Follow TV Tropes

Following

Minecraft / Tropes M to R

Go To

Minecraft tropes: A to F || G to L || M to R || S to Z


    open/close all folders 

    M 
  • MacGyvering: All the player has at the beginning of the game is their bare hands and the clothes on their back. They can fashion a crafting table after chopping down a tree and processing it into planks with their bare hands, use that table and those planks to make makeshift wooden tools, use those tools to gather cobblestone, which they can then use to build a furnace and upgrade to makeshift stone tools, which they can use in turn to gather coal and iron ore... and so on. With the right raw materials and a crafting table (which can be crafted on the spot in a pinch), the player can make whatever they need almost instantly.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: Version 1.14 adds crossbows, which can also use fireworks as ammunition making them impromptu rocket launchers. Crossbow can also gain the Multishot enchantment to triple the number of projectiles shot, leading to this trope.
  • Mad Bomber:
    • Creepers. Pretty much all they do is silently sneak up on you, hiss for a second and a half, and explode. Even on easy, the explosion can kill you instantly (sans armor) if you can't get away in time. It also destroys most types of blocks, which can allow other monsters to invade your shelter.
    • Ghasts (found only in the Nether), which shoot fireballs at you, which not only punch a hole in the terrain but also sets it on fire.
    • If you have Mad Bomber tendencies yourself, you can blow stuff up with TNT or Fire Charges. Incidentally, to make these explosives, you need to get gunpowder by killing Ghasts or Creepers, the other two Mad Bombers in the game.
  • Made of Diamond: Wearing a full suit of Diamond armor grants 80% damage reduction, which is quite a lot, though not enough to qualify. Having Protection V on all pieces of armor increases this to 96% reduction, which makes the wearer impossible to kill by most means.
  • Made of Explodium:
    • Creepers. Literally made of explodium if the T-Shirt is canon. They even drop gunpowder when you kill them, which can be used to craft your own TNT.
    • Time is irrelevant in the Nether. Clocks malfunction. Compasses pick up multiple magnetic poles. And beds? Well, beds just plain explode when you try to use them.
  • Made of Indestructium:
    • Bedrock is immune to explosions of every size note  and cannot be mined with any tool. Only in creative mode can it be removed in any way.
    • Obsidian, too, is immune to explosions and can only be removed with a diamond pick, or by spending over four minutes to remove a single block.
    • Diamond Pickaxes have a bit more than 1500 uses. Your fists, on the other hand, have infinite uses.
  • Magic Cauldron: Subverted — there are relatively standard-looking black cauldrons located inside witches' huts, but their only practical uses in the game (thus far) are temporarily storing water (up to three buckets' worth) and removing dye from leather armor and shulker boxes. Ironically, witches use potions in combat, yet the tool actually used for crafting potions, the brewing stand, is not present in witches' huts.
  • Magic Compass: A compass points to the world's player spawn point.
  • Magic Map: Is crafted from a Magic Compass and in multiplayer, it'll show the positions of other players, if they happen to be holding their own copy of that map at the time.
  • Magic Mushroom: Though there's not too many magic properties besides some potion possibilities, the mushrooms are mostly just used for food. They can however grow to unusual size, which is pretty magical, they can infest cows too.
  • Magic Tool: The furnace. Stove, smelter, kiln, and steam engine all-in-one combo pack! The Crafting Table also qualifies, considering the sheer number of things it lets you do (like forge swords without an anvil).
  • Magitek: You can use a redstone mechanism to throw a magic potion.
  • Magnet Hands: It is possible to climb ladders with a block of sand in each hand. With your back to the ladder.
  • Make Them Rot: The Wither status effect is inflicted by Wither Skeletons and The Wither. It turns the affected player's hearts black making it hard to see their remaining health and steadily drains health. Unlike Poison which cannot drain past the final hit point, Wither can kill, and if it does so it gives the death message "<Player> withered away".
  • Mama Bear: Played literally with the Polar Bears. Any Polar Bear near a cub becomes hostile to both the player and mobs. Attack a Polar Bear cub and all the adult polar bears in a huge radius will be out for your blood.
  • The Many Deaths of You: While there are no death animations, the message that appears after death varies depending on the manner. For example: <Player> was slain by <other player>/<monster>, <Player> tried to swim in lava, and <Player> blew up.
  • Mascot Mook: Creepers are the most well-known of all the mobs.
  • Mascot Villain: The Creeper is so iconic to the game it may as well be the game's mascot. Creepers are hostile monsters that try to "creep" on you and light the TNT within their bodies to explode in your face.
  • Master of None: Tridents double as melee and ranged weapons, but aren't as powerful as either. They also have more drawbacks, unless enchanted to mitigate them.
  • Mechanical Monster: The Blaze mob in the Nether appear to be of this. There's nothing in between their rotating rods and their sounds, pain sounds, and death cries sound very mechanical instead of organic.
  • Menu Time Lockout: The game averts this with its inventory screen, making inventory management very important to the game. It's played straight with the Esc pause menu but only in single player.
  • Metal Slime: Slimes used to be this. They only spawned in the first twelve layers of the world, four of which are full of unbreakable stone, spawn incredibly rarely, could only appear in one tenth of all chunks, determined on the world being generated. Their drop, slimeballs, happen to be incredibly useful for making piston machines (almost all types of machines are much simpler with Sticky Pistons, which can retract blocks in addition to pushing them) and are used in making useful potions such as Fire Resistance. A later update increased the height where they're able to spawn, and made them able to spawn in Swamp biomes during night.
  • Mind Screw:
  • Minecart Madness: Normally it's a bad idea to make a rail system and not secure it so that you come under attack while you're riding in a minecart. Still, it's possible to make a wacky, convoluted track that's just entertaining to ride.
  • Mini-Game: Three have been introduced so far on the console versions. Battle Mode, which resembles The Hunger Games, Tumble, an official version of the popular fan-created game "spleef," and Glide, an elytra race.
