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"Sometimes I dream of saving the world. Saving everyone from the invisible hand; one that brands us with an employee badge. The one that forces us to work for them The one that controls us every day without us knowing it."
"What I'm about to tell you is top secret, a conspiracy bigger than all of us. There's a powerful group of people out there that are secretly running the world. I'm talking about the guys no one knows about, the guys that are invisible. The top one percent of the top one percent, the guys that play God without permission... and now I think they're following me."
Elliot Alderson
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Hello, friend.

Mr. Robot is a USA Network original drama-thriller series created by Sam Esmail, starring Rami Malek and Christian Slater. Premiering on June 24, 2015, it ran for four seasons and concluded with a two-hour finale on December 22, 2019.

The series follows Elliot Alderson, a computer programmer who leads a double life as a hacker carrying out digital vigilantism. After discovering the existence of a secretive hacker group known as fsociety, Elliot gets recruited by their mysterious leader, Mr. Robot, and joins an online war against E Corp, a Mega-Corp with whom Elliot has a personal grudge. He soon learns, however, that the economic revolution he's trying to spearhead may be larger than he ever imagined, and that other forces could be pulling the strings.

The show is a love letter to post-modern and transgressive works such as Fight Club, The Matrix, Twin Peaks, and American Psycho. The presentation of the show is likened to the eccentric styles of David Fincher and Stanley Kubrick, with its use of dark visuals and a distinctive cinematographic method known as "quadrant framing", creating a paranoid and detached perspective of the show's world. Mr. Robot also notably averts Hollywood Hacking by creating accurate, realistic depictions of hacking and technology.

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The show has been spun off into a mobile game Mr. Robot:1.51exfiltrati0n.apk developed by Night School Studio and published by Telltale Games as well as a novel, Mr. Robot: Red Wheelbarrow (eps1.91_redwheelbarr0w.txt), written by Sam Esmail and Courtney Looney. A comic book prequel written by Sam Esmail was announced, but has since languished in Development Hell for unknown reasons.

The recap page urgently Needs Wiki Magic Love.


We at fsociety have only sudo chopped the spoilers for the current season (4.0). If you want to experience the revolution for yourself, it is advised that you alt+f4 immediately!
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Open file "mrrobot_tropes.txt":

    open/close all folders 

    Tropes A to G 

  • 10-Minute Retirement: Elliot's "exile" in season two, which was designed to pacify Mr. Robot.
  • Abandoned Area:
    • fsociety use a derelict Video Arcade as their primary base of operations, at least until they are forced to jump ship following the 5/9 hack and subsequent FBI crackdown.
    • Stage two is engineered within a vacant warehouse where Tyrell is also shacking up, away from public scrutiny.
    • The offices of Allsafe Cybersecurity are barren following the 5/9 hack, with very little left of the original firm we remember. Elliot and Mr. Robot set up shop in these offices in season 4.0, transforming it into another base.
  • Absurdly Sharp Blade: Leon's knife is capable of slicing and dicing neo-Nazis like hot butter without much force. However, he could just be that good.
  • Abhorrent Admirer: Both Tyrell and Vera served as one to Elliot as they were obsessed with him in different manners.
  • Abusive Parents: Life in the Alderson family house was not pleasant following Edward's ignominious death, after which Magda began physically and emotionally abusing both Elliot and Darlene. Even Edward isn't absolved of this, as he pushed an eight-year-old Elliot out of the second story window of their house after he revealed the former's leukemia diagnosis. That last detail in particular turns out to be false come the season three finale; Elliot willingly dived out of the window in the midst of a psychotic breakdown, despite him remembering it differently. Later, we find out that Edward was sexually molesting Elliot and it was actually Mr. Robot who made Elliot jump out of the window in order to save him from his father.
  • Action Survivor: Elliot, over the course of one year, has fallen off of a pier, fallen out of a window, been held hostage by gangsters, beaten to a pulp, shot at point-blank range, and held hostage twice more by a terrorist organization. The amount of life-threatening situations he has endured throughout the series is truly remarkable, and that isn't even counting what his friends, family, and colleagues go through along with him.
  • Act of True Love: The Mastermind realizes that Elliot doesn't truly have everything in his "endless loop" once Darlene confesses that she misses him. It is for this reason that the Mastermind finally gives up his control, and Elliot is allowed to wake up.
  • A Day in the Limelight:
    • "eps2.6_succ3ss0r.p12" focuses on the remnants of fsociety carrying out a leak of the FBI's top-secret surveillance program Operation Berenstain, being discovered by Susan Jacobs, and scrambling to cover their tracks as the feds begin to close in.
    • "eps3.2_legacy.so" revolves almost entirely around what Tyrell was doing behind the scenes in season two.
  • Affably Evil:
    • E-Corp CEO Phillip Price is generally so confident in his power that he's usually charming and polite to everyone in spite of being a ludicrously greedy and egocentric man with little to no regard for other people. In fact, it's something of a reveal just how cunning he really is after, since he's so innocuous in his first few fleeting appearances that it's easy to assume he's a bit ignorant of E Corp's wickedness.
    • Ray is the only person besides Leon who makes a conscious attempt to befriend Elliot in prison. Just when Elliot begins to see him as a mentor of sorts with the knowledge needed to find a place in a chaotic world, Ray is revealed to be the curator of a digital black market that specializes in guns, drugs, and human trafficking. Even Elliot is disappointed by this.
    • Leon, for all of his trite, philosophical ruminations on television shows and insistence on helping Elliot in his mental recovery, is still a ruthlessly efficient killer working with the Dark Army as one of their sleeper agents. Even after holding Darlene hostage with the intent of killing her, Leon still approaches Elliot like an old friend and wishes him well.
    • Irving is very gregarious and upbeat, yet also a brutal enforcer who describes murder as "fun."
    • Janice seems to be an ordinary, friendly person until she reveals that she's a merciless hatchetwoman for the Dark Army. Even then, she's chipper and communicates instructions for murder in upbeat, emoji-filled texts.
  • Agonizing Stomach Wound: Elliot and Tyrellboth end up on the receiving end of this. While Elliot survives, Tyrell does not.
  • Airport Novel: In his final scene, Irving is revealed to have written a trashy thriller novel called Beach Blanket, and he's doing a signing at an airport, so it's both literally an airport novel and beach novel.
  • Alas, Poor Villain:
    • Santiago, of all people, reveals that he is working with the Dark Army to ensure the safety of his aging mother. He later tries to avert Dominique's execution by Irving, pleading that she can still walk away. As it turns out, Santiago was the real target of this execution, in which he is butchered with an axe. Damn.
    • Grant's death is surprisingly tragic. Having let his obsession with Whiterose and jealousy towards Elliot interfere with his better judgment, Whiterose orders him to commit suicide for the cause, saying that he is not worthy to see her project through to the end. Grant then shakily tells Elliot to look after Whiterose before blowing his brains out.
    • Tyrell Wellick dies in the middle of season 4 after some Dark Army soldiers try to kill Elliot and he takes a bullet for him. He accepts his death and takes a final walk before falling down and dying.
  • All Love Is Unrequited:
    • Tyrell's love (read: obsession) with Elliot (read: Mr. Robot). Mr. Robot does not share the sentiment, and once Tyrell understands that Mr. Robot is the one he actually idolizes, it throws a wrench into their "relationship".
    • Elliot has been secretly pining after Angela since childhood, but the two are doomed to never be together: on top of already being taken by Ollie, Angela goes on to manipulate Elliot's mental condition for the Dark Army's gain (which nearly destroys their friendship), and ends up being executed for trying to seek retribution against Whiterose.
  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: Elliot believes this to be the case in regards to Darlene, Angela, and his therapist, Krista. The show proves him to be at least two-thirds right.
  • Alternate History: The show exclusively takes place in 2015, in which the Five/Nine hack destroys the world's economic stability and sends it careening into an unprecedented global depression. During this time, the world seems five minutes away from becoming the typical Cyberpunk dystopia with disorder in the streets, political tensions between the United States, Iran, and China, and corporations capitalizing on the chaos. This all changes dramatically when Elliot's reversal of the Five/Nine hack ends up "resetting" the show more or less with everyone seemingly forgetting that the hack even happened and things proceeding as normal. Once fsociety expose the Deus Group, redistribute their money back to the people, and destroy Whiterose's project, the historical impact is not lost on the world by the year's end.
  • Alternate Identity Amnesia: Because Elliot has dissociative identity disorder, he is totally unaware of the times in which Mr. Robot becomes the dominant alter.
    • The series finale deconstructs this with the reveal that the Elliot we have been following is just another alter that took over and never let go, forgetting that he was just another alter in the process.
  • Alternate Universe:
    • Whiterose waxes rhapsodic about a universe where 5/9 never happened.
    • The FBI investigation into 5/9 is called "Operation Berenstain", possibly a nod to the most popular of the Mandela effect's examples.
    • A worker at the Washington Township plant discusses the possibility of parallel universes during a tour of the plant's facility.
    • Angela's mother alludes to this, speaking of "another world out there" where her and Angela can still be together.
    • "eXit", "whoami", and "Hello Elliot" mostly take place in what appears to be the parallel universe that Whiterose sought after, with everything in Elliot's life being perfect. It's an illusion.
  • Always Someone Better:
    • The reason Tyrell was passed up for the verdict on the CTO position. As we learn much later, E Corp seems to engage in this on a regular basis when it comes to its employees.
    • The Dark Army also utilizes this via incredibly cold calculus — i.e. murder, to guarantee precision, loyalty, and endurance. If all else fails, compromised members promptly commit suicide to preserve the organization's "sanctity".
  • Alone with the Psycho:
    • In season one, between Elliot and Tyrell at the Fun Society arcade. The same occurs in season two, but in the Confictura Industries warehouse.
    • Dominique and Irving after he murders Santiago.
    • Darlene and Vera in the season three finale, although he is flanked by several of his cronies.
  • Ambiguous Disorder: While it is established that Elliot is clinically depressed and has social phobia as well as dissociative identity disorder, the manifestations of his mental illnesses (delusions, paranoia, hallucinations, etc.) strongly indicate schizophrenic traits. One could also deduce a presence on the autism spectrum based on his social interactions, prodigious technological skills, and detached, hyper-focused behavior.
  • Ambiguously Bi:
    • Despite being in heterosexual relationships, Angela and Shayla share a rather searing kiss.
    • In a "blink and you'll miss it" moment, you can see that Elliot has written "Obama is really hot" in his journal as he flips through the pages. Strangely, this line is not found in the Red Wheelbarrow book.
    • Tyrell has sex with another man with the sole intention of hacking his phone, and later professes his love to Elliot.
    • Dom's physical sexual relationships are exclusively with women. However, in episode "404 Not Found" she engages in cybersex chatrooms with men.
    • Darlene seems to be predominantly hetrosexual as demonstrated by her relationship with her boyfriend, Cisco. Some time after Cisco's death, Darlene seduces Dom in an attempt to obtain her FBI access card, and at one point says "I said I wasn’t a lesbian, end quote. I never said I wasn’t into girls. It's unclear if Darlene is at all sexually attracted to Dom or if she did it just for the access, although in 406 Not Acceptable Darlene admits her feelings toward Dom were genuine.
  • Ambiguously Brown: Elliot has a noticeably olive skin tone which he shares with his mother, whose ancestry is not revealed. His father is white and his sister apparently takes after him. Actor Rami Malek himself is of Egyptian and Greek descent and has said that he considers Elliot to be a person of color. In the Red Wheelbarrow book, Elliot writes that he wonders if a neo-Nazi thinks he's "pure white," implying that he is of a mixed heritage.
  • An Axe to Grind: Irving quite literally axes Santiago to death when the latter has outlived his usefulness.
  • Another Story for Another Time: When Elliot inquires about just who Mr. Robot is, he responds, "that'll come later." Oh, does it ever.
  • Anyone Can Die: To the point that most of the original main cast from season one are by the start of season 4. As of Season 4, Elliot, Mr. Robot, Darlene and Dom are the only main characters to make it to the end.
  • Apocalypse How: 5/9 almost instantly cripples the world thanks to the economic depression it unleashes across the world, and we see in grisly detail just how much the common people are suffering because of it. By season three, New York City is more or less a Wretched Hive straight out of a cyberpunk story, with rampant homelessness, vandalism, and street vendors trying to make ends meet.
  • Aren't You Going to Ravish Me?: While in a bathroom, Tyrell intimidates Scott's wife until she non-verbally consents to be violated (by spreading her legs), at which point he politely declines her offer and leaves the bathroom. She appears disappointed at this. When he forces himself on her on the roof of an office building, she does not resist and appears satisfied until he starts strangling her.
