they visit.
  • Master of All: You can master every class on the same character if you so desire. Until 4.0 it was highly beneficial, in some cases practically mandatory, to branch out to at least some other classes to get access to cross-class abilities.
  • Master of None: One of the things worth mentioning about the Warrior of Light's status as The Ace is that in regards to a lot of jobs, the Warrior of Light is actually weaker on paper than a lot of their job masters, due to their masters having trained their entire lives while the Warrior is an Instant Expert thanks to their soul crystals. A good example of this is to look at characters like Estinien and Widargelt, as Dragoons and Monks they have strength and abilities it's unlikely the Warrior of Light will ever have. However, in most situations the Warrior of Light makes up for this with their massive amounts of versatility, such as mixing Lancer fighting style into Dragoon fighting, or Pugilism into Monk arts, so even if they won't be throwing out castrum-destroying Dragonfire Dives or army-decimating Ki attacks, their flexibility makes them dangerous in an entirely different way. In-lore another thing that allows the WoL to stay ahead is their ability to change between jobs in the middle of a fight, as shown in the Shadowbringers trailer, which, of course, they can't do in-game.
  • Messianic Archetype: The Warrior of Light is an interesting example due to the fact that whether they are this trope, or Satanic Archetype, depends entirely on the point of view of the main conflict From the point of view of the races of Eorzea they are The Chosen One of the Top God, are a savior beloved by everyone, if were a Legacy character they came back from the dead, have True Companions, were betrayed by one of this companions and remain a beacon of hope and a paragon of virtue.
  • Military Mage: It doesn't come up often, given that the WoL is considered the Champion of Eorzea as a whole, but they are indeed part of the military, as of 4.4 having reached the rank of captain, and thanks to them being a Magic Knight even in their least magically inclined Jobs, they are always this.
  • Multi-Melee Master: They can master a vast array of melee weapons, ranging from swords to spears to axes or even just their fists in tandem with some knuckledusters. Multiple characters will also praise them for their masterful skill with any of these weapons.
  • Mysterious Past: Who they were and what they did outside of Eorzea is a complete blank, in both Legacy and A Realm Reborn. All that's known is that the Warrior has an almost-unquenchable thirst for adventure, and came to the troubled lands in search of it. Even when Shadowbringers introduces the idea of them being the current incarnation of Azem, everything that could be catalogued in the interim is a mystery. A lot of this is on purpose for player reasons so you can determine things for yourself.
  • Named Weapons: The various relic weapons that the Warrior of Light can obtain have unique names to set them apart from more generic weapons. The level 50 relic axe for the Warrior Job is called Bravura, for instance.
  • Nice Guy: While there is an increase in the amount of jerkish dialogue answers you can give, nothing says you have to take them, and it is possible to play the Warrior of Light as kind-hearted from beginning to end.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • After defeating Nidhogg, the Warrior and Alphinaud throw Nidhogg's eyes into the bottom of a chasm near Ishgard. The Warriors of Darkness retrieve them and give them to Elidibus, who gives them to The Griffin, who uses them to summon a primal even greater than Bahamut. To be fair, Aymeric assumed tossing the eyes into the abyss was a safe bet because the violent turbulence of wind and water aether made it impossible for a normal person to survive in. Unfortunately for them, their enemies are not normal people.
    • In Stormblood, the Warrior of Light assists Yugiri in assassinating Zenos in Doma, despite Zenos curb stomping them already. Predictably, all they accomplish is alerting The Empire that the Scions are in Doma.note 
  • Not So Stoic:
    • After dealing with a barrage of fetch quests courtesy of the Company of Heroes while the threat of Titan bears down on Limsa Lominsa, Y'shtola remarks that the Warrior of Light looks like they've been to the seventh hell and back, showing just how fed up the normally cheerfully stoic hero is.
    • Heavensward begins to show cracks in the player character's stoic persona, especially after Haurchefant sacrifices himself to save them. On a more comedic note, the Warrior of Light rapidly cycles between shock and anger while receiving multiple revelations all about how pointless a certain extended fetch quest during the Ivalice raid series was. They even get the option to demand that a quest giver not use the "f" word (fetch) in front of them after the whole farce.
    • On a more comedic note, during the Namazu beast tribe storyline, when one of the Namazu suggests sacrificing them in a giant wicker man, they react with vehement disagreement.
    • After listening to Vauthry's insane rant on the nature of Eulmore and the people within, the Warrior of Light looks pissed and clenches their fists like they're about to try to attack him then and there. Alphinaud has to stop them before they do anything they'd regret, but it's one of the few times outside of the Dark Knight storyline we see them get genuinely angry.
    • Pretty much any time they agree to help someone, it's by simply nodding their head, possibly punching one hand with the other as if so say "let's kick some ass". In the Hildibrand questline, they bear witness to Julyan completely knocking out three people, including the enormous Gilgamesh note , with a frying pan in short order. Julyan then turns and calmly asks for the Warrior's assistance. With a nervous look in their eyes, they very quickly nod rapidly, not wanting to be her next target.
  • Omniglot: The Echo allows the player to comprehend any spoken language, including the various beastmen dialects and the Black Speech of the Ascians.
  • One-Man Army:
    • They're explicitly referred to as such by Ilbard. Given their accomplishments, including slaying every primal on the face of Eorzea, storming the Garlean Empire's most heavily guarded fortresses, and routing waves of enemies on their own, it's hard to argue with it.
    • During the grand melee between Ishgard and the other members of the Eorzean Alliance, everyone on the Ishgardian side has no delusions that it was anyone but the Warrior of Light who granted them victory over the Alliance's finest soldiers in the mock battle.
    • In the Paladin questline, Jenlyn accuses the Warrior of being a Monetarist spy and calls for the entirety of the Sultansworn to execute them on the spot. Not only does the Warrior defeat all of them, but they do so non-lethally.