  • Minus World:
    • The Far Lands, the result of going far, far away from the world's center. It would take 800+ hours of walking to reach them without cheating, and things get strange when you arrive. While it was possible to fix the strangeness of the Far Lands, Notch liked the idea of the world turning into an Eldritch Location at the extreme edges. It was mostly removed in version Beta 1.8, although there are still some strange glitches.
    • The Void. It is an area of complete nothingness that stretches on for infinity, and can be accessed by either going below the bottom boundaries of the maps. It is completely black and has a starry particle effect strewn throughout it. You can only reliably access it in creative mode, which allows you to destroy bedrock, or with a map editor's aid. You will take damage at 4 hearts per second, leading to a quick death and respawn. It's also possible to access this deadly area via a bug in the Survival multiplayer mode, in which stepping on glitched blocks will cause a player to fall in.
  • Misguided Missile: While (very thankfully) not homing projectiles, Ghast fireballs can be punched to deflect them.
  • Misplaced Wildlife:
    • Pigs, sheep, cows, rabbits and chicken can be found in almost any biome, as it'd be frustrating to starve for starting out in the desert. Squids can sometimes be found in small lakes, and bats and spiders can be found in any dark area. And as of 1.7, the player can pull creatures such as pufferfish and clownfish out of small ponds.
    • Fish can be found whenever there's water nearby and the player happens to have a fishing rod. Players that are stuck in mineshafts take this to their advantage by crafting a fishing rod with nearby materials and pulling fish out of a single block of water.
    • Since 1.7.4, baby zombies can spawn riding chickens. Until 1.8, the zombies could despawn, but the chickens couldn't (since they're passive mobs, and passive mobs never despawn), so this led to chickens unexpectedly being encountered underground. A similar thing happened in the Nether. Nowadays, they're able to despawn if they aren't being controlled by a zombie.
  • Mix-and-Match Critters: The Mooshroom mob, which is a red-and-white half-cow, half-mushroom.
  • Mohs Scale of Violence Hardness: Level 3.
  • Money Multiplier: The game has item enchantments that work like this. Weapons with the "Looting" enchantment increase the maximum number of items that can be looted from each monster, up to three extra. Tools like picks with the "Fortune" enchantment increase the drop rate of diamonds and lapis lazuli by up to 120%.
  • Money Spider: Illagers (villagers who have undergone a Face–Heel Turn), introduced in version 1.11, fulfill this role as the only mobs in the game to drop Emeralds (the closest thing the game has to a currency), but they only spawn during Raids and in exceedingly rare Woodland Mansions, and do not respawn once killed.
    • Averted prior to version 1.11, mobs could drop all manner of useful stuff that they would be expected to have, but never Emeralds.
  • Mook Maker: Monster spawners.
  • Moon Logic Puzzle:
    • While the crafting process is generally fairly intuitive, there's the occasional recipe that only appears obvious in hindsight.
    • Oh, so you want to ride those horses you found out in the plains. You need a saddle for that. But how do you get the saddle? It turns out that saddles can't be crafted. You must either:
      • Loot chests from desert temples, nether fortresses, village blacksmiths, dungeons, End cities, and jungle temples;
      • Trade with villager leatherworkers (assuming that you can find any villagers);
      • If you can't find any, there is only one recourse: you must fish them with a rod.
  • Motivation on a Stick: You can make a carrot on a stick to steer a pig you're riding.
  • Multishot: The exact name of one of the Enchantment types a Crossbow can have. It allows the player to fire a Spread Shot of three bolts for the price of one.
  • Mundane Utility:
    • Want to have an awesome looking fireplace that will never burn out like wood does? Get some Netherrack from the Nether. It turns out that the landscape features of hell itself make fantastic pseudo-firewood.
    • Another handy feature of the Nether: all that lava is great for powering your furnace, as lava buckets are the longest-lasting fuel source. Lava is finite, unlike charcoal, but good luck using up the literal oceans of it down there. If you've only got a single block of lava to work with, you can still use it to incinerate all your trash, or to create a cobblestone generator for an infinite amount of cobblestone to build with.
    • Some of the loot to be found in the End. Reach an Eldritch Location, slay a dragon, find a tower in the outer lands, then kill some of its guardians. From their husks, you can create a box that allows you to simply carry more items on you at a time.
    • Arguably one of the primary purposes of an Enchantment Table. You could use it to imbue ultra-powerful magics into your weapons and armor to turn yourself into a demigod-lite... or alternatively, just make your stone tools last a little longer or mine a little faster.
      • Also: did your sword just get enchanted with powerful fire magics? Use it to save yourself some time and coal, and go cook some meat on the spot with it.
    • Depending on the version note , trapped chests might be less useful as a redstone component than for the fact that the game lets you set them down directly next to regular chests, allowing you to compact your storage room a little more effectively.
    • The ultimate example is probably sealing up the Wither to power a machine that does nothing but lets you auto-farm trees.
  • Mutually Exclusive Powerups: Common with enchantments, though many of them can be overridden with commands.
    • Sharpness, Smite, and Bane of Arthropods on a sword. An odd case occurs with Looting and Fire Aspect—you can have them both on the same sword, but in practice it's not recommended as a Looting won't trigger on a mob that burns to death instead of you dealing the final blow.
    • Protection, Blast Protection, Fire Protection, and Projectile Protection on armor.
    • Mending and Infinity on bows.
    • Multishot and Piercing on Crossbows.
    • Silk Touch and Fortune on Pickaxes. note 
    • Riptide is mutually exclusive with Channeling and Loyalty on a Trident. However, Channeling and Loyalty are not mutually exclusive with each other.
  • My Hovercraft Is Full of Eels: The in-game text can be translated into almost any language. The languages are named only in that language (Spanish is Espanol, etc.), and only in that language's alphabet. The languages are also listed in alphabetical order of said names. This is where the problem comes in: The Hebrew word for Hebrew transliterates as "Ivrit." However, Hebrew is listed under "H" in the list, and it instead says "Anglit," which, besides not starting with "H," is the Hebrew word for English.
