Follow TV Tropes

Following

Minecraft / Tropes A to F

Go To

Minecraft tropes: A to F || G to L || M to R || S to Z


    open/close all folders 

    A 
  • Abandoned Mine: As of the Adventure update (Beta 1.8), you can now find abandoned mineshafts around the world.
  • Abnormal Ammo: The game lets you uses dispensers as turrets. While they can "fire" out anything you stuff into them, most of it just falls down harmlessly. Though you can have them fire arrows, incendiary ammunition, potions of all kinds (including healing ones), snowballs, and eggs. Eggs may spawn baby chickens upon hitting the ground. Most of these can also be thrown by hand.
  • Absurdly Sharp Blade: A Diamond Sword enchanted with Sharpness V (or a similar tier) is one of the deadliest things a player has at their disposal, especially in PvP when opposing players are very likely wearing good armor and a little extra oomph is needed to pierce it. The monster-specific enchantments are even deadlier, though of course only against those monsters they specifically effect.
  • Acceptable Breaks from Reality: A common argument on why Minecraft should stray far from realism.
  • Achievement Mockery: The Java version has an advancement for using up a diamond hoe, while the Bedrock, Legacy Console and New Nintendo 3DS versions (as well as pre-17w13a Java) have a achievement for riding a pig off of a cliff.
  • Achievement System: The game uses two different systems. The first system, used in the Java version before snapshot 17w13a and still used in the Bedrock, Legacy Console and New Nintendo 3DS versions, has "achievements" that are saved for each player, carry across every world and are linked into a single tree that must be followed in a certain order (e.g. you could kill as many enemies as you wanted but you wouldn't get the achievement for killing an enemy until after you'd gotten the prerequisite achievement for crafting a sword). The second system, used in the Java version since snapshot 17w13a, uses "advancements" that are still saved for each player but are specific to each world and are now separated into several trees that do not have to be followed in order (e.g. the advancement for having an iron pickaxe can be obtained without obtaining the advancement for having a stone pickaxe first).
  • Action Bomb:
    • Creepers are creatures with no arms that drop gunpowder when killed. Their only method of attack is to explode as near to you as possible.
    • The Wither explodes upon being created and again when it reaches half health. If the Wither is flashing, find shelter.
  • Actually Four Mooks: During a thunderstorm, you may encounter a lone skeletal horse. Getting close to it will cause it to be struck with lightning and replaced by four skeletons in enchanted armor riding skeletal horses.
  • A.I. Breaker:
    • The game, for a long time, had enemy AI be very simplistic. If a monster was chasing you, all you had to do was stand in front of a pool of lava and watch the mobs walk straight into it. The AI was coded to walk in a straight path to the player when they spotted them, regardless if there was a lava pit or a cliff in the way. The 1.2 update enhances the AI to have better path finding so if the player is being chased by a zombie for example, the zombie will attempt to look for alternative paths to the player as long as it doesn't hurt itself. Skeletons were also made smarter by rushing at the player and flanking them should the player hide by a corner of a wall. Enemy mobs can also see through glass and will try to get to the player if they see them through the glass, whereas in the past, glass acted like solid blocks for mobs, thus they couldn't see through it.
    • Endermen also had an exploit in their AI that could be abused if used right. Endermen take damage from water and if an Endermen is hostile towards you, exposing it to water would cause it to become neutral again and stop attacking you. It was fixed as of 1.9 (15w31a), with Endermen now staying hostile even after touching water.
    • Endermen also have issues with enclosed spaces. Because they are three blocks tall, while players are only two blocks tall, Endermen simply can't fit into areas where players can hide, nor can they harm players in such areas. Their AI will lead to them running toward players that look at them, even if they can't hurt that player, as long as the Enderman doesn't encounter water. Simple Endermen traps thus consist solely of a roof.
  • Airborne Mook:
    • Ghasts and Blazes in the Nether, bats in the Overworld. The latter isn't hostile, thankfully.
    • Vexes summoned by Evokers are capable of flight and passing through walls, though they lose health over time.
    • Any mook struck by a Shulker's projectile (or otherwise affected by the Levitation status effect) will technically become this, though they cannot control their altitude and will continue to rise until the effect wears off.
    • The 1.13 Update adds the Phantom to the Overworld, a ray-like monster that appears in numbers and does swoop attacks at sleep deprived players.
  • Alien Sky:
    • The End has a dark, starless, cloudless sky that looks like TV static.
    • The Nether doesn't have a sky, but the Void is red rather than black like outside the Overworld.
    • The main overworld sky also counts, with its square sun and moon.
  • All Deserts Have Cacti: Cacti can grow in any sandy area, but they're most common in the Desert biome.
  • All-Natural Gem Polish: Diamonds and emeralds only require a modicum of processing if you mine their ores with a Silk Touch tool, otherwise the ore breaks into gems fully ready to use. Justified because you're not using diamonds as jewelry, you're using them to cut your way through anything you need to (this doesn't stop the texture from still looking like a jewelry-ready gemstone, though).
  • The All-Seeing A.I.: Spiders used to be able to sense players through walls, but the 1.8 update removed that ability. Hostile mobs who have already spotted a player can track their movement even through walls.
  • The Aloner: You are this in single player mode. It's just you and a world (potentially) eight times the size of the planet Earth, populated with eerily abandoned structures and filled with hostile monsters. The few NPCs you meet serve only to emphasize how alone you are, as they only slightly resemble humans.
  • Alternate World Map: Three, in fact: The Overworld, where players start; the Nether, a dangerous Lethal Lava Land; and The End, a World in the Sky.
  • Always Night: The End; a World in the Sky where it is always night, the terrain is comprised of floating islands, and the only inhabitants are giant killer clams, Slender Man expies and a giant, nigh-unstoppable dragon.
  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife: Through the use of dyes, sheep can become this. Even better, dyed sheep retain their new color if sheared, and pass that color onto their offspring. And for some reason, naming a sheep jeb_ makes it oscillate through the whole spectrum (though that won't change its actual wool color).
  • Ambiguous Gender: Steve?/Alex?, the player, has short hair if you play as Steve?, and long hair if you play as Alex?, but besides that (and the masculine name of "Steve?"), there's no indication whatsoever of the player's gender. Alex? in particular seems purposefully designed to be androgynous. Their name could easily be short for either Alexander or Alexandria, and long hair and skinnier arms are hardly exclusive to women. However, Alex? definitely seems feminine when contrasted with Steve?, and Owen Hill/Jones of Mojang has specifically referred to Alex? as "she" on his blog.
  • Ambiguously Human:
    • In keeping with the theme of the game, the player character is a very blocky human named "Steve?" or "Alex?", whose body is composed various shaped cubes and rectangles.
    • Villagers look closer to Squidward than anything else.
    • Skeletons and Zombies both look as though they could have been human (or whatever species the player character is) before. Both have the same proportions as the player (though skeletons have skinnier limbs, as one would expect), and both have facial features that match up with the default player skins. They spawn naturally (and via Mob Spawner blocks) as-is, however, suggesting that they are not "turned into" Zombies and Skeletons but rather start off that way. Zombies go farther than Skeletons in that they even have the same clothes as Steve, and the darker part of their head seems to vaguely mimic Steve's hairline. The existence of Villager Zombies further supports the idea that one can be turned into a Zombie, though Villager Zombies can be healed and regular Zombies can't, which would suggest that regular Zombies have always been Zombies.
  • Amulet of Concentrated Awesome: The player can make these, in the form of magic armor and tools.
  • And I Must Scream:
    • Soul Sand is made up of screaming faces, presumably the "Tortured Souls" of the Nether.
    • Some more obviously physical examples:
      • The player is fully capable of imprisoning most monsters in a small box made of anything from dirt to obsidian. When it's done, the mob of their choice will be stuck in there forever, unable to move from its 1x2x1 coffin, at least until it despawns (which it will never do if you use a name tag on it or has picked up an item).
      • There are some frustrating glitches from past and present that make the player themself unable to move, despite being in an open area. One of them happened back in Minecraft Alpha occasionally where the player would be walking somewhere and then suddenly be stuck to the spot, heavily vibrating until they relogged. Something that is still completely able to happen is a server issue called "rubber-banding". Try to walk somewhere and then 3 seconds later you're suddenly back where you started as if the game had no idea you were moving.
  • Angels, Devils and Squid: The extra dimensions: the (former) Sky Dimension, the Nether and the End. The Nether is a Fire and Brimstone Hell, and the End is a World in the Sky where it is Always Night, the terrain is flat save for huge towers of obsidian, and the only inhabitants are giant killer clams, Slender Man expies and a giant, nigh-unstoppable dragon.
  • Animals Lack Attributes: The pigs have nipples. Also, the cows have udders.
  • Annoying Arrows: Inverted, a fully charged arrow from a Bow will deal more damage in one hit than a (un-enchanted) Diamond Sword; if enchanted for maximum damage it will even one-shot a player armoured in anything worse than Iron! Mostly played straight with Skeleton arrows, which deal minor damage (especially with armour) but they fire them decently fast and the damage can add up quickly. Opening your inventory shows arrows still stuck in you, meaning you can eventually walk off the damage from 20 or more arrows.
  • Another Dimension: This game has the Overworld, the Nether, and the End. The Nether is useful for being a quicker way to travel across the land. One block travelled in the Nether is equal to eight blocks travelled in the Overworld. The player can utilize this by constructing a portal in the Overworld leading to the Nether, travelling a certain distance within the Nether, and then constructing another portal leading back to the Overworld. When the player returns to the Overworld, they will have travelled eight times the distance traversed in the Nether.
  • Antidote Effect: Drinking a bucket of milk will remove any status effects, including poison.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Nether Portals used to be much more random in the rules they followed for portal generation. To wit, players emerging from their portals frequently risked spawning 50 meters above anything, spawning right near lava, or, worst of all, in lava. The game now follows better guidelines in finding a spot to spawn from and adds extra Obsidian onto both sides of the portal if there are no nearby blocks, a minor safeguard against taking one step then plummeting into a lava lake.
    • 1.8 revamps the Villager trading system to be less annoying overall. Previous professions have been split up into sub-professions so the odds of getting the trade you want from a particular Villager improve (provided you know which of the new professions sells, say, Arrows) and the trades offered are now less randomized. For example, Shepherds will reliably spawn both buying Wool and selling Shears (Tier 1 trades) and will unlock Tier 2 after you make one of these trades, and so on.
    • Fire Charges, or at least their crafting recipe, might have been meant to be this; all the items needed to craft them can be found in the Nether (Coal from Wither Skeletons, Blaze Powder from Blazes, and Gunpowder from Ghasts) and they act as a one-time-use Flint and Steel, so they were probably meant to be a way to reactivate a deactivated Nether Portal if you were trapped in the Nether without Flint and Steel. Downplayed since the only way a Nether Portal can be inadvertently deactivated in the Nether (unless you somehow mine away a block from it yourself) is via the explosion from a Ghast fireball, which can also reactivate it; so if a Ghast deactivates your portal, you can just have the Ghast shoot at it again to reactivate it instead of crafting a Fire Charge. Failing that, you can always just drop all your items in front of the portal and then jump into a nearby lava lake to respawn back in the Overworld, provided you aren't playing on hardcore. Besides, chests in Nether fortresses, where you'll need to go anyway to get Blaze Powder and Coal, often contain a Flint and Steel.
    • 1.12 introduced the recipe book, which means you no longer need to open up the wiki to look up the many crafting recipes (though you need to have a certain ingredient in each recipe to unlock it) and you can also click on the item in the book to instantly position the ingredients on the grid and craft as many copies as you want, speeding up the process especially for those who aren't very nimble-handed with the mouse. 1.13 added a recipe book for smelting, but there is none for brewing yet.
    • Chests used to be unplaceable besides double chests (outside of a bug that was fixed in Beta 1.5), but a trapped chest could be placed beside a regular double chest and vice versa. The exploit, however, required using iron for the tripwire hook required to craft the trapped chest, which wasted material that could be used for tools and armor. As of 1.13, chests can now be placed beside double chests and sneaking while placing one now allows placing single chests adjacent to each other.
    • The Elytra are the only item in the game that is both nonrenewablenote  and of limited durability. Thus, the Elytra never actually break from running out of durability; at 1 durability, they become tattered and stop functioning, but tattered Elytra can be freely repaired at an Anvil or restored by EXP via the Mending enchantment.
    • Due to the farming mechanics giving more seeds than actual crops, players often wound up with way more seeds than they needed. The composter added in 1.14 helps rectify this by turning unwanted seeds (and plants) into bonemeal.
  • Anti Poop-Socking: A rare In-Universe case; As of Snapshot 18w07a, Steve?/Alex? is encouraged to sleep regularly by the threat of Phantoms, who swoop down from the sky to attack miners who haven't slept in at least three days.
  • Anvil on Head: The Anvil item is mainly used to repair enchanted items, but it can also be used as a weapon by placing it next to a hovering block and having gravity make the Anvil fall. It does a ton of damage to any player or mob that gets hit by it.
  • Apocalyptic Log:
    • You can find a broken, dusty record. If you play it, it details the final moments of someone being chased by an unknown mob and he cries out suddenly as the record ends. It only raises the question, who recorded it?
  • Applied Phlebotinum:
    • Redstone. Putting dust on the end of a stick makes an infinite power source (unless you short it out). It's also magnetic, given that it's used to make the Compass, and, as of 1.0, can be used as an ingredient in brewing potions, extending the desired effect's duration. With 1.5, enough Redstone can be turned into a Redstone block, which is similar to a torch but impossible to shut off.
    • The Crafting Table, despite being rather humble in origin and nature (it's just a work bench made from 4 Wood Planks). Once built and placed, you can do almost anything using it without any further tools. It's essential to do anything in this game.
  • April Fools' Day:
    • The 2011 April Fool's Day featured a massive parody of Team Fortress 2 with the Steve Co. Supply Crates. They were found randomly in newly-generated territory and glowed at night. They were indestructible (except by TNT). When clicking on them, a sign pops up that says it requires a key to open, and had a link to the Store. In the store, after placing $10,000 worth of silly items in the cart, the site would start displaying flashing colors, and a velociraptor popped up and moved across the screen. After a warning for flashing lights, of course. On April 1, an "April Fools Day" sign moved across the store page, along with a rearrangement of "Never Gonna Give You Up." Sadly, the store page no longer exists.
    • April Fool's 2013 saw the release of the joke update Minecraft 2.0 that contained, among other things, a pink, friendly Wither, a ridiculously difficult Super Hostile mode, and an Etho Slab which is a half-block of TNT. It also contained more serious and useful things like Blocks of Coal and Dyed Glass, both of which actually did get introduced in updates (1.6 and 1.7 respectively).
    • On April Fool's Day 2014, the villagers apparently turned sentient and took over the game, leading to all player skins changing into those of villagers. The sounds in the game were also affected, due to the game's minor inclusion of Element Animation Villager Sounds Resource Pack. It's hilarious.