  • Our Souls Are Different: During the second boss fight in the final Stormblood dungeon, a Garlean scientist forcibly extracts the Warrior of Light's soul from their body. The body itself goes comatose, but when the Warrior's soul forces itself back into its body, they are revived. The scientist is very surprised to see the soul rebel against the extraction, which could imply that the Warrior's soul is unique. It turns out that this is because the Warrior of Light is the reincarnation of one of the fourteen most powerful people of the ancient Precursor Race.
  • The Paragon: Of all the characters in the story, the Warrior of Light is considered the bravest and most incorruptible of them all, suffering through thick and thin for the sake of Eorzea and their loved ones and still managing to smile at the end of it all. Even after suffering from Heroic Fatigue, they continue to serve as Eorzea's greatest hope and an exemplar of strength, determination, and generosity for others to follow.
  • Party in My Pocket: Averted and played straight on occasion, often after unlocking a trial or dungeon NPC's tell you to gather "your adventurer friends" (as in other players) to aid you and on occasion other players in your party will be shown in the background for cutscenes but most of the time the player appears to stand alone until the scene ends. Gets lampshaded more as time goes on, to the point Lyse suggests finding some of your fellow adventurers, who hopefully are coincidentally taking a fishing trip in the Far East at the time of a pressing situation. Shadowbringers introduces the Trust System, where dungeons can be run with a party of nearby NPC's for those who want to avert this.
  • Powerful and Helpless: The Warrior of Light is THE strongest fighter in all of Hydaelyn. This means nothing with cases such as political machinations against them, being drugged, watching your friend's souls get taken one by one, and dealing with The Corruption of becoming a Lightwarden.
  • Power Incontinence:
    • The Warrior of Light has no control over when the Echo will trigger, resulting in them having an out-of-body experience whether or not the time is convenient. This is also coupled with a debilitating headache that can leave them helpless should it trigger on the field of battle, requiring others to snap them out of it or defend the Warrior long enough to shake it off.
    • During the Scholasticate quests, Briarden asks if the Warrior can use the Echo to determine whether or not the missing student Ulaa is in fact a radical revolutionary plotting to frame Archombadin for her disappearance. The Warrior has to shake their head, much to Briarden's disappointment.
  • The Power of Friendship:
    • Although the Warrior of Light is the champion of Hydelyn, there are many others gifted with the Echo (other players) that aid them in fighting primals. Word of God even points out the big difference that helps the player overcome Zenos in the end of Stormblood is that they "brought backup this time".
    • Shadowbringers reveals that even before the Sundering, as Azem they were fond of solving problems with the help of their friends. This is never more evident than the final battle against Elidibus; the Warrior of Light taps into their old power to summon the other seven party members, differently than how the Exarch does, and when it looks like they're going to be locked away in the Rift, they call out to their old best friend from Amaurot times - none other than Emet-Selch - to save them in their darkest hour.
  • Power Loss Makes You Strong: Midgardsormr strips away the blessing of light to test your abilities and see if you really are worthy of being The Chosen One, and after spending a long time without it, by the time you get it back, that's when the general reaction to you tends to be What Are You.
  • Precision F-Strike: They're normally quietly cheerful most of the time and quite eloquent when they do speak. It goes to show how irritated they are with the Namazu that they can respond to their request for help with an oddly aggressive, "Not just no, no, but hells no, no."
  • Propaganda Hero: Their fame as Eorzea's greatest hero has every Grand Company on the continent climbing over each other to get them to join their ranks to bolster their country's position. During important missions like Operation Archon, they're asked to rouse the soldiers with their "stirring gesticulation" out of hope that their fame and status as The Paragon would do what a general could not. Alphinaud also has the Warrior of Light use their status to help him recruit adventurers and soldiers to join the Crystal Braves.
  • Properly Paranoid:
    • By the time you enter Patch 3.4, you keep a wary eye on any one giving you wine or other drinks between Nanamo's near-death and you being drugged before Ser Aymeric's peace conference with the dragons. It almost seems like your character is going totally teetotaler in response.
    • In 4.5, the reveal of Gaius being alive puts the Warrior of Light on edge since they have tussled with them in the past and he knows what their plans were.
  • Protagonist Without a Past: The player's past and motivations don't come up too often, although the game gives you a few opportunities to define your character a little. They don't change the flow of the game, but mostly exist to let you define what sort of person your character is. Averted in Shadowbringers, concerning their original identity.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Although races have a few (negligible) points of difference in starting stats, there is no gender difference at all apart from some cosmetic gear.
  • The Quiet One:
    • The Warrior of Light doesn't talk too much, especially not in A Realm Reborn, preferring stoic nods more. Starting in Heavensward, they talk a lot more, but there is almost always an option to keep silent. Less so in Stormblood where you don't have the option to not say anything as much, but even so the Warrior of Light tends to let others do the talking. This is also lampshaded repeatedly, with others complaining about how one-sided conversations with them tend to be.
    • This largely plays to their advantage during the Disciple of the Hand jobs though. Their willingness to stop and listen to their clients' concerns allows them to come up with an idea guaranteed to satisfy them. This is heavily contrasted by the comparatively impulsive and vocal craftsmen around them, like Blanstyr and Cemi, who fail to complete their assignments precisely because they can't slow down and listen to others.
  • Quit Your Whining: 3.2 has the Warrior of Light giving these off at times (especially to the Vath Deftarm) if you choose to respond that way, though some dialogue choices will have them giving some variant of the trope no matter what.
  • Red Baron:
    • The Warrior of Light is referred to as the "bane" of the primals they defeat. As such, they garner a wealth of these titles over the course of the story, including "Ifrit's Bane" and "Titan's Bane". The Garlean Empire also refers to them as "eikon-slayer".
    • Their fame and status as the World's Best Warrior also gets them called "warrior of warriors".