Advertisement:

    N 
  • Narnia Time: Time only passes in a dimension if there's a player in it. In single player, this means time effectively stops when you change dimensions. Multiplayer requires every player to vacate a dimension to achieve the effect. This can be a good thing if you died in the Nether or the End and need some time to re-arm in order to re-enter and salvage your old inventory... but it also means that whatever killed you in the first place is still there, so it's possible to re-draw aggro the moment you leave the portal.
  • Nature Is Not Nice: In some ways, this is the heart of early gameplay. There is no real enemy or driving plot; it's just your struggle to survive in a hostile wilderness where the wild animals happen to be monsters.
  • Nerf:
    • Swords were quite powerful for a time, but their damage output was slightly reduced by the 1.0 release. This was likely to encourage players to use the Enchantment Table to power up their swords with various effects to compensate for the reduced damage.
    • Since beta 1.8, the Adventure Update, food in general has been nerfed. Before, food essentially worked like instant health potions, restoring your health as soon as you eat it; this meant you could go from almost dead to full health in a second. However, the Adventure Update made it so that food restored your hunger instead which then slowly regenerated your health. No longer can one Zerg Rush enemies and be fine as long as they have a bite to eat.
      • Cake used to be an extremely practical method of healing—just plonk it on the ground and right-click it whenever you need to heal, up to six iterations of 1.5 hearts. The 1.8 update turned food into stamina restoration rather than health restoration, nerfing it severely. A full cake restores six food points, and that restoration is very brief. Cooked steak, on the other hand, lasts significantly longer and restores four points a piece. Not to mention that cake requires a considerable resource investment, while cows can bred with much less effort.
    • Golden Apples used to be extremely difficult to make due to apples being extremely rare (until Strongholds were introduced, there was no way to obtain them outside killing Notch in multiplayer) and requiring 8 gold blocks (72 ingots!) to craft, but they were very powerful, restoring the full health bar before Beta 1.8 added hunger and restoring half the hunger bar and giving health restoration for 30 seconds after that. In 1.1, apples started dropping occasionally from oak leaves and the recipe was altered to 8 gold nuggets (8/9 of an ingot); consequently the effects were nerfed to only restoring two units of hunger and giving 4 seconds of health restoration. When the recipe was changed again to require 8 gold ingots in 1.6.1, the effects were improved to 2 minutes of two extra health units and five seconds of regeneration on top of the two units of hunger.
      • The Enchanted Golden Apples zigzag this. When they were introduced in 1.3.1, they used the old 8 gold blocks recipe of the regular Golden Apple and gave 30 seconds of health regeneration and five minutes of damage and fire damage resistance. In 1.6.1, the regeneration effect's power was increased and the 2 minutes of two extra health units introduced for the regular Golden Apple was also included for the Enchanted ones. In 1.9, when they were made uncraftable, the regeneration effect's power was decreased to below even the old pre-1.6.1 level and its duration was decreased to 20 seconds, but the temporary extra health units were increased to eight.
    • Ever wonder why there aren't as many videos of people accidentally burning their house down—or worse, an entire forest because of a single square of fire—anymore? That's because fire was toned down not long after, and it usually fizzles out on its own. Fire can still spread pretty quickly on higher difficulties, though.
    • Tools and weapons dropped by skeletons and zombies are now randomized in how much durability they have, whereas they used to be dropped as a fresh item that was never used. This is to discourage people from farming the rare drops.
    • Horse armor was also nerfed in obtainability. Before the nerf, horse armor could be crafted. Horse armor can no longer be crafted and they can only be found within dungeon chests now. This was because PvP matches boiled down to owners of armored horses automatically winning most of the time.
    • As of 1.6, health regeneration now drains the food meter. Potions of healing and regeneration were also reduced in effectiveness.
    • Mending converts gained Exp back to durability on the item Mending is on. Infinity gives Bows Bottomless Magazines as long as the player has one arrow in their inventory. The combination of these two would have made Bows definite game breakers, so as of 1.11.2, it's impossible to get both enchantments on one Bow.
  • Never Trust a Title: The mobile version, which have since been rolled into the Bedrock Edition, used to be called the Pocket Edition even though it was also available for many tablets.
  • Nice Day, Deadly Night: Minecraft during the day is filled with passive animals like sheep, cows and pigs with almost nothing that will try to kill you, but hostile ones like zombies and skeletons will come out during night.
  • Night of the Living Mooks: Some enemies are classified as undead, what means they take extra damage from a weapon with the Smite enchantment and they catch fire under sunlight (although they aren't necessarily damaged by it).
  • Night-Vision Goggles:
    • The game has a potion version of night vision goggles. The Potion of Night Vision makes everything around you instantly light up as if the sun was there, even in deep caves, and you don't go blind from bright light sources like torches or lava. However, this doesn't affect the actual light level in the world (just because you can see better doesn't mean the dark doesn't exist), which means monsters will still spawn as they normally do. The night vision effect also makes fog (especially in the Nether and the End) much more pronounced, which makes it more difficult to see at times.
    • Prior to 1.13, the Respiration enchantment acted like a smaller version of the trope; it removed the fog while you swam underwater, but you were still subjected to the diminished light levels since the sun can't fully penetrate water, unless you drink the Potion of Night Vision as well, which then gave you clear vision underwater. From 1.13 onwards, Respiration no longer grants enhanced vision.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: The Zombie Pigman is a combination of a zombie and a pig. It drops rotten flesh, like zombies, but also gold nuggets. It's undead, but it won't attack you unless you attack them, or any other Zombie Pigman.
  • Nitro Boost: Dash Pad variety is seen in powered minecart rails as the boost the mine cart when it rolls over the set of activated golden rails.
  • No "Arc" in "Archery": Averted; arrows follow parabolic arcs. They also can be slowed by water and do damage according to how fast they're moving.
  • No Backwards Compatibility in the Future:
    • The Bedrock Edition, while mostly meant for mobile platforms and consoles, is also available for Windows 10. However, you cannot transfer your old Java Edition saves to your Bedrock Edition installation due to both using different engines. On the other hand, the Java Edition is compatible with Windows 10, which makes the problem moot since there's not much point in switching from Java to Bedrock except if you want better performance, don't mind being behind on features and don't care about Game Mods.