  • Artistic License – Geography: In the pilot, Mr. Robot gets off the subway with Elliot at the Church Avenue station, saying that they need to wait for the Q train to go to Brooklyn. There are three different Church Avenue stations in New York City, and all of them are already in Brooklyn. The one that Mr. Robot and Elliot visit is underground and only serves the F and G lines.
  • Attempted Rape: Elliot becomes a target of this by the neo-Nazis while in prison. Leon arrives to rescue him just in time.
  • Ate His Gun:
    • Following the 5/9 hack, E Corp executive James Plouffe does this while being interviewed on national television.
    • Agents of the Dark Army notably use this as a morbid form of liability insurance to ensure that their field operations and plans can proceed without outside scrutiny.
  • Axe-Crazy:
    • Given that he is the malicious alternate personality of Elliot, Mr. Robot is remarkably violent and chaotic, often reveling in the disorder that he causes whether its out of personal spite, a so-called act of retribution against society, or simplybecause he is just bored. He grows out of this by season three once the consequences of his anarchist behavior and self-serving guile begin to manifest beyond his control, and he realizes the importance of having Elliot as his counterbalance.
    • Tyrell also counts, from paying a homeless man to let him use him as a punching bag, to murdering the wife of his business rival during spontaneous sex. While he is no doubt prone to violence, season three suggests that he has been a product of manipulation by literally everyone around him, and has been made a tool of whomever is pulling his strings based on his violent, obsessive personality.
  • Babies Make Everything Better: Subverted. Following the birth of his and Joanna's child, Tyrell has to go on the run from the authorities for his involvement in 5/9 and the murder of Sharon Knowles. Joanna is murdered by a scorned lover right in front of the child. In season 4, Tyrell is aquitted for the aformentioned crimes, but still doesn't get his child back. The Dark Army murders him soon after.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: The entire show revolves around Elliot's struggle against Mr. Robot, who desires to be the one in control so he can reign chaos however he pleases without Elliot's moral code interfering with his insurrectionist agenda. Season two in particular primarily focuses on their dynamic as two personalities fighting endlessly and accomplishing nothing in the process. While they do put their differences aside to stay ahead of the authorities, this armistice doesn't last, and season three brings them back to square one as bitter enemies who fight over the execution of stage two. "shutdown-r" ultimately seals this conflict for good once Elliot and Mr. Robot finally understand the futility and pettiness of their war after getting a front row seat to the real danger of the Dark Army's power and subsequent wrath.
  • Badass Gay: If a Dark Army soldier dies, chances are, Dom had a role in making that happen; either directly, or striking deals with people as scary as she is.
  • Batman Gambit: It's a show about hacking, after all. Expect plenty of social engineering, profiling, and a little bit of dumb luck along the way. Elliot himself even admits to this being how he operates so efficiently as a vigilante, as he looks for the singular qualities (read: weaknesses) in people.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Practically the gold standard of Tyrell's intimidation tactics, which he uses to get in close with Sharon Knowles and other women over the years, mostly on Joanna's command. Not even men are excluded from this.
  • Benevolent Boss: Gideon Goddard is a father to his employees, and Elliot even describes him as a good, honest man.
  • Berserk Button: Contemporary society seems to be the big one for both Elliot and Mr. Robot, who see it as revolting.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: The Dark Army believe in this trope wholeheartedly, and promote self-sacrifice as the ultimate gift to their cause.
  • Betty and Veronica: Tyrell's Archie to Joanna's Betty and Elliot's Veronica, even though Joanna is his sociopathic wife and Elliot has social anxiety.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Phillip Price, Whiterose, and Mr. Robot share the stage as primary antagonists. However, Season 3 reveals that Whiterose is the true Big Bad of the series, as she is shown to have control over Price, and Mr. Robot ultimately sees the error of his ways. In season 4, Whiterose returns as the main antagonist once again. Phillip Price and Mr. Robot are barely antagonistic anymore and are helping Elliot with bringing down Whiterose.
  • The Big Board: The FBI have a whiteboard detailing suspects and persons of interest related to Five/Nine.
  • Big Good: Elliot fully blossoms into this by the end of season three. Subverted in season four, in which he veers hard into Villain Protagonist territory, and is ultimately revealed to be just another alter that locked the real Elliot away in a dream world.
  • Bilingual Dialogue: The Wellicks, when they're alone. He speaks Swedish and she speaks Danish. The two languages have some degree of mutual intelligibility. Oddly, the captions state that she's also speaking Swedish, though a newspaper headline confirms that she's Danish.
  • Bilingual Bonus: In "runtime-error.r00" the first line of dialogue is a man speaking in German to Elliot, saying "Aller anfang ist schwer" which translates to "All beginnings are hard/heavy." Could also be a Shout Out to Milan Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being,"but is originally a quote by Friedrich Heinrich William Korte. The complete text is "All beginnings are hard. To begin is to begin. To begin is easy, to persist, art."
  • Bittersweet Ending: There are many losses during Elliot's journey, some of which affect him personally; namely his childhood friend Angela. On a global scale, thousands die to the Dark Army's actions, and thousands more suffer in silence as a result of the Five/Nine hack. Despite this, Elliot, with Darlene's help, manages to dismantle the Dark Army, expose the "top one percent of the top one percent", put an end to Whiterose's project, and ultimately make the world a better place, with Darlene still by his side in the end.
  • Black-and-Gray Morality: Fsociety is at best a grey hat organization that will use anything at their disposal to achieve their goals, but are ultimately pitted against the greater, corporate evil that is E Corp and the black hatted Dark Army, who are little more than mercenaries for hire and are responsible for most of the direct carnage that occurs throughout the show.
  • Black Comedy: The sitcom-inspired nightmare in "m4ster-sl4ve".
  • Bland-Name Product:
    • E Corp is an obvious riff on that other corrupt Mega-Corp, Enron. The E Corp logo, a box-shaped capital E at a 45 degree angle, is based on Enron's logo.
    • Steel Mountain is an obvious stand-in for Iron Mountain, an actual data vault company.
  • Blatant Lies: Minister Zhang (aka Whiterose) shows off his "sister's" dresses and fawns over them. He's in his own bedroom and doesn't have a sister.
  • Blood-Splattered Innocents:
    • Several members of the production crew including Angela are splattered with blood when the E Corp executive James Plouffe eats his gun on live television.
    • Dominique speeding out of Lupe's following Cisco's assassination by the Dark Army.
    • Joanna's infant son in "undo".
    • Dominique once again, when Irving murders Santiago.
  • Blofeld Ploy: Irving appears to be preparing to dispose of Dom with an axe when Santiago kidnaps her from FBI headquarters, only to instead swing it into Santiago, who has outlived his usefulness.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: Angela (Blonde), Darlene (Brunette) and Dom (Redhead).
  • Bolivian Army Cliffhanger:
    • Season 2: Tyrell shoots Elliot in the stomach to stop him from ruining Stage 2. Elliot's fate was left unknown until the Season 3 premiere.
    • Season 3: Just as Darlene is about to enter Elliot's apartment, Vera and his minions enter as well. The gleeful smile on his face suggests that he will make the ongoing chaos worse.
  • Bondage Is Bad: The Wellicks, a villainous couple, indulge in bondage despite her late-term pregnancy and Tyrell's hesitance due to possible risks to the baby.
  • Bonding Over Missing Parents: Angela and Elliot first met after Angela's mother and Elliot's father died in a toxic leak at the company they both worked at.
  • Book-Ends: The show opens with Elliot's famous greeting, "Hello, friend," in a skyscraper overlooking New York City. The show ends with a similar view in the same skyscraper, as the Mastermind personality relinquishes control to the real Elliot. As he wakes up, Elliot is greeted by Darlene: "Hello, Elliot."
    • The titles of the pilot episode and final episode ("esp1.0_hellofriend.mov" and "Hello, Elliot") also mirror this to drive the point home.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall:
    • Elliot's narration isn't just an explanation of what's going on in the show. It's actually a one-sided conversation with the audience that has Elliot regularly asking the viewers for support and confirmation.
    • At the end of the pilot, Elliot turns to look straight at the camera as his inner monologue directly asks the audience if they're seeing what he's seeing.
    • Near the end of "wh1ter0se" after learning that Darlene is his sister and he has forgotten much of his life, Elliot turns to the camera and asks, "Were you in on this? Were you?"
    • In the final episode, Elliot has a conversation with a mental construct of Krista, and she addresses the audience as well.
  • Breather Episode: Each season has one, usually following intense, consecutive episodes.
    • Season 1's "v1ew-s0urce", in which we see Fsociety having drifted apart following the Dark Army's abandonment, and a largely absent Elliot, still dealing with Shayla's death.
    • Season 2's "succ3ss0r", despite being viscerally intense, is more of a breather episode for your mind, considering the jaw-dropping plot twist in the previous episode.
    • Season 3's "dont-delete-me", which follows three back-to-back episodes of non-stop panic and turmoil, is entirely focused on Elliot as he tries to find the will to live in the wake of the Dark Army's terrorist attacks.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer:
    • Elliot is quite...odd, even when he isn't dealing with a malicious alternate personality. However, what he is capable of at a terminal can only be described as legendary. He even maintained a successful employment at AllSafe until the hack.
    • Vera is abnormally spiritual for a ruthless drug dealer and murderer. Even after escaping from a prison, he finds enough time to talk to Elliot about etymology and the cosmos.
    • Dominique obviously suffers from some form of social anxiety disorder. Her behavior is also rather dry and direct, making some of her interactions awkward by nature. As an FBI agent, she is insanely driven and perceptive, being the first person to campaign that the Dark Army is connected to 5/9.
    • Whiterose engages in cross-dressing to maintain her identity as Minister Zhang, is obsessed with time, and speaks in a droll, unaffected tone but with a healthy lexicon. She also happens to be unfathomably powerful, being the leader of an organized criminal syndicate.
  • Bunker Woman: Gender Flipped. In "m4ster-s1ave", after brutally beating Elliot up, Ray's thugs later lock him up in the basement.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: Terry Colby admits under pressure that he does remember the meeting that caused the death of Angela's mother, but his recollections focus mostly on the weather and the food. The meeting was dull and businesslike. It was just another normal day.
  • Bury Your Gays: Gideon is shot in the throat at the end of "unm4sk". Other LGBT characters remain alive by the end of Season 3, however.
  • Cain and Abel: More like Cain and Cain. We discover in "br4ve-trave1er" that Vera's brother Isaac wants Vera dead so he can take over their criminal empire. Elliot tries to help Isaac do this, only for Vera to have Isaac killed as soon as they were reunited, suspecting the betrayal.
  • Call-Back:
    • In the Season 3 finale, Elliot makes an Ironic Echo of his "top one percent of the top one percent" speech from the pilot during his reconciliation with Mr. Robot, and Vera refers to himself as a "brave traveler" (the title of the episode he last appeared in) when he shows back up in The Stinger.
    • In season 4, there's a soundtrack callback to Elliot's drug overdose hallucination in season 1, during which Perfume Genius's "Queen" plays. The song plays this time when Elliot confronts Angela, and she reveals that the "alternate universe" is another construction of Elliot's mind.
  • Camera Abuse:
    • In "br4ve-trave1er", blood splattering the lens when DJ shoots Isaac.
    • In "wh1ter0se", Elliot becomes enraged at his "imaginary friend" (the viewer) and shoves the camera away from him.
  • Camera Tricks: Any of the simulated long takes and the show's quadrant framing.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Subverted. The evil Megacorp of the series is called Evil Corp, but only because we see everything through Elliot's perspective. The company's real name is E Corp, but he's explicitly conditioned himself to see and hear his nickname for them instead.
  • Cassandra Truth: Justified. Dominique correctly believes that the Dark Army are the real string-pullers of 5/9, but has no evidence. After surviving two attempted hits by them, Dominique still cannot make a case to her supervisor, Santiago. This is because Santiago is a Dark Army mole, and is deliberately blocking her attempts to finger the Dark Army as anything more than boogeymen.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Joey Bada$$ plays Leon, Elliott's friend of sorts introduced in Season 2. When Darlene tries to scan Dom's FBI badge at a bar in Season 3, a Joey Bada$$ song is playing.
  • Central Theme: So far, there is one that can be deduced for each season:
    • Season one: Exposing truth, and ousting those who are pulling the strings. The general plot revolves around hacking the economy and revealing it for the "sham" that it is, while also detailing that Elliot himself is a personal victim of manipulation by Mr. Robot. This ends up becoming the plot arc for the last four episodes.
    • Season two: Control is an illusion. For the entirety of the season, Elliot tries to take back control from Mr. Robot but ultimately fails, Darlene is unable to keep fsociety together as a group when the chips are officially down, and Angela learns that all of her hard work in attacking E Corp from within was for nothing.