    • 2015 saw the release of the "Love and Hugs" update, which included a Love meter that forced you to play a Minecraft-themed Video Game/Minesweeper if you killed too many mobs, Obsidian boats that didn't float on water, and superflat worlds created large patches of snow near coordinates 0, 0 that formed a QR code revealing the true name of the actual next update, the Combat Update.
    • 2016's April fools came with a USB charger block, as well as HUD glasses, an ankle counter, and a smartwatch that refrence plenty of Dystopia tropes, more specifically They Live.
    • The Mine and Craft Lesiure Device was announced for 2017, a Game & Watch clone whose advertisement was done in the style of 90's flair.
    • For 2018, all of the textures of the Java version of the game were redone to use only colors from the palette of a NES, making the whole game look kinda sucky.
    • 2019 came with the "Java Edition 3D Shareware v1.3", which contained lots of references to 90's era shooters like Doom; colored keys, cheat codes, an Easter Egg picture of the development team, exploding barrels with a Crossbow renamed to "BFC", and an "Obligatory nightmare mode" where the player just constantly loses health.
  • Arc Number: 11, usually whenever horror is involved. The music disc that plays a man running away from things until it suddenly cuts out is named "11". Herobrine was removed 11 times. The only update in the Herobrine removal period that didn't have him being removed? 1.1. (And then 1.10 removed him again, long after the joke fell into disuse...) Music Disc 11's disc id is 11 and its length is 1:11. Hell, Minecraft 1.0 was released on 11/11/11!
  • Armless Biped: Creepers technically have four legs but their vertical bodies make them resemble armless bipeds more than the other quadrupeds in the game.
  • Armor and Magic Don't Mix: While the game only has magic in the form of potion crafting and enchanting equipment, it still has an element of this trope. When enchanting items, the material a tool, weapon, or piece of armor is made of has an effect on what effects are available at what levels. Wooden tools and leather armor have more "enchantability" than iron equipment or chainmail, and diamond tools/armor likewise is even less receptive to enchantments, while gold equipment is the most enchantable. The only exception to this pattern is stone, as stone tools (just above wood in terms of durability and utility) have the lowest bonus to enchantment.
  • Armor Meter/Points: Shields and each piece of armour have a durability meter that whittles down as the player takes damage while wearing them, eventually breaking when that meter runs out and leaving the player more vulnerable.
  • Armor of Invincibility:
    • Armor crafted from diamonds is far superior to any other armor in the game, especially if it is highly enchanted. However, you need 24 diamonds to craft an entire suit (4 for the boots, 5 for the helmet, 7 for the pants and 8 for the breastplate), which may take a long time to collect.
    • The 1.0 release had a bug where damage reduction from armour was applied twice, making a player wearing a full suit of diamond practically invincible. This greatly impacted on the strategies employed during the first reddit "race for wool" tournament as obtaining diamond armour or denying it to the other team would often decide the match.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack:
    • Armour has no effect on potions, so harmful status ailments will hurt and/or kill you just as quickly if you're wearing a full suit of diamond or nothing at all. This makes damage potions invaluable in PvP as a Potion of Harming II will always kill a player in two direct shots.
    • Evokers summon fangs that always deal 3 hearts of damage, regardless of armor.
  • Arrows on Fire:
    • Bows can be enchanted so the arrows they fire will set mobs on fire if struck. A similar effect can be achieved by shooting an arrow through fire or lava. As of snapshot 12w34b, these flaming arrows can be used to ignite TNT.
    • Skeletons have a chance to shoot flaming arrows if they're burning when they shoot. All arrows shot by Wither Skeletons will be flaming arrows, although this can only be seen using commands, as they can't wield bows in normal gameplay.
  • Artificial Brilliance:
    • Creepers deliberately wait to ambush you by hiding in alcoves until you pass by.
    • Pigmen group into tribes.
    • Tamed wolves will follow the player down stairs rather than leap off ledges. They're also smart enough to not attack creepers.
    • Peaceful mobs run away when they take damage, including when they're attacked by wild wolves.
    • Endermen get hurt by touching water. To avoid this they leap away as soon as they touch water.
    • Endermen run from approaching arrows, even if they're trapped in a minecart.
    • Endermen stay away from approaching players, if they are in combat with them, to avoid melee attacks.This can be nullified by wearing a pumpkin helmet.
    • In the 1.2 update, mob AI was significantly upgraded. Mobs can now follow players around corners and obstacles.
    • Witches will be able to run away from primed Creepers.
    • Creepers standing on high ledges dive-bomb you, priming their explosion in mid-air so that they explode right when they hit the ground.
    • Wolves no longer attack Creepers. This was a major issue as they would charge the suicidal little freaks without hesitation. Time to find a new dog...
    • Skeletons jump in water or under shade when the burning sun comes out.
    • As of 1.9, the Combat Update, mob AI has been refined even further. Among other things, Skeletons will back away from you while firing as you approach.
  • Artificial Stupidity:
    • Prior to the 1.2 update, hostile mobs had the very simple path-finding of "run at player, jump when you reach a block in your way", which means they would jump into bottomless pits, walk through lava and drown in water if those things happened to be in the way of the player. This was done intentionally according to Notch, but updates have since been done to make the mob AI much more smarter.
      • Well, unless you're a Slime or Magma Cube. They're both one of the only hostile mobs that don't have any sort of advanced path-finding, preferring to blindly jump towards you, all the while completely ignoring any obstacles that may lie in their path. So it's very easy to just bait them off of a ledge and watch them struggle to attack you from several blocks down.
    • Prior to 1.8, Ghasts would aim their fireballs at the camera instead of the player. This was usually not an issue due to the camera being in first person view by default, but it could be exploited by switching to third person view with F5 and laughing as the Ghasts' fireballs would sail harmlessly over the player. It was corrected as of 1.8.
    • If the player is inside a house and a spider spots them, the spider will climb up the wall in an attempt to get to the player. However, due to a quirk in the programming, the spider will drop off the wall if it climbs higher than your character. Thus, if your house is built high enough, the spider will repeatedly damage itself through fall damage each time it drops.
    • The tameable wolves update got a lot of flack when it was first introduced for the stupidity of the wolves. They would frequently get lost and de-spawn, or decide the shortest route between two points was a straight line right into a pool of lava.
      • Tamed wolves like to play in water, but used to have trouble telling the difference between water and lava. They still have a problem with fire and recognizing it as a bad thing.
      • While them not being able to use ladders is in all ways logical, tamed wolves will just jump after the player if they go down a ladder, no matter how long the descent is. Time to go looking for a new dog...
      • Wolves also have a hard time getting through open doors. It's usually a better idea to make them sit and then push them into the house through the doorway, or perhaps build them a dog door their own height immediately adjacent to your door.
      • Wolves who are standing up will teleport to the player if they move too far from them to prevent them from getting lost or killed. However, there is a glitch in which a wolf which is sitting down will stand up and teleport to the player by themselves. Now imagine that you're deep underground, climbing along narrow ledges over lava pits and suddenly your wolf who's been sitting in your living room at home suddenly teleports right over to you.
    • Wolves normally only attack mobs you've hit first (except for Creepers), but if there's a skeleton nearby, they'll go after it automatically. While this can be useful for preventing sudden sneak attacks, if you're underground it also has the tendency of causing your wolves to become paralyzed on the spot and stare into a wall, ignoring the non-skeleton mobs currently beating you into a pulp in favor of trying to reach a skeleton that's not even in the same room. Conversely, the skeletons also get their share of Artificial Stupidity if they have wolves after them, causing them to flee aimlessly right into your sword or into pools of lava - which, naturally, leads to the wolves chasing after it jumping in as well.
    • In the rare event in which there is an above-ground lava pool, neutral mobs (which spawn in light patches at night) can be seen almost ceremoniously throwing themselves into the lava. Bats, in their random flights, make no effort to avoid lava as well.
    • If an Enderman manages to catch fire, it will go to water. This would be perfectly logical, if not for the fact that water kills Endermen— and can set them on fire.
    • Villagers love to find every ravine in the village and get trapped in them. They also used to love opening and closing doors repeatedly, which was not only annoying but would get them killed if they did so at night with zombies outside, but the 1.14 Village and Pillage update fixed it by making them work during the day and sleep during the night.
    • Creepers still retain some artificial stupidity as an anti-frustration feature. They will not detonate and destroy your hard work unless they have a direct line of sight with you, meaning you can still have odd situations like groups of creepers gathered on a glass ceiling right above you or right next to your window outside, where all of them are unable to explode due to the completely transparent material somehow blocking their view.
  • Artistic License – Biology: Apples will sometimes drop from destroyed oak and dark oak leaves.
  • Artistic License – Chemistry:
    • You can't name a more reliable and valuable defense in Minecraft than the diamond armor. As debunked by Game Theory, though, real life diamond armor would be just as incredibly overpriced as it's actually worthless as armor.
    • Zig-zagged in the Education Edition and the Bedrock Edition with educational features enabled. Both allow players to use chemical elements as crafting ingredients in order to make chemical compounds, items, and blocks not normally found in the vanilla editions. Although the crafting recipes are based on real-life chemical formulas, the actual crafting process is greatly simplified.
  • Artistic License – Engineering: On one hand, sand, gravel, concrete powder, and most living things will respect the laws of gravity while most other blocks ignore it entirely, enabling floating continents and fortresses to be built and naturally generate with a little effort. Yet on the other, most anything electronic barring mods follow the laws of electronics mostly swimmingly (well, minus the fact that redstone torches produce seemingly infinite power.)
  • Artistic License – Geology: Real-world obsidian is fragile, being a sort of glass formed when lava cools rapidly. The obsidian in Minecraft is ridiculously hardy, being explosion resistant and taking more time to break than any other block in the game.
  • Art-Style Dissonance: The game looks like a harmless children's toy at first glance, until you play Survival mode. Constant threat of starvation as well as brutal undead creatures and otherwordly monsters out for your blood that are far more threatening than their blocky, cartoonish designs could ever suggest are what awaits in this bright and colorful Lego Land. Needless to say, if Minecraft is a playground, it's an evil playground that shows no mercy and wants you dead.
  • Ascended Glitch:
    • The creeper's model was that of a failed pig model. The model failed due to Notch attempting to make the pig model longer horizontally, but he botched the coding and it made the model grow longer vertically instead, which also made the legs look weird in that position. Notch liked how creepy it looked and decided to work with it to create the Creeper.
    • When the pistons were added, people soon realized that they sometimes got stuck in an incorrect state and need to be "updated" to make then snap back to their expected state. Ingenious people managed to transform this glitch into so-called block update detectors that significantly expanded the the ways redstone mechanisms can interact with the rest of the game world. Weird interactions between pistons and redstone torches led to an odd, but incredibly versatile piece of redstone machinery that can detect when adjacent blocks were modified. As of the 1.11 update, we now have Observer blocks, which function as glitchless block update detectors (but functionally only for one side).
    • Another, unrelated glitch with the pistons made it possible to propagate redstone signals arbitrarily far within a single tick (0.1s). This enabled the players to circumvent the intended 150m/s limit. This later capacity was expanded in the next update, making it significantly easier to transmit instantly both edges of the signal.
    • The Far Lands, a glitchy area players could see if they go far (really far) enough in one direction of the map. The Far Lands was named this by the fans and became popular. Even Notch liked the idea of finding a buggy area that had blocks and terrain spawn with weird results, so he decided to leave the bug in on purpose for players to find. Sadly, this glitch was accidentally fixed in the Beta 1.8 update when the coding for terrain generation was updated.
    • Green-robed villagers, which were unused at first, could be spawned using commands but would not offer any trades since none were implemented for them. While they were removed temporarily in 1.8 due to a game crash bug when attempting to trade with them, they later came back in 1.11 as the Nitwits, with their lack of trades becoming their defining feature, and were carried forward with the major village overhaul in 1.14.
  • Ascended Meme:
    • The "Steve?" name for the player character was originally coined by Notch as a joke.
    • Endermen can be seen as this applied to Herobrine — like Herobrine, they have glowing eyes, shuffle around blocks to make strange and unnatural formations, and aren't really aggressive by default but don't take kindly to being watched.
    • Every single patch since around Beta 1.7.3 except 1.1 has had "Removed Herobrine" in its patch notes.
    • Version 1.5 of the Xbox 360 Edition (aka TU12) includes in its tutorial world a hidden Tower of Pimps (four gold blocks stacked on top of a block of obsidian), a trophy made famous by the crew at Achievement Hunter.
    • Villagers had been compared to Squidward, mostly due to the Gag Nose, since they were put in. When they finally got audio noises, they sound almost exactly like the huffing noise Squidward makes when annoyed.
  • Asteroids Monster: Slimes come in three sizes, which can withstand and dispense proportional amounts of damage. If you kill a larger slime, it will split into two to four slimes of the next size down. The smallest size slime will still chase you around but can't hurt you (unless it pushes you off a ledge or into lava). In the Nether, Magma Cubes are similar, except that the smallest ones can hurt you.
  • Atlantis Is Boring: Oceans were originally rather plain, though an entreprising player could create an epic underwater base and ruins if they so desired. This was something Notch wanted to fix, and this was eventually done in 1.8 with the addition of Ocean Monuments and Guardians and with the 1.13 Update Aquatic which added many new ocean features like coral reefs, sunken ruins, shipwrecks and aquatic mobs like turtles and dolphins.
  • Attack Animal: Tamed wolves, foxes and llamas will attack mobs that attack the player.
  • Attack Backfire: Throwing a Splash Potion of Instant Damage at a zombie or skeleton will heal them. Likewise, throwing a Splash Potion of Instant Health will hurt them.
  • Automatic Crossbows: Minecraft, for most of the pre-release period, took this even further by having a fully-automatic longbow. If you had enough arrows stored up, you could just point at a horde of enemies, hold down the right mouse button, and mow them down like you're wielding an assault rifle. And as an added bonus, missed shots didn't waste arrows because they could (and still can) be gathered up and reused later. Beta 1.8 finally retooled the bow to behave more like a traditional video game longbow (i.e. hold the button in to pull back slowly, release to... well, release; damage and accuracy increases based on how far back the bowstring was drawn) but also do more damage if used properly. The actual crossbows introduced in 1.14 also avert it — they must be pre-loaded before each shot, but a pre-loaded crossbow can be left in the inventory still charged.
  • Automaton Horses: Horses can pretty much gallop and jump indefinitely once saddled, only needing food if they take damage. This particularly stands out since the player themself has a hunger bar and loses stamina as they run and jump.
  • Auto-Revive: The Totem of Undying is a one-use item that will instantly resurrect the player upon death and give them back several health points if in hand.
  • Autosave: The game uses a single save state that overwrites itself persistently and upon quitting.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: In Minecraft, there's nothing telling you what to do or how to do it. However, there are several types of building materials, crafts, and projects that by-and-large are not considered worth it considering how little use they are or how much effort they require.
    • Note blocks. It takes huge redstone circuits to make even small songs using them.
    • Composite blocks made from ingots and/or gems (iron, gold, diamond, emeralds). On one hand, they're great for storage, turning nine items into one that you can easily convert back. On the other, it takes nine pieces to make a block, so in Survival you have to mine a massive amount of ore if you want to use them as building material. If you want to make a power pyramid for Beacons, you absolutely need these, 164 in total for full effectiveness. Did we mention you have to kill the Wither for a Nether Star (which itself requires finding 3 Wither Skulls) in order to make the Beacon in the first place?