    • The Ascians know the Warrior as the "Bringer of Light", as their victories serve in Hydaelyn's favor and strengthen her hold in the cosmic order.
  • Regenerating Health: Happens in several main story quests throughout Heavensward and Stormblood under the "Brilliant Conviction" status where the Warrior of Light is breaking so many boundaries that they can regenerate HP on their own without any assistance and gains boosted strength as well. For gameplay purposes, the buff is to help the player get a slight edge when it comes to doing some of the major fights solo.
  • Reincarnation: One of the biggest reveals in Shadowbringers is that in a past life their unsundered soul held the seat of Azem on the Convocation of Fourteen, the ruling body of the Precursor Race, before the apocalypse and split of the worlds. Azem's soul was split across them and reincarnated. The Wol can be considered the main shard of it, as the others return to them every time a new calamity occurs or, in Ardbert's case, when both shards are consenting. A very sad part of this, is Azem was a very close friend of Emet-Selch, aka Solus, who apparently got an inch of the Wol's true identity, and was extremely conflicted and displeased by it.
  • Remember When You Blew Up a Sun?: The other characters in the story frequently bring up the Warrior of Light's heroic feats in conversation, particularly regarding their ability to single-handedly take down primals, facsimiles of the gods of the beast races' religions. In Stormblood, Genbu seeks out the Warrior of Light to help him quell the aramitama of his fellow auspices because of the Warrior's triumph over Susano.
  • Renaissance Man: Can easily switch between and master multiple classes, not to mention become a master of every major discipline on the face of Eorzea when it would normally take a lifetime to master one.
  • Ret-Gone: In-universe example; the Warriors of Light (Player Characters who have been playing since the original release) have been forgotten by the world at large due to the spell Louisoix used to send them five years into the future, to the point that although their deeds have been remembered, their faces are complete blanks. Most seem to remember them only as silhouettes against a bright light. At the end of the story of 2.0, everyone remembers you all at once.
  • Rookie Red Ranger: They are the newest member of the Scions of the Seventh Dawn during the events of A Realm Reborn, having never heard of them prior to meeting their members while starting out as an adventurer. It isn't long before they gain the reputation of being the strongest of them all as the Warrior of Light.
  • Satanic Archetype: The Warrior of Light is an interesting example due to the fact that they are a genuine heroic case of this trope, and whether they are this or Messianic Archetype depends entirely on the point of view of the main conflict. From the perspective of the Ascians, they were a powerful figure among their people who disobeyed the greater authority, was cast out in disgrace, had their body disfigured (in the Ascians' eyes), and is now the head of an army of (again in the Ascians' eyes) malformed beings who seek to overthrow the remnants of the Convocation and deny mortals true salvation in the form of the Rejoining.
  • Seen It All: It's hard to tell due to their stoic tendencies, but according to their quest journal, the Warrior of Light starts out as baffled as everyone else by everything involving Hildibrand. But by Heavensward's questline, they seem to simply accept everything with a bland smile and nod when people unfamiliar with Hildibrand are losing it over his insanity.
  • Self-Deprecation: As Fray and Myste are parts of the Warrior's psyche, their barbs towards the Warrior during the Dark Knight questlines are essentially the Warrior taking potshots at themselves.
  • Sergeant Rock: Should they be a sergeant in one of the Grand Companies, they can still lead squads of elite adventurers into the most dangerous locales on the planet and come out on top.
  • Ship Tease:
    • A lot with both females and males regardless of gender. The most blatant ones are Haurchefant, Hien, Aymeric, Minfilia, Lyse, and Crystal Exarch aka G'raha Tia.
    • As part of the fifth anniversary celebrations two videos were shown on screen with the Warrior of Light having potential dates during the Rising celebrations with Y'sthola, Alisaie, Hien, Magnai, Lyse, Sadu, Yugiri and Alphinaud. All of these are filled with Ship Tease to the brim.
  • Silent Snarker: Some scenes can have the Warrior of Light give the appropriate gesture or facial expression showing off their snark.
  • Slasher Smile: Whiel battling Garlean forces under Grynwaht's command at Carteneau, the Warrior flashes a sinister when Nero tol Scaeva lends them his magitek armor to help him deal with the rest of Grynwaht's men. Cue Oh, Crap! from the imperials.
  • The Slow Walk: They pull off two very badass slow walks at the end of 3.3. The first one re-enacts part of the Heavensward cinematic, where the Warrior slowly approaches the Horde as Temple Knights fall back. The second occurs after Nidhogg rips off one of Hraesvelgr's wings. The Warrior of Light doesn't even flinch as s/he stares down Nidhogg and proceeds to slowly approach him with a determined look once they obtained Hraesvelgr's eye.
  • The Soulsaver: They become this to the people of the First, by bringing back the Darkness to their world they allow the souls of the people living there to finally pass on, including those of the Sin Eaters.
  • The Stoic: As a result of their Heroic Mime status, the Warrior of Light rarely speaks and—prior to Heavensward, at least—demonstrates little emotion during conversations. Their stoicism is lampshaded repeatedly by multiple characters:
    Thancred: ...You might try to look a little disappointed! Or do you mean to give me another one of your stoic nods? You do, don't you? [sighs]
    Warrior of Light: [nods]
  • Stock Shōnen Hero: No matter what kind of character you create or which dialogue choices you pick, the Warrior Of Light will always have shades of this: They are protective of their friends to the point of invoking The Power of Friendship, are evidently very confident in their combat abilities and have Heroic Spirit for days.
  • Straight Man: They are usually this, though they can sometimes join in on the shenanigans from other characters if the player chooses to. This becomes very apparent in the Healer Role Quests during Shadowbringers where Giott gets frustrated at the Warrior of Light for either not reacting to their insults or jokes or giving them deadpan answers.