    • Averted with the Xbox One and Nintendo Switch versions when they switched from the Legacy Console platform to the Bedrock platform; saves and DLC from the former can be transfered to the latter. The same will presumably apply for the PlayStation 4 version when it'll change over to Bedrock. Xbox 360 saves can also be transfered to Xbox One, but they must go through the original Legacy version before they can be transfered to the current Bedrock version.
  • No Body Left Behind: All mobs (except for the Ender Dragon) explode into a puff of smoke when killed.
  • Nobody Poops: There is not a single mob in the game that stops to relieve themselves, no matter how much they eat.
  • Nocturnal Mooks: Most Mooks only come out at night or in dark caves, and burn or turn passive in sunlight. It's made Worse by the fact that the game completely averts Hollywood Darkness. Notably though, Creepers are completely unaffected by sunlight and will attack you during the day.
  • No-Damage Run:
    • The game has a Hardcore Mode that deletes the entire game world if the player dies. Since the entire point of the game is to explore the world and shape it through building (and mining, and crafting), this can be a very painful experience if the player has been working on a world for a while, and has grown attached to it. Hardcore Mode also locks the game on the highest difficulty setting, maximizing the amount of damage dealt by monsters, and otherwise making survival as difficult as possible.
    • As an extra kick, the game forces you to press the button that irrevocably deletes your world yourself, rather than doing it automatically upon your death. It simply doesn't give you any other options.
      • 1.9 and later versions added the option to view your world in Spectator mode after your death instead of simply forcing you to delete your world right away. Even then, however, your world deletes itself once you leave it, so it's lost forever either way.
    • Hardcore Mode was eventually made available for multiplayer servers in addition to single-player gameplay. In multiplayer, Hardcore Mode means that a player is permanently banned from the server if they die.
  • No-Gear Level: The game has you drop all of your items upon death, which means you're forced to endure the game without any weapons or tools when you respawn unless you are quick enough to get back to where you died or had stored extra items away in a chest. Many custom maps that take advantage of Command Blocks can also strip you of all your items if the block is programmed to do so. Can be subverted, though, as the game does include a command line prompt that prevents this. Again, use of Command Blocks can also enable this ability.
  • Non-Combat EXP: Since version 1.3 you can gain experience from mining and smelting — specifically, you get experience for mining anything that drops a usable block (diamond, coal, redstone, lapis lazuli, emerald, quartz) and experience for smelting raw blocks (iron, gold) into usable blocks (iron ingots, gold ingots). Breeding animals and fishing also nets experience, as well as trading with Villagers as of the 1.8 update.
  • Non-Human Undead:
    • One of the five inhabitants of the Nether are Zombie Pigmen.
    • 1.13 added Phantoms, undead, flying ray-like creatures that attack players who haven't slept in a while.
  • No Ontological Inertia: Ghasts' fireballs vanish when they are killed.
  • No Peripheral Vision: While the game can fall under this, surprise creeper attacks can be avoided by setting the POV slider to "Quake Pro."
  • No Plot? No Problem!:
    • The basic plot is "Wake up in the wilderness. Punch trees, mine, build, kill monsters." Notch has however said that he wishes to include some type of plot in the game later.
    • Make whatever you wish from the NPC villages, strongholds and abandoned mineshafts.
    • Now there's a general structure to the game with a long sequence of tasks necessary to "finish" the game. First you learn to make wooden tools, then stone tools, then iron tools, then diamond tools. Then you use the diamond tools to build a portal to another dimension called The Nether. Then you find a Nether fortress and kill a bunch of blazes for their powder. Then you combine the blaze powder with Ender Pearls dropped by Endermen, and use the resulting item to locate a stronghold and activate a portal to another dimension called The End. Then you slay the Ender Dragon. Technically, all this is just an optional side quest, and the real objective of the game is to have fun, whatever that means to you.
  • No Sense of Personal Space: Testificates in villages have an odd tendency to all crowd inside one house at night. Taken Up to Eleven when it's a small, 4x4 house.
  • Nothing Is Scarier:
    • Any moment that is spent in a dark place when you are not fighting monsters. Reason? In the dark, monsters spawn. Monsters spawn anywhere. Everywhere. If you've just opened up a hole into a cave system and hear growling, hissing, or clacking coming from it, you may be scared to venture into it, knowing a zombie, spider, or skeleton could be lurking around any corner. If you hear nothing, that's worse, because nothing is the sound that creepers make...
    • You're at bedrock level in a nearby mine. Near pitch black darkness, a narrow hallway, limited weapons. No music, no sounds (with the exception of when you mine). And you know that there are zombies, skeletons and spiders waiting randomly around to tear you to pieces, but you haven't found them yet... Made worse by the fact that some enemies don't make sound.
    • Endermen may creep some people out, but on the whole they aren't too scary in and of themselves. Once you set one off, however, and it sprints out of sight, the suspense of waiting for it to just go ahead and attack already is what makes fighting them such a trying experience.
    • There comes a moment while running around you hear one of the background sounds like lovely (terrifying) music but one of those sounds is very sinister. It's the same sound of an airplane flying over head, you look up to see it as a instinctual move and see... nothing. You are all alone. The sound can be heard here. That is called an ambience, and it happens when you are near a dark area that's large enough, as a sort of indication or warning, even if that area is underound or behind a cliff face nearby and you actually can't see it. Nothing indeed.
    • Peaceful mode removes the mobs, no ifs ands or buts, but unless you turn off the game's sound, ambient soundclips will still play in deep caves, making you question if you're really alone.
  • Not Quite Flight: The Combat Update adds the Elytra, an item that allows the wearer to glide at speeds faster than most other forms of transportation.
  • Not the Fall That Kills You: That is, unless you land in water.
