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The Main Duo

    Tropes about both of them 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/b00cmd757e_22.jpg

Our two main protagonists, the slacker duo Mordecai and Rigby.


  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: Both of them have their moments of sudden distraction, mainly Rigby.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: When they aren’t slacking off, playing video games, or engaging in some stupid activity, Mordecai and Rigby are actually pretty competent at their jobs.
  • Butt-Monkey: Both of them are put into a lot of unfortunate events while slacking off from their jobs. Rigby especially.
  • Catchphrase: Both of them say "OOOOOOOOH!" together.
  • Can't Get Away with Nuthin': The main element of a lot of episodes is Mordecai and Rigby attempting to shirk some responsibility and usually doesn't resolve unless they own up to what they've done.
  • Character Development: A major focus in the last third of the series is Mordecai and Rigby learning to grow up in multiple ways, most notably around their love lives.
  • Cheated Angle: Both of them are almost never shown head-on.
  • Childhood Friends: They have been best friends since they were kids.
  • Did Not Think This Through:
    • Constantly. They usually come up with a lot of harebrained schemes that they don't really cover all the angles of, usually leading into alot of the situations of the episode.
    • A few episodes have them actually try to do their jobs, only to wind up causing the problem of the episode because they didn’t think it through, a good example of this being “Journey to the Center of the Crash Pit”.
  • Flanderization: Episodes focusing on Benson that give him the Sympathetic P.O.V. tend to turn them into incompetent idiots even more lazy than usual, most notably in “Think Positive”, where they try to water plants with soda.
  • Foil: Mordecai is considered the much cooler and more responsible part of the duo as he is naturally sociable and friendly, but he has a hard time expressing his feelings, especially when it comes to his romance life. Ironically, he has also been shown to be a Chick Magnet and have two main love interests; Margaret and CJ. Rigby, on the other hand, is considered the irresponsible Butt-Monkey of the duo, being considerably more jerkish and anti-social yet more honest with his feelings. And as for romance, he has been shown to have mild interest in women but entered into a real relationship with Eileen.
  • Friendly Rivalry: The majority of the problems that Mordecai and Rigby face happen because of this, more so in the early seasons. The relationship they have of almost brothers often leads them to try to one-up the other, with Mordecai being the one (at first) to give in when it seems like Rigby has gotten the best out of him.
  • George Jetson Job Security: Rigby even lampshades it in the last episode:
    Rigby: "We're not gonna get fired. Not for [leaving a hole in the wall], not for smashing up Benson's car, or ruining everyone's Thanksgiving dinner, not for releasing a demon into the park. We actually have our jobs for like, six years after this!"
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: They are each other's best friends and enjoy spending time with one another. What makes them good friends is that they're both slackers who play video games, share a Catchphrase, have the same taste in music, and share the same opinion in some subjects. In the episode "Don", Mordecai even says that they're like brothers.
  • Interspecies Friendship:
    • Mordecai (a blue jay) and Rigby (a raccoon) are each other's best and closest friend.
    • They also form friendships with Benson (a humanoid gumball machine), Skips (an immortal yeti), Pops (a humanoid lollipop), Muscle Man (an ambiguous human), High Five Ghost (a ghost), and Thomas (a billy goat).
  • Jerks With Hearts of Gold: Both of them have less than admirable qualities, but are shown to be brave, selfless, and loyal. See their own sections for more detail.
  • Manchild: Both of them are prone to behaving like rebellious teenage boys trapped in the bodies of full-grown adults.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: They pretty much cause much of the danger in the episodes due to not heeding warnings told to them or just doing something stupid in general. Though they do at least try to fix the problems they cause.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Mordecai is the calm, level-headed Blue Oni to Rigby's hot-headed, rash Red Oni.
  • The Scapegoat: A lot of the time they are blamed for things they did not do or are always assumed to be the problem.
  • The Slacker:
    • Both of them will do anything to get out of work, Rigby more so. And while Mordecai is the more responsible one, he often joins in with Rigby's escapades for the sake of rivalry or just for the hell of it. "Just Set Up The Chairs" is a prime example. Since season two had started, he seems to be more inclined to go along with Rigby, but still has a better sense of responsibility than Rigby.
    • By Season 7, their dynamic gets flipped on it's head. While Rigby, up to that point, was definitely the more lazy of the two, also shows more ambition when he puts his mind to it, even eventually getting his High School Diploma and has a functional romantic relationship. Mordecai, meanwhile, is literally stuck in a rut with no idea what he wants to do with his life. The finale shows that he finally followed through with pursuing a career in art.
  • Supporting Protagonist: Both of them enter into this position in season 8, as it is Pops' destiny to defeat his evil twin brother to save the world.
  • Totally Radical: They say "dude" and "man" a lot.
  • Verbal Tic: Both are prone to "Hmm"ing a lot and saying "dude".
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Even though they insult and occasionally get violent with one another, Mordecai and Rigby are each other's best friend, surrogate brothers, and will always have each other's back. They develop the same dynamic with Benson and Muscle Man.
    • A few episodes deconstruct this, as one of them will push the vitriol too far and genuinely hurt the other emotionally.
  • Weirdness Magnet: Both of them attract all manners of weirdness at least once a week.
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    Mordecai 

Voiced by: J.G. Quintel

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "The Power"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/250px_mordecai_character_original.png
"Ugh, we're so fired for this..."

A tall blue jay out of art school who works with his friend Rigby at the park. Between the two, Mordecai is the more mature, although he will sometimes play along with the more enthusiastic Rigby's hijinks.