  • Suddenly Voiced: In Shadowbringers, after Ardbert willingly rejoins his soul with the Warrior of Light's, they give a voiced line of dialogue to Emet-Selch without any input from the player, albeit with Ardbert's voice (regardless of gender).
    Warrior of Light: This world is not yours to end... This is our future. Our Story.
  • Super Not-Drowning Skills: After undergoing a Kojin ritual in Stormblood, the Warrior of Light is able to breathe water as if it were air, allowing them to swim underwater indefinitely. This detail becomes life saving in Shadowbringers when the Fuath try to drown the Warrior of Light to turn them into one of their own. Since the Warrior is immune to drowning, the Fuath reluctantly leave them be.
  • Supporting Protagonist: Though the Warrior of Light is the one we control and is the one who generally gets stuff done, they are rarely the focus of the story, usually playing silent second fiddle to others in their story arcs.
    • In A Realm Reborn, they are just a mercenary that helps the Scions of the Seventh Dawn fight primals and eventually helps the Eorzean Alliance stop Gaius and his Garlean troops from taking over.
    • In Heavensward, though their reason for coming to Ishgard is personal (being framed for murder), the primary overarching story has little to do with them, with Aymeric, Ysayle, and Estinien having the most character focus.
    • In Stormblood, they are largely just the muscle that helps liberate Doma and Ala Mhigo from Garlemald, with Lyse and to a lesser extent Hien being the focus characters who orchestrate everything.
    • Shadowbringers' primary character arc seems to be about the First's Minfillia coming to terms with who she is and her powers, and Thancred coming to terms with the loss of "his" Minfillia and his feelings about this one. However, both of these arcs are resolved about 2/3rds of the way into the story, and the Warrior of Light finally steps into the role of the protagonist with a major arc focusing on them. Specifically, they are the only one who can slay the Light Wardens plaguing the land without instantly being turned into a Warden themselves when they absorb the Wardens' aether. They are also being tested by Emet-Selch throughout the story as they are the partially rebuilt soul of a major Aumarotian from Emet-Selch's time, and he wants to know if they are reformed enough to join him in the Ascians' quest to unite all of the worlds together again and revive Zodiark.
    • In the Hildibrand quests, they largely serve as an observer to the wacky hijinks that engulf the titular inspector and friends.
  • Sympathy for the Devil:
    • Towards Yotsuyu after defeating her primal form. While she was an enemy to the Warrior of Light, her tragic backstory and complete loss of hope doesn't make the Warrior of Light feel good about their victory and they have some sympathy towards her.
    • The Warrior of Light also expresses some somberness towards Emet-Selch after defeating them, nodding in agreement to uphold their legacy.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: In the case of a new character who isn't imported from FFXIV 1.0 you are treated as an entirely new person who for whatever reason decided to come to Eorzea, with people being reminded of the 1.0 heroes each time you accomplish a feat or act heroically. While you are never called an original Warrior of Light, and indeed the original Warriors of Light remain a foggy memory. The leaders of all city states and other groups come to recognize you as a new Warrior of Light in your own right, and Hydaelyn blesses you in the beginning as her new champion in the first place to replace the ones lost in the 7th Umbral Calamity. This is subverted however, as during the Bahamut raid story, Louisoix confirms he sent the player character forward through time by five years, even if they were created in 2.0, making them a 1.0 Warrior of Light in-story. This had to be confirmed this way most likely not only because of the continuity of the story, but also because the legacy campaign couldn't work for everyone.
  • The Teetotaler: An option for players following the events of the Dwarven Beast tribe story. When asked how you enjoyed the ale they provided, one of the possible answers is, "I never touch the stuff."
  • These Hands Have Killed: While numerous dialogue options indicate that the Warrior enjoys the thrill of battle, their journal entries make it clear that the many people they've killed weighs heavily on their mind. The Stormblood Dark Knight questline has their regrets and desire to atone manifest in the form of Myste, who attempts to atone for their sins by draining the land of aether to create simulacrums of all the people they've killed. It's not until the Warrior and Fray stop Myste that the Warrior finally manages to forgive themselves. Even then, the Warrior believes there will be a reckoning for them somewhere down the line and they'll welcome it when that day comes.
  • Thrill Seeker:
    • When the world of Hydaelyn isn't teetering on the brink of collapse, the Warrior of Light would like nothing more than to do what an adventurer does: go on an adventure. The promise of adventure alone is enough reason for them to join up with the Redbills and explore a voidsent-infested Ghost Ship. After ending the Dragonsong War, they can respond to the Scions' question of what they plan on doing next with, "Go on another adventure, of course."
    • Upon being roped into Ramza and Alma's quest to find and rescue their missing father, the Warrior can answer Alma's pleas for assistance with, "I'd be a poor adventurer if I were to shy away from an adventure."
  • Took a Level in Badass: In Heavensward which is impressive enough considering how powerful the Warrior of Light was before, but once you regain Hydaelyn's Blessing of Light it only adds to your strength to the point that even Lahabrea can't believe you've grown as overwhelmingly powerful as you have.
  • Trauma Button:
    • By the end of Heavensward, being poured drinks. During a private dinner with Aymeric at his estate, the Warrior of Light declines a drink, intensely watches the servant pouring the drink, and then watches Aymeric drink it with a look of worry. Between being drugged themselves at the peace talk, and Nanamo's poisoning right before the expansion, it's clearly left an effect on them. Infact, they have made a habit of refusing offered drinks through the expansions.
    • During the Return to Ivalice raid series, the word "fetch" quickly becomes this after the dramaturge of the Garlean acting troupe you are helping sends you on a (deliberately) extended hunt for a specific bottle of wine. And then he and his wife don't even drink it. And then you get chewed out by the leader of the group and his son for screwing around (even though he told you to help the dramaturge to begin with), leaving the WoL clearly annoyed. When the dramaturge's wife later asks you if you want to... fetch something, the top option has you channel your inner Fray and demand that they never use the "F" word in front of you again.