  • Not the Intended Use:
    • Most craftable items are tools that are available to the player to use in any way they can imagine them. Discouraged with tools, since using them in unintended ways (i.e. chopping wood with a sword, killing mobs with a pickaxe, etc.) will eat up their durability twice as fast as normal.
      • Somewhat averted with the Axe when attacking mobs, as it does more damage than the Sword of the same material and is less durable than a sword in real life. This makes the durability loss of 2 points per strike on a mob more realistic in nature.
    • While using a fishing rod to snag a mob uses up three durability (versus one for fishing), it is generally considered worth it to wrangle mobs and to prevent pesky Ghasts from flying away.
    • Beds are coded to explode when used in the End, but those explosions can deal large chunks of damage to the Ender Dragon, a trick often exploited by Speedrunners.
    • Torches can be used not only to light dark places, but also to quickly remove a pile of gravel/sand by placing it underneath while it's falling (thus preventing your shovel from wearing down), and to get an oxygen boost when you're underwater by placing it on a wall up close. The gravel/sand thing was a bug that was solved but reintroduced due to popular request.
    • Minecarts are good for transportation, but also for storing villagers in a convenient place to make sure they don't go away. This way you can make a villager market with no need to go find them as they're randomly walking about town.
    • The main function of the armor stands is to hold your armor when you're not using it, but clever redstone engineers have used it to make perpetual clocks for their circuits: create a water current that loops itself, throw in an armor stand, put a detection plate somewhere nearby that transforms the stand's weight into redstone signal, and done!
    • Prior to 1.11.1, bows with the Punch II enchantment could be used to begin and prolong flight when you were wearing the elytra (wings): every time you hit yourself with an arrow by shooting at a certain angle during flight, you got lifted, allowing to perpetuate your glide until you ran out of arrows or your bow broke, and even this could be prevented by applying the Infinity and Mending enchantments to the bow (the former provides infinite arrows, the latter allows for endless bow durability). 1.11.1 removed the ability to apply both Infinity and Mending to a bow, but those players who already have such a bow can still use it. In response to what the fanbase was doing, Mojang gave fireworks an additional use: propel the player to tremendous height upon release, which achieves the same goal but in a much easier (and safer) way.
    • The Wither, the most powerful mob in the game, may be used to farm gigantic amounts of wood automatically.
    • Smart players have found a way to use Iron Golems (whose main purpose is to protect villagers from aggresive mobs and players) to attract Slimes to their doom in a cacti trap, netting infinite slime balls. Iron Golems can also be summoned and killed in iron farms by sistematically creating and uncreating dozens of villages in just about the area of one by exploiting the game's village-creating rules with massive redstone circuits.
  • Numerical Hard: For most of the game's development history, the only thing that changed between the 3 non-Peaceful difficulty levels was the amount of damage hostile monsters do. Mojang is slowly adding actual differences between the levels in new patches, though. For an obvious example, zombies will try to break through wooden doors on all difficulties, but only on Hard will they succeed. Another example is that spiders on Hard can spawn with a Status Buff, and zombies have a higher chance of spawning with armor the higher the difficulty level is.

    O 
  • Obvious Rule Patch: Usually averted, as Notch, Jeb, and the rest of Mojang are often impressed whenever someone figures out an unintended use for something newly implemented and want to keep the game open-sandbox. However, there are some exceptions:
    • It is impossible to deal critical hits on a horse because riders ran around PvP servers getting nothing but critical hits by exploiting the loosely defined conditions that the player had to be higher than the ground but not in the process of jumping up.
    • Bows with the enchantments Punch II, Infinity and Mending were used by the fanbase to start and prolong flight. All players had to do was equip a sturdy armor and shoot arrows at a certain angle to hit themselves while mid-air, which propeled them. Mojang then removed the ability to apply the Mending and Infinity enchantments together to the same bow as of 1.11.1, but gave fireworks the ability to propel the player when released instead.
  • Ominous Cube: While almost everything in Minecraft is made out of cubes, the End Crystals, which explode and can heal the game's final boss, manage to look ominous with their otherworldly appearance and rotating animation.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: The game brings us the Wither, which is essentially the ultimate griefer. The Wither, once summoned, attacks everything that is alive. Undead mobs are ignored. It blows up everything in its path, and holds the philosophy that if something is alive, it must cease to be as such. It's also very good at this too. In-game griefers can be this as well, reducing server populations on death-ban servers to ridiculously low numbers.
  • One Bullet at a Time: Skeletons will not fire another arrow until their current arrow has landed. They will also fire more rapidly the closer their target is to them.
  • One-Gender Race: Practically every humanoid or animal species in the game. Notch elaborates on it here.
  • One-Hit Kill:
    • Since the 1.9 update buffed their explosion power, creepers can do this even to players whose armour is in a decent state.
    • Fireballs shot by Ghasts will do this to other Ghasts.
  • One-Hit Polykill: The Piercing Enchantment allows Crossbow shots to pierce 1-4 enemies depending on enchantment level.
  • One Steve Limit: An early Indev version of the game used to break it, with Steve and the since-removed Steve.
  • Only Shop in Town: The game has an interesting version, where a player on a multiplayer server will often set up a place to barter items with other players (note that this is not specifically provided for by the gameplay). Most servers only have one, because when the niche is filled no one will found another.
  • Only Six Faces: Zombies, skeletons, blazes, and enderman use a re-colored version of Steve?'s face texture. And all the villagers have the exact same head and face, they are only identifiable by their clothes, which differ depending on their profession. Time has yet to see if there'll be a Alex? zombie.
  • Organ Drops: Skeletons and their Nether counterparts drop their bones, as well as their heads. Zombies can drop their flesh, albeit rotten. Some passive mobs drop the appropriate form of meat, while cows additionally drop leather.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: The Ender Dragon in The End, the final boss of the game. It lives in the End and has a the same appearance as Endermen put on the body of a Western dragon. It's mostly black with bits of gray on the wings and sporting purple eyes, but it looks pretty much the same as any western type dragon. The Ender Dragon doesn't have any attacks other than ramming into you to send you flying back several feet, but it has a ton of health (complete with its own Life Meter) and is healed by the nearby Ender Crystals. It doesn't breathe fire (although a planned update for the Xbox 360 version will have it spit acid), but can fly and phase through terrain as it is nothing. It destroys any material not native to the End and is healed by Endercrystals. Killing it nets you 20,000 experience points and the Dragon Egg (which as of yet does nothing) and opens a portal to exit the realm. However, only one Ender Dragon can spawn per The End world.