    • Season three: Accepting the truth, and ridding oneself of denial. Elliot's plot stems from his realization that 5/9 was a mistake, Darlene has to come to terms with her brother's mental illness, Mr. Robot has to literally be lectured about how his "revolution" was already decided for him, and Angela has to be explicitly told how much of a pawn she has become to Whiterose as well as how ridiculous her agenda is in the long-run.
  • Chandler's Law: A by-the-book example occurs in "logic-b0mb". As Dominique stops to get something to eat in the hotel lobby, armed Dark Army thugs suddenly storm the place, killing everyone sans her.
  • Cliffhanger:
    • Season 1: Elliot, following Mr. Robot's initiation of the E Corp hack and Tyrell disppearing without a trace, goes to answer his apartment door after someone knocks. Elliot opens the doo—roll credits.
    • Season 2: Tyrell shoots Elliot, Darlene is in FBI custody, Angela has seemingly joined the Dark Army, and Leon confronts Trenton and Mobley, who are revealed to be alive and with new identities.
    • Season 3: Dominique is forced to replace Santiago as the Dark Army's mole in the FBI, and Fernando Vera returns to visit Elliot at his apartment, running into Darlene on the way.
  • Clue, Evidence, and a Smoking Gun: A rare non-verbal example in Season 2. Dominique begins to suspect that Romero was involved with the fsociety hack: He was killed shortly after the hack took place, he had information concerning local FBI agents, his computer was suspiciously well-protected...and his papers lead her to a building with a very conspicuous sign reading "F Society". Her response when she sees the building is to say "You've got to be fucking kidding me."
  • Consummate Liar: Elliot has a habit of saying what people want to hear when he feels uncomfortable with the questions.
  • Continuity Lockout: Miss one episode (or even half of one) and you will be totally lost.
  • Cooperation Gambit: This is apparently E Corp's response to Angela filing a lawsuit against them. It turns out that Price ordered this to sway her from pursuing more evidence on the Washington Township toxic waste scandal. Why? Not only because Whiterose told him to, but because Angela is Price's daughter, and he was secretly priming her to uproot Whiterose's plant. This ultimately fails in the end as Whiterose takes matters into her own hands.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Par for the course with E Corp. Many of its senior board members are quite formidable.
    • Tyrell Wellick is an amoral ladder-climber who figures out Elliot and strangles a woman with his bare hands.
    • Terry Colby covered up the incident that killed Elliot's father and Angela's mother. He plays some mind games with Angela and eventually recruits her to start working for E Corp.
    • The new CTO sees Tyrell coming from a mile away, gives him a dressing down, and threatens to whip out his penis in a gesture of dominance.
    • The CEO of E Corp, Phillip Price, is as canny, ruthless and intelligent as you'd expect the CEO of an evil Mega-Corp to be.
  • The Corrupter: E Corp CEO Phillip Price is portrayed as this toward Angela, slowly drawing her into seeing the life of a Corrupt Corporate Executive is true power and all but relishing in it.
  • Cosmic Plaything: Elliot as no matter what the situation is, he really can't catch a break.
  • The Cracker: The Dark Army is a mercenary hacker organization who will take any job for the right price.
  • Creator Cameo: Sam Esmail appears in the pilot during the first subway scene and in "init_5" behind a set of bars while Elliot is being processed in prison. He also appears as one of Phillip Price's goons in season 4, where he gives Elliot a lethal injection of heroin.
  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Whiterose speaks effeminately but dramatically lowers her tone when she is in her Zhang persona.
  • Darker and Edgier: The show proved to be the nail in USA's "Blue Skies" programming coffin. As it progresses, we are treated to murder, drug addiction, rape, terrorism, child abuse, and mental illness.
  • Damned by Faint Praise: When Joanna's new boyfriend is talking about how he'll take her to Madrid, Joanna comments that there's no way he can or will ever be able to afford to take her there, but it's okay because that kind of material stuff doesn't make her happy.
  • Deconstruction: Of the romanticism that underscores revolution and anarchy. Elliot enters the show with a grandiose and immature vision of toppling the plutocratic elite and redistributing their wealth to the common people with fsociety. However, their encryption of the world's collective debt to said elite ends up crashing virtually every economy on the planet, and forcing the common people even further into financial distress. Meanwhile, much to Elliot's dismay, the top one percent continue to thrive, and even begin to profit off of the very revolution he contributed to. By season three, the world is functionally a dystopia, with martial law creeping across the United States, E Corp instituting their own cryptocurrency to become the world standard, and the real string-pullers, the Dark Army, slithering even further into the cracks to exercise their own agenda.
  • Decoy Antagonist: At first, Mr. Robot, Phillip Price and Tyrell Wellick were shown to be the antagonists, but as of Season 4, Tyrell is killed as he was about to help Elliot take down the Dark Army, Price is broken after losing Angela and Mr. Robot finally supports Elliot and tries to nurse him back from his trauma. It is clear that Whiterose, The Dark Army and Vera are the Big Bad Ensemble of Season 4.
  • Defective Detective: What we see of Dominique's private life is pretty sad. She turned her back on her fiancee to focus on work, seems to have no friends, reads about overcoming social awkwardness and masturbates to cybersex.
  • Denser and Wackier: Season two proved to be a major exercise in esotericism, to the point where not even the numerous Mind Screwdrivers in season three have provided legitimate context to all of its mind-screwiness. Naturally, rows of Epileptic Trees are still being planted. That isn't even getting into just how complicated the underworld of the setting is implied to be, and the obfuscation of certain characters' motives and alignments.
  • Depraved Bisexual: Tyrell seduces people of both genders to further his nefarious goals. As of the Season 2 finale, he's in love with Elliot.
  • Destination Defenestration: Elliot's dad Edward threw him out a window when he was a kid, because he told his mom about Edward's leukemia. In a flashback to the event, Edward seems genuinely distraught about it and claims it was an accident. After Elliot finds out that Mr. Robot is actually his long lost father, the two pay a visit their old house. While there, Elliot decides to get payback for the aforementioned incident by throwing his father out of the same window he himself was pushed out of. However, it turns out he actually threw himself out by doing so.
    • It ultimately turns out that Edward never actually threw him out of the window to begin with: Elliot jumped out by himself during a hallucination. The trauma of the event caused him to misremember the incident as his father having thrown him out.
  • Did I Just Say That Out Loud?: While sitting in on his church group, Elliot goes on a massive tirade against God and organised religion. It's only after he finishes speaking and sees everyone's horrified faces that he realises he said it aloud.
    Elliot: Please tell me I didn't say all that out loud... Shit, I did.
    • He does it again in "runtime-err0r". When his coworker has been yet again bragging about his weekend's sexual conquests, Elliot rants about how puerile, repetitive and boring he finds it, before realising he didn't tell it to the viewer as he thought he was doing.
  • Disappeared Dad: Elliot's father died of leukemia during his childhood. Darlene knew him much less intimately than Elliot.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Tyrell Wellick is presented as the Big Bad of the series in the first season as a cunning, ambitious and thoroughly unhinged Corrupt Corporate Executive who seems like the worst member of E Corp's nest of vipers. However, he's eventually smacked down by Elliot's efforts as well as infighting among E Corp's own executives. He eventually makes a Heel–Face Turn and helps fsociety against E Corp and the Dark Army.
  • Disposing of a Body: As they consider wood chippers, acid barrels, and the Dark Army's expertise, Darlene and Cisco end up deciding to have Susan Jacobs' body cremated. They do this by stuffing her body in a suitcase and taking it with them to the dog shelter, and that includes riding the subway!
  • Disproportionate Retribution:
    • Elliot already doesn't like Terry Colby for being the CTO of E Corp, the company he blames for causing his father's death. However, when Colby is rude to Angela during a meeting, it's the final straw that makes Elliot frame Colby for a conspiracy, which he knows will destroy Colby's life.
    • Mr. Robot pushes Elliot off a pier because Elliot did not want to get innocent people killed in Mr. Robot's latest plan and tried to offer an alternative.
    • Elliot learns that Shayla is abused by her dealer, Fernando Vera, so he tips off the police and Vera ends up in prison. Vera retaliates by having Shayla kidnapped, threatening to kill her if Elliot doesn't break him out of prison and not letting Elliot know until later that Shayla was already dead.
    • Tyrell angrily fires three of his E Corp subordinates when they unwittingly insult him (while discussing workers who sleep with members of the same sex for promotions) in a casual conversation they were having. When they ask him what they did wrong, he blithely responds: "Nothing."
    • In perhaps the most egregious example, the episode "dont-delete-me" reveals Whiterose blew up 71 buildings and killed over 4000 people because she had to ask Price to schedule the UN meeting, twice.
      Price: You had to destroy so much. Why?
      Whiterose: Because, Phillip, I had to ask you twice.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: Joanna writhing and moaning after her beating by Scott Knowles is a little... suggestive.
    • Elliot's first time at a terminal since the 5/9 hack plays like an addict getting a fix after a period of abstinence.
    • Tyrell gussying up to go meet Elliot is eerily similar to a teenage girl getting ready for prom.
    • Angela's betrayal and treatment of Elliot throughout Season 3 is almost like Domestic Abuse.
    • The entire storyline of Vera's obsession towards Elliot feels more like a classic Stalker with a Crush and Yandere. Much worse than what Tyrell had for Elliot. He was at first obsessed with his ex Shayla, but after laying his eyes on Elliot, he immediately gets smitten with him because of his belief that they are connected somehow and immediately moves onto him after getting Shayla killed. He later returns to New York in order to be king and for that, make Elliot his ''partner'' and his mention of him and Elliot being linked on a spiritual plane is reminiscent of a stalker's claim of being soulmates with his victim. He later kidnaps both Elliot and Krista and threatens to rape/kill her if he doesn't become his partner and even puts him through psychological abuse and gaslighting to instil Stock Holm Syndrome in Elliot just so he could be the one he runs to. It shares some similarity with You, Berlin Syndrome and Enough 2002.
  • The Dog Bites Back: Whiterose and Dark Army prefer to keep people in line by constantly beating them with a heavy stick and providing no carrots. After taking everything from Price, Tyrell and Dominique and keeping them alive as muppets, all of these characters are willing to look past their differences with Alderson siblings and provide the latter with crucial assistance in their quest to bring Zheng down.
  • Doom Troops: The Dark Army seems to have an endless supply of these. Unlike your standard Mooks, the Dark Army muscle are brutal, efficient, almost always masked and ready to put a bullet in their own skulls at the slightest possibilty of being compromised.
  • Double Standard: Abuse, Female on Male: Angela exploits Elliot's mental illness by working with Mr. Robot and keeping Elliot in the dark. Worse still, she never seems to face any direct consequence of this, let alone seem to regret it. At least until she's murdered by the Dark Army.
  • Driven to Madness:
    • Mr. Robot attempts to do this with Elliot while in prison by actively tormenting him and mocking his confused exasperation at his blackouts. His efforts prove unsuccessful in the end once Elliot accepts that he is still very much himself regardless of Mr. Robot's influence.
    • Scott Knowles gaslights Joanna by sending her miscellaneous gifts and calling her, trying to sell the impression that Tyrell is still alive and maintaining contact with her. Joanna ultimately realizes the truth and confronts him later on.
    • Angela is made into what can only be described as a Manchurian candidate by Whiterose, who instills within her the (false) belief that her mother can be resurrected by the Washington Township project. Price has to snap Angela out of this fantasy by admitting his parentage of her and revealing that the project is a giant lie.
    • Angela herself tried to do this with Elliot after being brainwashed by Whiterose. She exploited his mental illness and was working with Mr. Robot behind his back for Stage 2. And when he doesn't remember anything about it she gaslights him so that he doesn't remember any part of it. When he finds out, she tries to weasel herself out of it and taunts Elliot for his DID.
  • Driven to Suicide: E Corp executive James Plouffe shoots himself on live television following the Five/Nine hack.
    • The Dark Army believes in this as a twisted form of martyrdom that serves a higher power. It also helps that it is a pretty effective tactic to avoid loose ends.
    • Subverted by Elliot in "dont-delete-me", who seems intent on overdosing on morphine to stop Mr. Robot but is interrupted by Trenton's brother, Mohammed. The two bond and become friends, which gives Elliot hope again.
  • Driving a Desk: Done during the sitcom sequence in "m4ster-sl4ve", and attention is even drawn to it when Tyrell Wellick crashes into the green screen at the back of the set while trying to escape.