    • Patch 5.2 reveals falling meteors/comets/etc. are another, not just for them but for any sundered Ancient. The Final Days of Amaurot left such an indelible mark on their past self's soul that witnessing a similar event triggers a flashback and awakens a fragment of the power they held back then—the Echo.
  • Trauma Conga Line: Not counting the many separately distinct examples before (such as the Garlean massacre of the scions) there are a pretty long, continuous series of events from the end of A Realm Reborn through to Stormblood where the Warrior of Light fails a lot and loses a lot of people. While they have many victories (stopping Thordan, ending the Dragonsong War, saving Estinien, killing two Ascians and watching a third die, etc.), it comes at great cost, as they watch Wildred, Moenbryda, Haurchefant, Ysayle, Minfilia, and Papalymo die or be lost in front of them, as well as spend quite some time believing they failed to save Sultana Nanamo, and seeing Y'shtola lose her eyesight and Thancred lose his access to magic because of it. While the Warrior of Light's personality is up to interpretation and choice, they are continuously and strongly implied (particularly in the 60-70 Dark Knight quests) to be very much traumatized due to all of this. There's a reason that they can choose to adopt a simple mantra:
    "For those we have lost. For those we can yet save."
  • Tragic Keepsake:
    • Near the end of Heavensward, Count Fortemps entrusts the Warrior with the remains of Haurchefant's shield, which he used to defend the Warrior from Sir Zephirin's attempt on their life. The Warrior would later lay it to rest at Haurchefant's grave, after which Count Fortemp gifts them another kite shield bearing the house's coat of arms.
    • In 5.3, they return almost all of the memory crystals to Elidibus, but hang onto Azem's, which Emet-Selch secretly created and had delivered to them posthumously. Given that Azem was their past self, the keepsake could be in remembrance of themselves, Emet-Selch, their lost people, or all of the above.
  • Trying Not to Cry: They're brought to the brink of tears by Haurchefant's sacrifice and death, but he tells them that a smile suits a hero better, so they manage to stifle their tears and smile for him in his last moments.
  • Try to Fit THAT on a Business Card!:
    • There's a very long list of titles that can be received and selected to display by the player. But of the ones officially recognized or mentioned in the game's Main Story Quests, they're eventually known as The Warrior of Light, Blessed by Hydaelyn, Slayer of Primals/Eikons, Bane of the Imperial Legions, Eorzea's Champion, Savior of Ishgard, Rider of Dragons, Khagan of the Azim Steppes, Liberator of Ala Mhigo and Doma, Knight (and later Honorary Son/Daughter) of House Fortemps, Soldier of one of the Grand Companies, Scion of the Seventh Dawn, Warrior of Darkness, Azem, Fourteenth of the Convocation of Amaurot, and Stealer of Pants if some of the more puzzling rumors involving their assistance of a particular Gentleman Inspector are to be believed.
    • Lampshaded in Stormblood. During a conversation over the future leadership of the Ala Mhigan Resistance, Conrad mentions that he wants his successor to be someone who's known both sorrow and victory, who can look at things through fresh eyes, and hasn't lived in Gyr Abania their entire life. The Warrior can jokingly respond that they have too many titles to add "Leader of the Resistance" to them.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Downplayed. The Warrior of Light's possible responses can become a bit blunt in Heavensward, but by Stormblood, it's possible to make them an outright jerk at times. Shadowbringers cranks it Up to Eleven where you can be a complete asshole with your replies. None of the characters will take the jerk responses seriously and the ones that do will quickly brush it aside. In the end, the Warrior of Light is still a good natured hero, even if they can be a bit of a jerk sometimes. It seems to be a sign of their growing frustration with the same repeating scenario's slowing them down in their pursuit of doing good and the growing list of traumatic events wearing them out, which is especially pronounced during Shadowbringers.
  • Übermensch: The events of the expansions, but especially Shadowbringers eventually turns the Warrior of Light in one of the rare positive examples of Nietzsche's "Will to Power" philosophy. Everything that the initial setting presents about it's conflicts and meanings note  is revealed to be a lie or far more complex than initially let on note . While it makes the situation far more complicated the fact that they become this is the key for them to become The Paragon, rather than accepting or trying to maintain a bad situation because of belief or hopelessness, they challenge the Status Quo and create their own reasons for fighting, creating a new future that allows for things that everyone else in the setting thought impossible.
  • Uncle Pennybags: The Warrior's adventures have accrued them a handsome sum of gil over the course of their career. Numerous story events have them wield their wallet to help their friends, such as trying to outbid a merchant planning on putting an immobile Inspector Hildibrand in his house as a statue or offering to foot the bill when Alphinaud blows the Scions' funds on buying back Gosetsu's sword.
  • Underestimating Badassery: On the receiving end of this far too often throughout most of the story up until Stormblood. From the Garlean Legatus under Gaius, to numerous factions and criminal groups that gets in their way, to even the supposedly all-aware Ascians, everyone seems to make a bad habit of thinking this mere adventurer isn't enough to stop them. Even when the villains start planning around the Warrior of Light once they gain the title formally, they still get caught off-guard by their unstoppable prowess. It's foes like Varis and Zenos, who don't underestimate the WoL whatsoever, that really get the leg up on them.
  • Universal Translator: The Echo allows those who have to be able to understand all languages, even ones that aren't native to Hydaelyn. It works by allowing the user to "hear" the whispers of the soul, conveying meaning even if the words being spoken are gibberish to the ear. In Stormblood, everyone is surprised when it fails to translate Alpha's kwehs despite the latter's clearly sapient intelligence. At the end, the Warrior can understand Alpha's goodbye when he leaves to begin Walking the Earth, indicating that he has truly gained a soul of his own.