  • Our Monsters Are Weird:
    • Creepers. Most of the other monsters are relatively normal, but creepers are just wrong. It's said that they came about from a failed attempt to make pigs.
    • There are also Ghasts, giant floating jellyfish-like creatures that spit fireballs.
    • Blazes are floating heads surrounded by flaming golden rods that orbit them at high speed while shooting fire all over the place.
    • The Wither is a massive, flying, desiccated three-headed torso that actually has to be constructed by the player out of skulls and soul sand.
  • Our Wights Are Different: The Endermen bear a striking resemblance to Tolkien's description of a Barrow-Wight.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: The ones featured here have the classic arms-forward walk, greenish-gray skin, and burst into flames when exposed to sunlight. They used to drop feathers when killed, simply because something had to drop feathers and zombies were introduced before chickens. Nowadays, they drop rotten flesh, which you can eat in emergencies, and the most you have to worry about is food poisoning. You can feed it to pet wolves to heal them without any downsides.
  • Outrun the Fireball: This can happen if a player gets careless with TNT. A pile of TNT can easily kill a player and vaporise anything they're holding; as such, if one happens to ignite (from a nearby lava source, a sudden spread of flame, or a griefer), standard operating procedure is to abandon whatever you're doing and run like hell, hoping you escape the blast radius.
  • Overshadowed by Awesome: The Village and Pillage update introduced the Smoker and Blast Furnace, upgraded versions of the standard Furnace. The former only cooks food and the latter only smelts ores/armor/tools, but both do their job at twice the speed of the Furnace. This comes at the cost of reduced EXP, but smelting doesn't give much experience anyway. Blast Furnaces do have the drawback of requiring iron to construct them, whereas the Furnace and Smoker are made from renewable materials. Furnaces still have their use in smelting logs into charcoal, and smelting raw non-metallic materials into refined counterparts.
  • Overused Running Gag: The changelog for 1.9.3 (and 1.9.4) interrupts the traditional "Removed Herobrine" entry to acknowledge that "This is getting old."
  • The Overworld: One of the three dimensions.
  • Oxygenated Underwater Bubbles: These can be created by placing something such as a sign that occupies only part of a block and leaves room for your head. They also occasionally show up naturally due to glitches. Since water won't flow through the block either, it's possible to make a deadfall trap look like a waterfall.
    • Update 1.13 added a more traditional example in underwater bubble columns that allow players to replenish their oxygen meter. They're only generated by soul sand and magma blocks, however, two materials that are almost completely exclusive to the Nether — while you can find magma blocks in the Overworld, they only generate at the bottom of underwater ravines.
  • Oxygen Meter: When you're fully submerged under water, you have 15 seconds. If you run out of air, you'll start taking one heart of damage per second. Enchanted helmets of respiration can expand your oxygen meter and reduce the rate of damage once you run out. Potions of Water Breathing eliminate the issue entirely, giving you Super Not-Drowning Skills for as long as the potion lasts. Turtle Shells, when worn, give you 10 seconds of the Water Breathing effect once you dive, resetting when you surface.

    P 
  • Painfully Slow Projectile: Ghast fireballs fly only slightly faster than running speed, and can be reflected by punching them. There is even an achievement for killing a Ghast with its own reflected fireball.
  • Palette Swap: Many blocks and items are the same models with different colored textures. The ores such as coal, iron, gold, redstone, and diamond play this straight in respective colors, then lapis lazuli ore subverts this, then the emerald ore averts this completely. Gold and diamond, when condensed into solid blocks, have the same texture but different colors. Iron blocks used to have this texture too but it was changed to a more stacked pattern. All tools and armor also obey this. To keep with the general art style or for coding efficiency reasons, most also follow these patterns.
  • Pamphlet Shelf: After the 1.3 update, players can write their own, mostly due to the limited space per page and the 50 page total limit.
  • Panthera Awesome: Ocelots are a mob found in jungles, can be tamed with raw fish, and creepers are scared of them.
  • Patchwork Map:
    • Biomes are all over the place. To start with, rivers have estuaries at both ends and run in circles.
    • Originally, the game tried to simulate biomes according to wetness and temperature, therefore a change in either of them would mean a change of biome. This system was eventually abolished, and afterwards you could walk in rapid succession from a temperate forest, to a tundra, to a sandy desert, to a tropical rainforest (which for some reason, has livestock instead of the normal stuff). Without skipping a beat. The Beta 1.8 update changed that once more, biomes are significantly bigger now, so it's not as stark anymore, though you can see a desert that shares close boundaries with a very large, temperate forest and ocean. The introduction of the Large Biomes option obviously makes these borders even less obvious/common.
    • As of the 1.7 update, biomes are put into four main categories: snow-covered, cold, medium, and dry/warm. This prevents a biome from being placed next to a biome that is too different to itself. (Though this isn't completely foolproof yet, as mistakes still happen occasionally.)
  • Pause Scumming: The game has a pause menu accessed by pressing the Escape key. One can change the game's difficulty to Peaceful (no monsters and perpetually regenerating health) if the player is assaulted by a monster while the player is at low health. Averted in Hardcore mode, though, where the difficulty is locked to Hard at all times.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Killing the Ender Dragon nets you a lot of experience and the purely decorative Dragon Egg. It can only be collected in a certain and rather tricky way, and if accidentally touched it will teleport in a spot at random, potentially falling off the floating terrain the fight took place on and being destroyed by the Void. You can't fight the Ender Dragon again unless you can convince an administrator to spawn it again for you via commands... Even though from 1.9 on, the Ender Dragon can be respawned as many times as wanted by crafting 4 Ender Crystals, it will not give you a new dragon egg.