    • Enchanted Golden Apples. They gave five minutes of damage and fire resistance, plus minor health regeneration and hunger benefits. They required eight gold blocks to make. That's 72 ingots. This used to be the standard for Golden Apples, which healed all health, but the effect was changed to a five-second regeneration effect and the cost was reduced, while the enchanted version uses the old recipe and keeps the old perks. As of 1.9, though, these apples are now uncraftable (must be found instead), and their regeneration effect has been nerfed in favour of an extra health effect.
    • Obsidian. It's the strongest block in the game that can still be mined and is explosion-proof. That's where the good ends. It can only be mined with a diamond pickaxe, which takes about ten seconds. Obsidian is only created when water runoff hits a lava source block, converting the latter into obsidian. Lava usually only appears far below the surface, forcing you to trek into hostile territory just to find some. Once down there, if you're lucky, you'll stumble upon a lava lake and not into it. You need to use water to convert that into obsidian, then try to mine it without the obsidian falling into the next lava layer (of which there tend to be at least three). This can be circumvented by dropping a water block behind you, creating an instant conversion process. Then, after you've strip-mined an entire lake, you'll have just enough for a tiny house (though more than enough for crafting), meaning larger projects will take several trips. On the plus side, once you have enough for building purposes, whatever you make will be almost indestructible, and the Nether has so much lava that you'll never run out, though it's annoying to collect. An alternative to mining it is to collect it in buckets and use other blocks to create molds (this is an extremely useful method of building a portal to the Nether without diamonds), but lava buckets don't stack so this takes a while. On top of all this, it's a rather ugly building material for most types of projects, since it can't be converted into nicer-looking blocks the way cobblestone and other basic building materials can.
    • Any type of brick block is impractical due to the smelting needed to make them (unless your pickaxe has the silk-touch enchantment), but red brick blocks (made of actual bricks) take the cake. Brick is smelted from clay, which is usually under a one-block layer of water, meaning you need to find lakes to find it. Each block drops four balls when mined, which must then be smelted into four bricks to form a red brick block. In other words, it takes four times the fuel to make red brick blocks than it does other similar blocks (except Nether Brick Blocks, which can be found naturally), and having Silk Touch doesn't let you get around it. Even then, its only benefit is appearance; it is functionally identical to other types in terms of resistance. Finally, version 1.6 added terracotta, which is basically the same except that it's created from a clay block instead of clay balls, in a way similar to other materials; now there's no reason to make bricks when terracotta is four times cheaper. Also, certain colors of terracotta generate naturally in the badlands biome, practically negating the need to even smelt raw clay. Additionally, terracotta can be dyed and smelted further to make glazed terracotta, making it a good choice for decoration, whereas bricks can't.
    • Golden Armor and tools. The tools are the fastest in the game, gold armor can hold better enchantments than anything else, and they all look really cool, until Reality Ensues and we find out that Notch opted for the realistic structural density of gold, rather than the JRPG version, leaving you with what amounts to some "slightly tasteless evening wear." Gold tools create the best enchantments of any material and mine even faster than diamond, but they're even less durable than wood and can't mine any ore except coal and quartz.
    • The majority of contraptions involving excessive amounts of TNT. TNT falls under a similar problem. Endless fun for rigging up minefields, self-destruct systems, and even artillery cannons. Almost always requires great caution and planning to set up anything more complex than a basic pressure plate mine. In addition, restocking on TNT requires hunting down considerable numbers of creepers for the required gunpowder. And if that isn't enough, TNT remains one of the only artificial blocks Endermen can still pick up and place. For general use, TNT is good to destroy a wall or the like if you are mining, but small explosions don't break enough blocks to justify their use and large explosions run the risk of destroying any minerals you intend to obtain.
    • Protection 4 diamond armor makes you pretty much invincible from everything from explosions to lava. However, the amount of diamonds it takes to make a full suit, as well as the amount of experience grinding required to enchant them all, and the fact that the armor will just break eventually, just makes them not really worth it.
    • Heck, Diamond tools in general isn't very practical. Diamond Pickaxes can mine only one more type of block than their Iron equivalents: Obsidiannote . Many players just carry around a diamond pickaxe enchanted with looting and only use it when they encounter ores to increase drops (since it's very durable, enchanting diamond equipment does come a long way), using stone picks for mining stone. Diamond Axes and Shovels really only differ to their weaker counterparts in durability. A Diamond Sword doesn't deal much more damage than an Iron sword: again, not very useful unless it's on a PvP server where the extra damage matters.
    • Any project in Survival mode that involves large amounts of lava permanently placed, especially one's home base. Yes, it looks awesome to have a skull fortress weeping lava-falls, but it's highly dangerous and one misstep can potentially kill you and melt all your valuable gear. Even if you build very carefully and never fall in by your own devices, you can still get knocked into it by hostile mobs (skeletons firing arrows, for example) and anything that compromises the integrity of your structure like Creeper explosions or Endermen removing just a single block can cause an escalating disaster. You can build fortifications and defenses to keep most mobs far away, but Endermen can run in whenever they please, even when you're not there to fend them off. Finally, while you can obtain an infinite water source with just two buckets of water, lava does not fall under the same rule, so you'll have to manually farm your lava with buckets that become unstackable when you put anything in them.
    • Beacon Pyramids. They look pretty darn cool (especially with the Pillar of Light) and provide some useful boosts, including movement speed, mining speed, and health regeneration. That said, these bonuses only apply within a somewhat small radius; getting the maximum 50 blocks of effect area requires a whopping 164 mineral blocks (1476 ingots and/or gems) plus a Beacon, requiring that you kill enough Wither Skeletons to get 3 skulls and defeat the Wither for its Nether Star (so by making a pyramid you basically prove you didn't need one to begin with). Most of the effects are mediocre at best, as well - Strength, Resistance, and Regen are all unneeded since the area around your base is probably fully lit and warded off from monsters and Jump Boost isn't useful at all. Perhaps the only one that's practical is Haste, which can be useful for future large-scale mining projects, but that's it.
    • Iron farms. A basic one will produce much less iron than you can mine in an hour (although it can produce iron while you're doing other things around your base) while more advanced ones that produce massive amounts of ingots require a considerable amount of time and resources to build and can be rendered useless by a single miscalculation due to the way the game recognizes villages and generates iron golems.
    • Shulker boxes. They serve as a backpack and can increase storage capacity by 27 times. They can also be broken (like an Ender Chest) and moved by pistons without losing their contents. The catch? You need to kill shulkers to get them, which means you must have already defeated the Ender Dragon and found an End City note . Not all shulkers drop the shells needed to craft the boxes... and to top it all off, they don't respawn, meaning you will need to keep exploring the outer islands if you want more. Have we already mentioned that they're pretty obnoxious to fight, too? note 
    • Skeletal Horses may seem cool, but they can't be bred for better stats, their health is always the minimum for a horse and you cannot equip them with horse armor to increase their survivability. They're also very rare to obtain — a single "trap" horse is spawned during thunderstorms and when approached, it's struck with lightning which despawns it and replaces it with four skeletons in enchanted armor riding four of them. You of course have to kill the skeletons (and not the horses) if you want a chance to obtain one. Finally, you cannot attach leads to them, meaning that they can easily wander around if you don't use a proper stable. The only benefit to own one other than for cosmetics, is their ability to be ridden underwater.
    • The fire damage from Fire Aspect can seem helpful at first glance, but the Impractical part comes in when a Zombie decides to set you on fire with its dying breath. It's also not helpful underwater and can interfere with the Looting enchantment—if a mob burns to death instead of you dealing the final blow, Looting won't trigger. Doesn't help that you can get the Flame enchantment on a bow which does the same thing at a distance, eliminating the former risk and rendering the latter issue moot as you can't get Looting on a bow anyway. Apart from PVP where the extra damage can make or break a match, the only real practical use for Fire Aspect is killing farm animals so the meat's already cooked (which can also be done with a flint and steel anyway).
    • Tridents, introduced with 1.13, are a two-in-one melee and ranged weapon. Sounds like the perfect weapon on paper, but in the field it's anything but. Not only is it less effective than just using a bow and sword separately, but it's a lot harder to get your hands on as well. You can only get them as a very rare drop from Drowned, an ocean-exclusive mob that only spawns with them 15% of the time, whereas you can just simply craft a sword and bow from commonplace materials. When you finally do get a trident drop, it will almost always be heavily damaged - the only way to repair them is to grind out more Drowned for additional drops or use the incredibly rare Mending enchantment. Even when fully repaired, it only has as much durability as an iron tool. Finally, if you don't want to lose your precious trident, you have to run and retrieve it every time you throw itnote , which often results in you putting yourself right in the middle of danger - something you'd almost never have to worry about when using a bow and arrows.
    • Either kind of Golem. While having your own personal guard in your base is pretty cool, they're both outclassed by simply spamming torches on the surface world in addition to their other problems:
      • Snow Golems deal no damage, thus simply placing them as sentries is useless because all they do is draw aggro from mobs and probably get shot to death by Skeletons. Furthermore, they'll just melt to death if they're present in locations that are too warm.
      • Iron Golems have the problem of being ridiculously costly to make (36 iron for one), and while they're fairly effective for what they are, they have no methods to recover health by themselves. Thus, that expensive Golem you spent so much to make will eventually have to be replaced as Zombies gradually grind its health away.
    • Cake. A food source that can be placed down and eaten in slices? Pretty cool! But, it takes lots of resources from multiple sources to create (chickens, cows, wheat, and sugarcane are all source ingredients), is annoying to craft by milk buckets not being stackable, the inventory item cannot stack, and while eating a whole cake provides the most hunger points of any single item, it doesn't hold a candle to a complete stack of potatoes nor will it last as long.
      • There's also rabbit stew, which is a shade more awesome but hits many of the same pitfalls. Heals the most hunger out of any item in the game just short of cake, and has the third highest saturation of any item as well. Has the same resource dilemma (rabbit, potatoes, carrots, mushrooms - some of these items are rarer than cake's requirements), and similarly can't be stacked.
    • The Totem of Undying sounds like a great item, but there's a few issues with it. The first is getting one—it only drops from the boss mob in a woodland mansion, a rare structure which you can only find either by wandering the world endlessly or locating a Cartographer villager (which not all villages will have, possibly requiring you to build a Cartography Table and breed villagers to get one) and trading lots of stuff with them until they offer a map to the place. Once you have it, there's still some major drawbacks. For it to do anything, you can't simply carry it in your bag, or put it on your hotbar; you have to hold it in your offhand, meaning you can't use a shield, ironically making it more likely that you'll die and use up the totem. Also, when it does activate, it doesn't restore you to full health, it just restores half a heart and gives you temporary regeneration... so you're likely to immediately die again to whatever killed you the first time. It's probably most useful to have in the Nether, where shields are less useful (arrow-shooting skeletons rarely appear), because it also gives you fire resistance when it activates, potentially saving you from burning up if you fall into the ocean of lava.
  • Axe Before Entering: Axes are a quick way to break down wooden doors, though they cannot be locked so it's easier and quicker to just open them (breaking them down is only useful for relocating them). Iron doors, on the other hand, need a pickaxe to break through unless you can find a way to power them with redstone.
  • An Axe to Grind: The axe, though primarily a tool for chopping wood, can be used as a weapon. Before version 1.9, it used to deal more damage than a pickaxe or shovel, but less than a sword. After 1.9, it deals more damage than swords, at the cost of having a lower swinging speed. Swords still do more damage per second, but axes can effectively be used in situations where spam-clicking isn't an option (like, say, when facing a Creeper). It also has the secondary effect of disabling shields, although this is only useful in PVP.
Advertisement:

    B 
  • Badass Adorable:
    • Wolves, when tamed. They follow you, sit when right-clicked, have cute little puppy-dog eyes, shake themselves dry when getting out of water, tilt their heads to the side and beg when you pull out food, and murder anything that you attack with melee. Except creepers.
    • Cats become this for being able to ward off creepers.
  • Badass Beard: Steve?, the masculine (sort of) version of the player, is a badass who, if the player is skilled enough, can become very powerful, and once had a badass Beard. It was eventually removed due to players mistaking it for a smile.
  • Badass Normal: The Player, who is essentially this, with exception to the ability to punch chunks out of trees and compressing minerals with one's bare hands, all the player has in their arsenal against the undead and monstrosities from a realm equivalent to hell (among others) consists of what the player can craft at the time, he/she fits comfortably into the Badass Normal category.
  • Bad with the Bone: Although entirely cosmetic and giving no damage boost, you can hold a bone while punching enemies.
  • Bag of Holding: The basic chest has 27 slots, each of which can hold a stack of 64 items (and each item might be a cubic-meter block if something), meaning it can potentially hold 1,728 times its own volume. A literal mountain's worth of stone can fit in a small closet of them.
  • Bag of Sharing: Averted with Ender Chests. Each occurrence of those chests have the same inventory (for the same player). So two players opening the same chest see different inventories, but each player can open any of those chests anywhere to see the same inventory in all of them. This inventory is still safe, even if the very last chest is destroyed. Played straight with the original incarnation that shared the same inventory with everyone.
  • Bamboo Technology: Long before you gain access to iron, gold, redstone and diamond (to say nothing of plundering other dimensions for the riches therein), most tools and structures you build will be composed of wood, stone, and the odd bits of various animals. The bamboo introduced in 1.14, in a literal example, can be used to make scaffoldings and sticks.
  • Bandit Mook:
    • Endermen have the ability to steal certain kinds of blocks. The variety was greater at one point, but 1.0 nerfed it to a small selection of naturally-occurring blocks.
    • Snapshot 12w43b introduced this trope to zombies, skeletons, and zombie pigmen (though only a fraction of them actually have this ability). Any items that are dropped can be picked up by these mobs and used against you. This means any undead mob that kills you may walk away with your stuff if you don't get back there quickly.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow:
    • If the difficulty is set on Hard, wooden doors won't stop zombies, just slow them down. Iron doors will keep them out.
    • The 1.9 Combat Update in February 2016 introduced Shields. Simultaneously, it allowed striking a player with an Axe to temporarily disable their Shield.
  • Battle Royale Game: Many servers have a fan-made game mode known as the "Hunger Games" in which players spawn in an arena and have to gather weapons and other resources, all while fighting other players to be the last man standing. At the center of each map is a cornucopia filled with all sorts of goodies and equipment, and some servers even allow for the use of starting kits.
  • Bat Out of Hell: Solidly averted by the bats, which are completely harmless and incapable of attacking the player.
  • Bat Scare: Lighting torches sometimes triggers this trope, but they're harmless outside of accidentally startling a more flinch-y player into falling off a steep drop or onto lava.
  • Battle Trophy:
    • Wither skeletons have a rare chance to drop their skulls upon defeat. You can keep them as a decoration or even wear them or use them to summon the Bonus Boss, the Wither.