  • Vague Age: It's never quite clear how old the Warrior of Light is supposed to be. They're old enough for numerous characters to offer them a drink, but also young enough to be consistently referred to as "lad" or "lass" by their elders.
  • Victory Pose: The "Victory Pose" emote features a unique, cheerful pose for every combat class, with one shared pose between all of the Disciple of the Hand and the Disciple of the Land jobs.
  • Villain Killer: The character ends up accumulating a very large villain body count throughout the stories and expansions; this includes various generals and Legati of The Empire, powerful Voidsent such as Diabolos, several godly avatars called Primals, the powerful, incredibly hard to kill Ascians, a Mechanical Abomination from another planet, several massive dragons, etc. After a certain point, most of the main cast is fully confident of the Warrior of Light's ability to pull through, considering the absurd feats of power they managed to pull off. The Omega Raid storyline takes this to its logical conclusion, allowing you to fight and defeat villains from other games in the Final Fantasy Franchise, including Kefka, Exdeath and Chaos, though as digital recreations rather than the real deals.
  • The Watson: Due to being from outside Eorzea before becoming an adventurer, the Warrior of Light is largely ignorant of the sociopolitical landscape, nevermind the sciences, magicks, and customs. This makes them an ideal target for exposition as they're brought up to speed on complex concepts and issues, introducing them to the player at the same time.
  • Wealthy Philanthropist:
    • Regardless of when the player actually starts assisting in the rebuilding of the Firmament, the Warrior of Light is consistently referred to as the top Skybuilder, meaning that they've gathered and crafted more materials and items to donate to the efforts than anyone else.
    • Their donations to fund the rebuilding of the Doman Enclave total up to several million gil worth of inventory, with no indication that it dents their bottom line that much.
  • What's Up, King Dude?: The Warrior of Light is placed at the center of Eorzea's politics due to the land's best hope at beating back the Primal and Garlean threat. Beause of this, they become quite close to its most powerful authority figures, including numerous members of the nobility of Ishgard as well as the royals of Ul'dah and Doma. Raubahn, Nanamo, and Hien in particular speak with candor around the Warrior, who lets them vent and express their most private thoughts around them. At one point, the Warrior can even offer Hien to the Buduga with a, "Sure. Why not?" to the bewilderment of the Domans.
  • When All You Have is a Hammer…:
    • The Warrior of Light is basically the heroes' silver bullet to every Physical God and Eldritch Abomination thrown their way. Monster uprising? Throw the Warrior of Light at it. Primal summoning? Send the Warrior of Light to an aetheryte. Defense mechanisms made of Lost Technology made by the highly-advanced Abusive Precursors? The Warrior of Light will plow right through them. On the off chance that they do lose, they almost certainly figure out a way to come back to win round two. It's repeatedly lampshaded how often they're called upon to deal with the latest world-ending threat, with a close friend, Haurchefant, is the first to call out everyone (even the Scions) for using the Warrior of Light like a primal-killing weapon and over time many authority figures apologize for how reliant they are on their hero.
    • A story quest in Stormblood has the Warrior teaching Wiscar how to deal with the monsters around Loch Seld. They can either tell him to Attack Its Weak Point or simply to hit it very, very hard.
  • Willfully Weak:
    • After Ravana is defeated, Ysayle notes that it's the first time she's seen the Warrior of Light fight with their true strength since she first summoned Shiva, implying the Warrior of Light isn't fighting at full power unless it's something like a primal, an Ascian, or worse. This is further implied by a handful of story missions where you get a buff that states you're, "Breaking your limits as only a true Warrior of Light can", resulting in significantly heavier hits and constantly regenerating HP.
    • In Stormblood, Omega hypothesizes that this is the case as well. He then tries to force the Warrior to activate their true potential by putting them in a death trap or endangering their friends.
  • The Worf Effect: In the first two battles against Zenos, the Warrior of Light fails spectacularly. This is a rare instance of Cutscene Power to the Max used against you as, regardless of how well you do in the actual fight, the story shows you losing to within an inch of your life. Lore-wise, this is a combination of you being caught unawares by his threat level while being Willfully Weak and needing to tap further into your true potential to grow stronger.
  • Workaholic:
    • Their Chronic Hero Syndrome and Thrill Seeker tendencies mean that it's rare for them to sit still for more than a few days before rushing off to do something, be it mastering a trade, fighting monsters, delving into dungeons, funding orphanages, building the Dezul Qualan with the Ehcatl Nine, or any of the other countless things they get up to as an adventurer. Lampshaded by Adalberta, who complains that the Warrior never seems to kickback at the bar to relax and only seems to visit to ask about work. Alisaie wonders if the Warrior even sleeps with everything they do.
    • This is actually a point of concern for the Warrior's friends and loved ones, who note that the Warrior would probably throw themselves at any battlefield they're needed until they either pass out from exhaustion or get killed. Hence why they're always sure to do their part to alleviate the burden on the Warrior and give them time to rest.
  • World's Best Warrior: The Warrior of Light is considered far and wide as the best warrior in all of Eorzea, becoming a master in all the styles they pick, ranging from elite styles note  to incredibly dangerous and forbiden practicesnote . Combine all that with the Archmage above, and the result? There is no one in Eorzea that can claim to be superior to the Warrior of Light in combat by the end of Stormblood, and very few outside of it can actually match them.
  • Worthy Opponent:
    • Various Legates and commanders for the Garlean Empire show some levels of respect for the Warrior of Light, particular in regards to their skill at slaying eikons (primals), and to a begrudging degree for having had a hand in stopping Garlemald's aggression against Eorzea.
    • There's dialogue options to feel this way about Zenos, returning his own opinion on the Warrior. When the chance for a rematch with Zenos comes up midway through the Stormblood story one of the reasons you can have them give for accompanying Yugiri on her assassination attempt is purely for the chance to fight him again, much to her shock. And when confronting Zenos at the end of Stormblood, Zenos gives a "Not So Different" Remark and the Warrior of Light can choose to accept Zenos for who he is - still a monstrous killer who needs to be stopped - but also an opponent they're going to relish fighting. Zenos is particularly pleased if you respond to him this way.