    • Many guides stress the role of renewable resources, as while it's possible to expand one's range of exploration to find more non-renewable resources, they will eventually run out if the player stays in the same zone.
  • Perpetual Beta: A Tropes Are Not Bad example — the game will probably never be truly "finished" as long as it's actively maintained. Notch had stated that he wanted to include a variety of base features, then release a finished game and essentially turn it over to the modding community; he left Mojang before he could do the last part. While the game technically left Beta status in 2011, a ton of features too long to list here have been introduced since.
  • Pig Man: The Zombie Pigmen, residents of The Nether (and the result of an ordinary pig being struck by lightning). Unlike regular Zombies, Zombie Pigmen will not attack you without provocation. Notch originally planned to add regular Pigmen in a future update, going as far as to design their character model, but it was eventually removed.
  • Pillar of Light: The Beacon Block does this.
  • Piñata Enemy: Blazes and Wither Skeletons. Blazes drop Blaze Rods, which are incredibly useful as a fuel source, crafting the brewing stand, and a potion ingredient, as well as for reaching The End. Wither Skeletons have a very rare chance of dropping Wither Skulls- it takes three of these skulls to build the Wither, a boss monster that drops the Nether Star when it dies.
  • Pint-Sized Powerhouse: The mini-zombies are even more powerful than their normal-size equivalent. Though their attacks do the same amount of damage and they have the same amount of Hit Points, they're able to do so at a faster rate, and move at over three times the speed of normal zombies. They also aren't killed by sunlight.
  • Planet Heck: The Nether. It was originally called "Hell" in development and was referred to as such in the F3 menu until 1.13.
  • Planet of Steves: For some time after the post-release 1.3 update came out, Minecraft suffered from a problem where skins would break, causing everyone to look like Steve? (the base player skin), causing this trope to be in effect for a while.
  • Planimal:
    • Creepers are actually some type of leafy plant monster.
    • Mooshrooms are funganimals (half-cow, half-mushroom).
  • Player and Protagonist Integration: The game borderlines between An Adventurer is You and You Are You. The playable character has absolutely no traits or personality and its appearance can be changed with a different texture to represent how the player wishes to be. Since there is no dialogue or any way to interact with the game's only NPCs, the villagers, the player character is a pure blank slate. Things get more weird after you slay the Ender Dragon and leave The End realm. Two unseen beings are talking to each other about your actions and know that you have evolved to the point where you can read their thoughts. They then start talking directly to you and discuss weird philosophies.
  • Player Headquarters: The player has to build everything from scratch: from a simple hole in the side of a hill, to a small house made of dirt, to a colossal castle. Which the player can outfit with beds to rest/respawn, crafting stations, storage, plantations and any mechanism the player can invent.Other than being a safe haven from the nightly monsters, of course.
  • Player Nudge: If you find an Igloo with a basement, you'll find (among other things) a caged Villager, a caged Zombie Villager, a chest, and a brewing stand with a single potion. The chest contains a golden apple, and the brewing stand contains a splash potion of weakness. To cure the Zombie Villager, you have to use the splash potion of weakness on it and then feed it the golden apple, then keep it contained for several minutes.
  • Point Build System: The game has an experience points system that is used to enchant tools and pieces of armor. The more levels you spend, the stronger the enchantment gets and the higher the chances of having multiple enchantments will be. Placing bookshelves around the enchantment table will increase the chances of getting higher level enchantments.
  • Point of No Return: Once you enter The End, you can no longer return until you kill the Ender Dragon or die.
  • Poison Mushroom:
    • Zombie Flesh, which can be consumed, but there's a very high chance that you'll inflict food poisoning on yourself and it'll make your hunger meter deplete faster than normal when doing certain activitiesnote . However, the item does refill your hunger immediately, so it's good as a temporary way of keeping your hunger up until you can get some actual food, making it more of a zig-zagged example.
    • Straighter example with spider eyes, poisonous potatoes, and pufferfish, all of which inflict actual poison on you when consumed. Pufferfish in particular inflict a much more potent and long-lasting poison than other poisonous foods, and you also get hunger and nausea alongside it.
    • Also played straight with the "negative" potions (poison, weakness, slowness, etc.), when in their normal, non-splash form.
  • Portal Network: You can make one with at least two Nether Gates, which require at the minimum 16 Obsidian blocks and a source of fire. Benefits: being able to get from point A to point B up to 8 times faster than Overworld travel. Drawbacks: walking through Hell each time you use it and the possibility of dropping straight into lava each time you make a new Nether Gate.
  • Portal Slam: A semi-example: Ghast fireballs can disable Nether portals, and if you don't have a flint and steel, you'd have to either find one in a Nether Fortress, or go killing ghasts, wither skeletons and blazes to craft a fire charge so you can relight it.
  • Post-End Game Content: Although the gameplay doesn't change at all after you kill the Final Boss and the credits roll and you're allowed to continue playing, there are a few things that can only gotten after the ending:
    • After you beat the Ender Dragon a portal will open in the End that allows you to access the other End Islands which have unique resources like chorus plants and elytra.
    • The achievements "The Beginning?" and "The Beginning." can only be gotten after you defeat the Ender Dragon.
  • Post-Modern Magik:
    • Gunpowder can be added to magical potions to make them splash potions.
    • With the addition of the Hopper to the game, players are now able to create automated potion brewing factories, although this isn't particularly widespread quite yet. The Hopper and the Dropper can be combined to create conveyor belts of indeterminate length (as opposed to previous attempts which were hampered by the 5 minute time limit imposed on item entities), which aid immensely in inventions like the automated potion factory.
  • Potion-Brewing Mechanic: Potions are made in brewing stands crafted and placed by the player. You put in 1-3 water bottles, then some nether wart, then an ingredient, then (optionally) gunpowder to make it throwable and glowstone or redstone dust to make it stronger or longer-lasting.