  • Accidental Murder: In "It's Time". After getting rattled up all day by Rigby about him getting a date with Margaret and Mordecai not because of his shyness as well as his unwillingness to admit being jealous, Mordecai ends up pushing him out of the tunnel they're going through, killing him. He's remorseful afterwards.
  • Affectionate Nickname: "Mordy" by his mother and Uncle Steve.
  • Always Someone Better: Mordecai's better than Rigby in most aspects: way more friendly with people, more of a case of wasted talent rather than a deadbeat like Rigby and considered more responsible than him. And he will always rub it on his face. Eventually downplayed after realizing how this attitude has made Rigby resentful and insecure.
  • Ambiguously Jewish: Named after Jewish man Mordecai from the Purim story.
  • Amicable Exes:
    • Zigzagged with Margaret. When they broke up with her returning and him being with CJ, it is awkward, as Mordecai has complicated feelings over seeing her again while being in an official relationship. Things gets more messier after they share a kiss. And while they have no ill will for one another, Mordecai's awkward nature initially causes some problems, but they manage to work it out.
    • Averted with CJ. While they ended their relationship on amicable terms, even hugging one another, CJ is (understandably) a little frosty to Mordecai and Word of God confirmed they no longer speak with each other post-breakup.
  • Anti-Hero: A Classical and Sour type. He's as lazy they can come and can also be a surrogate Big Brother Bully to Rigby at time, but Mordecai is willing to stand up for something if interested enough and not as much as a jackass as Rigby.
  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: He has his moments when he gets distracted by something.
  • Author Avatar: Besides being voiced by him, Creator J.G. Quintel has stated that Mordecai is based on his own personality traits (what he'd do in any given situation).
  • Babies Ever After: He and Stef have three children (2 sons and 1 daughter) in the series finale.
  • Badass Driver: Usually in high speed situations he's the one behind the wheel and can pull off some pretty gnarly tricks.
  • Badass Normal: Mordecai normally goes against powerful beings and supernatural stuff, a lot of which are way more powerful than he is. And more often than not, he and Rigby always come on top, despite being simple groundskeepers.
  • Barefoot Cartoon Animal: Even if dressed for special occasions, he still doesn't wear shoes.
  • Beard of Sorrow:
    • After Margaret leaves. He shaves it off after the rest of the park help him get back to normal again.
    • He also had one when he ran away to Dumptown, USA after CJ broke up with him during Muscle Man's wedding.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Don't call him a slacker.
    • Don't pick on his shyness towards Margaret or any of his girl troubles. Rigby learned that one the hard way and Mordecai soon regretted what he did to him. Though this seems to have lessened throughout the series and now is just a casual annoyance.
  • Betty and Veronica: The "Archie" for Margaret's girlish, calm "Betty" and CJ's tomboyish, hot-headed "Veronica". At first, Mordecai is with Margaret but they break up because she got into her dream school and he eventually starts a relationship with CJ. Although, due to Mordecai mixed signals which included him kissing Margaret despite being in a relationship with CJ has led to her getting hurt over and over again. Finally, when he attempts to make a Love Confession to CJ or Margaret at Muscle Man and Starla's wedding, they both decide to break up. And in regards to Margaret, both amicably agree they are Better as Friends. And Mordecai finds love in a different person — a batwoman and fellow artist, named Stef.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Mordecai can be a decent person most of the time, but he can be dangerous when pushed to his limits. He once decked Benson in "Eggscellent" after the latter makes a thoughtless comment towards a dying Rigby.
  • Big Brother Instinct: To Rigby. When Benson callously brushes off Rigby's possibly fatal coma as another one of their slacker's antics, he punches him in a fit of rage and pretty much tells him that he constantly makes everything about work and that he has no real friends.
  • Birds of a Feather: With C.J. They both like to have fun, play video games, go to rock bands, etc.
  • Blue Is Heroic: He's one of the heroes, is more level-headed and is even the blue Oni to Rigby's red Oni. Plus, he's a blue jay.
  • Boxing Battler: If a fight breaks out and involves him, he'll start swingin'. Mordecai clearly isn't a trained fighter, and he's a beanpole besides, so his (non-Death Kwon Do) punches don't do a whole lot of damage.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: He is much smarter than Rigby (although that's not saying much), and holds a high school diploma.
  • Byronic Hero: Downplayed in every part, except when it came to romance and the future. In the earlier seasons, Mordecai would often angst and go to extreme levels to prove his life to not be a waste and that he wasn't a slacker in any sense. He would also be a hopeless romantic, sensitive and dreamy eyed about love, going into deep depression when he would screw up or hesitate. Even recently, after moving on, he still has shades of this, like being torn between two possible love interests.
  • Catchphrase:
    • "Dude."
    • "Awww Sick!"
    • "YAY-YUH!", the last of which is pretty much Quintel's own catchphrase.
    • Whenever Rigby's in danger or Mordecai's worried about him, he sometimes stretches out his wing and cries "Rigby!"
  • Character Development:
    • He's gotten better at talking to Margaret, and they've had romantic moments together even if they're not technically dating. She's even let him kiss her. This would never have happened in the earlier episodes. He also appreciates Rigby more (only punching him when he says or something stupid or insensitive instead of for no reason), and tends to care far more about him than he did early on.
    • He gets some more in "I Like You Hi". Asking CJ out instead of beating around the bush like he did with Margaret once he realizes he does like like her.
    • Mordecai started off completely embarrass of going to visit his mom for anything, given how she would embarrass him whenever he brought home a girl. Getting a What the Hell, Hero? from his past selves helps him realize that embarrassing moments happen and fade, how much of a jerk he was being to her, and remember that she is still a loving mother. And he goes to her for advice in "Sad Sax" to discuss his cheating on CJ with Margaret and how to handle it, without the initial anxiousness her had before.
  • Characterization Marches On:
    • Yeah, he still punches Rigby in the arm once in a while when he says something jerkish or idiotic (though that seems to be fading as well), but he became less abusive towards Rigby in comparison to the earlier episodes (when's the last time you ever saw them play punchies?)
    • In Season 1, Mordecai could be an almost unbearable Jerkass who was actively malicious and vindictive. From Season 2 onwards, Mordecai became far more laid back and was more Innocently Insensitive than anything.
  • Chick Magnet:
    • Margaret eventually started to reciprocate his feelings and stated that being in a relationship with him was most likely the best one she has ever had.
    • Starla was instantly smitten with him after he made a passionate speech about love in her debut episode, "Muscle Woman".
    • When Rigby signed him for online dating in "Yes Dude Yes", 12 girls responded that they wanted to go on a date with him...on the same day Rigby made him the account.
    • He immediately hits it off with CJ when they first meet in the above mentioned episode, with her quickly developing feelings for him and they started dating after he broke up with Margaret.
    • When practicing his plan to kiss Margaret to win a bet in "Do or Diaper", he accidentally practices said kissing in front of another woman. Her response is to give him her phone number.
    • When he accidentally proposes to the mantis princess in "Lost and Found", she immediately accepts the proposal even though she had just met him.
    • The way he and his future wife Stef first met implies Love at First Sight.
  • Classical Anti-Hero: Most of the time, Mordecai is just content with his life and is just too laid-back to care to do any work or take responsibility about anything. He'll still do so if it's needed but has no aspirations for the future other than what he has at the moment.
  • Cloudcuckoolander's Minder: Mordecai is usually this to Rigby, if not a bit immature and eccentric himself.
  • The Conscience: He's the voice of reason for Rigby.
  • Cool Loser: He's not popular amongst the crowd, or super successful, but he's still a cool guy amongst his friends, and the audience.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Occasionally, but when he does, it's usually towards Rigby.
    Rigby: (when applying his mom's cleaning formula) "By the power of my mom, stain be gone!"
    Mordecai: "Hmm, maybe that's why your house is never clean."
  • Did Not Get the Girl: For all of the focus on Mordecai's romantic turmoil, he doesn't end up with either Margaret or CJ. He does end up marrying a bat woman named Stef and starting a family with her.
  • Does Not Like Spam:
    • Implied. When looking for food for Thomas in "Dead at Eight", Mordecai reacts in disgust when he sees that Death and his family have almond milk.
    • He mentions how much he hates mayo in "Picking Up Margaret".
    • It's shown in "Fries Night" that he strongly dislikes whole wheat pasta.
  • Dope Slap: More like Dope Punch. He tends to occasionally punch Rigby in the arm when he either says something stupid, insensitive or insulting in later episodes.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: He does overcome his various flaws and insecurities in his romantic endeavors and the arts while maturing. The end of the series has him going separate ways with Rigby and becoming a well-respected artist and falling in love with a batwoman before starting a family with her. He also maintains close with the rest of the park gang and the end touches off with him and Rigby thinking back on Pops before searching for the old video games.
  • Easily Impressed: Not as much as Rigby's case but still displays this a lot himself.
  • Embarrassing Slide: He always dreads going to his parents' place because of a VHS his mom has of "Mordy Moments" which consists of screw-ups made during his childhood.
  • Fatal Flaw: His inability to be honest with his feelings and self doubt. It led to him accidentally killing Rigby, putting a strain on his relationship with Margaret at times, and a major part of the reason behind the messy, complicated Love Triangle between him, Margaret, and CJ.
  • Feather Fingers: He's a humanoid bird with hands that look webbed.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Phlegmatic/Melancholic — Pretty much the Straight Man, but also extremely lazy and timid (however he somewhat grows out of this).
  • Furry Denial: Word of God is that he's "a dude in a bird's body". He doesn't fly or do anything remotely avian.
  • The Gadfly: Picks on Rigby. A lot. Though it's toned down from physical violence for no reason to verbal jabs and the occasional physical one when Rigby either insults him or says something really stupid or insensitive in later episodes.
  • Gentle Giant: Flaws aside, Mordecai is very tall and usually easygoing.
  • Going Commando: The secret that Mordecai reveals in "Diary" is that "[he] likes going commando. A lot." Considering he goes around completely naked at all times, this much should already be obvious.
  • Happily Married: Not with CJ or Margaret, but with a bat-woman named Stef he met after becoming an artist. Given how they're seen in the 25 years park reunion, Mordecai finally found the one.
  • Heavy Sleeper: How he ended up in Australia without noticing in "Mordecai and Rigby Down Under". Beyond that, out of the two, Mordecai is shown having trouble waking up immediately, only doing so when Rigby gently tugs him or when somebody screams like in "Ello Gov'nor".
  • Heroic BSoD: Shown in the montage at the beginning of "Laundry Woes" After Margaret leaves. He snaps out of it after the entire park pulls together to help him.
  • Hidden Depths: "Mr. Maellard's Package" reveals that Mordecai has at least some interest in owning his own airline and being a pilot.
  • Hikikomori: He becomes this whenever he's gone through a romantic disaffection, often staying the room listening to depressing music, not showering and letting fungus and beard grow. Seen in all of its glory in "Yes, Dude, Yes" and the montage in "Laundry Woes". Taken to its logical conclusion in "Dumptown U.S.A."
  • Hipster: Several instances, but the quote "You can't touch music. But music can touch you" wraps it up.
    • "You gotta be in the know to know, ya know?"
    • Also the bit in "Grave Sights", where his movie of choice is a black-and-white foreign film.
      • Almost all the bands he and Rigby listen to are British Glam Metal bands, implying that they revere the British (which is common amongst American hipsters).
    • The entire episode, "Cool Bikes", when he and Rigby shown to be cool bike riders and in fashion.
    • Mordecai lists the "annoying music" as one of the reasons why he doesn't like going to clubs, though Rigby comments that he likes the music.
  • His Heart Will Go On: It takes him a bit, but he eventually moves on from Margaret with CJ.
  • Hopeless Suitor: With Margaret. When he ignores her (due to being mindless) in "Brain Eraser", she suddenly finds him attractive. Deconstructed later on in the series until it's reduced to nothing.
  • Hypocrite: In "Eileen Flat Screen", Mordecai becomes annoyed when he learns Rigby has been hanging out with Eileen without him, when Mordecai has constantly ditched Rigby to hang out with CJ and Margaret. Rigby calls him out on it.
    • Several episodes are kickstarted by Mordecai behaving like a Jerkass towards Rigby. Rigby then manages to get back at Mordecai, who will be pissed off beyond belief at this.
  • I Call It "Vera": He's the one who names "The Power" in the first episode, since he has always wanted to date a girl named like that. He calls his fists Steve and McQueen in the crossover comic.
  • I'll Kill You!: He yells this to Rigby in "It's Time". And he ends up going through with it.
  • Informed Ability:
    • In "Slam Dunk", Mordecai apparently has enough knowledge in HTML coding for Margaret to ask him to help make her website.
    • He mentioned offhand in one episode that he went to an art college, though he has never actually shown any real interest or talent in art (though that could just be a throwaway reference to his creator and voice actor, J.G. Quintel), though in "The Best VHS in the World," he did tell Button McButtonWillow that he should take life drawing classes because of how bad his fanart of The Best VHS in the World is. In "Fool Me Twice", Mordecai brings up his art college again and Rigby revealed that he never graduated which may explain why he works as a groundskeeper. It becomes subverted in "Bad Portrait" where Mordecai paints a portrait and it's revealed that we never see him draw or paint is because of his fear of people misinterpreting or getting offended by his artwork. He gets over it by the end Paints a painting that is incredibly well received and ends up hung in Benson's office and is seen taking an art class at community college with CJ in "I Like You Hi".
    • In "Rigby in the Sky with Burrito", he used to play the saxophone in high school when he was in jazz band.
  • Innocently Insensitive: He can be very self-absorbed and self-pitying, but he doesn't intend on hurting anyone.
  • Interspecies Romance: Mordecai (a blue jay) — averts this with Margaret (another bird); plays it straight with CJ (a humanoid cloud) and Stef (a bat).
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Mordecai, compared to many of his friends is not very strong (''Muscle Man and Skips'') but nor is he weak in anyway shape or form (''High Five Ghost and Rigby)''.
  • Last Minute Hook Up: He falls in love with and marries an fellow modern artist named Stef during the last few minutes of the series finale.
  • Like a Son to Me: Margaret's father, Frank, refers to Mordecai as a surrogate son in "The 1000th Chopper Party".
  • Looks Like Jesus: During his time at "Dumptown U.S.A.", he lets his hair and beard grow long enough to reach his back and his chest, besides only wearing a bathrobe as a sign of how much has he let himself decay. Just as comparison, he looks like The Dude.
  • Love at First Sight: Implied. While at an art convention, Mordecai bumps into his future wife, Stef, another fellow artist. The two gaze at one another before a Time Skip happens — showing that they are married with three kids.
  • Love Makes You Dumb: Mordecai has a tendency to do this when he's around women. While Rigby is shown to have a better relationship with Eileen, Mordecai has problems being honest and opening up about his feelings, especially with Margaret and CJ and will often stutter and can't decide who to open up to and it eventually puts him in the middle of nowhere. Rigby even points out how he puts love before his best friend.
  • Masculine Lines, Feminine Curves: Downplayed with Margaret. They are both drawn almost the same way, but the feather patterns on their respective faces play this trope straight — Mordecai's are more sharp while Margaret's is more rounded.
  • Master of the Mixed Message: Mordecai's biggest problems in his romance life, is that he is never specifically clear on his actions, this making it hard for his love interest to really know if he's genuinely into them. This is lampshaded by Margaret in "Do or Diaper".
  • Meaningful Name: His name is Hebrew for "warrior".
  • My God, What Have I Done?: He has moments of that.
    • In "It's Time" when he accidentally kills Rigby, and deeply regrets it.
    • In "Merry Christmas Mordecai", when he accidentally kisses Margaret when he's currently dating CJ and deeply regrets it and also in the following "Sad Sax". Luckily he made up for it, and got back together with CJ.
  • Never My Fault: While Rigby does convince Mordecai to ditch work, Mordecai does have a choice in it, but always puts the blame on Rigby.
  • Nice Guy: Post-season 2, while still a slacker and has his faults, he's mostly a well-meaning and amiable guy.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • He and Rigby are (in)directly responsible for a lot of the really weird things that happen during the show. Though, unlike Rigby, he usually knows when to play and when to be serious when things hit the fan, quickly leaping to straighten things right if it's in his power.
    • Perhaps the biggest example of this so far is during the episode "It's Time" when he accidentally kills Rigby and has to go back in time to save him.
  • Nobody Calls Me "Chicken"!: He should known better, but rattle him too much and he will give. Especially in the early episodes, when Mordecai's lapses of judgement were often caused by dares or suggestions that he's a coward, afraid or simply doesn't know what he's doing.
  • Not So Above It All: While he's one of the more level-headed ones, he'll still go with some crazy plan and making his own set of bone-headed mistakes as well.
  • Official Couple: Mordecai and Margaret eventually get together, but her having to move far away for school ended the relationship. After taking a while to get over her, Mordecai is officially with CJ until they broke up in "Dumped at the Altar".
  • Only Sane Man: He's usually the voice of reason to Rigby, although he zig-zags between this and Not So Above It All very often.
  • Person as Verb: "Pulling a Mordecai", which is described as "The act of never making a move, but at the same time, not knowing what to do with your hands".
  • Pink Girl, Blue Boy: The Blue Boy to Margaret's Pink Girl. Technically, she's bright red, but it looks pink due to color saturation from digital ink and paint.
  • Relationship Upgrade:
    • Starts dating Margaret after they their first (mutual) kiss in "Meteor Moves" and Mordecai asking her to be his official girlfriend in "Steak Me Amadeus". Unfortunately, she refuses because she got into her dream school. Afterwards, they decide to stay friends.
    • Asks out CJ in "I Like You Hi" but they break up in "Dumped at the Altar".
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: For all of Mordecai's romantic drama with both Margaret and later CJ, he actually ends the series not getting either. It's a fellow famous artist.
  • Shipper on Deck:
    • For Rigby/Eileen, either when he convinces Rigby to kiss Eileen when the two are under the mistletoe or being genuinely happy at the news of the being together.
    • While attempting to make an awkward Love Confession at their wedding, Mordecai states that Muscle Man and Starla were designed to be together.
  • Straight Man: He plays this role to Rigby as the moral compass.
  • Strong Family Resemblance: Mordecai looks exactly like his parents, especially his father, as they both have brown hair.
  • Surfer Dude: Has speech patterns like one.
  • Toothy Bird: He is drawn with a beak full of teeth.
  • Two-Timer Date: Played for Drama and deconstructed. In "Yes, Dude, Yes", Mordecai ends up inviting Margaret to a movie premiere, despite having invited CJ before. This confusion ends up infuriating both of them, with CJ actually Hulking Out in anger and almost killing everyone in a tantrum. After clearing things out, neither wants to go out with him.
  • Uncanny Family Resemblance: His Uncle Steve and unnamed aunt bear a very strong likeness to him.
  • Verbal Tic:
    • He has a tendency to stretch out words when excited.
    • Plus, he usually uses "dude" when referring to Rigby.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Every so often he will throw Rigby under the bus, "Wall Buddy" and "Lift With Your Back" come to mind, in which Rigby will call him out on acting like a jerk.

    Rigby 

Voiced by: William Salyers

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "The Power"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rigby.png
STOP TALKING!

A short raccoon, Mordecai's best friend since childhood, and his closest coworker as a result. Being energetic and immature, he's usually the one who instigates any sort of trouble that Mordecai or the other characters get into. He is a high school drop-out who never received his diploma at least until the show's penultimate season, and Mordecai thinks that's pretty funny.

Has a very tall younger brother named Don, who is an accountant.