  • Driving Question: The show is a cavalcade of driving questions, but the one question that has loomed over the show for the longest time is what Whiterose's machine actually is. Apropos, it is also the question that has planted the most Epileptic Trees among viewers. In spite of this, the machine's true function remains unknown even after the series finale.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Elliot & Darlene leave the Deus Group doxxed and penniless; with Elliot personally destroying Whiterose's machine and ending her reign of power. In the aftermath of all the pain, trauma and loss he endured since fsociety began a year ago, Mastermind!Elliot learns his true identity: another of Elliot's personalities. Accepting his fight is finished, he gives control back to the real Elliot to awaken in a newly liberated world.
  • The Ending Changes Everything:
    • Once it is revealed that Mr. Robot is a split personality of Elliot, quite literally everything that happens in Season 1 is given new light.
    • The reveal in the series finale that the Elliot we've been watching isn't the real Elliot - he's just another alter, like Mr. Robot, created to protect Elliot's psyche - and the real Elliot has been trapped in a fantasy world since the start of the series serves to recontextualize the entire show.
  • Entitled to Have You: Vera has this attitude towards both Shayla and Elliot for different reasons.
  • Dysfunction Junction: It is no exaggeration that literally every major player in the show has serious issues. Rounding up established characters that haven't been through life-altering trauma and/or carry unstable personalities is an easier task.
  • Establishing Character Moment:
    • The series opens with Elliot confronting a child pornographer with evidence he obtained by hacking him, and refuses an attempted bribe by the man, saying that he doesn't care about money. Elliot then leaves as cops storm in, acting on the anonymous tip he made just shortly beforehand.
    • Tyrell shows his true colors when he pays a bum to let him beat him up.
    • E Corp CEO Phillip Price first shows the audience that he's not some ignorant goober when he fires Tyrell. He takes great relish in it and talks about how he'd been looking forward to seeing how he'd react.
    • When we first meet Leon, he fearlessly squares off with another man at the basketball court, establishing that, Seinfeld obsession not withstanding, he's not someone to be messed with. This foreshadows him carving through Elliot's attackers and revealing that he's been protecting Elliot for the Dark Army this whole time.
  • Exact Words: Promotional material for later episodes of Season 3 do this.
    • The description for "fredrick+tanya" says that "Angela hits the rewind button." She sits in front of a television and obsessively watches the aftermath of stage two, rewinding the broadcast.
    • As for "dont-delete-me", it is stated that "Elliot tries to get ghosted; it is the day of all days." Elliot tries to get ghosted in that he engages in suicidal ideation, while "the day of all days" is that the same day, he watches his favorite film, Back to the Future Part II, in a theater.
  • Expy: Fsociety is based on Anonymous. They are both "hacktivist" organizations with a smiling mask as their logo, prone to making video threats and masked appearances.
  • Everything Is Online: Apparently. Elliot can use his unusual hacking skills even to open prison gates.
  • Evil Corp: It's the actual name of the company (in Elliot's head at least).
  • Evil Is Petty: Irving, a high-ranking member of the Dark Army, is shown to be petty and penny-pinching. In an early scene, he argues exhaustively in an attempt to get a free milkshake from his fast food loyalty card. In his final scene, he signs a copy of his book and gives it to Dom, only to insist that the cashier charge her for it.
  • Extremely Short Timespan: In comparison to previous seasons that spanned several months at most, the fourth season takes place over the span of one week, specifically during the Christmas season.
  • Face/Heel Double-Turn: Season 3 is one for both Darlene and Angela. While Darlene realizes her mistakes and decides to be more around Elliot and take care of him, Angela grows more selfish and starts to emotionally neglect Elliot, even go as far as to making him miserable.
  • Fake Guest Star: Pretty much every recurring character gets credited as a guest star, even though they're integral to the plot, such as Whiterose.
  • False Flag Operation:
    • The Dark Army organizes the E Corp riot as a smoke screen for Angela to access the code-signing machine on the twenty-third floor.
    • They later implicate fsociety as Iranian terrorists who carried out the cyber-bombings through extensive stage-setting and the use of a funded patsy.
  • Fatal Flaw: Each of the main characters have this:
  • Fauxshadow: Elliot's actions in "406 Not Acceptable" serve as a Red Herring of him going down a dark path with Mr.Robot even wondering if he cracked under pressure or did it reveal our true selves. "407 Proxy Authentication Required" makes it clear that nothing like this happens with Elliot.
  • Feud Episode: Most of season 3 is this for Elliot and Angela thanks to Stage 2.
  • Fingore: Cisco gets a needle jammed in and broken off under his fingernail after questioning the Dark Army's true intentions with the femtocell.
  • Final Season Casting: Season 4 introduces Janice as Dom's new Dark Army handler/taxidermist.
  • Five-Man Band: fsociety's original roster can be summarized as:
  • Five-Philosophy Ensemble
    • The Realist: Elliot
    • The Cynic: Darlene and Mr. Robot
    • The Optimist: Angela
    • The Apathetic: Tyrell
    • The Conflicted: Dominique
  • Flaw Exploitation: A tactic utilized by many of the show's characters on an extremely frequent basis.
Elliot: Nothing is actually impenetrable. A place like this says it is, and it's close, but people still built this place. And if you can hack the right person, all of the sudden you have a piece of powerful malware. People always make the best exploits. I've never found it hard to hack most people. If you listen to them, watch them, their vulnerabilities are like a neon sign screwed into their heads.
  • Foil: Elliot and Angela. Both have lost their parents as kids due to the toxic leak at Washington Township plant and desired to get justice for their deaths. But as the series progresses, there is so much difference between them. Elliot remains noble in his goals, cares about his loved ones and doesn't lose his kindness and humanity despite the hell he was put through and steps up to improve himself and make amends. Angela, on the other hand, becomes more and more corrupted with power and greed and willingly loses her humanity to advance her goals.
  • For Want of a Nail:
    • Whiterose got her Start of Darkness because she failed to land a job promotion, which had disastrous effects on her personal life. All of this led to the creation of the Dark Army and its global conspiracy.
    • If Elliot hadn't needed the suboxone to avoid getting addicted to the morphine (which he got addicted to anyway), then Shayla would never have had to go to Fernando Vera, who she describes as a "fucking psychopath", as a supplier and therefore never would have ended up caught in the mess that ended with her being Killed Off for Real and Elliot possibly becoming Vera's Replacement Goldfish.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Elliot (phlegmatic-melancholic), Darlene (sanguine-choleric), Mr. Robot and Tyrell (melancholic), Angela (melancholic-choleric) and Dom (choleric).
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus:
    • A few can be found when Elliot is hacking, such as Krista's brutally honest dating profile and Gideon's emails about cookies. Some of these are implied to be created by Elliot's subconscious and reflect on his feelings about them.
    • When the camera is following Susan Jacobs around on her jog back home, you can briefly see Darlene watching her.
    • Pausing when the camera skims over Elliot's journal reveals some funny entries, such as him trying out potato latkes for the first time, and an entry stating that "Obama is pretty hot."
    • When Elliot is receiving a beatdown in "h4ndshake", you can briefly see that Mr. Robot is taking the hits for Elliot.
    • In the episode "401 Unauthorized", Elliot and Mr Robot are discussing Angela's death. One frame briefly flashes a picture the Dark Army sent Elliot, which depicts Angela's corpse with a gunshot wound to the head.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • Mr. Robot only interacts with other people when Elliot is in the same scene, and he is always front and center when doing so. Elliot on the other hand is hanging out in the background.
    • Darlene somehow knowing where Elliot lives despite him being a ghost in the digital world. Darlene also knows Angela and the two seem to act like BFFs.
    • Elliot's routine at his "mother's house". A bit odd that Elliot would voluntarily sit down to watch basketball games, go out to eat three times a day with the same guy, always chat with visitors at the same table and not somewhere else more convenient, and attend a church group despite being a fervent atheist. Even further, that Elliot would even consider staying with his mother!
    • The dream that Elliot experiences while being pummeled by Ray's cohorts features the line, "I hear prison jumpsuits are in these days" by Mr. Robot himself.
    • Elliot's ideal future ends with E Corp crashing to the ground. By the end of Seaon 2, we are shown that Mr. Robot and the Dark Army are planning to do just that by blowing it to smithereens.
    • While being seduced by Darlene, Dom mentions needing melatonin supplements to get to sleep. The morning after, Darlene tries hacking Dom; she doesn't get very far.
    • Later, Dom wishes that Darlene suffers pain and agony for the rest of her life. Guess who returns to make sure he gives the main characters exactly that in season 4...
    • During Mr. Robot's monologue about the lost in "404 Not Found", he mentions a set of keys left somewhere and forgotten. Come "408 Request Timeout", it's revealed young Elliot hid the key to his room in the museum's storage in 1995 as a measure to fight back against his father's sexual abuse. Around twenty years later, Elliot is led there by his second split personality, his younger self after learning the truth.
  • The Friends Who Never Hang: The only character pairings we haven't seen interact with each other so far are Elliot/Dom and Darlene/Tyrell.
  • From Bad to Worse: Season 1 is a moody tech-noir drama, but hardly reaches the level of dread in Season 2, with Anyone Can Die in full effect, an even darker aesthetic, and some seriously twisted plot developments that catapult the show into a Lynchian nightmare. Season 3 ups the ante with more action and tragedy, as well as characters having to come to terms with themselves and their actions so far.
  • Fourth Wall Psych: At the end of Mr. Robot's rant in "da3m0ns", he says: "But first, a word from our corporate overlords." The show then cuts to a commercial break. When it returns, the scenes begins with an Evil Corp. commercial.
  • Freudian Trio: Darlene is the Id, Elliot is the Ego and Angela is Superego.
  • Gilligan Cut: In "d3bug", Elliot promises his psychiatrist he isn't going to do morphine again. Cut to him railing morphine in the back aisle of a bodega.
  • Gender Inverted: There are most of the tropes in the series that are gender-inverted between the characters.
  • Go Back to the Source: Season three's premise is that Elliot must reverse 5/9. While he doesn't necessarily change history, he has to literally return to what set him on his journey with Mr. Robot in the first place: the CD containing records of his entire childhood (and the encryption keys for E Corp's formatted data).
  • Going Cold Turkey: The premise of "da3m0ns". Elliot loses his supply of morphine and suboxone, forcing him to detox while on a road trip to hack into Steel Mountain's climate contol system. The results are not pleasant whatsoever.
  • Gone Horribly Right: By the start of Season 3, this is how Elliot feels about Season 1's big hack.
    (Flashback to Season 1): "Fuck society."
    Present Elliot: "Yeah, I fucked society alright."
  • Good Cannot Comprehend Evil: Elliot, Darlene and everyone else tries to rehabilitate Angela out of Whiterose's brainwashing, holding out hope for her redemption. But unfortunately, she is completely beyond repair as she decides to go back to her old tricks and take down Whiterose and her machine alone, which leads to her death.
  • Gratuitous Foreign Language: The Wellicks are Scandanavian. When they're alone, he speaks Swedish and she speaks Danish. Tyrell also occasionally peppers his speech with random bits of French.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: E Corp (called Evil Corp) and its corrupt executives are initially presented as the Big Bad of the series, but fsociety eventually learns that E Corp is a puppet of a much more powerful and malicious organization, the Dark Army, led by Whiterose.

    Tropes H to M 
  • Hacker Cave: The Fun Society arcade, which served as the original base of operations for fsociety. Combined with the arcade being stuck in a legal limbo of sorts after the odd number of tragedies that befell its previous owners and Romero siphoning electricity from the city's power grid, it made for an ideal safehouse. After Five/Nine, fsociety abandoned the arcade and went on to take over Susan Jacob's house as their new HQ.
  • Hacker Collective: fsociety is a hacker group with which the protagonist is affiliated. They are highly secretive, ideologically anti-corporate and members only communicate in person to minimize traceability. The Dark Army, by contrast, is an apparently bigger/more professional operation of hackers for hire.
  • He-Man Woman Hater: Terry Colby.
  • He Knows Too Much: After a BOLO is issued for Cisco, the Dark Army quickly dispatches an assassin to gun him down for this reason.
  • Head-Turning Beauty: In "407 Proxy Authentication Required", after he successfully breaks Elliot, Vera gets too distracted by his beauty and fragility to the point he forgets he left Krista untied and with his knife. This gives her the opportunity to kill him.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Tyrell Wellick starts out as the Disc-One Final Boss but ends up joining Elliot's resistance of E Corp, though his motivations of hatred and vengeance prevent him from going beyond an Anti-Hero.
  • Hero of Another Story: Hot Carla, whom Elliot describes as his "personal totem," is never given any focus in season two aside from a couple appearances. However, in the Red Wheelbarrow tie-in book, it turns out that she was the most important figure in Elliot's life while he was in prison, and ultimately steers him in a more rehabilitative direction.