    • At the end of Shadowbringers the Warrior of Light can express this opinion about Emet-Selch and Elidibus, as knowing where they come from gives them a newfound perspective on the Ascians they've been fighting all this time.
  • You Are Too Late: They usually cannot prevent the summoning of the primals because of this. They were also too late to stop Livia from massacring the scions, kidnapping the core members and killing Noraxia, but they were expecting to come back to a party, not a massacre, after defeating a major primal.

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Disciples of the Hand and Land

    Gathering and Crafting classes 
Disciples of the Land / Hand serve the purpose of Item Crafting but are mechanically classes of their own, including having unique weapons or "tools" to equip. Disciples of the Land focus on gathering ingredients to craft with, while Disciples of the Hand use those ingredients. They cannot be picked as a starting class, and so are only available once the player has reached level 10 in a Disciple of War or Magic class.

The various Gathering and Crafting classes provide examples of...

  • Absurd Cutting Power: In the final quest of the A Realm Reborn Blacksmith questline, the Warrior presents a cobalt winglet to an Ul'dahn gladiator whose poor weapon is holding him back. After admiring the sword's craftsmanship, the gladiator proceeds to demonstrate its sharpness by using it to effortlessly Clean Cut the blade of his old weapon.
  • Big Brother Mentor: They act as this to Cemi Jinjahl in the Stormblood Carpenter questline. When Beatin dispatches her to the Far East to study Hingan and Othard carpentry and practice serving clients, he sends the Warrior after her to make sure she stays on task. During this time, the Warrior prevents Cemi from losing sight of her tasks, crafts their own works to show how best to satisfy a client, and highlights her shortcomings so she can improve.
  • Bulletproof Vest: Er, chainmail. Merlwyb has the final say in the armor-making contest between the Warrior of Light and Blanstyr. Much to H'naanza's alarm, Merlwyb tests the efficacy of the cobalt haubergeons by shooting them while her own men are wearing them. The bullet penetrates Blanstyr's armor, but pings harmlessly off the Warrior of Light's.
  • Cool Teacher: In the Stormblood Goldsmith questline, the Warrior serves as a schoolteacher to a group of three Ala Mhigan refugees trying to become goldsmiths to find work once Ala Mhigo is reclaimed from the Garleans. While the actual programming work is performed by Emeloth, their guild-assigned assistant, the Warrior shows remarkable patience regarding their various quirks, creates masterworks as examples for the students to follow, and is eager to hear their concerns and encourage them.
  • Didn't Think This Through: The Warrior and Emeloth make a new pair of glasses to address J'khebica's eyesight issues and to serve as a reference for the students of Crown Gemworks to follow. Only after the teachers finish do they realize that J'khebica will have to take them off to use as a reference, rendering it virtually impossible for her to replicate due to her awful vision.
  • Elemental Crafting: The specialty of the crafting classes, naturally. In addition to the usual materials, all crafting also uses various types of elemental crystals, which come in three tiers: Shards, Crystals, Clusters. Back in A Realm Reborn, some recipes also have a specific elemental affinity, which was removed in Shadowbringers while their associated crafting actions is condensed to Brand/Name of the Elements.
  • Famed in Story:
    • The Warrior of Light's proficiency as a craftsman or gatherer grows throughout the storyline. By the end of each, they're recognized as masters of their craft. Their fame and reputation single-handedly turns the Blacksmiths' Guild's fortunes around, with orders coming from even the steel-hating nation of Gridania. The end of the Heavensward Leatherworker storyline also has Elde name her line of fashion goods after them to earn them recognition for their craft that her grandfather, who developed the leatherworking techniques used by the Leatherworkers' Guild, did not.
    • Subverted in Stormblood. Due to how far away Othard and Hingashi are, the Warrior's fame does not reach there. This comes up during the Culinarian storyline, where the sushi chef the Warrior asks to apprentice under sees them as a mere novice and refuses to give them the time of day. It's not until Dellemont, who happened to be staying at the same inn during the Warrior's visit, vouches for them that the chef decides to take them on.
  • Forensic Drama: The level 50-60 and 60-70 quest chains for the Alchemist involves the Warrior of Light using their alchemy skills to help solve a mysterious murder in Mor Dhona and Ul'dah, respectively.
  • Honest Advisor: In the Heavensward Leatherworker storyline, they become the main advisor for an Ishgardian merchant named Elde, who goes against convention in her country by selling high-quality products to highborn and lowborn Ishgardians alike. In addition to providing Super Prototypes of products for Elde's artisans to copy for mass production, they assist her in business dealings and criticize detrimental actions like ordering too many pieces of leather from the Twelveswood.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Their primary tools are equipped to the weapon slot and can be used to attack, though doing so is never advisable. Some tools like hammers, pickaxes e.t.c. would make some sense; alembics and needles, not so much.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • Crafters can use "Observe" to abstain from taking action for the turn. While this sounds silly on paper, the passage of turns allows an active "Manipulation" stack restore durability, or cycle through Condition, if you need to fish for Good or Excellent. Specialists also have "Careful Observation", which is solely used to cycle through Conditions due to lacking the turn passage as "Observe". They formerly had "Steady Hand", which increased the success rate of all their Synthesis and Touch actions prior to having most of them be guaranteed.
    • Gatherers have "Sharp Vision" and "Field Mastery", "Deep Vigor" and "Brunt Force", "Unearth" and "Leaf Turn", "Dredge" and "Prune", Nald'thal and Nophia's Counsel, and finally Mind of the Mountaineer and Pioneer. The first two sets of skills focus on the success rate of harvesting items, while the third, fourth, and fifth sets increase the rate of High Quality items. Mind of the Mountaineer and Pioneer does a little bit of both.