  • Adults Dressed as Children: Type A in "Fuzzy Dices". When the park workers need a kid to get inside a Suck E. Cheese's center, they have Rigby wear a hoodie, a fanny pack, and a backward cap due to his size.
  • Alliterative Name: Rigby the Raccoon. Probably done for humor purposes.
  • All Men Are Perverts: The only reason he didn't want to see "Pajama Sisters 2" is because "They're just gonna talk about their feelings — fully clothed," yet in "The Unicorns Have Got to Go," he didn't see the appeal of having sexy women tearing a man's clothes off as seen in the Dude Time cologne commercial.
  • Aloof Big Brother: One to his brother Don. Namely because Don was taller, stronger and smarter than Rigby. He briefly crossed over into Big Brother Bully as well by telling Don he wished he was never born. They patched things up though.
  • Amazon Chaser: He frequently comments on how Eileen is attractive due to her smarts and survival skills.
  • Amusing Injuries: Rigby, The One-Cheek Wonder.
  • Anti-Hero: Despite being selfish, he's still often willing to do the right thing.
  • Anti-Role Model: He's lazy, greedy, rude, selfish, smug and convinced he's a lot smarter than he actually is.
  • Attention Whore: The main reason why he resents Don? Don got more attention than him.
  • Babies Ever After: He and Eileen have three children (2 daughters and 1 son) in the series finale.
  • Back to School: After being mocked for never getting his high school diploma, Rigby briefly tried going back to school. His first attempt didn't last long, though he does try again and finally graduates a few seasons later.
  • Badass Adorable: A small and feisty raccoon who can pull through in some seriously reality-defying situations. He's also a decent fighter for someone his size.
  • Bad Liar: Partially averted; Rigby is perfectly capable of telling a convincing lie, but Mordecai is better than him at lying.
  • Berserk Button: He really dislikes it when Mordecai puts his obsession with his many girlfriends over his friendship between the two.
  • Big Brother Bully: He wasn't nice to his younger brother Don at all, and in Don's debut episode, Rigby even says he hates him. When Don asks if he did something wrong, Rigby says "Yeah! You were born!". He gets better eventually.
  • Big Eater: Rigby is definitely one of these.
    (Rigby's stomach growls)
    Mordecai: Don't touch that cake.
    Rigby: It's a medical emergency!
    Mordecai: You just ate a sandwich!
    • In "Rigby's Body" he eats so much junk food that his body literally quits on him, and in "Temp Check" he considers busyness to consist of having a meatball sub to eat. Many other episodes have him complain about being hungry.
  • Big "SHUT UP!": "STOP TALKING!", which is one of his Catch Phrases.
  • Boisterous Weakling: Rigby often is loud mouthed and hot headed but he isn't particularly strong in any way shape or form. As shown when he talks tough to those who are bigger than him but regrets it when he's outclassed. This often becomes a Running Gag during the episode "Death Punches" where he's clearly overpowered by everyone. However once he gains any sort of power that puts him either above most people and makes him much stronger than he is, he becomes a Boisterous Bruiser.
  • Book Dumb: He's a high school drop-out, and his recklessly stupid attitude only reinforces it. But there is more to him.
  • Bratty Half-Pint: A rare full-grown example, nevertheless he's one of the shortest of the cast and fittingly enough one of the most childish.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: Or more accurately, competent but lazy. He can actually be a more efficient worker than Mordecai when properly motivated.
  • Butt-Monkey: Possibly one of the best examples, every episode will result in some pain coming to him or even dying in some episodes. Add in his physical weakness where he can't retaliate and near everyone can beat him up and he's almost The Chew Toy. Luckily, he has moments these days where he's successfully able to punch a guy back.
    Benson: First on the agenda is trophy talk. Who gets the trophy on what day? I think the schedule is more than fair.
    (Everyone on the team is scheduled to have the trophy for two days each week, except Rigby who only has it one day.)
  • Calling the Old Man Out: Rigby calls out his father for never supporting him.
  • Can't Take Criticism: Subverted, since Rigby like many others, does not like being called out and due to his constant belittlement from his father.
  • Cartoony Tail: Rigby's tail always points up when he's standing or walking. Real life raccoons keep their tails on the ground when standing, as their hind legs are usually too weak to support their bodies on their own.
  • Catchphrase:
    • "Check it."
    • "STOP TALKING!"
    • He also has "Ah, what?" whenever Benson asks him to do anything (usually as punishment) and "Why?" when Benson threatens to fire him.
  • Character Development:
    • Rigby grows pretty close to Eileen over the course of the series. In "Yes Dude Yes", he eagerly suggests going to the movies with her, when previously he only accepted a date as a solid, and did everything possible to sabotage it. Later, it goes even further in "Diary", where he admits that she looks hot without her glasses on. In "Terror Tales of the Park", when his story has him transformed into a house, the living room has a photo of her. Seasons four through six have him spending time with her when Mordecai's unavailable, before eventually revealing to Mordecai (and the audience) that he and Eileen had been dating for several months by the time of "Dumped At The Altar". The show's "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue reveals that they married shortly after the events of the finale.
    • Rigby also became more supportive Mordecai's crush on Margaret. He started off hostile of that aspect but eventually grew to trying to help Mordecai navigate his love life, showing a better understanding of Mordecai's relationships than Mordecai himself, pointing out problems and trying to help him solve them.
    • As seen in "Bank Shot", he now has a much better relationship with Don after working out his resentment towards him in "Don" and calls him for help when everyone else is mad at him at the moment.
  • Characterization Marches On: Mordecai's character development is much more apparent and pronounced at the beginning of the show, but once Rigby's character development sets in, it really sets in. Later seasons have him going back to high school and graduating, entering into a serious relationship with Eileen (and resultantly being able to give Mordecai good relationship advice), and gaining an overall better sense of self-esteem and self-discipline.
  • The Chew Toy: He's quite the Butt-Monkey though he brings it on himself sometimes.
  • Claustrophobia: He displays this in "Terror Tales of the Park II" and in "Portable Toilet" and he doesn't think clearly when he's in closed spaces.
    Rigby: We're gonna starve before they find us! Why did you eat the whole sandwich?! You should've saved some just in case!
    Mordecai: Dude that makes no sense.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: He'll come up with silly ideas out of the blue.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Rigby is small and weak, and to compensate he'll use every trick he can think of in a fight whether it be biting or attacking at the face.
  • Cool Loser: He's incompetent and incredibly lazy, but has some good style.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: Proven in the "Death Punch" episode.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Not as much as Mordecai, but is able to hold his own.
    Mordecai: Come on, Margaret and I are just friends.
  • Death Is Cheap: Rigby has died at least three times (expelled from his own body, thrown into a time void, crushed during an arm wrestling match), being revived each time.
  • Defrosting Ice King: Rigby was initially cold and mean to Eileen. Spending time with and getting to know her, makes him warm up to her considerably to the point she became his Morality Pet, girlfriend, and eventual wife.
  • Depending on the Writer: His skill and knowledge in regards to video games. Often, he's depicted as barely knowing the basics of whatever game he's playing and relies on randomly mashing buttons. However, there are also episodes where he's shown to be a very competent gamer with more knowledge about games than Mordecai.
  • Determinator: Despite his slacker ways, when he's properly motivated, he can be surprisingly focused. For example, he stayed attached to Muscle Man's chest for eight solid hours in a mentor-harness just so he could keep his job. Did a pull up to complete a physical exam despite over-stimulating his muscles to the point he could barely move. Completed a literal back breaking job he had taken to prove he wasn't lazy. Stopped a jerk-ass roommate of Eileen's from breaking her flat-screen. The whole of season 7 found him going back to high school to gain his diploma. And pushing Mordecai to see a final concert of Fist Pump when he has all but given up hope.
  • Disney Death: In the episode "It's Time". He came back to life via time travel.
  • The Ditz: Rigby is not so bright.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Even more than Mordecai, having grown up a good deal. The Season 7 finale had him graduate and finally finish high school before the Season 8 arc. After the adventures there, the end of the series has him going separate ways with Mordecai and starting a family with Eileen. It's unknown if he has a job or if he is a House Husband, but is Happily Married to Eileen and raises a family. He also maintains close with the rest of the Park Crew, and the end touches off with him and Mordecai thinking back on Pops before searching for their old video games.
  • Easily Impressed: Gets dazzled by hilariously mundane things like 8-bit graphics despite all the crazy things that happen daily.
  • Embarrassing Nickname: He got the nickname "The One-Cheek Wonder" when he had to have surgery on one of his buttocks after a game of punchies with Skips went awry.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Despite him being very lazy and a messy individual, even he was disgusted by the way everyone in Dumptown, USA were living their life.
  • Expressive Ears: His ears droop when he's sad.
  • Fatal Flaw:
    • A mix of his inability to swallow his pride and stubbornness. He struggles to concede that he's not very good at something or that someone's better than him at something he likes doing and that if he wants makes a point, he will go to great lengths to prove said point. If he succeeds in proving himself, he'll take pride in it and brag about it to others, and if he fails, it bites him in the ass big time.
    • His constant incapacity to get his priorities straight and of course laziness. He prefers to do what he wants to do (slacking off, making himself look cool) rather than what he needs to do (doing work, obeying others). He slowly does grow out of this in the later seasons though.
  • Foolish Sibling, Responsible Sibling: The foolish sibling (a slacker who never graduated high school) to Don's responsible sibling (an accountant who owns his home). Although, Rigby does get better by season 7.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Sanguine/Choleric — He is extremely immature and rather hyperactive.
  • Funny Animal: He digs through trash and runs on all fours when in a hurry.
  • Furry Reminder: As with all raccoons, Rigby is basically a Fragile Speedster in addition to his relative size, which is a problem with the rest of the park members when they tried to give him The Chase in every occasion, right until he gets toppled over by smarter, stronger characters like Skips.
  • The Glasses Gotta Go: Rigby seems to be a firm believer of this since he thinks Eileen is hot without her glasses on, though he really doesn't care once they start dating.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Most of his idiotic schemes and troubles are motivated by his jealousy of some thing or another.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Whenever called out or trolled but mostly acts this way towards Mordecai who expects this from him. He can also be needlessly tempermental if he's pushed too far by someone who makes him angry.
    STOP TALKING!!!
  • Happily Married: He and Eileen get married in the Distant Finale and even raise a family together, as seen in the 25 years park reunion.
  • Heavy Sleeper: How he ended up in Australia without noticing in "Mordecai and Rigby Down Under".
  • Heroic Build: On his back in one episode
  • Hidden Depths: Much of his Jerkassery is a cover for his insecurity.
  • Hot-Blooded: Can be easily angered whenever he's under a lot stress and will usually scream at the top of his lungs for no reason. He's also very impulsive since his recklessness often leads him to do extravagant things.
  • Hypocrite: In "Bet to be Blonde", he makes fun of Mordecai and the Blonde Men for being blonde, but it's revealed that he used to have blonde hair during high school.
  • Indy Ploy: Unlike Mordecai, who is at least concerned with how the rest of the day or week will turn out, Rigby basically doesn't plan ahead beyond the next few seconds and is pretty much defined by his impulsiveness.
  • Informed Species: Despite being a raccoon he looks more like a South American coati.
  • Innocently Insensitive: Frequently makes thoughtless or tactless remarks that makes Mordecai punch him or call him out.
  • Insufferable Imbecile: He's a fairly selfish individual who says stupid/jerkish things (which Mordecai usually punches him for) and can't tell the difference between a square and a rectangle. He Took a Level in Kindness later into the series.
  • Interspecies Romance: Rigby (a raccoon) is dating Eileen (a mole).
  • Iron Butt Monkey: Despite always being the most physically abused and on the short end of the stick, he can sure get back up in no time.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • In "Lift With Your Back", he made a very good point about how, even if he also has a tendency to do this, Mordecai also takes advantage of him regularly and never thanks him for all the stuff he has done for him.
    • While Benson couldn't have possibly foreseen that Mordecai and Rigby ordered the Death Sandwich, Rigby does make the (convincing) point that it was still a jerk move to eat their sandwich without asking them.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He's more overtly callous than Mordecai, but he also takes their friendship more seriously, and is much better at romance than him.
    • Driven home in the hot dogs episode, where Rigby truly seems to care for Mordecai after they both get trapped in the freezer.
    • Also in the episode "A Bunch of Baby Ducks", where Rigby insists on keeping the ducks, and calls them his.
    • Another example is at the end of "Do Me a Solid" where Rigby destroys the only video evidence of the humiliating solid he made Mordecai do.
    • The first Halloween special drives home Rigby's dependency on his friends. The characters all share a horror story for the group: Pop's idea of horror is a scary doll drawing on people's faces. Muscle Man's idea of horror is dying in a crash. Rigby's idea of horror? Everyone BUT him dying and before finally being left all alone. He dies too, at the end, by means of a giant egg. This gets worse when you find out later he is deathly allergic to eggs.
    • In "Video Game Wizards", he was deeply heartbroken when Mordecai chose Skips as his partner instead of him.
      • In fact, this happens a lot. Mordecai takes Rigby's friendship for granted, and then has to repair it after damaging it; by contrast, Rigby never does it to Mordecai.
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: Particularly in "Rigby's Body," where, even after his body literally quits on him, he stubbornly insists that he was right about everything.
  • Lame Comeback: He has trouble arguing without resorting to one of these.
  • Large Ham: A big ham in a tiny body.
  • Little Big Brother: He's older than Don, but Don is much, much taller and more buff than him. Because of this, people apparently sometimes mistake Don for being the older one.
  • Lethally Stupid: Tends to instigate life-threatening anomalies from simple, mundane subjects. Like unleashing a destructive video game monster when he was warned not to cross the wires.
  • Lovable Rogue: This is evidently how he sees himself, since in "Temp Check" he refers to his "lovable scoundrel shtick".
  • Mama's Boy: He's very close to his mother due to how his dad blatantly favors Don over him and is such a dick to him.
  • The McCoy: Short tempered and emotional.
  • Mean Boss: Acts as one towards a temp named Doug in the episode "Temp Check", where he just lounges around and gives Doug orders.
  • The Millstone: While Mordecai does cause his fair share of problems, it's typically Rigby's fault whenever something bad happens. More often than not, whenever he tries to fix things, he just keeps making it worse.
  • My Instincts Are Showing: He’s addicted to eating things out of the trash, and admitted once that he thinks certain foods like donuts taste better in the trash.
  • The Napoleon: Somewhat small and quite rude.
  • Never My Fault: He will usually make some half-brained excuse for doing something irresponsible.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: He and Mordecai are responsible for a lot of the weird problems that occur in the series. Though a good majority of the problems come from his end due to his immaturity.
    "I can fix it! I can fix it!"
  • No, You: Practically his catchphrase when he argues with someone.
  • An Odd Place to Sleep: He sleeps on a trampoline with dirty clothes.
  • Official Couple: In the episode "Dumped at the Altar" Rigby reveals that he and Eileen have been dating in secret for a couple months.
  • Once Done, Never Forgotten: Not getting a high school diploma and sometimes being reminded that he only got his current job by Mordecai vouching for him. He eventually does get his degree, though.
  • Ping-Pong Naïveté: Despite the All Men Are Perverts joke above, he doesn't understand "why people really go to concerts."
  • The Pig-Pen: He sleeps in a pile of dirty clothes and reacted in disgust over taking a shower. Eileen also mentions in "Dumptown USA" that he doesn't floss or brush his teeth, ever.
  • Rascally Raccoon: To an extent. He's pretty prone (especially in early seasons) to lying or cheating to accomplish his goals. "Terror Tales of the Park" even has him don a burglar costume for Halloween.
  • The Resenter: Most of his insecurities stem from constantly being one-upped and disfavored in favor of other people. The two most prominent examples of this are his best friend Mordecai and brother Don.
  • Running Gag:
    • He can never win at punchies.
    • As a Foil to the above gag, Rigby frequently wins against Mordecai in Rock Paper Scissors.
  • Running on All Fours: Given that he is a Rascally Raccoon.
  • She's Not My Girlfriend: Will deny any sort of feelings for Eileen despite spending almost all his time with her when not with Mordecai. Averted during the second half of the show, where he and Eileen begin secretly dating but have been keeping it on the down low for a several months. He even admits to Mordecai that he's been really happy with her, and the two are eventually happily married.
  • Shipper on Deck:
    • Downplayed for Mordecai and Margaret, but it's mostly because he wants the former to be happy, and he personally doesn't like the latter all that much.
    • Played straight when he switches to Mordecai and CJ. In "I Like You Hi", he flat out says to Mordecai, "Dude, CJ's way cooler than Margaret."
  • Sibling Rivalry: Hates his brother Don for being more popular than him, stealing his friends, and being mistaken for Rigby's big brother when ''Rigby'' is the older brother.
  • Smart Ball: Despite his tendency to be The Load around the park, Rigby gives surprisingly sound romantic advice to Mordecai. Justified in that he was dating Eileen behind everyone's back, meaning that he knew how to approach many of Mordecai's potential issues due to experience.
  • Strong Family Resemblance: Rigby shares the exact same physical traits from his parents and brother.
  • Temporarily a Villain: Depending on the Writer. He had done some villainous deeds which are not acceptable.
  • Took a Level in Badass: As the seasons progress, Rigby matures significantly, enough to help Mordecai out of his depression after being dumped by CJ.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Towards Eileen. At first he was a jerk to her, but as the series went on he warmed up to her and began showing genuine compassion for her. The biggest example of this is "Eileen Flat Screen", where he offers to take her new flatscreen back to her home, and even plans to set it up and order pizza as a surprise. Mordecai is openly impressed, calling it the nicest thing he's ever done... before telling him to tone it down, because it's freaking him out. He also reveals he waters her plants for her when she's out of town, and that they do things like go to Renaissance fairs together. The episode was basically foreshadowing for the reveal in the season 6 finale that the two have been dating for several months, to Mordecai's utter surprise.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Once tried to eat a huge omelette to earn a free hat, despite being deathly allergic to eggs.
    • "I thought if I ate really fast, maybe I wouldn't notice."
    • Played for laughs at times. He also appears to have a knack for dousing life threatening fires with lighter fluid.
  • Tsundere: Is heavily implied to be this, especially towards Eileen.
  • Uncanny Family Resemblance: When his extended family are shown in "Just Friends", they all bear a striking resemblance to Rigby.
  • The Unfavorite: Justified. Rigby's father prefers his young brother, Don. This has some merit since Rigby is a slacker who lies and does other things to get out of work while Don does the exact opposite. This also seems to be the case when it comes to anyone who isn't Mordecai or Eileen, which the latter two actually enjoy his company and don't ditch him for someone else. In rare cases Mordecai has done this but will instantly regret it once he realizes how badly it hurts his feelings and learns not to treat him this way.
  • Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist: Most of the time. He's reckless, selfish and immature. He grows out of it at the end.