    • The Dragon Egg that appears after defeating the Ender Dragon certainly qualifies as a battle trophy. It pretty much has no other purpose in the game.
  • Bears Are Bad News: 1.10 (the Frostburn Update) introduced polar bears in icy biomes. Despite this, the cubs are passive and the adults neutral... just as long as you don't play "punch the cub".
  • The Beastmaster: You can tame wolves, who will follow you around loyally. Wolves will attack most mobs that you're attacking (except Creepers) as well as going after skeletons of their own accord, making them very useful to have around.
  • Beating A Dead Player: If you died but haven't respawned yet, monsters will keep trying to attack you. This is more significant than one would expect; creepers attacking your corpse will still explode, destroying your items and potentially damaging nearby structures.
  • Beautiful Void: At least in single player Survival mode, until the introduction of villages with NPCs, although there's still an option to remove structures at world generation so you can play in an uninhabited world. Prior to that, the only sign of other intelligent life was two of the enemies, zombies and skeletons, which are both types of monsters that used to be people.
  • Bee Afraid: Bees are normally passive, but if one is attacked, the entire swarm will retaliate and sting the attacker, injecting them with Poison. After attacking once, bees lose their stinger and die within the next minute. Bees will also attack if the player harvests from or destroys a bee hive, though putting a campfire directly underneath the hive will keep them passive.
  • Behind the Black: Hostile mobs can seem to advance in an endless tide from a stretch of unlit cavern... until you light it up with a torch and reveal a dead end not even five blocks away.
  • Beneath the Earth: Cave systems in Minecraft can be extremely large, especially abandoned mines. In the former, you'll find all kinds of ore (iron, coal, lapis lazuli, gold, emerald, diamond, redstone), lava, flowers, mushrooms, lakes, ravines... and monsters. The mines contain tons of wood, rails, minecarts with loot, poison spider spawners and other regular cave elements too.
  • Benevolent Architecture: Even though you can dig and build ladders, you don't really need them to climb the mountains. They're rather short and at least one of the sides will always be a slope climbable by mere jumping.
  • Berserk Board Barricade: While not always using boards, one can build a wall very quickly to keep a monster away.
  • Berserk Button: Endermen are normally passive unless you look directly at them, which seems to make them fly into a murderous rage.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: The Iron Golems give the villager kids flowers, and won't do anything to hurt you - unless you harm a villager.
  • Big, Bulky Bomb: The Creative mode lets you make some truly terrifying piles of TNT. Big enough to crash the game when set off if you have the patience.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Spiders, bees, and silverfish. The latter may be one of the smallest mobs in the game, but they're still huge compared to their real-world basis.
  • Big Electric Switch: One can be made. Where as buttons create a quick burst of electricity to a nearby object, and a pressure plate can be activated with any weight, a lever can be used to keep the electricity at a constant flow.
  • Bilingual Bonus: On the title screen, there is a random splash. One such splash reads "Bread is Pain", and pain means bread in French. Other splashes say hello to various countries in the local language.
  • Bizarrchitecture: The game allows players to build structures that fit into any category. Big Objects are common as megaprojects, while Unlikely Foundations (or No Foundations At All) are made possible by the fact that only a few blocks are affected by gravity. Place one block on top of another, then knock out the bottom block, and the first block will remain suspended in midair where you placed it.
  • Blackout Basement: Weather is a vital game mechanic to pay attention to, as hostile mobs will generally spawn in areas with low or no light, such as under cloud cover. Since a good chunk of gameplay involves going underground, players are advised to carry plenty of torches.
  • Blatant Lies: One of the title screen random splashes claims "Absolutely no memes!". Aside from the fact that Minecraft has spawned a good dozen memes, it does make its own fair share of references in other title splashes.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: You can make picks, swords and armor with gold. Huzzah! Gold axes and swords do, in fact, swing incredibly fast and can plow through blocks faster than diamond speed. To many folks' dismay, Notch was also aware that gold is a relatively soft metal. Thus, the durability of gold implements is in the toilet. Gold armor in terms of durability and longevity is barely better than leather armor. Diamond weapons themselves are also a pretty good example, except they're much more durable.
  • Bling of War: You can go around sporting golden armor and swords in PvP, it's just not a great idea considering how many players will have better equipment. You're better off with Iron equipment if you don't have enough Diamonds to make a full set. The exception is Gold horse armor, which weirdly has better protection than Iron and has infinite durability, making it more practical. Diamond also qualifies, with the bonus of being incredibly durable.
  • Blob Monster: Slime enemies, which split into smaller ones if you hit them.
  • Bonsai Forest:
    • This varies between biomes. Pine trees in the cold biomes can grow quite large. The standard biomes other trees appear in can also grow to great size at random. It is not uncommon to see a grove of small trees around a much larger tree or two.
    • The jungle biomes generally invert this. The trees soar in them, forming a huge, high canopy.
  • Bonus Boss: To fight the Wither, you will have to gather up four blocks of soul sand and three Wither Skeleton skulls to construct it, both of which are found in the Nether. One of the paintings even shows you how to put it together.
  • Booby Trap: Desert pyramids have treasure rooms with a pressure plate in the middle of it. If the plate is stepped on note , it triggers the TNT buried below and will blow you to hell, along with the loot. Jungle temples have tripwires that, when activated, makes dispensers nearby fire arrows at you. Woodland mansions have a very rare chance to spawn with a room that resembles the end portal room from the strongholds, which a contains a trapped chest that triggers some nearby TNT, releasing a swarm of silverfish if they explode (although this particular trap is so incredibly obvious that it's impossible to trigger it unless deliberately done).
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Cobblestone. Not very fancy, but it's durable, incredibly common (all your stone automatically turns into it upon mining), and very important when it comes to crafting. As a building material, it's relatively durable. As a crafting material, it's abundant. Outside of massive super-projects, you'd be hard pressed to be at a loss as all the stone you mine turns into cobblestone. It's also one of the materials (all derived from wood, water, plants, and monsters) that can never run out as you can always create more through a combination of lava and water. This same property also allows you to construct simplistic shelters out of basically nothing so long as you have at least one bucket. Even better, it can be smelted into much nicer-looking stone blocks. Once you're sick of having boatloads of the stuff around, just make more tools out of them, players practically guzzle pickaxes when mining and you'll always get the Cobblestone back that you spend on the Stone tools if you don't manage to find any Iron.
    • In general, literal farming of crops and livestock. Farming isn't the most exciting thing to do in Minecraft (as opposed to going around slaughtering pigs and cows), but with a reasonably-sized, well-lit, and hydrated farm, you can easily produce enough wheat to constantly feed yourself with bread, at a fast enough rate that you'll never starve to death again (unless you by chance allow Creepers or Endermen to wreck your farm). It takes a while to set up and longer to get going (and routinely harvesting/replanting isn't the most exciting thing to do), but necessary to keep a reliable source of food going since mobs with edible meat spawn very slowly. Having a good population of farm animals has other benefits too, including leather for books (to enchant) and feathers for arrows. Breeding animals then slaughtering them is also an efficient way to figuratively farm for EXP to enchant anything.
    • Blocks of dirt. You can't craft it into anything, but it's vital to farming of any kind. It is also excellent for temporary platforms, since you'll never run out of it, it can be broken down relatively quickly without having to use tools, and can be used for makeshift barricades if necessary. It can even serve as housing at the start of the game, until you've gathered the necessary supplies to build something more sturdy. In fact, it's become something of a tradition for brand-new players to make a dirt house even when they have immediate access to stuff like wood or stone.
    • Water is as plain as it can get. It may slow you down and you can drown in it, but when combined with the humble bucket it is your absolute best friend. It puts out fires, solidifies lava, provides irrigation for farming, can be turned into a makeshift elevator to break your fall off a cliff, allow infinite food via fishing, or be used as a trap. Water can also be used as an elevator by swimming up waterfalls.
    • Light sources, especially the most accessible form of them; torches. They let you see underground or at night, prevent monsters from spawning in the dark, and have a very plentiful crafting recipe (four torches are created from one stick and one coal/charcoal; a full stack of coal and sticks will supply a whopping 256 torches). The second best light source is Jack-O-Lanterns, which are a bit tougher to craft than torches — they require an additional carved pumpkin to make — but are very good for lighting underwater areas.
    • Composite blocks, as long as you're not using them for anything, are great for storing large amounts of items. One block is composed of nine individual items (in most cases), letting you store nine times as much of it. This is especially true of redstone and coal (but not charcoal, due to technical issues); both substances are one of the most abundant products of mining short of cobblestone and dirt. They even have fringe benefits on top of being easy storage. A redstone block acts as a power source, and a coal block gives the equivalent of 10 coal pieces in fuel while only requiring nine pieces to craft.
    • "Getting wood" is a meme for a reason, everyone. Wood is by far one of the handiest materials in Minecraft, serving as construction material, tool-crafting material, and fuel. And it's renewable, since the foliage of the trees you punch for wood contains saplings you can replant for more trees.
    • Iron. Although many players look for Diamonds, which are much better than Iron in terms of strength and durability, Iron is used to make more items than Diamond, and it's found almost anywhere. It's also one of two minerals that are renewable without use of Villager Trading (the other being charcoal, but charcoal technically isn't a mineral), being found off of Zombies (the drop rate is terrible, however).
    • Notch himself mentioned that he thought ladders were boring, but added them because of how useful they were.
  • Boss Room: Until 1.9, arguably the End, which is essentially one giant arena to fight the Ender Dragon. Nowadays, there are more floating islands to be explored after defeating the dragon.
  • Bottomless Magazines: A bow with the "Infinity" enchantment doesn't actually use up any arrows in your inventory. You still need at least one arrow in your inventory to fire the bow, though. Also, the bow is limited by durability, but that's still the equivalent of six full stacks of arrows—which you can further extend through repairs at an anvil and/or the Unbreaking enchantment. It also only works for bog-standard arrows- arrows tipped with potion will still be consumed.
  • Bottomless Pit: The Void. In the Overworld and Nether, it's blocked off by indestructible bedrock, but "indestructible" doesn't mean anything to a player in Creative mode. The End, being a series of floating islands, has a bit more of it to deal with.
  • Bow and Sword, in Accord: Players who elect to wield a bow alongside their trusty sword. Early on in Survival an effective way to conserve both durability and arrow count is to shoot mobs once then swing at them when they approach, though this still works even past the stage where one is very strained for resources.
  • Bragging Rights Reward:
    • Once you go through all the trouble of farming Endermen for their pearls, farming Blazes to get blaze powder to convert those pearls into Eyes of Ender, using said eyes to find an End Portal (which you then must activate with up to 12 eyes), and defeating the Ender Dragon in The End, you're rewarded with... a dragon egg. It literally does nothing, and is annoying to even collect because it teleports if you try to touch it. But hey, at least you can say you got it. Subverted with the 1.9 update, as killing the Ender Dragon opens up the way to the Ender City section of the End with dungeons, new mobs, and the Elytra, which allow Not Quite Flight.
    • Similarly, a Beacon requires a Nether Star from killing the Wither (which itself requires quite a bit of Wither Skeleton farming) and many, many mineral blocks to achieve an appreciable effect. As awesome as the boosts and the Pillar of Light are, the effort needed to make a beacon pyramid just shows how little you needed one in the first place.
  • Breakable Weapons: All weapons, tools and armor have a fixed number of uses before breaking. Bows are somewhat unique in that they lose durability when fired, but not when used to club things over the head; unfortunately, they are no more effective in this manner than fists note .
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: The ending directly addresses the player. The End Poem you get after defeating the Ender Dragon, in which Creators says to player, that he had reached the final goal, and now can also do something useful in the real world.
  • Bubblegloop Swamp: One of the biomes. It has flat terrain and shallow pools of water containing lily pads able to support your weight. Edible mushrooms are more common here, and trees are overgrown with vines hanging to the ground. It also features an abundance of slimes, and there are some huts where witches always spawn. The water was originally very dark, but this was changed after players complained that it was too ugly (although the introduction of different colors of water in 1.13 somewhat reverts it, as swamp water now has a very dirty tint).
  • Build Like an Egyptian: Desert Temples.
  • Built with LEGO: More like it's made out of DUPLOs. The entire map is built out of large blocks that you can mine and craft into more blocks. And now Mojang is working with the LEGO group to make Minecraft-themed LEGO sets.
  • Bullfight Boss: For a while, the Ender Dragon's only attack was ramming you. Then the Console Edition (and later the 1.9 update for the PC Version) gave it two ranged attacks—Ender Charges and Ender Acid.
  • But Thou Must!: How death in Hardcore Mode is handled. The Game Over screen shows up, you get a message informing you that you cannot respawn, and you'll just sit where you died until you click the only button on the screen, labeled "Delete World".

    C 
  • Call to Agriculture: There are all kinds of flora and fauna you can farm, including wheat, carrots, potatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, cocoa, sugar cane, mushrooms, trees, chickens, cows, pigs, sheep and so on. In fact, unless you want to spend half your time fishing, establishing farms to grow wheat and livestock is essential for a reliable food supply, since animals don't respawn in large numbers, so hunting and gathering will prove inadequate before long. Even after you've accumulated enough food to last you for the rest of your playtime (or more), farms are still great sources for Villager trading fodder, as they buy most foodstuffs for Emeralds.
  • Camera Perspective Switch: The game allows the player to toggle into 3rd person view.
  • Canine Companion: Wolves can be tamed with bones, and will follow you around and fight for you.
  • Cannot Cross Running Water: Endermen take damage if they step in water or get rained on.
  • Cap: The majority of items/blocks have a maximum stack of 64. A few have a maximum stack of 16 (usually the ones that can be thrown), and before the release of Beta 1.8, food had a max stack of 1. This is slightly different than most examples, as instead of being a maximum holding capacity for a particular item, you can carry as many stacks of the item as will fit into your inventory.
  • Cast from Experience Points: Experience points and levels are spent when enchanting or repairing items.
  • Cast Full of Gay: As Notch pointed out, there is only one gender for all mobs, which means that any creature in Minecraft is homosexual, because there is only one gender to choose from.
  • Cats Are Superior: Creepers are the bane of any player's existence. But Creepers know better than to mess with cats.
  • Cats Hate Water: Zig-zagged: The adult cats decide to swim along with you when you swim and don't avoid water when you are standing and water is near. The ocelots in the game don't swim in water like the cows, sheep, chickens, pigs, wolves, dogs, and spiders would though.
  • Chain of Deals: Downplayed when trading with the NPC villagers. It doesn't happen a lot thanks to currency, but sometimes you need to sell a villager rotten meat to pay for a book and give that book to another villager to get the enchantment you want from him.
  • Chandler's Law: Stay too long in one place on Hard difficulty and more monsters, with better armor and potion effects, will spawn at night.
  • Changing Clothes Is a Free Action: Changing armour is a simple matter of opening your inventory anywhere and dragging armour pieces into appropriate slots. Downplayed in that opening your inventory doesn't pause the game, so you can still be attacked while you're doing this.
  • Charged Attack: A game mechanic for the bow, introduced in the Beta 1.8 update. The longer the bow is charged, the more damage the arrow does and it will fly faster and farther.