  • Hitler Cam:
    • Of sorts. After James Plouffe's suicide, Phillip Price gives a public eulogy while the camera lifts up to show him looking down upon an onlookng crowd from a balcony. The whole scene gives off an eerie Bohemian Grove vibe as Price's voice echoes through the hall.
    • When fsociety takes over Susan Jacobs' house, there is a shot like this of Darlene as she enters.
  • Hollywood Hacking: The writers go through great lengths in order to ensure that techies will not roll their eyes at what transpires. Details are glossed over in the hacking scenes, and hacks are shown to occur much faster than they would in real life however. The trope is referenced several times, however:
    • In one scene, two members of Fsociety laugh at the inaccuracies of Hackers.
    • In "br4ve-trave1er" (1x06), it's deconstructed when two gangsters force Elliot to hack a prison in less than a day. While not explicitly referenced, it's made implicitly clear that the characters got their idea of hacking from pop-culture.
  • Hollywood Healing: Elliot is shot in the stomach by Tyrell in "Python" and later wakes up in "Power-Saver-Mode" in Angela's apartment after one week with only a bandage on his stomach. He at first had a slight discomfort while walking due to the stomach pain but while going to the defcon with Darlene, he is perfectly fine and also has no scarring from the wound.
    • Same happens with Dom in Season 4, she gets stabbed in the chest by Janice, puncturing her lung. Then the next day, she moves around fine without feeling any breathlessness and chest pains, especially when running to the plane to travel to Budapest.
  • Hollywood Nerd: Played with. While Elliot and his father are both portrayed as being traditional nerds in the sense that they are enthused by computers and technology, they also are shown to have respectively cosplayed as Marty and Doc Brown from the Back to the Future series. However, Elliot makes it clear on several occasions that he is not swept up in popular geek culture like comic books, video games, and so on.
  • Homage: Dominique is frequently seen holding a lollipop in her mouth, an almost certain homage to Kojak
  • Honey Trap:
    • Tyrell's preferred method of manipulation, showing himself being both willing to seduce a man so he can hack his cellphone and his rival's wife with the intention of sabotaging his rival's career.
    • Darlene attempts to hack Dom by getting her badge number via a hidden NFC device; when it doesn't work she seduces her, which still doesn't work as Dom locks her badge in a safe and hears Darlene attempting to break into it.
  • Hourglass Plot: One of the main parts about this show is how Elliot's path to self discovery and healing parallels with Angela's path to darkness, loss of humanity and self destruction. Especially since their goals were similar, but their motivation was different: Angela wanted power and revenge for her mother's death while Elliot at first wanted revenge for his father's death, but also wanted what's best for the people he serves. Elliot started off as a lonely broken person who was a morphine addict while Angela was a confident woman who had an amazing social life and a boyfriend (who turned out to be a cheater). But notice how their Character Development become polar opposites of each other, especially in Season 3. Elliot remained humble and kind throughout the series as he realised his mistakes and wanted to make things right and redeem himself. He even tried to protect his loved ones from any danger and wanted to improve his relationship with them. While Angela joined E Corp which caused her to slowly let greed and power get the better of her, which is later made worse when Whiterose brainwashes her and turns her into a cold power hungry sociopath who will hurt anyone who gets in her way of her goals, especially Elliot. The end result of all this is that Elliot retained his humanity, gained profit (which he and Darlene later gave back to the people) and victory from the Deus Group hack and even gained emotional support from Darlene, Mr. Robot, Krista, Leon as well and possibly Dom, despite dealing with the trauma of finding out about his dad's sexual abuse, while Angela lost her sanity, status, friends and eventually her life due to being to committed towards Whiterose's project and her declaration to take it down by herself.
  • How We Got Here: "eps3.2_legacy.so" finally reveals what became of Tyrell during all of season two, leading up to the present.
  • I Am Your Father:
    • Mr Robot is revealed to be Elliot's father before he's revealed to be a figment of Elliot's imagination who looks like Elliot's father.
    • Phillip Price is Angela's biological father.
  • I Just Want to Be Normal: The episode "1.2_d3bug.mkv" focuses on this almost entirely. Elliot takes his relationship with Shayla more seriously and even attends his boss' dinner party. When he's reminded of the Washington Township scandal, his lust for revenge is reignited and he rejoins fsociety by the end of the episode.
  • Icy Blue Eyes: Tyrell and Joanna Wellick both have some eerie, piercing blue eyes. Fitting, given the cold, calculating, almost alien nature shared by the two.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming:
    • Season 1's episodes end with a different video file extension, and the file name portions of the titles make liberal use of L33t L1ng0. For example, the pilot is titled "eps1.0_hellofriend.mov".
    • The second season uses encryption file extensions, such as ".tc" for the now defunct Truecrypt, ".p12" for a PKCS12 file usually containing an RSA public key and an X.509 certificate, ".hc" for Truecrypt's successor Veracrypt, and so on, and the file name portions of the titles themselves continue the use of L33t L1ng0.
    • Season 3's episode titles drop the L33t L1ng0 and end in various semi-obscure file extensions ranging from ".h"note  or ".ko"note , to ".torrent" or ".gz"note . The final episode, "shutdown -r", bucks the trend by being a command.
    • The first ten episodes of the fourth season are titled after 4xx error codes used on internet pages.
  • The Illuminati: While not the actual Illuminati, the Dark Army are much alike in sheer power and scope. They can manipulate governments at will by directly influencing the political structures and decisions of their respective countries, and even fabricate events to facilitate their dubious goals of societal reform.
  • Impersonating an Officer: Elliot spoofs a fax saying that he is a police officer to exploit the exigent circumstance procedure and have Tyrell's phone traced.
  • Inferiority Superiority Complex: Much of Tyrell's instability stems from this.
  • Informed Loner: Possibly due to being an Unreliable Narrator, Elliot is constantly talking about how lonely and alienated he is, yet has maintained a close friendship with Angela since childhood and has casual sex with Shayla in the pilot. It's eventually revealed that his Mr. Robot personality is more personable and interacts with more people than Elliot normally does.
  • Insistent Terminology: Elliot refers to E Corp as "Evil Corp", because that is what he visualizes them as. As our ever-so-unreliable narrator, that also means that other people in Elliot's life do the same. By season three, Elliot grows past his petty hatred for them, and begins seeing E Corp as normal.
  • Instant Sedation: When Elliot briefly lapses into his normal self while in the Red Wheelbarrow basement, Angela uses a syringe to inject him with a sedative. It does not take more than ten seconds before he collapses.
  • Insufferable Genius: Elliot's technical expertise often gets brought up in comparison to how others navigate the digital world, which is almost always inferior.
  • Interplay of Sex and Violence: After Tyrell successfully seduces Sharon Knowles, they meet on the roof of the E Corp building and begin making out. Halfway through, however, Tyrell loses it and begins to strangle her, resulting in her death. The same sultry love song is playing throughout the whole scene.
  • In the Hood: Elliot, to the point where you have to wonder if he was born in that thing.
  • Irony: Elliot, who was constantly shipped by fans with either Angela or Tyrell, ends the series happily single.
  • It Will Never Catch On:
    • In 1994, Mr. Robot says that he's never heard of this movie Pulp Fiction, but he'll reluctantly give it a shot.
    • The villains Price and White Rose watch Trump's media appearances in 2015 and take cracks at his intelligence while pondering how useful he'd be as a political puppet.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Elliot comes across as difficult to engage with because of his scathing views regarding modern civilization and his laundry list of personal impediments, but he is a legitimately decent guy trying to keep people happy through his vigilantism.
  • Jerkass: Quite a few on this show, and on different sides of the spectrum, whether it be the people that Elliot hacks or the corporate drones in E Corp.
    • Former E Corp CTO Terry Colby is your average, loathsome business executive and a misogynist who thinks of himself as intelligent when it comes to technology, but as Elliot points out, he is an arrogant moron. The worst kind.
    • Lenny Shannon cheats on Krista and abuses his dog Flipper.
    • Scott Knowles is portrayed as more smug and confident than Tyrell is, and that is actually saying something.
  • Kansas City Shuffle: The paper records facility in New York turns out to be a red herring designed to keep Elliot distracted while the other facilities are leveled by the Dark Army.
  • Kavorka Man: Leon gripes that Frasier of Frasier isn't handsome enough to be "getting more butt than an ash tray."
  • Kent Brockman News: Let's Be Frank with Frank Cody which appears to be an obvious Infowars parody, complete with a frenzied host, unhinged conspiracy theories, and doomsday prophesying.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Krista's boyfriend yanks his dog into the air by the collar while yelling at her to poop.
    • Colby rather callously has Angela dismissed from a meeting, causing Elliot to decide to frame him for the hack after all.
    • Tyrell pays a bum to let him beat him up, establishing that he's not just a corrupt executive but a real scumbag.
    • Angela's treatment towards Elliot in the first half of season 3. It shows that how much Whiterose's brainwashing has turned her into a sociopathic jerk.
    • Whiterose and her lieutenants engage in petty cruelty while carrying out the business with the worst example being organizing a terror attack with massive casulaties purely out of personal spite. Ultimately, this behavior drives very much antagonistic characters like Elliot, Mr Robot, Tyrell, Price, Darlene and Dominique to set aside their differences just to see Zheng being taken down. So much so that even selfish executives like Tyrell and Price are willing to die for this cause.
  • Kicked Upstairs: At the end of season 3, Wellick has been offered a promotion to CTO, in which capacity he'll have no power and do exactly as Price says.
  • Kingpin in His Gym: Tyrell has an Establishing Character Moment where he pays a bum to allow Tyrell to pummel him. Tyrell is played as a physical threat in a few later scenes.
  • Klingon Promotion: While people don't usually get murdered, the board of E Corp is extremely Darwinian. The execs are constantly sizing each other up, looking for weakness.
  • Knight In Sour Armor: Elliot has a very pessimistic view of modern culture and humanity in general. That doesn't stop him from being a dedicated hacker vigilante who takes down people who cross his moral code, or make him okay with innocent people getting hurt.
  • Lack of Empathy: A startling quality of E Corp executives is their complete absence of anything resembling understanding to personal tragedy. One example is when the CEO of the company gives Angela a thousand dollars in cash to buy some new shoes after hers get blood on them following a suicide she witnesses.
  • Lady Macbeth:
    • Mrs. Wellick seems to wear the pants in the family and is constantly urging Tyrell to push harder for advancement. On the day of their child's birth, she threatens to leave him if he doesn't fix the professional mess he's made. She even gets a very subtle Out, Damned Spot! allusion in a scene where she's scrubbing a stain off her dress while scheming with her husband. In spite of everything that happens to Tyrell and some infidelities on her part, she stays loyal to Tyrell and continues trying to advance his interests.
    • Angela herself took over this position in season 3 when she started manipulating Elliot by working with Mr Robot. She helps him complete Stage 2 and motivates him to fight off Elliot, even if it means he will no longer exist.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: The official Twitter account makes no attempt at hiding Elliot and Mr. Robot being the same person, despite it being a major plot reveal later in the season.
  • Laugh Track: The beginning of "m4ster-sl4ve.aes" parodies 90s sitcoms, complete with one.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • During a scene of "da3m0ns" (1x04), when two Fsociety hackers are laughing at the Hollywood Hacking in Hackers, Romero says, "I bet you right now some writer's working hard on a TV show that'll mess up this generation's idea of hacker culture."
    • In "power-saver-mode" (3x01), when Elliot rants about how It's All My Fault, he looks quickly at a few posters on the wall. They are about "a new TV series, based on fsociety. Coming to NBC this fall." It's named SHIFT+CONTROL. During the same rant, as often, he also turns to face the camera and talks directly to it.
    Elliot: Televising our revolution with commercial breaks.
    • "Payment required" (4x02)opens with montage full of jabs at very particular existing political and corporate leaders. Later in the same episode, when Price tells Zheng that the latter's Christmas tree is unbalanced, the reply is nonchalant admittance that it is unbalanced "to the left". One of the main criticisms of the show since very beginning was its one-sided political affiliation.
  • L33t L1ng0
    • Most of the episode titles in seasons 1 and 2 use numbers in place of certain letters. The convention was dropped for seasons 3 and 4 in favor of more "normal" file names for the former, and 4XX HTTP status codes for the latter.
    • Elliot will occasionally drop common chat lingo into his speech, like "Why meet IRL?" or "I'm doing this AFK." This is almost entirely limited to the first episode.
    • The episode summaries on Amazon Prime are also styled this way.
  • Lipstick-and-Load Montage: "Legacy" has a rare male version, with a sequence showing Tyrell shaving and putting on a suit to look his best for Elliot.