Park Management

    Benson Dunwoody 

Voiced by: Sam Marin

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "The Power"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/benson_0.png
"Get back to work or YOU'RE FIRED!"

An anthropomorphic gumball machine who is Mordecai and Rigby's boss. Although he generally seems mildly annoyed, at the worst he can get really pissed if Mordecai and/or Rigby have messed something up.


  • All Drummers Are Animals: Subverted in "150-Piece Kit" when the audience finds out that the man behind Hair to the Throne's famous drum solo was Benson.
  • Ambiguous Disorder: During the episode "The Button", Benson seems to have signs of PTSD from the previous dome experiment beforehand where he did not trust anyone and subjected himself in isolation and did not trust anyone, including Skips who is his most trustworthy friend and employee. Especially after finding out Malleard lied to him caused him to have a break down when he was about to push the red button, but was traumatized that he had trust issues from beforehand with his employees and was worried that it was some big test.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: He's a talking gumball machine.
  • Anti-Hero: He's nice sometimes. Other times he can be a weapons grade prick.
  • Anti-Villain: Treats Mordecai and Rigby like crap most of the time, but he's just doing his job as their manager although he's quite unreasonable. Though the duo tend to slack off a lot, but they do nothing out of malicious intent. In truth, though, he can be Not So Above It All at times and he's partially this way because his boss Pops Maellard is a Scatterbrained Senior who is The Alleged Boss, but delegates work to Benson, and a Clueless Boss who has No Social Skills and is Innocently Insensitive, which causes him no end of stress in addition to his Freudian Excuse for having a Hair-Trigger Temper.
  • Ax-Crazy: His Hair-Trigger Temper is so extreme that he reaches many times a psychotic behavior.
  • Babies Ever After: Averted with Pam. While most of the other workers get married and become parents, he and Pam don't have kids and instead care for a group of cats and their pet pig Applesauce.
  • Badass Armfold: His standard pose. Especially when he gets to have his own moments of greatness.
  • Badass in Charge: He rules the park and often performs Big Damn Heroes moments.
  • Bald of Awesome: He had lost his hair a long while ago and still manages to be a badass.
  • Beleaguered Boss: He has to deal with slackers Mordecai and Rigby on a regular basis, Muscle Man's constant pranking, and even the others under his command have their moments of Not So Above It All. On top of that, his boss Pops is a Cloud Cuckoolander. It's no wonder Benson frequently gets mad, and needs the constant threat of George Jetson Job Security to keep Mordecai and Rigby in line.
  • Benevolent Boss: Despite his meanness as stated below, in a calm mood, Benson is ordinarily a nice guy who can show a softer side and reward his employees. He soon befriends all of his coworkers.
    • He walks the talk - he'll genuinely praise his employees, Mordecai and Rigby included, when he feels they've done a good job. The ending of the episode "Grave Sights" is a good example of this.
    • He's also fairly nice to Skips (who is hard-working) and Pops. He's also a bit strict with Muscle Man, but that's more because he's obnoxious (although he normally does his work).
    • The episode "My Mom" has Muscle Man calling him to request a break for lunch, which he allows to Mordecai and Rigby's surprise. Muscle Man then explains to them that if you tell Benson what you're up to instead of just being unaccounted for, he is reasonable.
  • Berserk Button: He has several due to being angered very easily.
    • Getting prank calls, apparently makes him angry enough to damage the Park phone which is a piece of company property.
    • Whatever you do, DON'T THROW TRASH AT HIM. He will go berserk without a second thought.
    • He starts out Angrish and screams in a rage while chasing Mordecai and Rigby when Rigby claimed he was "all talk" in "A Bunch of Full Grown Geese" since most of Benson's threats to fire them had not been guaranteed.
    • Anything music related really works him up real badly since he had bad experiences in the music industry. So anytime there's a situation involving music he will become more angrier than usual.
    • But the most obvious one is when Mordecai and Rigby either slack off on their jobs, or when they accidentally cause something to cause a bunch of destruction due to their inexperience in dealing with the supernatural until working at the park.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: He can be a nice person, but making him angry is one of the most ill-advised things you can do.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • In "Benson Be Gone" he returns to the park just in time to save it from Susan.
    • He also arrives with his drum set at the last second, giving the cast enough music power to destroy the Summertime Lovin' cassette.
    • And again in "Stick Hockey" when he arrives just in time to finish Mordecai and Rigby's stick hockey death match and is revealed to be a master at the game.
    • Got yet another one in "Cool Bikes" when he saves Mordecai and Rigby's lives by attacking the judge that was sentencing them to death and aiding in their escape.
    • He got a small (yet awesome) one in "Karaoke Video". Mordecai and Rigby are attempting to steal the video of them dissing on their coworkers. Some brawls between the bars employees and them eventually turn into an all out bar brawl. Near the end it shows Benson hopelessly looking at the ridiculous warfare just as the tape lands in front of him. He picks it up curiously and the owner of the bar punches him in the face and orders him to give it back. He then smashes the karaoke tape right into the owner's face, knocking him out and destroying the tape in the process. He basically saved Mordecai and Rigby's necks from himself without even realizing it.
      Benson: You want it?! FINE! TAKE IT THEN!
  • Big "WHAT?!": Screams this midway through "Country Club" when Skips caves in and tells him that Mordecai and Rigby went to the country club to get a golf cart back. Turns out he's actually furious for a different reason.
  • Birds of a Feather: With Pam, as both of them are workaholics and love chicken wings.
  • Breath Weapon: Benson unleashes a torrent of pure, pent-up rage at Mordecai and Rigby during "Think Positive" in the form of a mouth laser.
  • Butt-Monkey: If bad luck isn't happening to Mordecai and Rigby, it's probably happening to him. Benson is a rigid and stubborn jerk but he's is also a very lonely and insecure loser that hardly gets any respect by anyone, even his demanding boss.
  • The Captain: He's the supervisor for the park's maintenance crew.
  • Can't Hold His Liquor: Has a weakness for chicken wings.
  • Catchphrase:
    • "Get back to work!" and "Clean up this mess!" (both of which are usually followed by "Or you're fired!")
    • MORDECAI!!! RIGBY!!!
  • The Cavalry:
    • The guys are losing to a physical manifestation of an Ear Worm that they're battling by playing a counter Ear Worm. When Benson arrives, Mordecai assumes he's there to yell at them for messing up the park with their battle. He is there to yell at them, but for forgetting a key part of an Ear Worm: the beat from the drums which he plays.
    • In "Country Club", he shows up with the rest of the park employees to help Mordecai and Rigby get the golf cart back and get revenge on the titular club for stealing their property over the years, which included his boombox.
  • Character Development: He's noticeably more tolerant of Mordecai and Rigby after "Benson Be Gone", not getting as angry at them for when they mess up. He even came to their rescue in "This Is My Jam".
    • Also shows in "Jinxed" when he subverts his Rant-Inducing Slight because they apologized for slacking off, where before he'd not have given them the time of day. He did lose it earlier in the episode when Rigby was intentionally enraging him trying to break his jinx, but Benson didn't take it out on Rigby and instead vented his rage elsewhere.
    • Newer episodes even had him lead the group in downtime activities, like a weekly game night and paying for everyone at a bar, even Mordecai and Rigby.
    • It's revealed in "Stick Hockey" that he used to be a champion stick hockey player until ten years prior to the episode when his apprentice Dave was killed in the final round of a tournament. Now he sees himself as a loser who wasted his life on stick hockey and now he's wasted his life in a dead-end job.
    • "Think Positive" revealed that Benson of all people was The Quiet One in his family, and his father taught him that the only way to get stuff done is with a Hair-Trigger Temper. His giant rant at the end had him imply that he always holds off on firing Mordecai and Rigby because he really just wants to teach them to be more responsible.
    • "150-Piece Kit" reveals he performed a legendary drum solo for the band Hair to the Throne, one everyone though was done by the band's drum machine. He then proceeds to perform said solo again in front of the whole park, proving he did it. The episode also has him turning down an offer to tour with Hair to the Throne to keep working at the park showing how much he loves the place.
    • "Expert Or Liar" has Benson show Rigby a tape of him being humiliated on national television (as Rigby had done earlier in the episode). Benson had to say 'bandanna' in order to win some prize money, which he was planning to use to quit his job at the park, which he hated. However, Benson accidentally says 'banana' instead. He mentions that he couldn't go out for years after that without someone throwing a banana at him, and it also explains why he kept working at the park (note: Benson is highest in command because of how long he'd been working there, but he is not the boss - Mr. Maellard is). It becomes pretty obvious that Benson hates when people don't do what he says, because it puts his job on the line, and he can't afford to fail again at his age (having experienced plenty of failure and humiliation himself). Benson, nevertheless, is shown to be quite easy going on the rare occasion Mordecai and Rigby aren't doing something to anger him.
  • Chick Magnet: Despite his bad luck when it comes to romance, Benson is pretty popular with the ladies — there are his previously mentioned exes, Audrey, Pam, Roxy, and Bluray. Skips even lampshades how Benson became popular with the ladies after entering space.
  • Color Motifs: Red. Most of his body is colored red. Whenever he is angered, his face turns completely red. Lastly, the color can represent anger.
  • The Comically Serious: He's serious most of the time, but his chewing out of Rigby and Mordecai is often played for laughs.
  • Control Freak: Benson tried to be the literal boss of everything and doesn't like it when someone takes control of a situation unless Skips is the one to do so. Even then everyone is very annoyed with him doing so and often have to plot behind his back.
  • A Day in the Limelight: "Benson Be Gone" was his first one, but "Think Positive" was more about his personality.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He sometimes leans on this especially when the HA HA HA—No trope is used.
    Rigby: And we'll be all like "In your face!"
    Benson: Haha, and I will be all like GET BACK TO WORK!
  • Depending on the Writer: Benson's characterization ranges from a cynical, but reasonable Jerk with a Heart of Gold to a full-blown Jerkass that overreacts to everything.
    • He can also either be completely task oriented or much more relaxed and willing to go along with an adventure.
    • His relationship with Mordecai and Rigby. In some episodes, while he gets annoyed by their actions, he does admit that he respects them (Busted Cart, Cool Bikes). In other episodes, he would look for any excuse to get them fired and even gloat about it (Replaced, Muscle Mentor, Lunch Break).
  • Dysfunctional Family: Benson's family taught him to yell whenever he wanted something, which turned him into a big anger ball.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: First appeared in "2 in the AM PM'', one of J. G. Quintel's first short films, in the gas station clerks' acid-induced hallucination.
  • Embarrassing Last Name: In the Dome Experiment Special, the head scientist refers to Benson by his full name and boy it's made clear why he sticks with just Benson. For those who want to know... it's Benson Dunwoody.
  • Enraged by Idiocy: One of his biggest triggers is Mordecai and Rigby's incompetence.
  • Everyone Has Standards: While he's quick to veto any of Mordecai and Rigby's crazy schemes, he quickly gives them full permission for one certain scheme which involves entering a music contest. Not that because the reason why they wanted to enter was to win the natural turducken as a grand prize due to screwing up the upcoming Thanksgiving dinner, but because the winning song would also legally replace "Happy Birthday", which he absolutely detests.
  • Fatal Flaw: Benson has three major flaws.
    • His Hair-Trigger Temper causes him to easily lose his cool and causes a great amount of distress to the people around him. Example such as Mordecai and Rigby who are always victims to his temper as he's always losing his cool around them but it leads the duo to have a lack of respect towards him and they often have a tendency to go behind his back due to the fact they don't want Benson to get involved with their own issues.
    • His pettiness, he always seems to take things way too far, that normal people would let slide but not for Benson. He's very exaggerated in many of his actions over simple things and doesn't have the stable mental condition to just leave some things alone without taking things to epic proportions. Examples such as eating both of Mordecai and Rigby's food multiple times for simply taking his one sandwich, attempting to spoil a TV show for them for not vacuuming the floors, giving them cruel punishments, and often threatening to fire them for very small mistakes and unimportant reasons.
    • Finally his inability to let go of his insecurities from the past or within himself as it is basically what fuels his other Fatal Flaws. This is mostly what drives Benson to do the things he does and it more often works against him as it makes him very unlikable and frustrating to deal with as barely anything will ever get through to him.
  • Former Teen Rebel: He was a drummer and underground stick hockey player in his adolescence.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Choleric/Melancholic — Has a short temper and is quite bitter too.
  • Freudian Excuse: "Think Positive" implies that Benson is so quick to raise his voice because his father told him, "You'll never get anything you want in this world if you don't yell for it." Although this does not justify anything he's done for extremely petty reasons, to where he becomes borderline abusive to his workers and is a toxic influence.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: At times. Examples include "Eggscellent", where Mordecai outright tells Benson during a fight that everyone only hangs out with him because he's their boss (though he takes this back later), and "Return of Mordecai and the Rigbys" where his perfectionism in band practice irritates the other workers/band members.
  • Friend to All Living Things: He seems to have a soft spot for animals. It's established that he's a cat lover, and he's extremely loving to his new pet pig, Applesauce (Leeroy) in "Benson's Pig". He also takes a liking to a bird in "The Dome Experiment Special".
  • Gag Nose: Has a rather pointy nose on his head.
  • George Jetson Job Security: He threatens to fire Mordecai and Rigby on a daily basis. Rigby, at one point, flat-out tells him to his face that he's "all talk", to which Benson responds by screaming and chasing them down, as if ready to beat them up.
  • Good Is Not Nice: He often threatens to fire Mordecai and Rigby, but all he's really doing is his job. He's very friendly when things aren't out of hand.
  • Grumpy Bear: Not much makes him happy, and when Mordecai and Rigby are around him, things don't get any better.