    • Fishers, meanwhile, have "Surface Slap", "Identical Catch", and "Patience". "Surface Slap" prevents you from hooking your last catch, narrowing down the pool of items that can be caught. "Identical Catch", meanwhile, guarantees you hook your previous catch. "Patience" is a stranger case in that while it increases the chances of High Quality fish, it also lowers hook efficiency, reducing the success rate of catching fish unless negated with Powerful or Precision Hookset. "Patience II" does the same as "Patience", but also increases the chance of catching the rarer, "big fish". Spearfishing has its equivalents in "Veteran Trade", "Identical Gig", and "Nature's Bounty" respectively.
  • Mechanically Unusual Class:
    • They are not suited for combat at all, and strictly locked out of joining any Duty Finder queues, can't contribute to FATEs and get their own set of leve quests. There are no jobs associated with them either, they can't use any Disciple of War/Disciple of Magic cross-discipline skills, and they have no limit break. Instead, their skills are entirely centered around the mechanics of gathering materials or crafting items. Both categories also have their own types of energy, replacing the MP bar. Finally, their main means of gaining experience naturally has nothing to do with combat, instead, they gain experience for gathering and crafting items respectively.
    • Within their discipline, Fishers stand out for having their own system for gathering unlike Miner and Botanist who are basically carbon copies of each other, and the crafting classes mostly have all the same skills as well.
  • Named After Somebody Famous: Inverted. At the end of the Heavensward Leatherworker storyline, Elde decides to name her newest line of leather goods after the Warrior of Light, both as thanks for helping make her business a smashing success and to get them the recognition her grandfather did not.
  • Non-Action Guy: None of the crafting or gathering classes are intended to fight. As a result, while acting as them, the Warrior of Light is seemingly incapable of wielding their martial prowess. This results in strange scenarios like the Oschon Raider's going out of their way to protect the World's Best Warrior or a botanist accused of heresy panicking over his trial by combat when the Warrior would be more than happy to champion themselvs for him.
  • Not the Intended Use: Crafting and gathering classes can fight. Their combat stats are too low to make them practical for fighting anything stronger than low-level mobs, and they can't use weaponskills or magic spells, but they can use their tools as weapons if need be.
  • Pun: While making an ash box for a teahouse owner whose shop is frequented by smokers, Beatin notes that the Warrior decided to make a little carpenter's joke by constructing the entire thing out of ash lumber. Though he also notes that it's something of an inside joke, as most people wouldn't be able to tell what wood it's made from at a glance.
  • Private Tutor: In the Heavensward Weaver questline, you're hired by a noblewoman to teach her daughter how to sew as party of her "maidenly" duties. Said daughter is a Tomboy who'd much rather be mending her clumsy boyfriend's wounds as a Conjurer than knitting robes in her room, instead asking you to help her play hooky while she pursues her dreams.
  • Supreme Chef:
    • A fully kitted out max level Culinarian WoL at the time of whatever the main expansion is is this, able to find the rarest ingredients whether they're in scorching deserts, arctic wastelands as well as the various monsters prowling the world, they can make a feast worthy of royalty. The Level 60 Culinarian quest has them winning the Dellemont d'Or with the first perfect ten.
    • Even when just starting out as a Culinarian, clients will rave about how perfectly everything you make is cooked, along with astonishment at your skill given how new you are.
  • Stealth Expert: Funnily enough, the gathering classes put the Rogue to shame in this regard once they learn their version of it called "Sneak". Unlike "Hide", which breaks upon doing pretty much anything more than moving or jumping, "Sneak" persists through almost anything the gatherer does, allowing them to safely gather resources right in front of aggressive enemies, provided they're no higher than four levels above you and can aggro regardless. Prior to Patch 5.1, it was known as "Stealth", which imposed a movement penalty while hiding, and cannot be used while mounted. "Stealth" also periodically got upgraded through Traits, unlike the flat four level difference tied to "Sneak". Getting attacked while under "Stealth" also canceled it.
  • Surpassed the Teacher: At the end of every A Realm Reborn storyline for the Disciple of the Hand and Disciple of the Land jobs, the guildmaster admits that they have noting left to teach you and that you're a full-fledged master of your craft. Lyngsath, guildmaster of the Culinarians' Guild, admits that even if he were in the mood to compete in the Dellemont d'Or again, he feels he'd be pushing his luck with you in the tournament, implying that he sees you as an equal or even his superior as a culinarian. Wawalago also calls them the "absolute apex of the angler's art", though he later says they're the "second most skilled angler" he knows.
  • Ultimate Blacksmith: Downplayed. In-story, a fully kitted-out Blacksmith job will have your name echoing across Eorzea and even into the steel-shunning nation of Gridania. Your work single-handedly turned the Blacksmiths' Guild's fortunes around and has people clamoring to own just one of your weapons. In-gameplay, craftable weapons face stiff competition from the latest and hardest dungeons as well as special gear like the Relic and Zodiac Weapons. You also can't pull off the same feats of wonder that other blacksmiths like Godbert and Gerolt can.
  • Weapon of Choice: Same as the combat classes, each of them is mainly defined by what they equip in their weapon slot, although as noted they use tools ill-suited for actual combat. Unlike the combat classes, however, all of them also have a secondary tool equippable in the shield slot. Miners, Botanists, and Fishers both need the secondary tool to access a secondary type of gathering node, while the crafting classes don't strictly need them but can't really pass up the significant stat boosts. That said, the secondary tool also offers a cosmetic change in some recipes, like a weaver using a spinning wheel to make cloth or yarn. Fishers in particular lacked a secondary tool until Stormblood, which introduced Spearfishing alongside swimming.
  • Weapons of Their Trade: They can use their crafting tools to fight, but doing so is not recommended and will only work against the weakest of opponents.
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