  • Lotus-Eater Machine: It's revealed at the end of the series that Elliot has trapped his "real" personality in an infinite loop where he lives a happy, mundane life.
  • Loyal Animal Companion: Elliot's pet fish Qwerty and later on, his adopted dog Flipper.
  • The Man Is Sticking It to the Man: The show makes fun of itself for doing this during the Season 3 premiere, by having an In-Universe NBC show about the 5/9 hacks called Shift+Control:
    Elliot: They packaged our fight into product. Turned our dissent into intellectual property. Televising our revolution with commercial breaks. They backdoored into our minds and robbed our truth, refurbished the facts, then marked up the price. This is what they do. It's what they're good at.
  • Malevolent Masked Man:
    • Fsociety has created a market with their iconic "The Gentleman" masks. In-universe, they are based off the mask the serial killer wears in a very obscure horror film, The Careful Massacre of the Bourgeoisie. Out-of-universe, they resemble Uncle Pennybags of Monopoly and the Guy Fawkes masks of Anonymous.
    • The Dark Army also utilizes their own masks, with the muscles' masks modeled after the Japanese folkloric oni and assassins simply wearing ski masks.
  • Manipulative Bastard:
    • The Wellicks are a Machiavellian power couple. Tyrell sleeps with a male secretary in order find information on the favored candidate for CTO of E Corp and later sets a dinner party with the man purely to gain leverage. Meanwhile, Joanna is shown to have put Tyrell up to some of these actions. Following Tyrell's disappearance, she begins dating a bartender so she can use him as a means to absolve Tyrell of a murder charge against him. It works, but it ends up leading to her own murder by the bartender when Joanna reveals her true love for Tyrell.
    • Elliot and pretty much everyone else in Fsociety kind of have to be this to carry out social engineering for their hacks.
    • Whiterose is the ultimate manipulator, having been responsible for Price's implementation as CEO of E Corp as well as supposedly having U.S. President Donald Trump elected.
  • Manipulative Editing: The entirety of "runtime-err0r" was filmed and edited to make it look like it was done in one take a la Birdman. Appropriately enough, USA aired it without any commercial breaks.
  • Medium Awareness:
    • During his sitcom delusion in 'eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes', Elliot can hear the laugh tracks and censor bleeps, and is understandably freaked out.
    • At points, Elliot addresses the audience in a more intimate manner, sometimes appearing to interact with us.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • Alderson loop is a term for an infinite loop that would normally have an exit condition, but because of the current code implementation, such an exit is impossible. Elliot's current "code" prevents him from exiting the infinite loop that is Mr. Robot. It gains an additional meaning in season 4, when it's revealed that Elliot put his "real" personality in an infinite loop within his own mind.
    • A ridiculously wealthy CEO named Phillip Price.
    • The white-dressed Angela Moss, who ends up manipulating Elliot. Moss is also a flowerless green plant without any true roots.
    • Vera believes in these. When he escapes prison, he tells Elliot he plans to live up to his name, which means "brave traveler."
    • Gideon is the name of a minor but heroic biblical figure. Gideon Goddard is a minor character, but is one of the most moral and honest characters in the series.
    • Tyrell is the name of the primary megacorp in Blade Runner, which produces replicants (androids) that are "more human than human."
  • Mega-Corp: E Corp, obviously. Their role in the economy makes them "too big to fail," as they are behind many, many, many commercial ventures.
  • The Men in Black: A product of Elliot's delusions
  • Mental World: Elliot dissociates himself from the harsh surroundings in prison and projects his own perspective onto everything. The cell is his bedroom in his mother's house. His mother and Lone Star are prison guards, Ray is the warden, and everyone else besides are inmates. His routine is random work around the prison, three meals a day, and writing constantly in his journal.
  • Messianic Archetype: Elliot has strong elements of this. He represents a once in a generation leader who truly wants what's best for the people he serves, which makes him a threat to the people with selfish motives who are willing to hurt or kill him. He even sacrificed himself several times to protect the people he loves and almost died several times throughout the series but survived. He even maintains a kind-heart despite the hell he is put through.
  • Mind Screw: Delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia make the plot of this show. It'd honestly be easier to count the number of times when the show isn't trying to confuse or throw you for a loop.
  • "Mister Sandman" Sequence: The first season takes only a very brief detour into 1994, and during that detour never even leaves a single store, but within even that brief scene is a Super Nintendo with game cartridges, a Sega Genesis, a pile of floppy disks, a reference to the latest Pentium 90 with an 800 megabyte hard drive, a discussion over whether to see Time Cop, Star Gate or Pulp Fiction, a man on the radio talking about the pending 1994 Major League Baseball strike, and no less than two giant posters that say 'Rated 1994's best buy of the year!'. All that's missing is Nirvana playing in the background.
  • Mushroom Samba:
    • An interesting inversion; in "eps1.3_da3m0ns.mp4", Elliot experiences this during drug withdrawal. The delirium combines with a fever dream to create a twisted, chaotic step into Elliot's mind.
    • This is later played straight when he overdoses on Adderall, although it is fairly brief.
    Tropes N to T 
  • Nebulous Evil Organization: The "top one percent of the top one percent" that Elliot warns us about in the pilot episode turns out to be more than just a deranged conspiracy theory. Episode "402 Payment Required" elaborates on this, and Price reveals to Elliot that Whiterose founded the group, named the Deus Group, after collapse of the Soviet Union. Its members were under the impression that it was a cooporative effort to shape the world for profit. This is a ruse, and the group was created to facilitate Whiterose's "project" and the annexation of the Congo. The members of the group are subservient to Whiterose, or are replaced by someone who will be.
  • Neon Sign Hideout: In season one, Fsociety operates out of a derelict arcade on Coney Island. Once known as "Fun Society", the continued decay of the arcade's marquee led to the U and N letters falling off, leaving behind "F SOCIETY". Dom later quips that the FBI were probably the weakest link in the situation purely because of its hilariously belated discovery.
  • Never My Fault: Ollie comes off as this, rarely ever attempting to level with Angela about anything and trying to excuse his infidelity as part of a larger problem.
  • Newscaster Cameo: Nancy Grace makes an appearance as part of her current affairs program, commenting on the investigation into Tyrell Wellick as well as the fallout from Operation Berenstain. Laurie Segall also cameos in a few episodes.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: At the Deus Group reception in season four, one of the attendees is a man with his back turned to the camera wearing Donald Trump's distinctive hairstyle. The show pulled no punches in season three, when Trump is specifically called out by Price as a useful puppet.
  • Nice Mean And In Between: Zigzagged in each seasons and sometimes Downplayed:
    • Season 1: Elliot and Angela are Nice, Tyrell and Mr. Robot are Mean and Darlene is In-Between.
    • Season 2: Elliot and Dom are Nice, Tyrell and Mr. Robot are Mean and Darlene and Angela are In-Between.
    • Season 3: Elliot and Dom are Nice, Tyrell, Mr. Robot and Angela are Mean and Darlene is In-Between.
    • Season 4: Dom is Nice, Elliot is Mean (until Not Acceptable) and Darlene and Mr. Robot are In-Between.
  • No Escape but Down: At the end of the episode "405 Method Not Allowed", Elliot finds himself cornered by police on all sides with no way out except a lengthy fall down a steep hill. He takes the plunge and makes it.
  • No Fourth Wall: The show is barely contained within its own reality; Elliot and Mr. Robot both acknowledge us, the audience, and often involve us in the action when the two are experiencing a power struggle. Elliot himself states right off the bat that we're just another construct in his head, and that we're only able to watch the show because he created us. Logically, the series ends once Elliot (revealed to be the Mastermind) relinquishes control, and Host!Elliot wakes up, thereby rebuilding the fourth wall and locking us out of his thoughts forever like the rest of his alters.
  • No Name Given: Despite telling Elliot that it will come in due time, Mr. Robot never reveals his name to him. This is because Mr. Robot is his name, given that he does not actually exist.
  • No Medication for Me: Elliot neglects to take his psychiatric medication, instead opting to rail morphine and smoke marijuana. He later hacks his therapist Krista, and learns that she also forgoes taking her medication.
    • Averted in season three, when Elliot begins to take Prozac, although it is presented as being not as good as what everyone assumes.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Elliot helps Angela throughout the series and is one of the only people who is caring towards her. And what he gets from her? Angela starts to psychologically abuse him and work with Mr. Robot behind his back, despite knowing that Elliot loves her and how much is it going to hurt him.
  • No Romantic Resolution: With all of his love interests and those who had a crush on him dead, Elliot ends the series single, though he is completely okay with it.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown:
    • In "eps2.3_logic-b0mb.hc", Elliot gets the ever-loving crap kicked out of him courtesy of Ray's goons.
    • Scott Knowles dishes one out to Joanna in "eps2.9_pyth0n-pt2.p7z" after she slanders Scott's wife. It later turns out that she intentionally provoked him into attacking her.
    • Tyrell nearly gives one to Mr. Robot in "eps3.8_stage3.torrent"
  • No Sense of Personal Space: Tyrell blatantly uses this as a method of intimidation with Elliot as well as Sharon Knowles.
  • No, You: When Mr. Robot accuses Tyrell of being a puppet to the Dark Army:
    Tyrell: "No puppet! No puppet! You're the puppet!"
  • Nightmare Fuel Station Attendant: Angela becomes this in Season 3.
  • N-Word Privileges: Vera doesn't care.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: Ernesto Santiago is one, and seems to actively stonewall Dom from pursuing credible leads or stepping back to look at the bigger picture. It turns out that Santiago is actually working for the Dark Army, and that he really is stonewalling Dom.
  • Ominous Visual Glitch: A tell-tale sign that Elliot is experiencing a hallucination or Mr. Robot is about to take over. fsociety also uses this as a gimmick in their propaganda videos.
  • Once a Season:
    • So far each season has ended with a post-credits scene that begins on a lingering shot of a Cadillac, with the passenger always being a big reveal.
    • Medication plays a significant role in Elliot's life each season. Season one followed his addiction to morphine, season two featured a brief experiment of overdosing on adderall to stop Mr. Robot, and season three shows that Elliot is finally taking sertraline: a proper medication and anti-depressant that is prescribed by Krista. This last example is depicted as the most negative of the three; Elliot is at his worst, even after suffering agonizing withdrawals and intense hallucinations.
    • Each season builds upon the relationship between Krista and Elliot, and dedicates a decent chunk of the plot to their continued development. Season one established Krista and Elliot's relationship while showing their revealing interactions as the two learn truths about themselves. Season two examined their relationship after much of Elliot's life and his consequences on Krista's life are laid bare. Season three revealed a major twist in their relationship, with Krista finally meeting Mr. Robot, who confesses his and Elliot's involvement in 5/9. Krista attempts to report Elliot but is denied based on hearsay and coincidence.
  • The Oner: The show is very fond of this cinematographic technique.
    • In "eps1.3_da3m0ns.mp4", there is an uncut shot that begins with Mr. Robot dragging a delirious Elliot from a cab and sending him into a drug house.
    • The shootout at the hotel in China is also done in one take, starting with Dom descending a flight of stairs.
    • "eps3.0_power-saver-mode.h" has a sequence that follows Elliot and Darlene through the CTF tournament. However, this is given the illusion of a single take, with cleverly hidden cuts.
    • The entirety of "eps3.4_runtime-error.r00" takes place in real time, but, much like the above, is just post-production sleight-of-hand.
  • Order vs. Chaos: Invoked by Price in a conversation with Minister Zhang.
    Price: Order will not protect you anymore, my friend. I will rain chaos, even if it hurts me. Because I would rather see you lose than win myself.
  • The Ophelia: Angela in "Stage 3", Darlene in "401 Unauthorized" and Elliot in "408 Request Timeout".
  • Parody Episode: "eps.2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes" opens with a twisted sitcom parody of the show, complete with a different theme song, laugh tracks, shoddy effects, and censor bleeps. Justifed in-universe as the sequence is playing out in Elliot's head.
  • The Password Is Always "Swordfish": Done much more realistically than is typical. Elliot benefits a lot from the slovenly approach to password safety of the people around him, but to the non-tech savvy the passwords they choose might actually seem reasonably safe, such as his therapist using the name of her favorite artist combined with her birth year backwards (Dylan_2791). The most straightforwardly moronic password (Angela's boyfriend, with a password of 123456Seven) is used to emphasize that he is, indeed, kind of a moron.
  • Pastiche: While the plot of the show borrows some obvious elements from Fight Club, the color filters, framing of characters, and shot choices in general are very much in the style of David Fincher.
  • Pet the Dog: When Elliot confronts the man who is two-timing his therapist, his only demands are that the man tell her the truth—and give Elliot his dog, whom we saw him mistreating earlier in the episode. Considering he frequently expresses his hatred for 90% of human society, he seems very fond of Flipper.