  • Guilt by Association Gag: Usually blames Mordecai and Rigby combined for a mishap even if it was only Rigby's fault.
  • HA HA HA—No: Often done with sarcasm.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Has very explosive outbursts that often end with "...OR YOU'RE FIRED!!" Though he generally seems to be ready to blow his cool at the drop of a hat in almost every situation he's a part of. His anger issues are so bad that it ends up with multiple people including his co-workers which are also among his best friends taking concern on how he manages his emotions.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: He's sometimes shown to be a pretty Nice Guy whenever things aren't out of control, or when Mordecai and Rigby actually do their work.
  • High-Pressure Emotion: His gumballs turn red when he's angry.
    • "Think Positive" makes this trope literal. If he holds in his anger too long, he starts burning things at his touch and destroying everything until he's let it out.
  • Hulking Out: He grows as giant as the gumball guards in the Regular Show/ Adventure Time crossover comic.
  • Hot-Blooded: Not necessarily in mannerism, but the guy shows total dedication to everything he does in the moment, be it Stick Hockey, playing the drums, or his job. He is either constantly moving or not at all.
  • Interspecies Romance:
    • He (a sentient gumball machine) and Audrey (a human).
    • He (a sentient gumball machine) and Pam (a human).
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Like Mordecai, Benson isn't all that strong or fast, but is mainly balanced.
  • Jack-of-All-Trades: Benson is very knowledgeable about simple chores and can do almost anything similar to Skips, but he is only a master of Stick Hockey and drumming.
  • Jerkass: Benson's temper can lead him into becoming one as he becomes highly irrational, extremely intense and overly aggressive.
  • Jerkass to One: He's mainly this to Mordecai and Rigby as they're the ones to push his buttons the most and on how often he threatens to fire them, sometimes for no reason at all. Even when an issue is presented in front of him the first ones he blames are the duo for merely just being witnesses to the situation.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: While he can be very obnoxious and hostile, but since Mordecai and Rigby rarely do their job and are almost always slacking off. You just have to wonder why he hasn't fired them for good yet, though.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Despite his extremely short temper and being constantly annoyed by Mordecai's and Rigby's antics, when he's in a good mood he'll treat them very well, and he considers all of his employees to be friends. On a couple of occasions Benson has claimed that he does something tough on Mordecai and Rigby out of concern for their future and wants to instill some sense of responsibility in a pair of irredeemable slackers. He also gets along just fine with Skips and Pops. And he only gets mad at Muscle Man when he acts obnoxious.
  • Kick the Dog: While "Best Burger in the World" can be justified by Mordecai and Rigby's incompetence, there was no excuse for his actions in "Lunch Break". When Mordecai and Rigby were running out of time on finishing their sandwich, Benson happily tells them that they better pack their things and that they'll never move out of their parents' house just to really twist the knife. When Mordecai and Rigby manage to honor their end of the deal, Benson rewards them by making them run 50 laps and threatens to fire them if they fail.
  • Kindhearted Cat Lover: Zig-zagged. Benson has a love of cats — owning one and becoming addicted to cat videos in "Cat Videos", but he's a Jerk with a Heart of Gold (sometimes just a straight-up jerkass) instead of a full-on nice guy. In one episode, Benson gives up on cats and becomes a "pig guy" after adopting his pet pig, Applesauce. In the series finale, it's shown that Benson and Pam, who are now Happily Married, are the happy owners of Applesauce and a couple of cats.
  • Knight in Sour Armor: He'll yell a lot, but he does care for the park's well being.
  • Large Ham: Having a Hair-Trigger Temper does not help his case. He's even rowdier when intoxicated.
  • Love Hurts: He has horrible luck with women. He has had many past girlfriends and got dumped by them all.
  • Mean Boss:
    • Benson arguably skirts this line. He yells a lot and constantly threatens to fire his employees, but it is fairly clear that he runs a tight ship. Furthermore he claims that his aggressive attitude is him trying to hammer a sense of responsibility into Rigby and Mordecai. Although he once make it pretty clear he has no respect for them when Mordecai ask why they are paid cash in plastic bag instead of check even though they had been working harder on their jobs.
    • Eventually becomes a Deconstructed Trope in "Benson's Suit" where it is shown that constantly harping on Mordecai and Rigby may get results in the immediate moment but leaves them with a very low level of respect towards him from a long time of putting up with his temper. As if he were calmer with them rather than constantly losing his cool they might do a much better job.
  • Misunderstood Loner with a Heart of Gold: Very often shows he's not as mean as Mordecai and Rigby think. Especially since he's calmer with the other staff.
  • Never My Fault: When his car ends up missing and the cops don't do anything to help him, he resorts to hiring a bounty hunter from the future to find the perpetrators and his car. It turns out, however, that the perpetrators were Mordecai and Rigby, who secretly took it for repairs after breaking the windshield of his car. To make matters worse, as part of the terms, the bounty hunter was allowed to do as he wished when he found the thieves, regardless of the outcome, which in this case did not necessitate such a thing by any measure as the car had been returned good as new. In the meantime, the bounty hunter ends up wrecking the house in pursuit of Mordecai and Rigby. Even after Benson called him off, the bounty hunter ends up accidentally destroying the car. Benson sticks Mordecai and Rigby with the tab even though it was his idea to send in the bounty hunter in the first place. Then again, this whole mess would have never happened if Mordecai and Rigby just told Benson that they damaged his windshield or that they took his car in the first place.
    • A recurring flaw of Benson is to blame Mordecai and Rigby for his own mistakes. Several times Benson blames them for several problems he had caused, when Mordecai and Rigby were only tangentially related.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: He isn't so different than Mordecai and Rigby, thus he has his moments.
    • In "Guitar of Rock", he warns the duo not to touch Mr. Maellard's stuff while unloading the boxes, in which they obeyed. Later on, however, he accidentally breaks a guitar himself than was previously held by a famous rockstar.
    • It's brought up again in "Gold Watch", where he immediately blames Mordecai and Rigby after waking up in the desert because of his own drunken recklessness. The test pilots, though, call him out on this, and Benson is forced to take responsibility for his actions.
    • Another instance was in "Lunch Break", where he said it was okay for Mordecai and Rigby to pick whatever they wanted on the menu of the sub shop, he didn't even bother to research the prices, and he paid for the sandwich anyway just to give them a task where they can't succeed. Yeah it was a dick move on their part, but he still should've known better.
  • Nice, Mean, and In-Between: The brash, quick-tempered mean to Pops' nice and Skips' in-between.
  • No Indoor Voice: If you get him really mad, of course. What's even worse, the events of "Think Positive" made his voice loud enough to make Mordecai and Rigby go deaf! His parents taught him that.
  • Noodle People: He has long, gangly arms and legs.
  • Not So Above It All:
    • OOOOOOOOOOOOOOH!!
    • Calvin Wong's Formspring also spoiled (by accident) that he's a huge fan of rock music, in particular "Foghat, Hall and Oates, Asia, Toto, and Phil Collins."
  • Not So Stoic:
    • As seen in his scene in the ending of "Mordecai and the Rigbys" where he nonetheless gives them both a standing ovation after their disastrous performance and Mordecai's speech.
    • Seen again in "This Is My Jam". He's initially angered by the omnipresent ear-worm, but willingly joins in on drums to help Mordecai's improvised band defeat it.
    • In Carter and Briggs", he lets Mordecai and Rigby use the park cart for a contest where the price is a supporting role in their favorite cop show, on the condition that they wear the park's official shirts on TV if they win.
  • Offscreen Breakup: He revealed in "The Real Thomas" that he and Audrey both broke up months ago and he was depressed and all the park workers helped him through his slump but nobody can remember any of that happening.
  • Perma-Stubble: Word of God is that his gumballs are supposed to resemble this, as a visual sign that he is over-worked.
    • Which would technically mean that, in Benson's flashback in "Take It Easy," not only did he have stubble 'as a child,' but his mother also had stubble, and his sister's face was almost entirely covered in it, seeing as her "gumball line" was above her eyes. Scary. Then again HIS gumballs, not a whole racial thing.
    • However it is later proven that he does have natural hair and more often then not his five o'clock shadow only shows up whenever he's in very stressful situations. Such as in "Peeps" where he grew one out of his own madness due to his overwhelming obsession to record Mordecai and Rigby. Same for when he lived as a shell-shocked recluse in the park's forest during the dome experiment. The same thing also happens when he guarded the red button for another experiment.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Rarely smiles.
  • Prematurely Bald: A flashback revealed that a younger Benson was humiliated on a game show, and the stress was so intense that he instantly lost all of his brown hair.
  • Rage Breaking Point: Taken Up to Eleven, if not beyond, in "Think Positive", when Pops makes the mistake of telling Benson that he will be fired if he ever gets angry at Mordecai or Rigby, which results in Benson being so filled with rage, that if he doesn't find an outlet for it, he could end up destroying himself, the park, and life as we know it. Pops has no choice but to reverse his decision and allow Benson to tell Mordecai and Rigby off, and he gives them a vitriolic The Reason You Suck speech taken Up to Eleven.
  • Rant-Inducing Slight: Benson doesn't get REALLY upset at Mordecai and Rigby until after whatever horrible situation they created has been resolved. Decreased in number after "Benson Be Gone", after which it happens noticeably less often.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Zig Zagged. Not quite at Depending on the Writer levels but how level headed Benson can be with his employees tends to vary from episode to episode. Usually he is stern and only yells when he's ticked off at the slightest things. At his worst he is petty in his punishments, makes assumptions about what has been done, and will invoke Never My Fault. At his best he is willing to hear out employees and will adjust the schedule to accommodate personal troubles for them but it is rare to catch him in such a mood.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Gives a truly intense one to Mordecai and Rigby in "Think Positive":
    "AARRRGGGHHH!! YOU LAZY, NO-GOOD SLACKERS DRIVE ME NUTS! CAN'T YOU JUST LISTEN TO ME ONCE IN YOUR WORTHLESS LIVES?! 'CAUSE IF YOU DID, YOU'D SEE THAT I'VE BEEN TRYING TO TEACH YOU SOME SIMPLE RESPONSIBILITY, SOME PRIDE IN DOING A JOB WELL DONE!! BUT YOU WOULDN'T KNOW A JOB WELL DONE IF YOU PAID SOMEONE TO DO IT FOR YOU, AND EVEN THEN YOU'D SCREW IT ALL UP ON ACCOUNT THAT YOU CAN'T EVEN FOLLOW THE SIMPLEST INSTRUCTIONS, WORRYING MORE ABOUT LOOKING COOL THAN DOING YOUR JOB!!!"
  • Red Baron: Benson was once known as the Death Dragon in stick hockey circles.
  • Retired Badass: He was formerly an expert Death Stick Hockey player, and a rock band drummer who played what is considered the world's greatest drum solo.
  • Seen It All: When the usual daily crisis happens, he tends to not question the fact that it's happening so much as how Mordecai and Rigby caused it. For example, when Mordecai and Rigby turn up with a thawed-out caveman, he simply tells them to get rid of him because he won't be covered by the park's insurance.
  • Sore Loser:
    • He takes dodgeball very seriously. He also doesn't take losing very well.
    • When Mordecai and Rigby succeed in finishing their sandwich in "Lunch Break" before their deadline, he decides to make them run 50 laps on the basketball court that everyone worked on while they were eating or else he'd fire them.
  • The Slacker: If you can believe it, even more so than Mordecai and Rigby. In "Benson Be Gone," the two try to teach Benson it's okay to slack off a little as long as you get back to work, but Benson takes this as meaning it's perfectly fine not to work at all. If he doesn't have a constant stream of work, he won't work at all. Justified as he used to spend his days as a stick hockey player which is not known for bringing in money. He was a drummer which is less of an example, but given what rock does to a guy... Benson outright states he's wasted his youth.
  • Straight Man: Subverted as he usually tries to keep his life all about business and improving himself with his job, but moreso often he ends up being so angry at times that he pretty much becomes an emotional wreck with little to no social skills.
  • Talking in Your Sleep: In "Saving Time", Mordecai and Rigby notice him doing this while they break into his house.
  • Team Dad: Despite his annoyance with the main duo and the rest of his employees at times, he's nonetheless very protective of them, evidenced in episodes such as "Benson Be Gone", or "Stick Hockey". He really just wants to beat some responsibility into them.
  • Throw the Dog a Bone: The guy really got jerked around romantically first by getting dumped by Audrey offscreen, then getting dumped by Pam after being shot into space. However the finale revealed that he wound up reuniting and settling down with the latter.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Benson has a huge love for chicken wings.
  • Uncanny Family Resemblance: Implied. In "Skips' Story", Skips' old high school principal bares a striking resemblance to Benson — similar face, similar body type, and even the same voice. It's implied that Bennett is Benson's distant ancestor.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Even when Mordecai and Rigby save his life, he usually threatens to fire them if they don't clean up their mess. He eventually gets called out for that in "A Bunch of Full-Grown Geese".
  • Vague Age: Word of God revealed that Benson is anywhere between the ages of 25 and 35.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: He constantly chews out Mordecai and Rigby for their constant pranks and slacking off, but "Country Club" has him angry at them for not telling him that they were planning to basically raid the titular club to get a golf cart back, which he would gladly help with since they also stole his boombox.
  • Work Hard, Play Hard: The guy lives to put in effort towards what he does, and that stands regardless of whether he's being paid to do it.
  • You Wouldn't Like Me When I'm Angry: You really wouldn't want to get on his bad side.
  • Younger Than They Look: In-universe, since he's seems a lot older.

    Pops Maellard 

Voiced by: Sam Marin

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "The Power"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pops_by_luna_sregulartales_d8sqr8h.png
"Good show, jolly good show!"

The son of the park's wealthy owner who's been sheltered all his life. He's mostly there to be comic relief. Also, Mordecai and Rigby can get away with almost anything around him because he doesn't know better. The episode "Dizzy" reveals that he has an extremely dysfunctional relationship with his father, who's as scary as Pops is kooky.