  • Chekhov's Gun: One of the decorative paintings in-game shows a 4-block T of Soul Sand with a Wither Skeleton Skull on each of the three top blocks. This is the formation that spawns the Wither boss, whose exclusive drop is crucial to crafting a beacon.
  • Cherry Tapping: It was possible to defeat the Ender Dragon with chicken eggs, which do so little damage that it doesn't even hurt mobs with regular health bars. Sadly no longer possible as of 1.9.
  • Chest Monster: Silverfish start out as a special type of stone block that mines instantly no matter the tool (prior to 1.13, they just mined curiously fast if you didn't have a pick), and if attacked will summon their brethren to come out of hiding automatically. Once they start spawning, the best strategy is to just get the hell out of Dodge and wait for them to go into the surrounding blocks, which when mined will start the whole thing over again. With some updates, players have the ability to place these types of wall masters in creative mode wherever they please, which is most likely for people creating custom maps with traps. In survival mode, prior to 1.13, if you mined these special blocks with the Silk Touch ability in your pickaxe, you could harvest the booby trapped block and place them anywhere else as traps for your friends (nowadays, you get the non-infested version of the block instead). The item was even called "Monster Egg" in the inventory prior to 1.13.
  • Clingy Costume: The Curse of Binding does this, preventing you from taking off whatever has the enchantment.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Enchanted armor turns the player character directly into an Empowered Badass Normal.
  • Clucking Funny: There's a very rare chance that a Chicken Jockey spawns in place of a zombie. It's pretty hilarious seeing a tiny zombie riding on a chicken. Just don't get complacent.
  • Cobweb Jungle:
    • In the Abandoned Mineshafts that can be found, cobwebs are omnipresent, and rather tough to break without a sword or shears. If they suddenly thicken, you just found a lair of venomous cave spiders.
    • Woodland mansions have a rare chance to generate a secret room with a spider spawner surrounded by lots of cobwebs.
  • Cobweb of Disuse: Poisonous spiders have webs in abandoned mine shafts. Cobwebs also show up in libraries within strongholds, though this scenario doesn't guarantee spiders.
  • Collision Damage: Most mobs do this to you when they turn hostile. The only mob that doesn't use the trope is the Creeper.
  • Color-Coded Stones: Emeralds are a conventional green, Diamonds are light blue.
  • Color-Coded Item Tiers: 1.13 introduces rarity: specific hard-to-get items have their tooltip names in a different color to signify their value and ease in obtaining. Most items are white, but there are three tiers above that: yellow/uncommon (totems of undying, elytra, mob heads, enchanted books, bottles o' enchanting, dragon's breath, nether stars and hearts of the sea), blue/rare (beacons, conduits, end crystals, golden apples and music discs), and purple/epic (enchanted golden apples, the dragon egg, and creative-exclusive items like the command block or the structure block).
  • Combat and Support:
    • Combat: Tamed wolves and iron golems
    • Balance: The player
    • Support: Cats, snowmen, horses and villagers
  • Common Place Rare:
    • Apples used to be incredibly rare. Rarer than diamonds. Apples were so rare that, without hacking or using mods to get apples, the only legit way to get an apple was to kill Notch if playing with him on a server. It wasn't until the beta 1.8 patch that added strongholds with chests that have a chance of carrying an Apple or more. Since the full game was released, apples fall out of destroyed oak or dark oak leaves with a 1/200 chance of falling from any given leaf block.
    • So are leather saddles, which you can't craft from leather found commonplace. Fortunately, over time more sources have been added, and they can now be randomly fished and bought from villagers.
    • Clay was also rather rare in the earlier days of the game, only available on coastal areas. As a matter of fact, clay was a strange example of this, as it was rarer than diamonds, but easier to find: decent amounts were grouped near water, but only near water. Diamond is just really really deep and spread out. The addition of biomes such as the Swamp (which has clay lining many of its marshes) and Mesas (made almost entirely of multicolored clay) makes clay much more common.
    • Cookies were this for a long time, to the point that they became a sort of trophy. This changed once cocoa beans became farmable and could be easily found in jungle biomes, instead of just in dungeon chests.
    • As mentioned in the Yahtzee quote, making a cake is a highly elaborate process: you must build a furnace and a stone or better pickaxe, find nine iron ore, smelt them into nine iron ingots, make three buckets, milk cows, grow or find wheat, gather sugar cane and make it into sugar, and find an egg laid by a chicken, then put them all together. There's even an achievement for it. That said, once you get to the point that you can produce one cake, it becomes fairly easy to make more.
    • Carrots, potatoes and beetroot are also pretty hard to get ahold of: you can only find them growing in NPC villages (which themselves are rather rare), as a Rare Drop from zombies (carrots and potatoes), in random chests or by trading with wandering traders (beetroot).
    • Name Tags, the only legit way to give any mob a unique name outside of creative mode, can only be found inside chests located within a dungeon, as a rare item from fishing, or sold by villagers.
    • Pumpkins can be this on the Xbox 360 version of the game, since it's a finite space rather than the PC's nigh-unlimited world. If a cluster of pumpkins—usually around four or five at best—spawns, you will have to search far and wide to locate them. They end up being more rare than diamond ore. And even in the PC game, wild pumpkins can sometimes be hard to come by. Pumpkin seeds can be found in chests found in dungeons and abandoned mineshafts, but finding them is a challenge in and of itself.
    • By the same token, watermelon farming requires finding either the melons themselves or their seeds. Watermelons only generate in Jungle biomes, which are rare and usually a considerable walking distance from your spawn. The seeds can spawn in chests in dungeons and such, but this is hit or miss.
    • Blue dye used to be rarer than other dyes back when the only way to obtain it was by mining lapis lazuli (presumably a nod to the real-life ultramarine pigment), which only spawns deep underground at about the same rate as diamond. Cornflowers were added in 1.14 as another source of blue dye, and since they spawn at the same rate as many other flowers, blue dye is now as easy to obtain as other colors.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard:
    • Skeletons will spin and shoot you with pin-point accuracy and a reaction time no human could ever achieve. Particularly obvious with the Beta 1.8 update, which introduced bow pull-back. The longer you hold the bow back, the more powerful the shot. Your movement speed is also slowed to a crawl when you pull it back. Unfortunately, skeletons seem to be immune to this.
    • Even if a monster isn't looking at you, it'll still lock-on to you if you get close enough.
  • Concealed Customization: The game gives you the ability to create a player skin in which every pixel is custom designed. While the helmets aren't full-face, a full suit of armor means your face and hands are the only part of that skin you worked so hard on that can be seen, and for many texture packs, not even that. And even when not fully covered (either because you don't have a full set or because the texture pack you're using drew the armor to cover less), the armor often clashes with the player skin. Its inadvisable to fight monsters without armor, and certain resources can only be gained by killing monsters.
  • Conspicuous Consumption: Most stuff generally has some use in the game, but golden tools and diamond hoes are just plain conspicuous consumption. Tools and armour made of gold may have more enchantments stick to them, but their base attributes (damage dealt, blocks that can be mined, number of uses before depletion etc.) are simply too low to compensate for such a rare material. Hoes, meanwhile, all perform the exact same function, with the only difference being the amount of farmland they can create before breaking, so even an iron hoe is a waste when you can simply create a hoe out of a plentiful and easily renewable material that is cobblestone. Not to mention diamond is not renewable to begin with. As of 1.12, diamond hoes actually have a minor use for 100% Completionists: There is an Advancement called "Serious Dedication" which requires you to "completely use up a diamond hoe, and then reevaluate your life choices".
  • Continuing Is Painful: When you die, you'll drop all the items you're carrying, and most of your experience. You can run back and pick up your stuff and half the lost experience, if it doesn't despawn first... unless you happened to die by falling in lava — in that case, your inventory is toast. Also, zombies can loot your belongings, so don't be surprised if you encounter a zombie dressed like you that you'll need to kill to get your armor and sword back.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: The game has the Ender Dragon as one of the two boss mobs in the game and it's immune to all negative potion effects.
  • Control Room Puzzle: The game seems to have a bit of a lever puzzle in its jungle temples. Granted, most players don't bother with it, preferring to mine out the block that retracts once the puzzle would be complete. What's more, depending on how unlucky you're with the randomly generated treasure hidden inside the secret room note , the three sticky pistons involved in the mechanism that retracts the block may be more valuable than the treasure itself (as sticky pistons require somewhat hard-to-find materials to craft).
  • Convection Schmonvection:
  • Conveyor Belt o' Doom: A natural variant can form when flowing water goes into a lava pool. It's an especially frustrating way to die since your dropped items get washed into the lava too.
  • Cool, but Inefficient:
    • Because of how open-world Minecraft is, players are free to build whatever they please however they please. However, some projects or items are inefficient given the amount of resources put into them or exist solely to look cool. For instance, it's possible to make a Rube Goldberg Device out of redstone tinkering to do something like move items from one chest to an adjacent chest for the hell of it when a single Hopper would do the same job (or just manually moving them).
    • Gold anything. As in real life, gold is treated as a soft malleable metal meaning that, at best, things made from gold were no better than the wood versions. Gold was really only useful for decoration and making watches, though presently they can mine through certain materials faster than even diamond... except they're just as fragile as they always were. Golden booster tracks were introduced to defy this, but they didn't work until a glitch exploit that allowed for even faster boosting was removed. The removal of the bug, incidentally, was the other reason booster tracks were added.
    • Throwable negative effect potions. Unless you're trying to cure a zombie villager (itself a difficult task which may fall under this trope), there's nothing they can do to monsters that whacking them with a sword can't accomplish just as easily.
    • Anvil traps. There are a lot of traps made possible by redstone circuitry, but anvils need to be dropped at least nine meters to be lethal, and they have to land directly on their target, making them inferior to lava traps, TNT traps, and long drop traps. Making it worse is that, to prevent a duplication bug, they can't be moved by pistons — to drop them, you need to use a sticky piston to pull out the block underneath them. If you manage to pull it off anyway, though, it is just as hilarious as in the cartoons. Plus, they are made a bit more practical with traps utilizing deep holes and dispensers.
    • TNT cannons. It's loads of fun to lob explode-y death at your enemies, from a few pieces of TNT to dozens of blocks of it (if particularly ambitious) but they require the target(s) to be standing right in the blast zone to be of use, since they're immobile, and people are going to avoid the blast zone and/or work to dismantle your cannons when they realize you have them. Even the basic ones take time to build, so building one in the open is vulnerable to outside interference as destroying even a single block can render it useless. Thus, it's not too feasible to build these out in the open as an anti-fortification weapon (if you're very unlucky a flaming arrow or Fire Charge thrown your way could set the TNT off early). Pulling it off successfully can be Difficult, but Awesome though.
    • Piston trains. They don't require gold or fuel, and are automatic... but they're really slow (2 meters per second), make a lot of noise, may lag your game and require tons of redstone: not only for powder wire, but for the sheer number of repeaters needed. There really is no reason to use this as transport instead of a good old minecart boosted by golden rails.
    • Diamond hoes may be the single least practical item in the entire game regarding input cost to output reward, as hoes see very little use nor do they increase in anything except durability with different materials, and you rarely need to replace your regular stone hoe, if at all. A common joke among players is "Don't waste your diamonds on a hoe." But there's no better way to say "I'm so rich I use diamonds for mundane tasks" than to walk around carrying a Diamond Hoe. It was precisely because of this that an advancement was added that requires to craft and completely use a diamond hoe.
    • Horses outside of PvP matches. Sure, they look good both with or without armor, but donkeys and mules are just as fast, just as strong and can actually carry items. Given that outside of battle gaming, inventory is crucial throughout the entire game, and you hardly need to protect your rides from mobs, the horse takes second place to their long-eared brethren.
    • Sugar cane farms using pistons. It's flashy to have all those pistons push the canes and bring them to you via a water current with a single press of a button, but the cost for it isn't really worth it when you can just pass through the canes and break them by left-clicking in the same span of time or sooner.
  • Cool Gate: With Obsidian, you can make yourself your very own Portal Network, assuming of course you don't mind literally walking through Hell every time you use it.
  • Cool Horse: The 1.6 update added horses and donkeys to the game. First you have to tame them by riding them without a saddle (feeding them certain items will speed this up) until they stop tossing you off, after which they can be saddled. A saddled horse is about as fast as a saddled pig led by carrot, with the added bonus that you can armor the horse to give it extra protection. Horses can jump, too, and you can even use weapons while riding them. Donkeys are similar, but can be given a chest for mobile storage and the two types can be bred to make mules. Like sheep, they come in various colors and breeds.
  • Cool Pet: Thanks to the tameable wolves and cats.
  • Cosmetic Award: The Dragon Egg. You get it by killing the Enderdragon and it serves no purpose whatsoever, although the creators has stated this might change...
  • Couch Gag: The splash text in the title screen is randomly selected from among more than 380. Every time you open Minecraft, a different phrase is across the title. Occasionnally, a special splash overrides the random splashes to commemorate a special event, such as a holiday (Halloween, Christmas, New Year) or an anniversary (the game's 10th anniversary, the birthdays of Notch and ez before the former left Mojang).
  • Counterattack: The Thorns enchantment allows you to send some damage you take from mobs and other players back at them, but at the cost of your armor wearing down faster.
  • Cow Tipping: There's an achievement in console versions and older PC versions called "Cow Tipping", which involves picking up leather, preferably from a dead cow (but getting one from fishing or a loot chest also works). The death animation of mobs, including cows, is them simply tipping over sideways, making it look like deadly cow tipping.
  • Crafted From Animals: Animals frequently drop resources such as leather, wool, feathers or ink sacs that can be crafted into more stuff. Thus, any gear the player obtains through these materials qualifies for this trope.
  • Crapsaccharine World: The Overworld is a lovely place filled with friendly animals, beautiful natural wonders, and peaceful villages populated with simple agrarian people... who are forced to cower in terror in their homes every single night, desperately hoping that the endless hordes of undead horrors won't break down their doors and eat them and their families. If the village is extremely lucky, their resident Iron Golem may, half the time, check the zombie threat of a given night before half the population is wiped out. Their only hope of salvation, really, is the demigod-like Steve? (or Alex?), should they decide it's worth their trouble to fortify the village into a well-lit, walled, safe haven. Unfortunately, they are probably just as likely to steal everything in sight save the buildings themselves. note 
  • Crapsack World: Just about every humanoid thing is out to kill you along with every humanoid thing that isn't you that doesn't want to kill you. The only peaceful people live in constant fear of a zombie attack and the player themselves can never outright exterminate the plague of undead.
  • Creator Cameo: Naming a mob either "Grumm" or "Dinnerbone" flips it upside-down. Naming a sheep jeb_ makes it rainbowy.
  • Creature-Breeding Mechanic: There's all sorts of friendly and passive mobs that provide utilities or materials that players may find useful. Since natural mob spawning can't entirely be controlled or relied on, there exists a breeding system that allows most animal-based mobs to produce babies. Breeding for most of these animals is very bare-bones, but horses have a more complicated system that involves colors, markings, and hidden stats, while turtles lay eggs that need to be protected until they hatch instead of making a baby then and there.