  • Playful Hacker: While Elliot is certainly not "playful," his interest in hacking is benevolent. He wants to help people and punish wrongdoers.
  • Product Placement:
    • A more low-key example, but most of the browsers we see used in the series are Firefox
    • Most of the phones are Android-based, Blackberry is mentioned in pilot.
    • Elliot regularly uses Kali Linux, a penetration testing (Ethical Hacking) Linux distribution, and Protonmail, an email service designed to maximize privacy through end-to-end encryption. Both received a corresponding recognition boost from general audiences, with developers of the former having to gently warn people that Kali isn't really meant to be used as a day-to-day OS for anyone who doesn't work in information security.
  • Post-Cyberpunk: Begins in a tech-dominated world easily comparable to our own, but as 5/9 tears the world to pieces, this trope slowly becomes more and more subverted. By season three, martial law has begun to sweep over the United States, with other countries experiencing civil unrest and utter chaos due to the global economic depression. It almost serves as an origin story for a classic cyberpunk setting, a tale of how our modern world can end up like that.
  • Power Corrupts: One of the reasons why Elliot does not want to be a leader and what disgusts him about the Corrupt Corporate Executives. And Angela herself ends up getting Drunk with Power as the series progresses.
  • Properly Paranoid: Elliot frequently "wipes down" his computer rigs and destroys any traceable components following his hacks. Elliot only becomes more paranoid once he learns the truth about Mr. Robot, allowing himself to be arrested by the police and incarcerated to prevent the alternate personality from causing any further damage.
  • Protagonist Journey to Villain: Angela's main storyline serves as this.
  • Psychopathic Man Child: Tyrell Wellick. He actually pouts before smashing a vase on the countertop during his talk with his wife in the aftermath of his disastrous encounter with Scott. And then, later, he strangles Scott's wife and it's clear he didn't intend to do it, but was provoked into it by her insinuation that he doesn't have what it takes to impress her.
  • Punchclock Villains: A common occurrence at E Corp.
    • Angela has a pleasant dinner with several nice executives of Evil Corp. Afterwards, Philip Price comments that they were "ordinary people" who even participate in charities. However, they also signed off on the action that killed Angela's mother and engage in other white collar crime.
    • When Angela sits in on a meeting with the Risk department, who handle lawsuits and liability against the company, the executives are remarkably banal and much more interested in the snacks being late than talking about business.
    • Leon is a laid-back, media-obsessed contract killer and enforcer for the Dark Army. He doesn't seem to have any ill-will toward anyone and just does as he's told.
  • Rapeand Revenge: After being sexually abused by his father, Elliot grew up to be a vigilante hacker who takes down pedophiles, rapists, abusers etc.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • Fernando Vera has Shayla and Isaac murdered, musing that either way, he is a wanted man with nothing left to lose.
    • Elliot is arrested for hacking Lenny Shannon when he takes Flipper to be examined by a veterinarian and unwittingly has the dog's microchip scanned in the process.
    • It turns out, when you wipe out all records of debts owed to an enormous corporation in the aim of bringing down the top one percent of the top one percent and fomenting a revolution, what actually happens is the economy collapses and the elite you were fighting can still work the system to their benefit. Who would have thought? This one point ultimately becomes the driving arc for the latter two seasons.
    • Being followed by the Dark Army, Elliot is unable to sabotage stage two at the hacker tournament.
    • Stage two targets the other seventy-one recovery buildings instead of the one Elliot labors to save because of his decision to divert the paper records.
    • Trenton and Mobley are made sacrificial lambs for the Dark Army once their identities are ousted in the national media.
    • Elliot, Darlene and Price keep on trying to pull Angela away from Whiterose's brainwashing. But their attempts end up futile as Angela is completely beyond repair and continues to be stubborn, which eventually ends up to be her undoing as it causes her death.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech:
    • Elliot gives a brutal one to Bill to get him out of the way:
    Elliot: Think about it, Bill. If you died, would anyone care? Would they really care? Yeah, maybe they'd cry for a day, but let's be honest. No one would give a shit. They wouldn't. The few people that would feel obligated to go to your funeral would probably be annoyed and leave as early as possible. That's who you are. That's what you are. You're nothing to anyone, to everyone. Think about it, Bill. 'Cause if you do, if you let yourself... You'll know I'm telling you the truth. So instead of wasting any more of my time, I need you to go call someone that matters, because, Bill... You don't.
    • Elliot, coming down off of Adderall after having not slept for six days, unleashes one against God, and the people of his church group, after listening to a man's story about God "forgiving" him for beating up an Indian store owner, and then thinking about Gideon Goddard's senseless death.
    Elliot: Is that what God does? He helps? Tell me, why didn't God help my innocent friend who died for no reason while the guilty run free? OK. Fine. Forget the one-offs. How about the countless wars declared in his name? OK. Fine. Let's skip the random, meaningless murder for a second, shall we? How about the racist, sexist, phobia soup we've all been drowning in because of him? And I'm not just talking about Jesus. I'm talking about all organized religion. Exclusive groups created to manage control. A dealer getting people hooked on the drug of hope. His followers, nothing but addicts who want their hit of bullshit to keep their dopamine of ignorance. Addicts. Afraid to believe the truth. That there's no order. There's no power. That all religions are just metastasizing mind worms meant to divide us so it's easier to rule us by the charlatans that wanna run us. All we are to them are paying fanboys of their poorly written sci-fi franchise. If I don't listen to my imaginary friend, why the fuck should I listen to yours? People think their worship is some key to happiness. That's just how he owns you. Even I'm not crazy enough to believe that distortion of reality. So fuck God. He's not a good enough scapegoat for me.
    • Angela gives one to an old family friend who insults her for working for E Corp.
    Angela: You're a plumber, right, Steve? You've had, what, 60 years at life? And that's the best you can come up with. Literally cleaning shit for a living. I'm 27, and I've got a six figure salary at the biggest conglomerate in history. And I'm just getting started.
  • The Red Baron: Susan Jacobs, a lawyer for Evil Corp, is known as "Madame Executioner", because she's proficient in killing lawsuits, usually involving deaths, against the corporation.
  • Recycled Script: As it goes on, season three begins to reflect the events of season one, but in reverse. This is intentional, as the entire season is built upon Elliot undoing everything that he set out to accomplish in season one with the 5/9 hack. Other characters that underwent high octane deconstruction in season two (namely Angela, Darlene, and Tyrell) are sent back through their respective arcs from season one in the same manner, amounting to the season's Meta Twist: everyone had the answers that they were looking for the entire time.
  • Reset Button: Elliot hits the reset button at the end of season 3. He decrypts E Corp's financial records, undoing the 5/9 hack and saving the world economy from the brink of collapse.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Irving, somewhat. He has been active since season one (and the linchpin of season two's more tantalizing mysteries), but we are only made aware of his presence in season three.
  • Retraux: "eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes" featured an intro designed to parody 80s-90s sitcoms, especially Full House and Family Matters; in fact, the guys who wrote and sang that series' theme did this one. Also in the mix was Paul Fusco- the guy who created and puppeteered ALF! And to complete the night, USA Network itself got in on the act- using recreations of their 80s-90s idents and promos from the "America's Favorite Cable Network" era, including voiceovers from Alan Kalter, a different logo bug, and a promo for USA Up All Night!
  • The Reveal:
    • Darlene is Elliot's sister.
    • Mr. Robot is Elliot's father, Edward Alderson.
    • Mr. Robot is Elliot's hallucination of his father, which acts as his split personality.
    • White Rose is China's Minister of State Security.
    • Leon is a member of the Dark Army.
    • Elliot has been in prison for all of Season 2.
    • Angela is working with Mr. Robot.
    • Mr Robot isn't the only alternate personality inside Elliot's mind, with two based on his childhood self and his mother Magda along with an mysterious third male, who is revealed in the finale to be the Elliot we've been following throughout the series.
    • Elliot was sexually abused by his father as a child. Mr. Robot is an idealized version of his father that Elliot created in order to protect himself from the abuse and pretend his father was a good person.
    • As the series finale shows, the Elliot that the audience has been following since the start is another personality, created by the real Elliot to deal with the rage and anger that he had towards the world.
  • Revealing Cover-Up: The episode "eps3.4_runtime-error.r00" consists entirely of one of these. The Dark Army stages a riot that spreads throughout the E Corp headquarters, as a cover for Angela to get to the code signing machine and sign their malware.
    • Another one of these is used in "eps3.6_fredrick+tanya.chk", when the Dark Army stages a house to make it look like 5/9 was an Iranian terror plot and has the FBI raid it.
  • Riddle for the Ages: What is the blue glow that Tyrell stares at as he dies from a bullet wound.
  • Sanity Slippage:
    • Elliot's experiences in prison are turned into an illusory world where Elliot can relish in his own self-created comfort while getting through his sentence and attempting to annihilate Mr. Robot. He snaps out of it upon going free, despite Elliot himself disagreeing, going as far as to doubt that Tyrell is even real.
    • Angela spends all of season three slowly entering what can only be described as a permanent fugue state. She hides in her apartment, slowly obsessing over resurrecting her mother, Elliot's father, and the innocents who have paid the price for the revolution. Her paranoia reaches a breaking point, and eventually she voluntarily abandons her apartment to live on the streets, disguised as a vagrant.
  • Sanity Strengthening: The entirety of season three is built upon Elliot realizing his agency apart from Mr. Robot, and ends with the two identities merging finally to wage war on the Dark Army.
  • Screw the Money, I Have Rules!: A defining character trait of Elliot, established in the very first scene, is that he cannot be bought or bribed.
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog:
    • The entire story arc of "eps1.5_br4ve-trave1er.asf". After going through with a complicated and risky hack to break Fernando Vera out of prison so he will let Shayla go free, Elliot finds Shayla in the car trunk with her throat slit, revealing she had already been dead throughout the whole ordeal. Mr. Robot invoked this trope midway through the episode when he advised Elliot to abandon the hack and let Shayla die.
    • Eps3.5kill-process.inc ends not only with Elliot failing to stop the Dark Army's terrorist attack, but with SEVENTY-ONE buildings being obliterated by the UPS exploit instead of the one he has spent the entirety of season three trying to rescue.
  • Shout Out:
    • In Season 1:
      • Angela shows up with a DVD of Back to the Future Part II, which she says is Elliot's favorite movie. Whether this is true or not is unconfirmed. Elliot seems to have no interest in art or culture. In the eighth episode, we see a picture of Elliot and his father cosplaying as Marty McFly and Doc Brown, respectively.
      • Shayla shouts "Keep the fish ya filthy animal" to Elliot minutes after she gives him Qwerty.
      • One of the games found in the arcade is called Intergalactic Planetary.
      • The ninth episode, in which Elliot learns that Mr. Robot was a hallucination of his dead father and he was responsible for all of his actions, ends with an instrumental version of "Where Is My Mind" by The Pixies.
      • Mr. Robot asks Elliot if he wants to see Time Cop or Stargate, but Elliot chooses Pulp Fiction.
      • When asked if he is okay, Eliot responds "I am pretty fucking far from okay," a memorable line from Pulp Fiction.
      • The masks worn by Fsociety and its supporters are an obvious allusion to the Guy Fawkes masks worn by Anonymous, who themselves were inspired to wear them by V from V for Vendetta.
      • The use of a talking fish in the withdrawal hallucination sequence, and the use of Time Zone's "World Destruction" during the season finale, both shout out to The Sopranos.
      • In the final scene in the 1% gentlemen's club, while Price and White Rose discuss the hack, a harpist plays "Nearer My God to Thee," purportedly the last song played on the Titanic before it sunk. Appropriate.
      • Angela loves the book From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. She later uses the pseudonym Claudia Kincaid, a character from the book. The book inspired her and Elliot to sneak into a museum together as kids, and season 4 contains scenes of them doing so. Elliot also gifts Angela a signed copy of the book in season 4.
    • In Season 2:
    • In Season 3:
      • When they were kids, Elliot and Darlene once made a snowman that they named Kevin McCallister.
      • Leon has moved his 1990s sitcom commentary to Frasier, which he doesn't like because he finds Frasier Crane to be unbelievable as a Kavorka Man.
    • In Season 4:
      • The expository montage that opens "Payment Required" is ironically set to part of the soundtrack of the montage-of-modernity film Koyaanisqatsi.
      • In a nod to Christian Slater's role in Pump Up the Volume, Dominique chats with happyhardonhenry806 in a cyber sex chat room in "Not Found".
      • Leon says that he needs to find a rest stop and "steal some mirrors." This is a reference to Kurt Vonnegut's Breakfast of Champions, in which the narrator ponders the slang phrase "take a leak" and invents the phrase "steal mirrors" to mean the same thing.