  • Achievements in Ignorance: When Pops tries to get on his favorite game show, "Win That Prize". He instead ends up becoming the man that brings a television company back on top even getting promoted up to Senior Senior Vice President.
  • The Alleged Boss: He's technically the boss of the park but rarely asserts his position and acts more like a co-worker. In a flashback, it's revealed that Mr. Maellard put Benson in charge specifically because he knows perfectly well that his son is way too scatter-brained to handle the responsibility of maintaining the park.
  • All-Loving Hero: Pops is a friendly and sweet person who never wants to harm anyone if he doesn't have to.
  • Animal Motifs: Butterflies. He likes chasing them and they become more prevalent to him in season 8.
  • Anthropomorphic Food: Pops is a talking, walking lollipop.
  • Awesome Mc Coolname: His birth name is Mega Kranus.
  • Badass Adorable: He's shown to be a skilled wrestler and has even saved the entire universe in the finale.
  • Bald of Awesome: He has a giant bald head and has proven to be quite the badass.
  • Barbie Doll Anatomy: Seen when naked Pops is falling down the cliff in "Brain Eraser".
  • Benevolent Boss:
    • He's technically the head of the park, but he lets Benson run things and acts like any other worker. On the rare occasion he does feel the need to assert his authority, he treats everyone with kindness and respect. Just listen to how he speaks to Benson when he politely but firmly tells him not to yell at Rigby.
    • In the first episode, he unhesitatingly gives Mordecai and Rigby a raise when they ask for one. (Though he bestows it in lollipops, it's the thought that counts.) He was also the one who thought of the idea to get Benson a gift in the episode "World's Best Boss," gathering all of the employees together to think of the perfect gift.
  • Beware the Nice Ones:
    • He's a very friendly sort who would rather get along with people than have conflict. But push him too much or hurt his friends and he can be surprisingly formidable.
    • Though he's usually a wimpy pushover, he gets genuinely pissed at Muscle Man's antics in "The White Elephant Gift Exchange," so much so that his anger drives him into getting Muscle Man a can of exploding, very expired clam chowder as a prank gift.
  • Born in the Wrong Century: Though, since he is from Lolliland, it's possible that his way of dress and behavior is normal where he's from. As seen in "Skips Vs. Technology", he's over 100 years old.
  • Butterfly of Death and Rebirth: Butterflies are a major recurring motif with him, initially representing his airiness and innocence, but eventually it's revealed that he and his Evil Twin are responsible for a cyclic destruction and rebirth of the universe, imbuing his butterfly motif with a strong sense of this trope.
  • Butt-Monkey: Downplayed slightly, but in a great deal of his major episode appearances as a main character, he's either badly injured, mildly traumatized, humiliated, or some variation of the three. He also has a nasty habit of hitting his head on things and getting knocked out.
  • Camp Straight: Displays very effeminate mannerisms, a fondness for the color pink, and typically "feminine" pastimes such as baking, poetry, and butterflies. Despite this, he seems to be attracted to women, if the excited look on his face when he sees the sexy dancers in "Party Pete" is any indication.
  • Catchphrase:
    • "(Jolly) good show!"
    • Sometimes turns into "Bad show... very bad show" when he's sad.
    • "Mordecai and Rigby, hellooo!" seems to be another one, said in his typical sing-songey voice.
  • Character Overlap: He first appeared in one of two pre-Regular Show sketches that JG Quintel made called "The Naive Man from Lolliland."
    • In "Don", he believes lollipops are the same thing as money, and are therefore suitable for paying bills, which gets the park into some trouble. The exact same situation is the plotline for the aforementioned sketch.
    • Pops "generally" considers lollipops to be the equivalent of money. "The Power," among other episodes.
    • He briefly appears in the other JG Quintel sketch (2 in the AM PM) as one of their hallucinated forms.
    • In a nice bit of Mythology Gag during the final battle with Anti-Pops, he gets flung into said cartoon short much to his confusion. It's also, in a way, a Book-Ends to his development cycle. Bringing Pops full circle from JG's student film.
  • Childhood Brain Damage: Mordecai and Rigby travel back in time and meet a younger Pops, acting lucid and sane, unlike the Cloudcuckoolander he is in the present. Later during a car chase, they accidentally hit Pops, who then starts giggling like present-day Pops.
  • The Chosen One: To defeat Anti-Pops.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Pops' flighty behavior is said to come from either getting run over by a cart or by a brain tumor from excessive cell phone use.
  • Clueless Boss: As the son of the man who owns the park, Pops means well, but he's woefully unaware of how terrible Mordecai and Rigby are at their jobs.
  • Cool Car: His schway flight capable ride, Carmanita.
  • Cool Old Guy: Maybe.
    • In the karaoke episode, Pops punches a guy while singing without even being fazed.
    • In his Character Overlap above, he wipes the floor with three guys. One them the size of a wall.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: In "Really Real Wrestling" it turns out he used to wrestle. Turns out he's still pretty good at it too.
  • Cuddle Bug: Very openly affectionate with his friends, often expressing this affection with hugs. He even recited a poem about hugs in "Rap It Up."
  • Cultured Badass: Surprisingly well-spoken/educated, and a formidable wrestler.
  • The Cutie: It's pretty rare that an elderly man can be this trope, but his amiable and somewhat timid personality, and his whimsical character design, make him very lovable.
  • The Determinator: Once he has his mind set on doing something, no matter how stupid, it's nearly impossible to talk him out of it. Case in point, "Catching the Wave," when a doctor tells him that he could get himself killed by surfing, Pops ignores his advice and learns how to surf anyway. Not to mention his sheer willpower to beat the milk challenge in "Guy's Night."
  • Dirty Old Man: Implied in the episode "Party Pete." When a group of young, scantily-clad women start twerking around him, he looks thrilled to bits.
  • Foil:
    • To Benson. They're both in positions of authority at the park, but conduct themselves very differently. Whereas Benson is a generally respectable man who occasionally needs to manage his anger, takes his job very seriously, and rightfully calls out Mordecai and Rigby on their shenanigans, Pops is nearly the opposite. Pops is technically in charge but delegates most of his responsibility to Benson, he's friendly to the point of being an Extreme Doormat, has his head stuck in the clouds a great deal of the time, and he's an absolutely Horrible Judge of Character who's almost completely oblivious to how bad Mordecai and Rigby are at their jobs, (and was even the one who decided to hire them in the first place.)
    • He's also a foil to his father, Mr Maellard. While the both of them are obscenely wealthy, his father is rather selfish in how he squanders his wealth, yet he seems to be more level-headed and logically-thinking than his son. Pops on the other hand is usually pretty quick to buy ridiculously expensive gifts for his friends and is much more generous, although he's prone to making stupid decisions.
  • Friend to All Living Things: He loves butterflies and songbirds. According to Benson, Pops once helped a baby bird back into its nest.
  • Funny Foreigner: He's ambiguously British, especially in earlier episodes, where he usually signed off by saying "Ta-ta!".
    "Oh, I adore Rock Paper Scissors! Except where I come from, it's called 'Quartz Parchment Shears'"!
    • A lot of his weirdness is a result of him being a foreigner. In the show's finale, he finds himself in Lolliland, his birthplace, where all of the inhabitants are just as silly and odd as himself.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Sanguine/Phlegmatic — He's gentle and reliable and is generally optimistic and upbeat.
  • Genius Ditz: His wrestling skills. Also, his cherry tart, which won the pie contest for ten years in a row.
    • He has many "sophisticated" hobbies, such as playing the harpsichord (among other instruments) and improvising poetry on the spot, (and according to Pops, he's won "many a competition" with his poems.) His speech patterns also imply that he's very well-read. Apparently, he even published a lengthy book about etiquette.
    • In the episode "Win That Prize," he reveals himself to be extremely cunning and manipulative when he wants/needs to be.
    • Pops is a rather talented gardener, displaying an interest in the growing and tending of plants. Becomes a minor plot point in "The Dome Experiment," in which he's put in charge of growing food for the park employees when they settle into their self-sufficient ecosystem.
  • Go Out with a Smile: Dies content that he saved his friends and the universe as well as made up with his brother as the two plunge into a star.
  • Happily Adopted: He turns out to be Mr. Maellard's adopted son, and despite the latter's personality, he and Pops had a loving relationship.
  • The Heart: Despite his many quirks, Pops is a sweet, gentle, childlike man who's the type to have a kind word for anyone when they need it, and to help a baby bird back into its nest. Everybody who works for the park loves and wants to do right by the guy, and messing with him is a collective Berserk Button.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Saves the universe from Anti-Pops by hugging him and holds on, his positive energy weakening his brother. Pops acknowledges that if he let him go, Anti-Pops would just go right back to his murderous ways, and simply holds on as both of them fly into a star.
  • Hurl It into the Sun: Sacrifices himself by hugging Anti-Pops, weakening him with positive energy enough for Pops to restrain him as both fall into a star and die.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: He's the good half of a Physical God.
  • Innocent Blue Eyes: In the show's pilot, the irises of his eyes are shown to be baby-blue. The irises of his eyes are also shown to be pale blue during a brief moment in the party scene in the episode "Cheer Up Pops."
  • Innocently Insensitive: For all of his virtues, Pops is a loony with No Social Skills and is dreadfully prone to making social faux pas. Examples include straight-up tackling Mordecai and throwing him onto the floor in "Really Real Wrestling" without knowing that Mordecai was just play-wrestling, and accidentally pelting handfuls of sand at beach-goers in "Catching The Wave." And in "Win That Prize" he unintentionally ruins the cooking show of a Gordon Ramsay expy by running onto the set and eating all of the bacon. He also came very close to making a borderline ableist remark about a makeup artist's prominent limp in "Win That Prize."
  • It Sucks to Be the Chosen One: He feels this way at first during his training with Earl. Everyone else comforts him that it's acceptable to be scared.
  • Keet: Most of the time, he has a playful and cheery personality.
  • Killed Off for Real: Sacrifices himself to save the universe from Anti-Pops by restraining his evil twin with a hug and allowing both of them to fall into a star. The final scene of the show is Pops in Heaven, watching a video tape showing the events of the series.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton: The guy's a total flake (and also somewhat of a crybaby), but is easily the nicest character in the whole show.
  • The Klutz: Seems to be really prone to tripping over his own feet, bumping into things, and falling over. He usually just laughs about it.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: "...Who wants to wrestle?" Curbstomping ensues.
  • Literal-Minded: Inverted by Pops.
    Mordecai: That taxi's yellow!
    Pops: My taxi is no coward, I assure you!
  • Lovable Coward: Under the right amount of pressure/stress he proves himself to be quite badass; but this doesn't change the fact that, by default, he's usually quite a timid and very easily-frightened person.
  • Made of Good: The real reason he's so nice is that he's the living conduit of goodness in the Regular Show universe.
  • Manchild: He's a (super-)centenarian with the mind of a small child. However his vocabulary is very formal.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Briefly becomes one in "Win That Prize", although a benevolent example, resulting in him becoming a Karma Houdini in said episode.
  • Meaningful Name: Pops is an elderly lollipop man.
  • Missing Mom: We first see his mother in 1879 in "Skips vs. Technology". But in the present time, we never see his mother throughout the show.
  • Morality Pet: To pretty much the entire Park crew, just see the lengths they go to get him his birthday present in "Fuzzy Dice."
    • To Benson in particular. Several episodes show Benson holding his hand or trying to protect him. And it's very rare that Benson gets legitimately angry at Pops.
    • To Muscle Man, apparently, according to the book "Muscle Man's Guide to Life." Muscle Man describes Pops as a "gentleman" and states that he needs to keep an eye on him so someone doesn't take advantage of him.
    • To his father. Mr Maellard isn't usually kind to anyone, but has a couple Pet the Dog moments towards his son here and there.
  • Mundane Object Amazement: Pops can summon up an inordinate level of awe for even the most boring task or object.
  • Muscles Are Meaningless: Much stronger than his lanky 100+ year old frame suggests. This turns out to be foreshadowing of the fact he's actually an immensely powerful being.
  • Near-Death Experience: Has one of these in the episode "Prankless," when a bed Muscle Man had taped to the ceiling falls on him and crushes him.
    • Happens near the beginning of "Catching the Wave." Due to his ridiculously top-heavy physique, he nearly broke his spine while surfing.
  • Nice Guy: He is probably the single kindest and sweetest character in the entire show. Almost absurdly so.
  • Nice Hat: His little top hat.
  • Nice, Mean, and In-Between: The jolly, scatter-brained nice to Benson's mean and Skips' in-between.
  • Nice to the Waiter: Whenever he's shown paying for something, he pays (in his form of currency) what he describes as "more than enough." This originates from his first appearance in JG Quintel's student film, in which a butterscotch ripple lollipop seems to be the equivalent of a one hundred dollar bill when he's paying a tip at a restaurant.
  • Out of Focus: To an increasing degree in later seasons. He often appears and has a few lines when the park staff is gathered, but it's rare for him to have major amounts of screen-time. In season 5, he only has around two actual focus episodes, and none in season 6 (except for a segment of the Halloween Special). To contrast, in the first season, he was featured much more prominently than for example Muscle Man. This is then drastically reversed in the Finale Season, where Pops essentially becomes The Hero of the final storyline while Mordecai and Rigby are Supporting Protagonists.
  • Papa Wolf: Towards Mordecai and Rigby on occasion, coming to their defense in "Really Real Wrestling" and "Think Positive."
  • Performance Anxiety: He's absolutely terrified of public speaking.
  • Physical God: Is a god-like embodiment of goodness. He's so immensely powerful that he and his brother Anti-Pops' fights have always ended in universe breaking ties, forcing the universe to reset.
  • Pointy-Haired Boss:
    • He's extremely negligent and a more than a few episodes stem at least in part to him letting something happen or trusting Mordecai and Rigby too much. He also has a problem with failing to see how much Mordecai and Rigby fail as employees. He can't even maintain the park since he think candies count as currency when doing tax return.
    • Deconstructed in the episode "Think Positive," when Pops does assert his authority over Benson, which nearly destroys the park in the process. Pops seems to have enough self-awareness to admit that Benson is a far greater fit for a managerial position than himself.
  • Prone to Tears: A rare male example that isn't always played for laughs — in fact, seeing Pops cry is absolutely heartbreaking sometimes. Pops is very sensitive and it doesn't take much to make him cry. When someone does greatly upset him, his friends immediately come to his aid and stick up for him.
  • Punny Name: His name is Pops, as in he's a giant lollipop, who is also an elderly man, like how "Pops" can be used as an affectionate nickname for older men.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Zig-zagged; he tries to be one, at least, when the situation calls for it. His idea of conflict resolution usually involves calmly talking things out, but in a world like Regular Show, this is usually pretty ineffective. Then again, on another occasion in which he was put in charge of the other employees, he attempted to lead them all in a dance rather than get any work done...
  • Rich in Dollars, Poor in Sense: A more benevolent example of this trope. Still, he isn't all that bright.
  • Secret Legacy: He's really the amalgamation of all the goodness in the universe destined to fight his brother, Malum-Kranus or Anti-Pops, who inherited all the negative traits for the fate of the universe.
  • Sheltered Aristocrat: He's lived in a first class community most of his life with little knowledge of the world.
  • Shown Their Work: His really real wrestling is actually fairly accurate. Notable moments include dropping Four-Armageddon with a single leg takedown, the Fire Marshall and Hissy-Fit with five-point throws, and finishing Four-Armageddon with a triangle choke.
  • Smart Ball: At times when he needs to assert his authority as one of the heads of the park and as one of Benson's bosses, a good example would be in "Think Positive."
  • Supreme Chef: His cherry tart was the best pie in the pie contest, and he's won said contest 10 years in a row.
  • Taking You with Me: Since he and Anti-Pops are too evenly matched and their fights will always end in universe destroying ties, he ultimately defeats him by hugging him and refusing to let go as the two of them fall into a star, killing them both.
  • Tender Tears: Frequently cries in emotionally charged moments.
  • Together in Death: He and his brother Anti-Pops die while hugging each other as they fall into a star.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Takes a huge one while training to defeat Anti-Pops, where he becomes proficient in telekinesis, mind-reading, and many other abilities.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Implied. Whenever he gets his wallet, it always has a nice amount of lollipops in them.
  • Vocal Evolution: His voice was lower and more soft-spoken in "The Naive Man from Lolliland". It seems to become a little more high-pitched and screechy through each season.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: He wanted to make his father proud in "Dizzy" with his public speech.
  • Worthless Currency: One Running Gag of the show is his attempts to pay Mordecai and Rigby in lollipops, thinking they're legal tender.
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    Skips 

Voiced by: Mark Hamill

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "The Power"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/skips_character_1.png
"I've seen this before."