  • Credits Medley: The "ending" is backed by a medley of the title themes.
  • Creepily Long Arms: Endermen were partly inspired by the Slenderman mythos, and thus also have very long arms.
  • Critical Encumbrance Failure: Averted. You can't carry more items once your 36 inventory slots are full, but you'll never slow down or stop moving because of it.
  • Critical Existence Failure: The game essentially plays this straight. Your character can fall many meters to the point where your legs would be shattered and you're fine, but a single punch and you die. (You lose the ability to run at low health, though.) The same goes for mobs, even the bosses. The Wither plays a variation of this; when it gets to half of its health, it's immune to ranged weaponry.
  • Critical Hit: In a melee attack, your normal damage can be buffed by up to 50% if you attack them while you're falling.
  • The Croc Is Ticking: All the monsters make their own distinct noises that warn you when they're near. Of all monster noises, though, the most dreaded is the Creeper's hiss. This is because Creepers don't hiss (or make ANY noise, for that matter) until they're right next to you, and they only hiss for a second and a half before they explode. note  So when you hear a Creeper's hiss, you usually only have time to think "Oh, Crap!" before the Creeper detonates and kills or severely injures you.
    sssssssssssssSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS-*BOOM*
  • Crouch and Prone: The game has a "sneak" function, which prevents the player from falling off the edges of blocks and stops you from sliding back down ladders and vines. In multiplayer it also prevents other players from seeing your name through walls. As of 1.14, it also functions as a proper crouch function, letting players squeeze through 1½-block-high passages (not that such things naturally exist). Also as of 1.14, players can swim through water quickly using the sprint key, which rotates their hitbox 90 degrees and allows them to go through holes only one block high. They will remain in this position until they emerge into a space high enough to stand in, even if they leave water. People immediately started posting guides on how to exploit this and make elaborate bases that are only tall enough to crawl around in.
  • Cryptic Conversation: The "End Poem" has two disembodied voice saying seemingly meaningless things yet feel meaningful.
  • Crystal Weapon: You can make diamond weaponry and armor, which is quite powerful.
  • Cute Kitten: Villages contain cats, which can be tamed with raw fish. Cats can be bred to make kittens, which are the first kind of baby animal whose head doesn't look disproportionately large. When they were initially added, they did nothing useful. It was just for the adorable. But it gets better: as of 1.2.1 they are the only thing creepers fear.
  • Cutting the Knot: Jungle temples have a three-switch puzzle that needs to be solved in order to open a secret room containing potential treasure... or the player can just knock a few cobblestone blocks off the wall, reach in, and grab the goods while ignoring the puzzle entirely. The game actually seemed to encourage this, as doing so rewards you with Chiseled Stone Bricks, which until 1.8 could only be found three at a time in Jungle temples in Survival.
    • Averted with the ocean monuments. The devs knew that players would simply dig through the structures' walls rather than search for the hidden loot the hard way, so they created the Elder Guardians and their Mining Fatigue debuff to discourage this. They decided against just making the walls indestructible since they felt that would be lame.
  • Cycle of Hurting:
    • Falling into the Void at the bottom of the map is a one-way trip to a place of the game where items and entities cannot logically exist, and the player takes damage continuously.
    • A glitch in the potion that allowed you to walk in lava made it so that you would still build up falling damage while swimming in it, meaning that a player that was in it for more than a couple seconds would either burn up once the potion's effect was gone, or die instantly as soon as they touched a flat surface.
    • Being surrounded on all sides by Bedrock at least two blocks tall, with no blocks to use as steps, leaves no other choice but to spend all your energy until you starve to death.
    • Being stuck on a tiny deserted island with no access to wood or food usually means either a quick death in ten minutes from the enemies that spawn during the night, a significantly slower death from starvation, or taking your chances by swimming across the open ocean where, if you don't find land that can actually support you, you run the risk of drowning or (again) starving, or getting killed by a Drowned's trident.
    • Expect this if you attack a Zombie Pigman, a Wolf, a Polar Bear, a Dolphin, a Panda with the "agressive" personality or near one that has it, or a Bee: their nearby brethren will retaliate as a group. Zombies can call in reinforcements when injured similar to those other mobs, but there's also a chance they will spawn new zombies as backup on Hard difficulty.
    • This is very likely to happen if you're being attacked by a Skeleton while in a large body of water without a ranged attack of any sort. Their arrows prevents you from approaching it since you can't swim the distance of their arrow's knockback between attacks.

    D 

  • Dare to Be Badass: A strange example of this is Minecraft's ending, in which the apparent creators of the Minecraft universe praise your accomplishments in the "dream" of the game, and command you to do it again, in the real world this time.
  • Dark Is Evil: Enemies spawn in any dark areas (whereas non-enemy animals spawn on grass in the light).
  • Darkness = Death:
    • Enemy mobs spawn at night or in the dark.
    • Tunneling through bedrock in creative mode and falling into the pitch black void results in relatively instant death.
  • Dark World: More specifically the Nether.
  • Daylight Horror:
    • Most enemies spawn in darkness and burn in direct sunlight, with the exception of two mobs. The first is the giant spider, which becomes passive and stops attacking the player without provocation after the sun comes up. The second exception, the creeper, is an Action Bomb which combines several annoying traits. Its body is mottled green, so it blends in rather well with trees. It's completely silent except for a hissing sound it makes right next to you moments before detonating. Its AI is advanced enough that it can ambush the player, hiding in alcoves or around corners waiting to catch you by surprise. And most importantly for this trope, sunlight neither harms nor pacifies creepers, so when you leave your shelter in the morning, they'll be waiting for you.
    • Endermen are also not affected by sunlight. So, if you're particularly unlucky, you may emerge from your base in the morning, check your surroundings for the aforementioned Creepers, and find yourself face-to-face with an Enderman who has just become enraged at you for looking at it.
    • Husks (added in 1.10 / 0.15PE) are also unaffected by sunlight. They work like zombies but inflict the hunger status on you when they hit.
    • Drowned can spawn in the ocean at day, where the water depth causes lower light levels. They can rise to the surface and chase any player. While they do burn in sunlight, they tend to stay in water which instantly puts the fire out, and some of them can carry deadly tridents that deal great damage from a range.
  • Dead Character Walking: Mobs have a glitch where if you kill them, and exit quickly and on return they will be alive and moving around in whatever position in dying animation they were in when you exited.
  • Deadly Dodging:
    • The only way to get Music Discs (other than being really lucky with dungeon chests, and even that won't get you every record) is to get a skeleton to kill a creeper with its arrow.
    • Pillagers can be tricked into shooting themselves, which can be handy for killing the raid captain without triggering the "Bad Omen" status effect.
  • Death from Above:
    • On Hard difficulty and now on Normal, mobs will take fall damage if it means reaching you. Creepers can also explode immediately upon falling next to you, a literal "dive bomb".
    • Being on the wrong end of a cave-in, or accidentally flooding a corridor with water (or lava) can result in this for the unlucky player. An update made lava in the nether flow a lot faster than it does in the overworld, which means if you got lava falling on your head, you have very little time to react.
    • An update added anvils. Which can be dropped on enemies. Ouch.
    • 1.13 introduced Phantoms, which are flying mobs that spawn at night after at least 5 in-game days of no sleep. Their method of attack is swooping down and attacking you before flying back up where you can't reach them.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: At the beginning of the game, where you have few items to drop (and what you have is probably easily replaced), have little exp to lose, and aren't yet that far from spawn, dying on your first night isn't so bad. It's when you start gaining rarer equipment, racking up more levels, and start travelling farther from your spawn that it starts getting problematic.
  • Death Mountain: Can crop up anywhere, but especially common in Extreme Hills biomes. Usually several blocks tall, with sheer cliffs or precipitous overhangs. The Amplified biome setting cranks the trope Up to Eleven where the mountains go beyond the clouds and they even have snow past a certain height.
  • Death of a Child: Villager children can be killed, and can even be turned into zombies.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: It used to be completely possible to take down the Ender Dragon with snowballs or eggs, which don't even deal damage to other mobs, but it was fixed in 1.9.
  • Death Trap: The game has tons of these, such as bomb-ridden rooms, arrow shooters, pitfalls, drowning traps, one-way doors...
  • Death World:
    • Minecraft can easily be regarded as one. Sure it's pixelated and easily domesticated farm animals seem to be the most of your troubles at first, but once the Sun sets or you start exploring you realize this seemingly serene world is trying to kill you in every way possible. The terrain is littered with random cliffs, deep drops and pits of lava one could easily kill themselves in and random forest fires happen a lot. At night armies of undead zombies and skeleton archers along with kamikaze creepers and gigantic spiders will track you like heat-seeking missiles if they see you while the almost 3 metre tall Endermen will wipe the floor with any unprepared player does as much as glance at them. Meanwhile booby trapped ruins experiment with different ways to creatively end you; from housing nests of huge poisonous spiders to being able to blow you and all the treasure to bits or having tripwires primed to shoot any trespassers. Even seemingly "safe" mobs like the wolf will descend upon you in packs if you hurt any even by accident. It even has the Nether; its version of Hell, home to its own collection of death-toting enemies from huge fire-shooting Eldritch Horrors to 2.5 metre tall sword-welding skeletons that will cause you to literally wither away. At least with a Hell you'd think there would be a Heaven right? WRONG. It's just another Hell, where bottom void surrounds the one tiny island and Endermen are everywhere; if that's not enough there's also an almighty dragon that kills anyone on the island.
    • One of the preset customized world options, named "Good Luck", consists chiefly of stone and gravel, has little water, few plants and fewer animals, and has oceans of lava everywhere.
  • Defend Command: Swords used to let you do this, but the function was moved to shields in 1.9.
  • Deletion as Punishment: Be wary playing Hardcore Mode, as dying in this Harder Than Hard mode results in your entire map getting deleted.
  • Dem Bones: There are arrow-shooting skeletons among the many enemies.
  • Deserted Island: Popular start locations for Self Imposed Challenges.
  • Destroyable Items: If items come in contact with fire, cacti, lava, or an explosion, they are destroyed.
  • Destructible Projectiles: The fireballs launched by ghasts can be reflected by hitting them.
  • Diagonal Speed Boost: Minecarts travel diagonally over curved rails. If you place rails on two adjacent diagonals, you get a zig-zagged track, which you can travel over as if it were a straight diagonal. This results in a speed boost.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: Any player that manages to fight and kill the Ender Dragon or The Wither. To a lesser extent, the first time a new player manages to slay an Endermen without dying (especially if they were terrorized by them earlier in the game).
  • Die, Chair! Die!: The game is a peculiar example of this. Apart from the usual mining and gathering chores that require "destroying" (i.e. hitting a block with your fist or tools until it breaks), every block or placeable item, except for Bedrock, which is indestructible, has to be destroyed and re-picked up as resource if you wish to carry it.
  • Diegetic Interface: You have to craft your maps, and they only update if you're holding them.
  • Difficult, but Awesome:
    • Redstone mechanisms. Building anything much more complicated than a light switch requires understanding of logic gates, BUD switches, monostable circuits, etc. All of this information can be looked up on wikis and YouTube, but applying that information to build and debug your own mechanisms can be extremely challenging. It's also incredibly rewarding when you show off your automated farm, smelter, mob trap, or TNT cannon. Extreme technicians, however, are able to build fully functional (yet titanic) calculators.
    • Tamed cats and Wolves. Wolves will attack any mob you attack (or that attacks you), cats repel creepers. The catch? Wolves are very hard to find even in their designated biomes, and feral cats avoid players, making them difficult to approach.
    • The Mending enchantment. An absolute pain in the rear to find (you can't get it on an enchantment table—you have to be lucky with either Chests, Librarians, or fishing), but can essentially give your gear infinite durability, especially if combined with Unbreaking.
  • Difficulty Spike: Welcome to the Nether! Or, as it was called in development (and still was in the F3 menu until 1.13), "Hell".
  • Disadvantageous Disintegration: Traps that blow up, set fire to or bring cacti into uncomfortably close contact with enemies, while fun, will also generally destroy whatever items they drop. Weapons enchanted with Fire Aspect or Flame also run the risk of disintegrating whatever loot that the mob dropped (the exception being raw meat, which it just cooks).
  • Disappears into Light: The Ender Dragon's death animation. It's repeatedly skewered by beams of light and eventually it completely dissolves into nothingness.
  • Disc-One Nuke:
    • With the right strategy, it's possible to obtain a few diamonds within minutes of spawning.
    • Finding a NPC village also counts, as you get a safe place, a source of food and a way to get rare items all in one.
    • Constructing a Nether portal can be done with lava buckets and molds, bypassing the need for diamonds entirely.
  • Dogs Are Dumb: Dogs are rather infamous for falling off of cliffs and into lava, and for attacking anything the player attacks, which could mean their death.
  • Don't Go Into the Woods: At least not for the first few nights. Wandering around an unlit forest at night can be one of the most dangerous things for a player starting out, given how many blind spots there are for monster ambushes. Even worse, a Creeper could be lurking behind every tree...
  • Don't Look at Me!: Looking directly at one of the Endermen (as in, moving the reticule in the center of the screen over them) causes them to freeze and turn to face you. The moment you look away, they attack, moving very, very fast. They also make a creepy growl/scream sound.
  • Don't Try This at Home: The same update that added parrots, which could be tamed with cookies at the time, added splash text saying "Don't feed chocolate to parrots" due to chocolate being poisonous to them and the cookies being chocolate chip. Later, in 1.12-pre3, they just changed it so that parrots were tamed with seeds instead, and feeding a parrot a cookie will instantly kill it, complete with poison particles.
  • Door of Doom: Both the Nether and End Portals. They don't look great like many other things on the list, but considering how the rest of the game looks, they're pretty hellish.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: Ever since mob heads were added to survival, wearing one of them will make you go unnoticed by the corresponding enemy unless you're very close to them.
  • Dual Wielding: Heavily downplayed by the dev team for 1.9. While you can choose to put a sword or other damaging tool in your off hand, you can't use it to attack. However, you can put items with right click functions (ender pearls, potions, etc.) in your off hand to use them in combat, or blocks and torches for spelunking.
  • Dual-World Gameplay:
    • The game has the normal world and the Nether, accessible through obsidian portals when lit on fire. The Nether is smaller than the normal world, ten meters in the Nether is eighty meters outside. This makes it convenient for fast travel, assuming you can travel safely.
    • As of full release, Minecraft has a third world, called "The End". It's a floating landmass, full of Endermen and one of the game's bosses. To get there, you need to fix an enderportal, found in a Stronghold (found in the main world), with items obtained in the Nether.
  • Dug Too Deep:
    • The bottom z level of every Classic mode map is nothing but lava. In the full game, every map has a rough layer of unbreakable bedrock (which can be revealed in Classic with water); if you somehow get past that, you'll find an endless void that quickly kills you.
    • In Alpha 1.2.0, the rules changed so the deeper you dug, the more light you needed to prevent enemies from spawning, until eventually they could spawn even in direct sunlight. However, Notch reverted it back to the old light rules in 1.2.1, saying it was too annoying and he'd have to come up with a better way to carry out this trope.