  • Significant Wardrobe Shift: Earlier in the season, Angela mostly dresses in pale colors but once she takes the job at Evil Corp she is shown going to work in a black business suit but wearing white heels. After her shoes are ruined by the blood spatter from the Evil Corp executive's suicide she witnesses and Phillip Price talks to her, she says she doesn't think she'll be able to return for the press conference later that day. However, after he gives her money to buy new shoes and following her Out-of-Character Moment in the shoe store, she does return to Evil Corp in time for the press conference wearing black heels. Upon seeing her present in her new shoes, Price comments: "Very nice, glad you reconsidered."
    • A promotional poster for season two has Elliot wearing Mr. Robot's jacket over his hoodie.
    • Elliot experiences one of Mr. Robot's takeovers as Mr. Robot's shirt and jacket replacing Elliot's hoodie.
    • Mr. Robot's appearance reflects his legitimacy and how much control he has over Elliot. His strongest is when he sports his hat, scarf, and glasses, but when the two become disintegrated in season three, he loses hit hat, glasses, scarf, and slowly becomes more grungy.
    • Elliot passes by a sign advertising Omni Consumer Industries. The name and logo are both references to Omni Consumer Products from RoboCop.
  • Shown Their Work: All over the place. The series is famous for this.
    • The hacking piece of the story is incredibly well researched compared to virtually any other series.
      • One of the first plot threads emphasizes that hacking is time and research intensive.
      • The series prefers basic Unix terminals to flashy graphics.
      • It features Kali Linux, and while obviously an in-story advertisement, it is a real operating system designed for IT security tests (hacking).
    • In Season 2, Episode 7, it shows FBI agents walking around in a large room with a massive monitor suspended from the ceiling, inside Ecorp. To the casual observer, it might seem oddly artistic and clashes with the grittier feeling of the show, but its actually really accurate to what a high-end emergency management office would look like. Considering that season 2 is essentially a season long emergency response, it makes perfect sense the FBI would spend a lot of its time there.
  • Slowly Slipping Into Evil: Angela's arc throughout the series is this.
  • Simultaneous Arcs: Season 4 does this a few times. 406 ends with Elliot being Kidnapped by Vera and Darlene and Done being held by Janice. The next episode 407 involves Elliot and Krista being held by Vera while 408 focusses on Dom and Damlene being held. Both the arcs have different formats, as 407 feels more like a stalker/stockholm syndrome thriller a la Berlin Syndrome and You while 408 is more similar to 310. Though we do see the aftermath of Elliot being held by Vera in 408 so they don't quite match up. However eXit plays this much straighter as it and the previous episode start in the same place, with Elliot and Darlene saying goodbye. 410 shows this scene from Dom’s point of view while eXit shows it from Eliot and Darlene’s. From there the two episodes go in different directions with Darlene and Dom heading to Budapest in 410 and Elliot heading to Washington Township in eXit.
  • Sinister Surveillance: Operation Berenstain, a (highly illegal) mass surveillance program orchestrated by the FBI and designed to tap into thousands of innocent Americans' phones, all in a bid to stop Fsociety.
  • Smart People Play Chess: Ray and Elliot play chess together, and Ray convinces Elliot to play chess against himself to sort out his problems.
  • Smoking Hot Sex: Elliot smokes a joint in bed after sleeping with Shayla.
  • Smoky Gentlemen's Club: The Stinger at the end of the Season 1 finale reveals that this is where The Illuminati meet.
  • The Snack Is More Interesting: A scene in Season One has Tyrell throwing a tantrum while Joanna calmly eats dinner in front of him, not even looking back when he smashes a vase behind her.
  • Spot the Impostor: In "power-saver-mode", when Mr. Robot asks Angela how she can tell him from Elliot:
    Angela: Your eyes. You're never trying to look away.
  • Stalker with a Crush: Tyrell is revealed to be in love with Elliot in the season two finale. Vera himself ends up being obsessed with Elliot in Season 4 when he desires to break him and build him back up again to be his partner.
  • Starter Villain: Terry Colby, despite representing the obnoxiously conceited jerkasses that run the E Corp gamut, is shown to be totally oblivious to information technology and a pitiful, digital victim of Elliot.
  • Start of Darkness: Season 4 gives us a flashback episode in which we see the origin of Whiterose.
  • The Stinger: Each season thus far has concluded with one that teases an oncoming facet of the plot.
    Season one: Whiterose (as Zhang) meets with Price at a lavish club to discuss a response to Five/Nine among other political conquests. Price then reveals that they know of the person responsible behind the hack.
  • Stuffed in the Fridge:
    • Shayla is found with her throat slit and stuffed into the back of Isaac's car, with Vera stating beforehand that she'd been in there the entire time Elliot was working to bust him out of prison.
    • Cisco is killed by a gunman in front of Darlene, which causes her to go on a downward spiral in Season 3.
  • Stun Guns: Darlene uses one on Susan Jacobs, killing her. It is later revealed that Susan had a heart condition which required a pacemaker to treat, and the stun gun shorted it.
  • Sugar-and-Ice Personality: Elliot is shown to be cynical and aloof most of the times but deep down, he is actually a kind-hearted person and deeply cares for other people.
  • Suicide Attack: The Dark Army's protocol for dealing with being potentially burned is immediate suicide. Every one of their direct attacks have ended in the assassins turning the guns on themselves.
  • Surprise Incest: Elliot has forgotten that Darlene is his sister when he plants a kiss on her. Her reaction begins a sequence of events that ultimately makes Elliot confront his dissociative identity disorder. To the audience, however, it is a major reveal.
  • Surreal Horror: Displays some elements of this, between Elliot’s hallucinations and Unreliable Narrator status, and the masked aggression from Leon, Irving, Mr. Robot, Whiterose, and even Angela.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute:
    • The mask worn by Mr. Robot in his public addresses as well as the logo of fsociety resembles a certain other anarchist anti-hero whose image has been taken by certain other anonymous computer hackers.
    • Midland City is pretty much an amalgamation of darknet markets such as the Silk Road and Black Market Reloaded.
  • Take That!:
    • Elliot can tell that Colby knows nothing about technology because he uses a Blackberry phone.
    • Two Fsociety hackers watch Hackers and talk about how stupid its Hollywood Hacking is.
    • Season three is littered with potshots at Donald Trump. Price and White Rose watch him on television and decide that he'd make a useful puppet while also mocking him for a buffoon. They later spend several scenes at Mar-a-Lago mocking its tasteless decor. White Rose later contracts an Alex Jones expy to endorse his presidential campaign. There's also a scene where Tyrell snaps, "No puppet! No puppet! You're a puppet!" which was a comment made by Trump during a 2016 presidential debate against Hillary Clinton. In season 4, a member of the evil Deus Group with his back to the camera is implied to be Trump himself.
  • Talking to Themself: Whenever Elliot talks to Mr. Robot, he is really doing this, much to the concern of the people around him.
  • Tempting Fate: In the final moments of "pyth0n-pt2", Elliot begins ranting about how he's finally going to "take back control" from Mr. Robot. Anyone who's seen the posters for Season 2 can anticipate this won't end well.
  • Through the Eyes of Madness: We experience the entire show through Elliot's perspective. Knowing how unstable he is, it is safe to say that some of what we see in the show should be taken with a grain of salt.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Angela in season 3.
  • Trapped in TV Land: Elliot spends the first half of 'eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes' stuck on a 90's sitcom roadtrip with his family, complete with laugh track, swear bleeping, and ALF. It's a delusion created by Mr. Robot to distract him from his near-fatal beating at the hands of Ray's thugs.
  • Trauma Conga Line: Most of the characters went through that, but these two take it the worst:
    • Elliot from the beginning of his life. He was abused physically, emotionally and mentally by multiple people, survived multiple near death experiences (getting brutally beaten up, getting shot in the stomach, being forced a heroin overdose, getting trapped in a nuclear meltdown), he loses his loved ones including Shayla and Angela, gets kidanpped multiple times, nearly gets raped in prison. And this is all the while he is dealing with multiple mental illnesses, most notably his DID and Depression.
    • It isn't easy for Dom either. She survives two shootouts, her interrogation is stonewalled by her boss who is a Dark Army mole, she gets kidnapped and is forced into replacing him with the threat of hurting her family, and then gets captured with Darlene and during interrogation Janice punctures her lung.
  • 20 Minutes into the Past: While the show Mr. Robot has been running on for a number of years, in-series the plot has only taken a number of months. As of season 3 (which aired during 2017) the show still takes place during 2015, which allows the show to indulge in some It Will Never Catch On trope examples.
  • Twisted Christmas: The events of season four are set to occur during the holiday season of 2015, and is by all accounts the bloodiest and most explosive of the series.

    Tropes U to Z 
.
  • The Unfettered: Tyrell Wellick, but his pregnant wife Joanna fits the bill even better than he does. When the police come to their door asking about the murder of Sharon Knowles, she immediately realizes Tyrell killed her and, while preparing drinks in the kitchen, forcefully induces labor with a fork to prevent the unstable Tyrell from answering their questions. Yeah.
  • Unholy Matrimony: The Wellicks. They indulge in bondage sex despite his misgivings over risks to the baby.
  • Unreliable Narrator: While this is a no-brainer and could fill a Doorstopper with examples alone, it is still very much justified considering that Elliot legitimately suffers from a laundry list of mental disorders, one of which has psychogenic amnesia as a symptom.
    • Elliot seems to think that random men in black are following him at all times, but Krista asserts that they are born out of delusion. It is never known whether the men in black are actually there or just Elliot's paranoia.
    • According to Elliot, he has underwent "intensive self-reprogramming" to see visualize any mention of E Corp as "Evil Corp", as it is all he sees and hears.
    • Elliot's withdrawal nightmare definitely indicates that there is a much deeper method to his madness as his hallucinations become more cryptic.
    • Despite seeing a picture of only him and his mother early in season one, Elliot later finds that the same picture now features his father and sister.
    • Elliot discovers that Mr. Robot is an alternate personality of his, and that every single one of their experiences was really Elliot taking charge.
    • Played straight in season two, where Elliot purposely lies to the audience about being in seclusion at his mother's house and the circumstances surrounding it when he was actually arrested and locked in prison for hacking Lenny Shannon.
    • Early in season one, Elliot mentions that he strictly controls his drug usage to avoid "turning into a junk". However, Vera later mocks him for not admitting to himself that is a junkie already.
  • Unknown Rival: Elliot became one for Angela, as she was hell-bent upon foiling his plans to stop Stage 2.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Fsociety is an anti-capitalist hackivist organization that wants to bring down Evil Corp and other Mega Corps who cross their moral code. They are indifferent to the upheaval this would cause if they should actually succeed, which is something that Eliot is not comfortable with.
  • Wham Line:
    • "wh1ter0se" (1x08): "Did you forget me again?"
    • "m1rr0r1ng" (1x09): "Who are you talking to?"
    • "h4ndshake" (2x07) has two: "When you see Whiterose, make sure you say I did good," and "Where do you think you are right now?"
    • The Season 2 finale has two pretty big ones at once after Tyrell is told by Mr. Robot to shoot Elliot and picks up the phone to call someone afterwards:
    Angela: Tyrell, you did what you needed to do.
    Tyrell: [crying] I love him.
    • "Series Finale: Part 2" (4x13): During his mind collapse, Elliot talks to a manifestation of Krista and she reveals the third personality hinted at for the entire season.
    Krista: Krista never quite figured it out, did she? She never realized she wasn't talking to the real Elliot. She was talking to the dominant personality."
  • We Used to Be Friends: Angela and Elliot go from childhood best friends to bitter enemies.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Usually when characters are in life-threatening situations, their fates are left ambiguous until much later. This has happened with Tyrell, Angela, Dominique, Elliot, Trenton and Mobley, Cisco and Darlene, Mr. Sutherland, and Krista.
  • You Are Too Late: In "eps3.6_fredrick+tanya.chk" it appears that the FBI are raiding the house where Trenton and Mobley are about to be murdered and framed by the Dark Army. When they breach the room, it's revealed Trenton and Mobley are already dead and the Dark Army cleared out hours ago.
  • What You Are in the Dark:
  • Your Cheating Heart:
    • Infidelity is apparently a motif in Elliot's hacking escapades.
    • Ollie has been cheating on Angela with another woman he met online.
    • Tyrell thinks this is the case with Joanna, but she is really holding out hope for his return, and is only using Derek to ensure Tyrell returns.

 
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Elliot Breaks Down.

After finding out that his father was a disgusting monster, Elliot is left emotionally scarred and broken. He loses his strength to go through with the hack against the Deus Group

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