A yeti who also works at the park. He seems the most tolerant of the crazies he works with, and is often quick to find a solution to any problem.


  • The Ace: Most of the time. He's been adventuring and fighting evil for over 100 years. He even won an arm wrestling battle against The Grim Reaper.
  • Berserk Button: It's usually when Mordecai and Rigby interfere with the supernatural. Often responding with the line "YOU FOOLS!" when calling out there actions.
    • He also doesn't like being reminded of his past such as his former name Walks and the people from said "past" returning to haunt him.
    • Skips is also not fond of others who cheat in anything believing that the truth is what matters most.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Skips is hardworking and levelheaded, and the last person you'd want to mess with.
  • The Big Guy: A unique combo of Class 2 and 5.
  • Bigfoot, Sasquatch and Yeti: The Yeti.
  • Blood Knight: In his younger days Skips used to relish the brawls he got into and loved fighting anyone who proved to be strong enough to face him. Now that he's older he's pretty much dropped this attitude after losing Desdimona the love of his life.
  • Bully Hunter: In "Skips' Story", he was the only one in school to stand up against Klorgbane and challenge him to a fight.
    Walks: Walks never walks away from a bully.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: A highly intelligent yeti who gets around by skipping. Yeah, perfectly normal.
  • Byronic Hero: In his younger days he was very temperamental, passionate and broody. Curiously enough he went to school during the Romantic era (early 19th century).
  • The Comically Serious: He is always serious despite this.
  • Confirmed Bachelor: Of the "Lost Love Bachelor". While Skips has gone on a couple of dates with other women, with one episode focusing on him getting back in the saddle, he ultimately remains single in the series finale.
  • Cool Old Guy: The oldest guy in the cast and quite a cool customer.
  • Cultured Badass: Is actually quite nice and polite as well as being a good fighter.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: He lost the love of his life.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Whenever he makes a remark, he'll do it with a straight face.
  • Everyone Went to School Together: In "Skips' Story", he attended high school with Gary, the Guardians of Eternal Youth, and Klorgbane during the early 19th century (most likely the Regency/War of 1812 period).
  • Former Teen Rebel: Skips was a brawler and a bad boy in his teens before his love for Mona softened him, and his guilt over her demise shaped him into the man he is today.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Melancholic/Choleric — during his "Byronic" phase. He has gotten quite phlegmatic nowadays.
  • Genius Bruiser: At times Skips seems to be able to improvise very quickly, as seen in The Power near the end. Likewise, his quick thinking brings about the avatar by which Rigby destroys the Destroyer of Worlds.
  • Gentle Giant: Is one of the nicer characters on the show, as well as the strongest.
  • Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal: Rarely seen with a shirt on.
  • Heroic Build: Just look at the guy. He's pretty much built like a brick wall.
  • I Hate Past Me: Averted when he meets his teenage self in "A Skips in Time". Walks, before Skips changed his name, doesn't want to be like his present self because he believes he has become boring and refuses to change his name to "Skips". Skips was angry at first but he understands that he's a teenager and he'll grow out of it.
  • Interspecies Romance: Him (a yeti) and Mona (a human).
  • Kryptonite Factor: Even with his immortality, it turns out that an excess of stress without proper management is the only thing that can potentially kill him. Unless he kills it himself.
  • The Lancer: Will act as the more laid-back Number Two to Benson when it comes to park management.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: When Rigby gives him a hard time the first time he is ever wrong about something in "Sugar Rush" he claims that they ask for his help with a new problem every week.
  • Lightning Bruiser: He's exactly as strong and agile as you'd expect a yeti who skips everywhere to be.
  • Meaningful Rename: He always skips rather than walking. It turns out his original name is not Skips, but Walks. He changed it because he got tired of everybody asking him why he skips everywhere instead of walking. That turns out to be partially true in The Diary, he reveals he likewise skips in memory of a girl he once loved but lost in the past. Skip's Story goes into more detail about this.
  • Mr. Exposition: With his Seen It All nature, he usually provides info on whatever threat the park is facing.
  • Mr. Fixit: According to "Skips vs. Technology", he's in charge of basically any repair work needed around the park, a role he fills quite well... at least, when it comes to physical stuff. Fixing a malfunctioning computer seems to be a bit beyond him.
  • Muscles Are Meaningful: He is incredibly muscular and has the immense strength to back it up.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Gets this in "Over The Top" after killing Rigby. He's so guilty that he puts his eternal soul on the line to win Rigby's soul back from Death.
  • Nice Guy: Actually quite nice, although he's always serious.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • Um, KILLING Rigby in the arm-wrestling episode.
    • Again in Sugar Rush, a fact that Rigby chides him about.
  • Nice, Mean, and In-Between: The in-between to Pops' nice and Benson's mean; he's serious and often stoic, but has a soft spot at times.
  • Not So Stoic: Has moments where he's smiled and broken his stoic personality.
  • Older Than They Look: He made a deal in order to obtain eternal youth.
    • To the point of Really 700 Years Old (over 220 years at least).
    • It's even foggier now with Skips' Story revealing how he got his immortality, but doesn't reveal when exactly the story takes place.
      • He seems to have been born in the 18th century and witnessed the American Revolution, making him at least two-and-a-half centuries old.
  • Only Sane Man: Pretty much one of two only sane people who work at the park. Although even he has a tendency to slip up at times.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Rarely seen smiling, but don't let it trick you.
  • Rage Breaking Point: When Klorgbane had a hand in Mona's death, Skips sent him flying. Also when Rigby constantly beat him in arm wrestling to where he killed him.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He's willing to help Mordecai and Rigby with whatever problem they have to deal with at the time, but will often try to stop them if they mess around with the supernatural
  • Rebellious Spirit: In his younger days he cared not for rules or regulations and often hated being told what to do. Especially when the younger version of himself comes from the Timenado and pretty much disrespects his future self for being washed up and following someone elses rule.
  • Romanticism Versus Enlightenment: Skips is the Romantic to Techmo's Enlightened, as lampshaded by "Skips vs. Technology".
  • Seen It All: Very few things seem to faze him and he somehow knows just how to deal with all the insanely weird things the park has to deal with. Justified possibly due to Older Than They Look.
  • The Smart Guy: Fills this role whenever Muscle Man has The Big Guy role. He can fix almost anything (except computers), and comes off as the wisest of the team.
  • Static Character: He doesn't really change in the series. While he was a different person in his youth, he never gets any onscreen Character Development. It's quite noticeable in the finale too. While his other co-workers stop working at the park to find meaningful relationships (with some even having children born out of it), and/or pursue their dreams, Skips remains single and still works at the park with the new batch of workers.
  • Sugar-and-Ice Personality: Gruff, quiet and sardonic. But fun if you get to know him.
  • Super Strength: Those muscles aren't just for show. He's able to lift heavy objects with ease and any punch that is thrown by him usually ends up in a knockout blow.
  • Token Immortal: The only member of the core cast to possess immortality, having been so for centuries.
  • Top-Heavy Guy: He has a Heroic Build and thin legs.
  • Tragic Keepsake: He still keeps the heart-shaped locket he gave to Mona after her death.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Skips may be a calm and collected person who keeps his emotions under control but there are times when making him angry is the worst thing you'll ever do.
  • Vocal Evolution: His voice was a lot more gruff in the pilot.
  • Walking Techbane: As shown in "Skips VS Technology" he can fix almost anything, except computers.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: Subverted. Skips accepts his immortality specifically because the one reason he wouldn't want to live forever already passed on before he gained it.
  • You Fool!: He does one when Mordecai and Rigby unleash Destroyer of Worlds.
    Skips: You fools! Destroyer of Worlds will kill us all!

    Mitch "Muscle Man" Sorenstein 

Voiced by: Sam Marin

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "Just Set Up the Chairs"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/reg_muscleman.png
"You know who else is a troper? MY MOM!!"

An ironically-named, short, out-of-shape guy, who has a hicklike lifestyle.