    • It has always been possible, using external editing tools, to remove the bedrock layer of the map and literally fall out of the bottom of the world, but the Adventure Update made it both easier and significantly creepier. Easier in that Creative Mode allows you to destroy any block with a single hit, up to and including the otherwise-indestructible bedrock. Creepier in that The Void is now a pitch-black void, glittering with the same particle effects used for the Endermen. And it kills you. (For comparison, the pre-1.8 void still killed you, but it was at least the color of the sky.)
    • Since Beta 1.8, and until 1.8, the immediate area above bedrock level had a peculiar fog that precluded seeing much beyond twenty meters, so bedrock-level branchmines and caverns were rather difficult to navigate, with the reduced viewing radius, and the reduced viewing distance might hide hostile mobs... Placing more torches didn't seem to help, either. The "fog" effect slowly faded the farther you got from the bedrock layer, and once you got above y-30, the effect went away completely. The fog effect also did not apply when a player is standing in sunlight.
    • The "don't dig straight down" applies doubly in the Nether, where the geography doesn't even try to make sense. It's possible to dig down in one spot and have a 10+ block buffer of Netherrack then have the next spot lead straight into the endless sea of lava below after mining just one block. Beware!
  • Dummied Out:
    • The first ever mob to be added to the game was the Human. Looking identical to Steve?, it would run around endlessly in circles. It initially spawned randomly in Pre-classic, then would only spawn on command by pressing G in Classic; this was disabled in 0.24 Survival Test, but it could still be spawned using third-party tools. It was split into two IDs in Infdev: "Mob", which kept the old AI (and was formerly used in Indev by four mobs, Beast Boy, Rana, Steve and Black Steve, which briefly replaced the old Human mob), and "Monster", which would pursue the player and attack them like a zombie. The existence of the mob, especially the "Monster" variant, fueled the "Herobrine" rumors, which was helped along with changelogs which would include "Removed Herobrine" both as a running gag and to indicate the removal of remains of the Human mob.
    • Sponges were introduced in Classic as a temporary fix to stop flooding until finite water was implemented. When that was done in Infdev, they became non-functional (though available in Creative from Beta 1.8 onwards) until their functionality was restored in 1.8. and they became available in Survival via ocean monuments.
    • Chain armor was introduced along with the other types in Indev, but they were unavailable legitimately in Survival until the introduction of villager trading in 1.3. They could be crafted if the player somehow managed to get fire in their inventory, but this is no longer possible as of 1.8.
    • The Giant mob introduced in Indev, basically a giant zombie with no AI (though it had the same AI as regular zombies briefly during 1.14 development, and prior to 1.8 they had a very basic AI) which can only be spawned using commands since no biomes include it in their spawn lists and it requires a light level above 11 AND below 8, which is obviously impossible.
    • Textures for a quiver have resided in the game files since Indev. This item would presumably have allowed the player to carry more arrows without cluttering the inventory as much. During 1.9 development, Jeb tweeted a screenshot which featured the quiver, but he eventually decided having arrows in the off-hand "felt more natural" and the textures were removed for good in the final 1.9 release.
    • The locked chests of April Fools 2011 (Beta 1.4) were removed from normal gameplay on April 5, 2011 (Beta 1.4_01), but they remained in the code until 1.7.2 in 2013 under the longest ID in Minecraft history: "chest_locked_aprilfools_super_old_legacy_we_should_not_even_have_this". During that time, the original chest texture was removed and their place taken by those for blocks of emerald and redstone, so the locked chests as of 13w01a (1.5) had an emerald top and bottom, redstone sides and a purple placeholder front. When the textures were moved to separate files in 1.5, a placeholder texture had to be introduced for the locked chest to use in order to avoid a game crash due to missing textures.
    • The status effects were first introduced in Beta 1.8, but many went unused for years and remained buried in the game code until some use was found for them. Those which are still unused are Bad Luck (which decreases the chances of good loot) and Health Boost (which gives extra health points like Absorption, except they can be healed back as long as the effect lasts; it was briefly obtainable from eating a Golden Apple in 1.6.1, but was quickly changed to Absorption).
    • At one point, Notch planned for the villages to be populated by (non-Zombie) Pigmen, but he eventually decided on introducing the Villager mob in Beta 1.9. Textures for the Pigmen remained in the game files until 1.6.2.
    • When horses were introduced in 1.6.1, a Zombie variant (which acts like a normal horse, except it drops rotten flesh instead of leather upon death) was included, but so far it's only spwanable using commands and their spawn egg.
    • The Mountain Edge and Deep Warm Ocean biomes no longer spawn naturally since 1.7.2 and 1.13 respectively, but they can still be spawned as Buffet worlds.
    • When rabbits were introduced in 1.8, there was a 1/1000 chance they could spawn as a Killer Rabbit, an hostile variant which could deal 4 hearts of damage to the player in Normal difficulty. The spawn chance was quickly decreased to 1/2500, then they were made unspawnable outside of commands because Jeb thought that it was "a tired joke [...] referenced in so many games" and they were "basically a random death event".
    • The Illusionner, an Illager which attacks the player using spells and a bow and can summon duplicates, was added in 1.12 (17w16a) but can only spawn using commands.
    • Unused audio resides in the game files, including four loops possibly intended to play in specific places (bird chirps, cave chimes, ocean, waterfall), the classic "OOGH" hurt sound, an "affectionate scream" for the Ghast, a breathing sound, a "successful hit" sound similar to the "collect XP" ding, two wolf howls and four Silverfish walking sounds.
    • Unused textures also reside in the game files, including angry villager particles, purple arrows (skeletons would shoot them in Survival Test), ruby (the early version of emerald), speech bubbles for villagers (part of an early experiment in implementing trading before the interface was added) and hoods for Vindicators, Evokers and Witches.
  • Dungeon Bypass:
    • Since bedrock is the only thing in this game you can't mine, there's nothing stopping you from tunneling through the walls of basically any structure to get to where you want to go. Strongholds have Silverfish hidden in the walls which will punish you for trying this, but in all likelihood this is how you will find said Stronghold in the first place, since the only reliable way to locate them is to search above ground then dig down. This is especially true if the stronghold happens to be beneath the ocean.
    • The reason that Adventure mode severely limits the blocks that adventurers can destroy, is so people can build elaborate dungeons or labyrinths and not have to worry about people just tunneling under them.
  • Dungeon Crawling. The game eventually added a few as late-game content.
    • Ocean monuments spawn in the deep ocean biome, and take the form of flooded temple-like structures inhabited by fish-like Guardians and three stronger Elder Guardians that have to be defeated to access the gold at their centers.
    • End cities shaped like branching structures holding upside-down ziggurats appear in the End. They don't have many monsters besides endermen and camouflaged shulkers, but their chests hold valuable iron, diamonds and enchanted equipment, and rare elytrae which allow you to glide are found only here.
    • Randomly-generated woodland mansions occur in dark forests, and are composed of a number of randomly-chosen rooms and passages home to evil Villagers winding either axes or limited magic, plus regular monsters. Naturally, there's plenty of loot to be had after the monsters are cleared.
    • There are also desert and jungle temples clearable earlier in the game, with some treasure and useful building materials behind some simple traps.
  • Dunking the Bomb: A safe way to dispose of creepers is to lure them into water. It won't stop them from exploding and hurting nearby mobs (including players), but solid blocks will be left intact.
  • Dynamic Difficulty: A feature introduced with 1.6 is escalating difficulty in a region the more time the player spends there. Spend enough time at your home base and start expecting Zombies and Skeletons to come better equipped, escalating to even Enchanted Gold gear!
  • Dynamic Loading: The game has Dynamic Loading and Dynamic Map Generation: Parts of the world literally don't exist until the player gets close enough. And only the chunks near the player are being simulated. This can cause Dynamic Loading Failures if the player uses means of travel faster than walking like teleporting or full-speed minecarts. The world itself usually loads up in time, but animals and enemies take some time to spawn. Also, crafted blocks spawn earlier than the generated ground does, so sometimes, you can end up seeing somebody's underground base, before the dirt covers it up.

    E 
  • Early Game Hell: Entire guides have been written on how to survive the first full day, and what you should set about doing immediately. The game starts you with nothing. No weapons, no tools, no food, and no real idea or explanation of how to get them. Just you, dumped into a random landscape, with ten minutes before nightfall, when the monsters appear. In that time you need to prepare some form of defense, even if it's just a basic shelter. The game gets much easier once you have a shelter, some cobble weapons (at least), and have learnt a few ways to craft all the stuff you'll need to survive against the enemies. Where you spawn can affect how easily you'll be able to get started: starting out in a forest with animals nearby or even in the middle of an NPC village will give you a much easier time than starting out on a lone island in the middle of the ocean with no trees or animals. The difficulty of starting out has been mitigated somewhat with the introduction of achievements/advancements as a loose tutorial, the option to start with a Bonus Chest which includes food, wood and tools to give you a head start and the addition of a recipe book which can help you craft the items you need.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: Compare today's Minecraft with how it was in Indev, Alpha, and even early Beta. A lot has changed since then thanks to its frequent updates. Early Minecraft almost feels like a different game compared to current Minecraft.
  • Earn Your Fun:
    • Certain useful items are only available infrequently (if at all) in Peaceful Mode, whereas they become much more common as random drops from hostile mobs on higher difficulties. These include gunpowder (used to craft TNT, dropped by creepers) and string (used to craft bows, dropped by spiders), among others. The 1.6 update scales the effectiveness of enchantments and items with difficultly level.
    • More generally, it has been speculated that this is one of the reasons Minecraft is so mind-meldingly addicting compared to other sandbox construction games. In Survival mode, the player has to spend time collecting all the resources themselves in order to build anything, so there's a greater sense of investment in any given project. This attachment is why most players will risk death fighting off Creepers (and griefing players) to defend their creations rather than just scrap the project and start over.
  • Easier Than Easy: Peaceful difficulty, which gets rid of hostile monsters and grants regenerating health. Falls and lava remain dangerous, though. Creative Mode removes your health bar altogether, making you otherwise invincible, but you can still die by falling into The Void.
  • Easter Egg:
    • In the splashes.txt file, the "Déjà vu!" splash is listed twice and there is an entry which reads "This message will never appear on the splash screen, isn't that weird?", which indeed never appears. In older versions, deleting the file without deleting the META-INF folder would result in a "missingno" splash; current versions now show the Unicode byte order mark (a "ZWN BSF" in a box) if that happens.
    • The code for the April Fools 2011 "Mann Co. Supply Store" page has a reference to the Konami Code in the script of the velociraptor Screamer Prank.
    • Naming a mob "Dinnerbone" or "Grumm" (Minecraft developers) with the Name Tag item will flip the mob upside down. Naming a sheep "Jeb_" will cause its wool to oscillate through the color spectrum, though shearing it will give you its true wool color. Naming a rabbit "Toast" will change its skin to one resembling Toast, the lost rabbit of the girlfriend of a Reddit user, who requested the inclusion of the skin as a memorial. note  Naming a vindicator "Johnny" will make it attack any nearby mob except other illagers.
    • The tutorial world in the TU12-TU13 (Xbox 360) or 1.0 (PlayStation) versions of the Legacy Console version had a hidden Tower of Pimps located on the top floor of a sandstone pyramid in the southwest sector of the map. The tutorial world in the TU19 (Xbox 360), CU7 (Xbox One) or 1.12 (PlayStation) versions had a remake of Stampylonghead's house and boat on an island in the north east side.
    • There is a 0.01% chance that the title screen will read "Minceraft" instead of "Minecraft".
    • Some textures have a signature hidden in them, such as the Guardian and Elder Guardian (Jeb), the armor stand (Searge, who implemented the stand, and Jappa, the texture artist) and the Zombie Pigman ("THX XAPHOBIA", Notch's credit to XaPhobia who originally created the texture).
    • The 2016-19 Java Edition launcher had a few of these. The translucent Creeper face in the top-left corner had a 1/11 chance of being replaced with "¯\_(ツ)_/¯"; clicking either of these would turn them white. A random mob would appear in the bottom-right corner if the mouse was left on the "Play" button for a few seconds. Pressing Ctrl + B would make the "collect XP" ding play.
    • Crash logs begin with a randomly selected "witty comment", as do debug profile results.
    • Running the sountrack of music disc "11" through a spectrogram reveals a face and "12418" (12 in hexadecimal is C, so 12418 is C418, Minecraft's composer) hidden at the end of the track. Running one of the ambient cave sounds through a spectrogram reveals that the track forms a Creeper face.
    • If an Evoker runs into a blue sheep, it will turn it red while saying "wololo" (with the exact same soundbite, even!)
  • Easy Exp: The game, since version 1.3, had bonus XP when you mined/smelted items depending on how they dropped. The higher the item value, the higher the XP they drop such as diamonds dropping more than coal. Iron and gold do not drop but they reward XP when their respective blocks are smelted. 1.4 introduces XP for farming and fishing as well.
  • Edge Gravity: The game plays this interestingly, you have no edge gravity during normal movement, but if you crouch down it is impossible to fall, and you can even move a few inches beyond where you would normally fall from. What makes this weird is that if you release the crouch key while being a few inches beyond the block you're "standing" on, you'll simply fall down, often to your death.
  • Eenie, Meenie, Miny Moai: Word of Notch says this is what the villagers are based on. There's also the Iron Golem, which appears to be a robotic villager.
  • Egging: You are able throw eggs in the game. The eggs will even sometimes hatch into chicks.
  • Elaborate Underground Base:
    • You're only a few well wasted hours of digging away.
    • Also, the Strongholds that are generated with the world so that you can get to The End. Initially, there were only 3 for each world, nowadays there are 128.
  • Eldritch Location:
    • The Far Lands used to be an example of this. At very great distances from the origin point the game glitched out, distorting structures, preventing blocks from being placed or even staying put, generating immense lag, and all in all making the game unplayable. The game's creator said that he hadn't intended for this to happen, but Left It In because he liked the idea of physics breaking down at the "edge" of an infinite map that was virtually impossible to reach without cheating. However, the terrain generator overhaul in Beta 1.8 accidentally Dummied Them Out.
    • Thanks to a glitch in the Adventure update pre-release, we had abandoned mine systems as well. They are generated procedurally underground in small chunks, but because of a bug in their code, any new chunk created while leaving a mine shaft would be another mine shaft. This lead to endless, labyrinthine catacombs that may not have existed at all if you had tried to tunnel into them from above first.
    • The Nether. Compasses, maps, and clocks don't work properly there, and beds explode if used there. The 1.5. update made lava flow at twice the speed and hid pockets of lava in the walls.
    • The realm known as "The End." The sky is grey TV-static style, it has a dull green ambiance to it, the world is nothing but floating islands in a black void, and giant obsidian pillars dot the otherwise featureless landscape, with a black dragon called the Ender Dragon flying above. It's also home to Endermen. And once you enter The End, the only way out is killing the Ender Dragon. The outer islands are strange as well, featuring lots of strange plants and, sometimes, castles and floating ships.
  • Elemental Crafting: Wood is worse than stone is worse than iron is worse than diamond, for tools and weapons. Wood and stone armor don't exist, with leather occupying the "bottom tier" position in their place. One notable subversion to the pattern is gold — you'd expect it to be between iron and diamond, but Reality Ensues and it's actually quite fragile, not much better than sticking with wood or leather.
  • Elite Zombie: The game has standard shambling zombies, who are the game's weakest enemies. Later updates added five elite variations, all of which have a rare chance of randomly spawning:
    • The first is the armed zombie, which is just a standard zombie that spawns with a random assortment of armour and/or a weapon (sword, shovel etc.), increasing its health and attack damage. The armour and weapon can also be enchanted, potentially increasing either or both values further.
    • The second is the baby zombie, which is a smaller, faster version that nevertheless has the same health and damage as the regular version. The baby zombie also has a chance to spawn as a chicken jockey, which doesn't take fall damage.
    • The third type is the leader zombie, which summons backup when you hit it.note  There's no way to tell if a particular zombie is a leader without hitting it and seeing if other zombies suddenly spawn nearby.
    • The fourth type is the Husk, which spawns only in desert biomes and also has a baby variant. They have the same health and do the same damage as a normal zombie, but each hit causes the player's hunger bar to deplete and they don't burn in the sun.
    • The fifth type is the Drowned, which either spawns naturally in oceans and rivers or when a zombie drowns. Along with the features of a normal zombie, they can swim and sometimes spawn with a trident. This makes them the only zombie to have a ranged attack. They will sometimes come up on shore at night, making them exactly like zombies.
  • Emerald Power: The exploding Creepers are green.
  • Emergency Weapon: Axes, picks, and (most) shovels deal more damage to mobs than bare hands. That said, they were not intended as weapons, and will break twice as fast as swords. Axes are an edge case; they actually do more damage since the Combat Update than the "real" weapons. Their downside is being considerably slower to swing.
  • Emergent Gameplay: The game as a whole has a lot of this, but one of the most notable examples is the redstone system of which a wide manner of contraptions have been made, including 16-bit computers.
  • Empathic Environment: When you summon a Wither, the sky darkens and turns to a redder shade.
  • Empty Room Psych: The game has caves that branch out into several paths which, most of the time, can lead deeper underground where diamonds and redstone ores can be found, lead to the surface, or even lead to underground structures like dungeons and mine shafts. However, since it's procedurally generated, some of the cave branches simply lead to a dead end with nothing in them other than the usual stone and dirt. Caves may also have an unnaturally large and circular-like room; supposedly this is where the cave generation starts behind the scenes, but it's certainly no use to you, unless, of course, you decide to make it the centerpiece for your new Elaborate Underground Base.
  • The End: The End is a realm populated by Endermen and the Enderdragon. After defeating the Enderdragon you have officially "completed" the game, though you are still free to continue playing. Guess what the achievement for beating the game is called?
  • Endless Game: Before Minecraft 1.0 came out, there was no ending to the game. There really isn't an ending anyway, as after beating the Ender Dragon, you're plunked back where ever your spawn point is, and can continue the game, build stuff, and fight the Bonus Boss, The Wither.
  • Enemy Mine:
    • The player and Zombie Pigmen when confronting Ghasts.
    • Any mob hit by a skeleton's arrow will stop attacking you to deal with its aggressor unless you hit it again to focus it back towards you (and once that mob hits the skeleton, the skeleton will ignore you to attack them!)
  • Equipment-Based Progression: Your character's baseline health and physical abilities never change. You can gain levels of experience, but you spend them to enchant, merge, or repair equipment. Your strength, health and ability to interact with or shape your environment entirely depends on the type and quality of the items you own or use.
  • Essence Drop: Enemies drop flashing green-and-yellow experience orbs upon death. These orbs also appear when you breed animals and collect ores (either mining or smelting, depending on the type).
  • Eternal Equinox: Day lasts ten minutes, night lasts seven minutes, and they're separated by an intermediate period 90 seconds long. Though the moon has different phases, the moon always rises as the sun sets and vice versa, behavior typically associated with a full moon.
  • Everything Breaks: All tools have durability which eventually wears out, and even using an anvil to extend their life requires more and more experience with each repair (which itself will break given enough uses). All blocks except a scant few necessary for game mechanics can be mined. Command Blocks are also unbreakable due to them needing to be around so that they can affect the map properly when needed.
  • Everything Fades:
    • Blocks and items mysteriously disappear when dropped and left on the ground for a few minutes. Averted if the player moves far enough until the area the items are in vanishes, to which they can stay in the game indefinitely until that area is loaded again.
    • Mobs (including players) leave no corpse, merely falling over and vanishing in a puff of smoke.
    • Water/lava falls and running water/lava from a spring vanish the minute you plug up the source or scoop it up in a bucket.
  • Everything's Better with Cows: Cows are one of the most useful resource mobs in the game. Their leather is necessary for books, their meat is the best cookable food, and they're adorable.
  • Everything's Better with Llamas: The 1.11 "Exploration Update" adds them as a ride-able mob that can carry items (less than a donkey or mule though), has a spit attack, and will automatically form groups with the lead llama if you're riding one, making them effective caravans for carrying items.
  • Everything's Deader with Zombies:
    • One of the earliest added, and least dangerous hostile mobs in the game; although as per usual with this trope, they can be a bit of a problem in groups. If they attack a village, they can turn villagers into more of them, though it is possible to cure infected villagers without killing them.
    • Zombie Pigmen are even worse. They show up in groups, most often in the Nether, and attacking one will bring the entire group down on your head. And they are much tougher, faster and stronger than regular zombies. Fortunately they're non-hostile and to aggro them you have to attack first.
  • Everything's Squishier with Cephalopods: Squids! They respawn far more frequently than other passive mobs (due to not being breedable) and drop ink sacs usable in dyeing.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: The Nether. Difficult to explore terrain, frequent sudden drops, and lots of lava everywhere. The mobs are a step up from the Overworld too, with Ghasts fire-bombing you frequently from the get-go and Zombie Pigmen who'll Zerg Rush you when provoked and hit you for more than half your health in Hard Mode (assuming no armor). There's Blazes and Wither Skeletons too, though at least you (usually) have to enter a Nether Fortress to run into them. Even trying to sleep in a bed will blow it up and possibly take you out if you're close!
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: You Mine stuff and you Craft stuff. That's essentially the entire game, right there.
  • Experience Meter: The game has a EXP meter below the Health Bar. Rather than making you stronger, experience levels are used to enchant tools and armor.
  • Experience Penalty: Tools can be enchanted with "mending", which makes any experience you gain while holding or wearing them go into repairing them rather than your experience bar.
  • Experience Points: The game has experience orbs that you get from killing monsters. Unlike other games that use EXP, the only use for EXP in this game is enchanting weapons and tools. These enchantments range from higher critical hit rates, extra damage to the undead and adding fire damage.
  • Explosive Breeder: Livestock mobs breed at a much faster rate compared to real life. Seconds after being fed their preferred food, they give birth to a baby that becomes breedable after a mere 20 minutes (one in-game day) and can themselves breed again after 5 minutes. There's no penalty for in-breeding, so there's no problem in creating a massive animal farm from two initial mobs in just a few hours.
  • Extra-Dimensional Shortcut: Locations in the Nether correspond to the Overworld, but travelling some distance in the Nether equals traveling 8 times that distance in the Overworld, so you can use the Nether to travel rapidly, assuming you can survive the monsters that live there. You get an achievement for this called "Subspace Bubble"—traveling 7km in the Overworld via the Nether.
  • Eyes Always Shut: Ghasts open their eyes for one reason - to make your life as miserable as humanly freaking possible.

    F 
  • Fake Longevity: A large chunk of rare items are few and far between, so you may spend hours upon hours just to find that one diamond, watermelon, pumpkin, stronghold, or what have you.
  • Falling Damage: Falls deal 1 point of damage for block (meter) fallen after the third, so a 23-block fall will kill you. However, having Slow Falling or landing in water, vines or spiderweb cancels the damage (as do ladders, given that you don't land on the footing), and Feather Falling-enchanted boots will reduce it.
  • Fantasy Axis of Evil: Out of the hostile mobs (and Endermen), there are:
    • Savage: Creepers, the now-deleted giants
    • Eldritch: Endermen, Ghasts, Blazes, Phantoms, Guardians
    • Humanoid: Zombies, Witches, Illagers
    • Fallen: Skeletons
    • Crafty: Slimes, Spiders, Silverfish, Endermites
  • "Far Side" Island: Not unusual in ocean biomes.
  • Fast-Forward Mechanic: The bed feature which can skip the night-time portion of a day cycle. Nothing that depends on the passage of time will benefit from the skipped hours, but since Darkness = Death...
  • Fast Tunnelling: Tunneling with even a wooden pickaxe is fast by real-life standards. A cubic meter of stone can be mined away in just over a second with a wooden pickaxe, and remarkably faster with better tools. Though, granted, it won't feel like you're fast tunneling due to the sheer amount of tunneling you'll need to do to find things. It helps that a player has a large amount of space in pockets to store all the blocks gathered by mining. The Haste effect speeds up how fast you can mine blocks and putting the effect to high levels can make mining ridiculously easy. Having the Efficiency enchantment on your pickaxe will achieve a similar effect.
  • Fatal Fireworks: In the 1.11.1 update, Fireworks which were made with a Firework Star were changed to cause damage to anyone caught in the blast.
  • Fictional Painting: The game lets you decorate your base with paintings. While most of them are based on real paintings by Kristoffer Zetterstrand, one is original to the game, depicting the construction process of the Wither.
  • Final Boss, New Dimension: The Ender Dragon makes its home in the End, a separate third dimension.
  • Final Death: The game has Hardcore mode, where you are stuck on Hard difficulty and dying means your save for that world gets erased from your computer! Not recommended for players who want to build and/or explore.
  • Final Death Mode: Hardcore mode. It's locked on the hardest difficulty, and death is permanent — in single player your world is deleted, and in multiplayer you're automatically banned from the server.
  • Fingerless Hands: The player's hand is a solid cube, yet able to hold and use items. (Although, if playing in first person, items float in front of you)
  • Fire and Brimstone Hell: The Nether has a strong ressemblance to this, being filled with lava, fire, netherrack (the game's equivalent of brimstone), sand made out of souls (with faces on it), and monsters such as the Ghast and Zombie Pigman.
  • Fireballs: Ghasts shoot devastating fireballs that can destroy most blocks. Blazes shoot fireballs that will set you on fire. You can make a harmless version by throwing snowballs through a lavafall. You can make a considerably more powerful version by combining blaze powder, gunpowder, and coal, and loading the result into a dispenser.
  • Firewood Resources: The game may not be a RTS but it does avoid this trope. Breaking a tree gives you "log blocks" which have no other real purpose than to be crafted into four "plank blocks". Later on, the ability to smelt wood into charcoal was added.
  • First-Person Ghost: The game lets you see only your arm and if you are holding an item, you only see the item itself while your arm is nowhere to be seen (unless you are holding a map, which both of your arms are shown then).
  • Fish Eyes: All passive (harmless) mobs. Since eyes are only two pixels wide by one pixel tall, it was either that or crossed eyes, which are used for the default player character skin and for wolves and ocelots, to make them look more intelligent.
  • Fishing for Mooks: Literally done. You can use a fishing rod to pick up enemies and have them suffer fall damage.
  • Fishing for Sole: As of 1.7.2, catching worn leather boots is possible. So is catching raw leather, bones, poisonous pufferfish, and enchanted artifacts, as well as actual edible fish.
  • Fishing Minigame: Fishing rods are used for two purposes. One is to pull mobs; the other is to fish. All bodies of water, even ones you make yourself, contain fish; you fish by throwing out your line and waiting for the bobber to go down. Once you have fishing rods, water, and a suitable supply of sticks and string to replace your rods, your food problems are solved. Version 1.7.2 ("The Update that Changed the World", released October 25, 2013) greatly expanded fishing by adding in multiple types of fish as well as making it so that the player can fish up treasures (such as enchanted items) or junk (like a pair of leather boots).
  • Flash of Pain: Along with a brief Mercy Invincibility, on both the player and mobs.
  • Flash Step: The teleportation command and jump boost effect can function as this at higher levels. Endermen also do this.
  • Flat World: The entire Overworld. In a more literal sense, the superflat option when creating a new world gives you exactly that, though it only applies to the Overworld as the Nether and the End generate independently of the settings used to generate the world. Since 1.4.2, the layers of the superflat world can be customised using a preset code and several presets are included, including the "Classic Flat" grass-dirt-dirt-bedrock which was the only option prior to 1.4.2.
  • Floating Continent:
    • The End consists of this, floating in a black void.
    • Depending on the generation of the terrain, you may sometimes get small islands floating in the air. You can also create your own floating landmass, but it will take a lot of building and terraforming.
    • In the old Indev version, there was an option to create the world as a "floating" type, resulting in a floating island. The 1.13 re-adds this as one of the options under the Buffet world type.
  • Floating Platforms: You can make some, too.
  • Floating Water: In past versions, water not only floated, but duplicated itself infinitely to occupy all space below the highest point of water. Nowadays, water still has very strange physical properties. You can use a bucket to pick up a water source block and place it somewhere else, where it will create an endless flow of water that travels a limited distance horizontally.
  • Foreboding Architecture: The game has this for its dungeons. Do you see a wall of cobblestone or moss cobblestone within a cave? That's a dungeon with a spawner ready to spit out monsters when you approach it.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • One of the random paintings you get from placing a painting depicts three dark gray skulls on a T-formation of Soul Sand. Replicating this pattern nets you a front seat ticket to the summoning of The Wither.
    • The 2013 April Fools 2.0 had several incomplete features in it which where later added into 1.6. These include:
      • Blocks of coal.
      • Chickens would spawn back-up when hit. Zombies now have that feature.
      • Tinted glass and stained clay.
      • Horses were added as a new mob, hinted at by the re-textured pigs and cows.
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You: Ghasts shoot fireballs at your character... if you're in first-person mode. In third person, it becomes clear that they're targeting the camera. This was actually a bug, it's been patched out.
  • From Clones to Genre: This is happening to Minecraft. While the concept of building blocks in a video game was not new by any stretch of the imagine (in fact, Minecraft was largely inspired by Infiniminer), Minecraft put it together in such a unique package that it was bound to attract imitators, such as FortressCraft, to games clearly inspired by it, such as Terraria. However such a plethora of games with similar concepts but large twists followed (Ace of Spades, GunCraft, Mythruna, etc), that it is far too many to count, and many of them are standing up on their own merits. More broadly, there is the emerging "survival sandbox" genre, which lacks the building-block look but retains the core gameplay loop of exploring a procedurally-generated open world with whatever you can cobble together — games like Don't Starve, No Man's Sky, and Ark Survival Evolved.
  • Fungus Humongous: These can be found growing in the wild in mushroom islands and dark forests, as well as grown by the player via sprinkling bonemeal on a normal mushroom. Just don't stand *on* the mushroom as you grow it or you might suffocate yourself.
Advertisement:


Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report