  • Achilles in His Tent: In "Prankless" after one of his pranks nearly kills Pops. However, he brings himself out of the tent just in time to save the park.
  • Acrofatic: There are times, especially during an episode's climax, where Muscle Man shows this. Despite his short and fat build, he seems to have super-strength.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: He has natural green skin.
  • Amazon Chaser: He makes comments to Starla on how he thinks her wrecking stuff is "foxy". He also expresses admiration for her mud wrestling prowess in "Tent Trouble".
  • Ambiguously Human: Muscle Man looks more humanoid than anyone else in the regular cast (possibly except for Eileen, who has been identified as a mole, and Pops who is supposed to be a lollipop), but he's green.
  • Ambiguously Jewish: Has an Ashkenazinote  last name ("Sorenstein"), and in the Christmas Special, his sweater has a dreidel on it. In "Dumped at the Altar," he had a Jewish wedding (or at least included the ritual where the groom steps on the glass covered in white cloth). In "Christmas in Space", he goes skiing as a "Chanukah tradition".
  • Ascended Extra: Since season 2, he has had more regular appearances.
  • Babies Ever After: While Muscle Man is in space, Starla gets pregnant and gives birth to their daughter, who he finally meets after he returns. By the series finale, she and him have had more children.
  • Battle Couple: Whenever he and Starla are in a brawl, they make an effective fighting team.
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: His friendship with Hi-Five Ghost is revealed in "New Bro on Campus", as both of them met in high school and Muscle Man continually acted like a jerk to HFG out of jealousy of the latter's popularity. But, when HFG saves his life after the drag race went sideways, Muscle Man was grateful at the selfless act and declared them as best friends.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Don't spill soda on him. It will most certainly lead to your Disproportionate Retribution, such as faking his death in order to get back at Rigby for accidentally spitting out an item he was choking on which landed in his soda which splashed in Muscle Man's face.
    • Don't ever prank him or else he will prank you back ten times worse than what he originally did. Plenty of people had learned this the hard way, but none more infamous than Gene.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Muscle Man may seem like an idiot. But with the occasional bout of Super Strength, a serious vindictive streak, and Chessmaster level smarts at times, it's wise to avoid his ire.
  • Big Eater: Muscle Man is most often eating something in his hands or eating a large portion of a meal.
  • Big Fun: A stout, fat guy with a penchant for pranks and a lot of energy.
  • The Big Guy: One of the Park's main muscle as he often takes on the more physically taxing jobs. This eventually leads him to quitting the park one time as he was tired of Benson giving him work that was way more difficult than normal because he knew Muscle Man was one of the stronger members who could handle it.
  • Big Man on Campus: "New Bro on Campus" shows that Muscle Man used to be the most popular guy in high school.
  • Boisterous Bruiser: He's very tough, obnoxious, and loves to throw his weight around. Sometimes literally.
  • Catchphrase:
    • "You know who else __________? MY MOM!"
    • "Oh no, bro!"
    • Often says "LATER, GRANDMAS!!" before exiting a scene.
  • Character Development: He becomes friendlier towards the duo since season 3.
  • Characterization Marches On: Was a lot more antagonistic towards Mordecai and Rigby in the early seasons.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: Do NOT get Muscle Man mad. His strength increases to insane proportions when he does for some inexplicable reason.
  • The Chessmaster: Surprisingly, Muscle Man is more than capable of pulling off a multilayer The Plan. An example of this is in "Trailer Trashed", where he fakes out a false health inspector who's trying to get his trailer, by running an empty truck to the border. Turns out, the trailer was back at the Park, being guarded by High Five Ghost. None of the other park employees were in on it, prompting Rigby to comment, "Remind me to never touch Muscle Man's stuff."
  • Does Not Like Spam: He hates anything salad related.
  • Drill Sergeant Nasty: Muscle Man becomes this to Rigby in "Muscle Mentor" in order to teach the latter, per Benson's instructions, to complete a task. And it actually works.
  • Dude, Not Funny!:
    • Near the finale of "The End Of Muscle Man", all of the Park members are not pleased when Muscle Man makes them think he's dying when he was really doing a ritual to propose to Starla.
    • In "Guy's Night," the other employees have this reaction when Muscle Man starts jovially chanting "911! 911!" after Pops has passed out.
    • He gets really angry when someone steals his mom, despite doing so being his catchphrase.
  • Everyone Has Standards: He may be an avid prankster, but Muscle Man was ashamed of himself when Pops got hurt from one of his pranks.
  • Fan Disservice: Played for Laughs. He is noted to be quite ugly due to his Gonk appearance.
  • Fat and Proud: He was once a bodybuilder, but he doesn't give a damn that he's a fat dude now, as evidenced by how he happily accepts a job showing off his stomach in "Gut Model". However, this trope may be Downplayed since another episode has him mention being overweight when lamenting about his flaws.
  • Fat Bastard: He's heavyset and can become like this when he's the episode's antagonist.
  • Fat Best Friend: To High-Five Ghost.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Choleric/Sanguine — A prankster with a short fuse.
  • Friend in the Black Market: Muscle Man knows a lot of people that can get unusual goods and services quickly. Sometimes the gang gets roped into doing shady jobs for them.
  • Fun Personified: He absolutely lives for pulling pranks and will do so no matter what's going on, as evidenced by how he tricks Rigby into bumping into a butt shaped mug in "World's Greatest Boss" while the gang was at the mall frantically searching for a specific mug for Benson. He also loves making bets, spinning donuts, taking his shirt off and waving it around, and he goes streaking in "New Year's Kiss".
  • Gag Boobs: Muscle Man's bitch tits (which he acknowledged on "Party Pete" in his line, "It takes guests with breasts, and mine don't count"). He even got smacked in the face with them in "Rage Against the TV".
  • Gasshole: According to Rigby in "Out of Commission", he "releases noxious fumes all the time." Displayed on-screen in "Trucker Hall of Fame" where he farts in the car while driving with Mordecai and Rigby, and in "Starter Pack" where he farts in Thomas's face.
  • Generation Xerox: He's pretty much his father right down to his love of parks and working a menial job. By the finale of the series, he even dresses like him.
  • Genius Ditz: "Exit 9B" shows that he's actually smart enough to lead a college lecture on quantum physics. Either that, or GBF Jr's brainwashing somehow increased his intelligence.
    • Invoked in the episode "Cool Cubed," in which he wants to prove himself to be an intelligent individual capable of more than just brute strength. Turns out, he is capable of being intelligent.
    • Played for Laughs in the book "Muscle Man's Guide to Life," in which he mentions that he plays chess with Pops on a regular basis, then comments, "What - you didn't think I knew how?"
  • Gonk: The most consistently unattractive man in the cast.
  • Guttural Growler: Has an exaggeratedly deep, growling voice, in contrast with the light, high voice of Pops and the more monotonous, slightly nasal tone of Benson (all performed by Sam Marin).
  • Happily Married: Starla and he were definitely made for each other so it's no surprise the two would be married, which indeed happens at the end of season 6. Even when he's shot for a time into space, Starla remains loyal to him and waits for his return and with good reason, she has his child while he's off in space, whom he meets three years later after they blasted off. The Distant Finale shows they're still married and now have many more kids.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: He and HFG have been best friends since high school, are always paired up together to do chores, and genuinely value the other's company.
  • Hidden Depths:
    • In "Exit 9B," it's revealed that he's somehow qualified to teach quantum physics.
    • In "Killit Radio," he shows himself to be a rather good guitarist/songwriter.
  • Hot-Blooded: He's usually very loud and boisterous whenever he does anything, but he also has a very short fuse being quick to temper at times.
  • I Was Quite a Looker: Downplayed. Muscle Man was still a Gonk back then, but was a little cuter as a child and had one heck of a muscular body as a teenager.
  • Insufferable Imbecile: In addition to being an obnoxious prankster who goes on rampages when enraged (though he does have a nice side, especially with women), he also thinks there's 400 days in a year and sometimes endangers his life in episodes like "Dead at Eight". He Took a Level in Kindness, though.
  • Ironic Nickname: Subverted. He seems to be anything but muscular. It turns out that he used to be very muscular, and even though he's fat now, he's still ridiculously strong.
  • Irony: One episode shows that he was afraid of going bald. By the finale that's exactly what happens.
  • Jerkass to One: Originally, Muscle Man was much more of a Jerkass to Mordecai and Rigby than to anyone else, culminating in "My Mom".
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Although he's still an immature idiot, he's never mean towards women, or to Pops. Plus, he started to willingly work with Mordecai and Rigby and view them as friends.
  • Kavorka Man: Despite his Gonk physical qualities, Muscle Man is surprisingly popular with the ladies.
    • First and foremost, there's his main love interest, Starla. And they are deeply in love with one another.
    • When he started flexing his pecs, many women (including Margaret and Eileen) were enamored by it.
    • During his high school years, a lot of girls were attracted to him.
  • Large Ham: "WOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: Both of them at the end of "The Night Owl".
  • Like Parent, Like Spouse: Like Muscle Man, Starla's parents are ill-mannered, good fighters, and love the chicken wings from Wing Kingdom.
  • Lookalike Lovers: He and Starla look almost exactly alike despite not being blood related.
  • Manly Man and Sensitive Guy: The... well... Manly Man to Five's Sensitive Guy.
  • Meaningful Name: He actually is very muscular, but it's covered by a thick layer of flab.
    • And as shown in "Slam Dunk" he's actually a good athlete, when he smokes Mordecai and Rigby at basketball. Several times.
    • In "The Night Owl", he defeats several guards by physical means and knocks out The Night Owl with a single punch.
    • Considering the fact that he throws trees and boulders effortlessly in "Starter Pack" Muscle Man might have finally lived up to his name.
    • In "Power Tower" it's revealed that the nickname is from his bodybuilder days before he let himself get out of shape.
  • Metalhead: Judging by the song he refers to as his "jam" in "My Mom", and the "ROCK ON!" poster seen in his trailer, it's a safe assumption that he's a fan of metal or rock music.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Muscle Man gets this in "Prankless" after a prank gone wrong nearly killed Pops, leading the former to swear off of pranking. This proves to be bad since a rival park restarted a VERY vicious prank war and Muscle Man is the only one who can easily defeat them. The guys snap him out of his slump when they trick him into thinking that the rival park hurt Pops in a prank as well.
  • N-Word Privileges: Muscle Man is the only one allowed to make the "You know who else likes to [action]? My mom!" jokes. When Mordecai and Rigby tell him he's not saying it right and it's supposed to be "Your mom", Muscle Man makes it clear he doesn't like anyone else dissing his mom.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: He is basically either Danny McBride or John Belushi with green skin and "My Mom" jokes.
  • No Indoor Voice: Easily has the loudest voice of the main cast.
  • Not So Different: He is prone to making mistakes like the duo. For instance, in "Firework Run", he accidentally lit all the fireworks before the event in the start of the episode.
  • Official Couple: With Starla, and the two are engaged and married by the season 6 finale.
  • Oh, Crap!: His catchphrase, "Oh no, Bro!". When he's aware he messed up big time, he'll react to that and say his phrase.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Averted; his real name of Mitch Sorenstein is revealed in "Muscle Woman". "Cube Bros" also confirms that Mitch is short for Mitchell.
  • The Pig-Pen: Even worse than Rigby. Muscle Man hardly showers, doesn't know proper table manners, and his trailer is a mess.
  • The Prankster: He's apparently the best in town.
  • Prince of Pranksters: "Prankless" puts him firmly into this trope. "Ugly Moons" has him become the best prankster in the entire galaxy.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: He's one of the most traditionally manly guys of the cast, but in "Operation: Hear No Evil", he's addicted to a soap opera called Lazer Hunters. He even cries while watching it and expresses no shame in doing so.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: Goes batshit insane once Mordecai & Rigby prank him for pranking Thomas nonstop by telling Thomas did it to make him look good. It all turns out to be a big prank against the duo... though Thomas loses his car.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Connections!: As one episode shows, Muscle Man has a lot of friends around town. Heck, a police officer chases after him just to tell him how awesome he is.
  • Sore Loser: He will make someone's life an utter hell if he loses at something.
  • Stealth Pun: Muscle Man is a green-skinned humanoid who likes to mess with and torment the other characters. He's a troll, both literally and figuratively.
  • The Stoner: The green complexion, pink eyes, man boobs, chubby build, and Pink Floyd poster do point to signs that Muscle Man could be on drugs (most likely marijuana, since all of those are signs or traits associated with pot use), but nothing has been confirmed by the creators (though given the strong adult undercurrent of the show, it might be true).
  • Stout Strength: He doesn't look super strong, and just super fat, but he's the strongest guy in the park next to Skips.
  • Super Strength: When angered, he's able to rip buildings out of the ground and throw them.
  • Talk to the Fist: In "Night Owl", after returning to the past after the title character froze him, Hi-Five, Mordecai, and Rigby for several hundred years, the Night Owl starts chewing them out for ruining his plan. So Muscle Man knocks him out cold mid-rant.
  • Tears of Joy: When he returns from space and Starla introduces him to his daughter for the first time.
  • Those Two Guys: Muscle Man is often accompanied by Hi-Five Ghost.
  • Token Human: Of the main characters. Maybe.
  • Token Minority Couple: He and Starla (along with their families) are the only short, green skinned people in the series.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Especially in "The Night Owl" where he willingly works with Mordecai and Rigby to win an antique car and is willing to share it with the other three if they do win. Episode "Gut Model" takes this a step further.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Muscle Man is a Big Eater in general, but he seems to have a particular affinity for Wing Kingdom chicken wings.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Whenever Muscle Man starts squealing like a pig it's a bad idea to stand in his way or someone might get hurt.
  • Violently Protective Girlfriend: Gender Inverted. No one harms and/or disrespects Starla in front of him.
  • Vocal Evolution: Muscle Man sounds quite different in a few early episodes, especially "Rigby's Body".
  • What the Hell, Hero?: In "The End of Muscle Man," everyone, with the exception of Fives, was extremely angry with Muscle Man when they thought the latter was going to die by the end of the episode. It turns out this was an act to propose to his girlfriend Starla. She happily accepts.
  • Your Mom: Inverted. Muscle Man makes "My Mom" jokes instead of "Your Mom" jokes. Rigby and Mordecai even try to tell him that the "your mom" jokes work better. "Trucker Hall of Fame" reveals that the "My Mom" jokes were from his father's "My Wife" jokes.
  • Xanatos Gambit: Some of the pranks he pulls off nearly require clairvoyance with their absurd specificity.

    Hi-Five Ghost 

Voiced by: Jeff Bennett (earlier seasons), J.G. Quintel (Season 3 onwards)

Debuted in: "Pilot"/Season 1, "Just Set Up the Chairs"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/highfiveghost0467865.png

Muscle Man's perpetually nervous ghost-looking friend who hi-fives him a lot.


  • Babies Ever After: He and Celia have a son together by the series finale.
  • Big Man on Campus: "New Bro on Campus" shows that HFG became instantly popular at the high school he and Muscle Man attended. In fact, in one day, he became more popular than Muscle Man, who was this trope himself.
  • Birds of a Feather: With Celia. They love the same coffee shop, down-tempo electronica, the same music album, watching animals in the aquarium, and they don't like the food in Wing Kingdom. But unfortunately, none of them had cellphones back then.
  • Boy Meets Girl: How he meets Celia fits this trope nicely.
  • A Day in the Limelight: "The Postcard". Only took five seasons.
  • Does Not Like Spam: HFG actually doesn't like chicken wings and most likely pretends to like them due to his friendship with Muscle Man.
  • Everyone Has Standards: While he's okay with some of Muscle Man's pranks, he doesn't like the pranks he pulls during "The White Elephant Gift Exchange" and he even goes along with the other park staff to get revenge on Muscle Man.
  • Four-Fingered Hands: Fives has... well, four digits on each arm.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: The Phlegmatic/Sanguine: He doesn't do much aside from participating in Muscle Man's pranks.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: He and Muscle Man have been best friends since high school, are always paired up together to do chores, and genuinely value the other's company.
  • Hidden Depths: He actually has a natural talent of being a manager.
  • Intangible Man: At least when he wants to be. Usually demonstrated when someone tries to punch him. He'll let it pass through, then strike back. Oddly enough, he fails to escape after being gripped by the evil living pumpkin in "Terror Tales of the Park III", despite Mordecai even shouting out: "Fives! Just phase through, man!"
  • Interspecies Romance: He (a ghost) and Celia (a human).
  • Light Is Good: HFG is a white ghost and is quite friendly.
  • Manly Man and Sensitive Guy: The sensitive guy to Muscle's Man's, well, manly man.
  • Meaningful Name: As his name implies, he gives high fives and is a ghost.
  • Morality Pet: While Muscle Man is not above pranking Hi-Five Ghost, he is one of the few people Muscle Man shows his soft, kind side to.
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: Hi-Five Ghost (and his family) can apparently form extra arms when needed. HFG once appeared with five.
  • Nice Guy: He's a decent and friendly person.
  • Only Sane Man: One of the dome scientists specifically calls HFG the logical one among the Park members which is mainly attributed to each of the other members' central flaws — Mordecai's self-doubt, Rigby's laziness, Skips' checkered past, Pops' childlike tendencies, Muscle Man's poor hygiene, and Benson's insecurity. Thus specifying that he is literally the only normal person there who doesn't have any major life changing flaws.
  • Our Ghosts Are Different: It's not clear whether HFG is living or undead. His family also consists of ghosts, and they all live normal lives.
  • Out of Focus: Oh, yeah. He has a lot of episodes that just don't focus on him. Averted in Season Three where he starts to get more screen time and he's actually talking more than usual.
  • Perpetual Smiler: He's usually seen with a huge grin on his face.
  • The Promise: He and Celia both agreed to meet up again when she finishes her schooling and if they're both single by sending him a postcard to let him know she's back in the country.
  • The Quiet One: Hi-Five Ghost spoke only one full sentence in the entire first season. The episode "Muscle Woman" has Fives talk more than usual due to Muscle Man isolating himself, implying that he usually doesn't talk because Muscle Man just does all the talking for him. As one episode shows, apparently he doesn't talk because he's jinxed and Muscle Man will punch him if he ever talks around him. Rigby broke his jinx and afterwards he talks much more often. Averted in the episode "Gut Model," where he blurts out more dialogue for the first time.
  • Satellite Character: Hi-Five Ghost is excluded from a lot of the park group's activities, serving mostly as an accessory to Muscle Man. A cut gag from one ending storyboard lampoons this. "Exit 9B" actually had to have brand new scenes when his memory was restored, because he's so ancillary.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: With Low-Five Ghost. HFG is quiet and shy while LFG talks more often and is outgoing.
  • Strong Family Resemblance:
    • Aside from his older brother having stubble, having Cool Shades, and wearing a hat, they look a lot alike.
    • HFG has a strong resemblance to his father. The only difference being his father is visibly older with wrinkles.
  • Vocal Evolution: When J.G. Quintel took over for Jeff Bennett, Quintel's voice zigzags between sounding like a pitched-up Mordecai and sounding like himself during the "embarrassing voice cracking" stage of male puberty.

Alternative Title(s): Regular Show The Main Duo

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