  • Power Creep, Power Seep: The Endermen went through a phase of this. Notch claims he nerfed them before the official Beta 1.8 release, and then complained that they're too easy, so the next major update gave their AI an overhaul, removed their vulnerability to sunlight, and doubled their health. It also limited the types of blocks they could move to the softer kinds.
  • Powerful Pick: You can use your pick this way, but usually it's better to stick to swords, bows, or axes, as using your pick as a weapon is much slower and deals less damage than either of those weapons and you cannot put damage boosting enchantments on it like you can with a sword or axe.
  • Power Glows: Enchanted tools and armor glow purple. While not necessarily more powerful, enchanted items all have some sort of beneficial affect.
  • Power-Up Food: Eating Apples that contain varying amounts of gold (a few nuggets to entire cubic meters) can simply either regenerate your health or make you invincible.
  • Power-Up Magnet: Experience orbs are naturally attracted on the player.
  • Powerup Mount: Pigs make great parachutes when you ride them via saddle.
  • Pre-Explosion Glow:
    • Creepers flash before blowing up.
    • The Ender Dragon has beams of light radiate from it before it disintegrates.
  • Press Start to Game Over: In Hardcore mode, if you're unlucky or just clueless, this can take about ten minutes, which is the time it takes from the start of the game until sunset, when enemy mobs spawn. If you're very unlucky, it can take less than twenty seconds.
  • Pressure Plate: There are several types of switches you can create. They can be used to open or close doors, toggle redstone torches, switch minecart tracks, or detonate TNT. Stone pressure plates can be triggered by players and mobs walking or riding over them, while wooden pressure plates can additionally be triggered by arrows, dropped items, and minecarts. There are also pressure-sensitive minecart tracks, useful for triggering boosters. Pressure plates, when placed on top of a fence post, can also be used as an improvised table. Weighted pressure plates trigger stronger signals if lots of items are placed on them.
  • Press X to Die: One mod allows you to make machines powered by electricity. You could use copper cables to route the power to these machines. Not using rubber to insulate the cables would cause you to get an electric shock. (Naturally, some savvy players use this effect to create an electric fence.)
  • Primal Fear: The spiders. The big ones are fast enough to chase you and can leap at you, striking repeatedly. They can jump gaps and climb walls. They mostly come out at night, but unlike the undead, sunlight doesn't hurt them, so you can try hiding in a shelter all night, but they'll probably be lurking on your roof, waiting for you to come out in the morning. The smaller cave spiders can fit into small gaps, and their poisonous bite will leave you weak enough that a short fall could kill you.
  • Procedural Generation: The game procedurally generates landscapes that are, for all practical purposes, infinite. There's an end, but it's about 30,000 kilometersnote  from your spawn point, which would take a minimum of 820 hours of gameplay to reach without cheating. The terrain randomly contains NPC villages, dungeons, strongholds, and abandoned mineshafts, as well as ten distinct biomes, including mountains, jungles, deserts, swamps, and tundras. This combines to create an immense worldnote  that you could spend your entire life exploring, if you felt like it. Furthermore, the game uses a special code called a seed to keep generated terrain consistent, and there are roughly four billion seeds to choose from, each of which can generate a unique world. The same seed can be used to generate the same world on any computer, and there are quite a few websites dedicated to sharing interesting seeds with other players.
  • Prongs of Poseidon:
    • The 1.13 update adds the trident. They can be thrown as a ranged weapon or used melee and deal a large amount of damage.
    • The Drowned also have a 20% chance to spawn with tridents. This also makes them effectively the only ranged type of zombie.
  • Protagonist Without a Past: The player character wakes up in the middle of nowhere and starts punching trees.
  • Puff of Logic: Due to the way terrain is generated, it is possible for certain blocks to be placed in ways the player could never replicate (floating sand or gravel, for instance), only to immediately obey the rules as soon as the player acts upon them.
  • Pumpkin Person:
    • Pumpkins can be worn as helmets, giving the appearance of this trope. While they obscure vision and don't protect from damage, they can prevent an enderman from becoming hostile and keep undead mobs from burning in sunlight.
    • Snow Golems also wear pumpkins.
  • Punched Across the Room: The Knockback enchantment gives your sword attack an extra kick by pushing your enemy backwards a lot farther than normal. At level 3, you can effectively push enemies beyond a 20 block distance from you, making it every effective to keep Creepers away from you so they don't explode or if you want to push enemies off a cliff.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: The default player character is either "Steve?", who is a male, or "Alex?", who is a female. (Mojang has confirmed this directly.) The only difference between them is that Alex?'s arms are one pixel thinner, which has no effect on gameplay. Players can change the skin of their characters to look like anything imaginable, but they will always retain the same blocky human shape, and changing the skin doesn't affect anything else in the game.
  • Purple Is Powerful:
    • Endermen are the most powerful, naturally spawning enemies in the Overworld. Their eyes glow purple, as does their particle effects.
    • Obsidian is purple and is the strongest destroy-able block in the game, takes longer to mine even with the best pick, and is the hardest to obtain in the overworld.
  • Purposely Overpowered: Anything made of diamond. They're more durable and efficient than any other materials, and greatly outperform iron, the second-best material. The diamond sword, for example, can kill most enemies in three hits, and the diamond pickax can mine the widest range of blocks and lasts six times as long as the iron pickax before breaking. Diamond armor lasts more than twice as long as iron armor, and a new set can reduce damage by 80% as opposed to 60% for iron. However, all of this is justified because diamond is by far the hardest resource to find.
  • Pyramid Power: The Beacon Block, when attached to a pyramid of blocks and fed a resource as power, buffs friendlies in the vicinity. Enlarging the pyramid extends its range and makes it possible to add more bonuses. Due to the way Beacon Blocks check their structure, it is possible to build a composite pyramid with numerous Beacons.

    R 
  • Rainbow Pimp Gear:
    • This can happen, although its generally not so much based on stats as what you can afford to craft. Additionally, the various armor bits can potentially clash not only with each other but with whatever outfit your player skin was drawn wearing. Most texture packs only exaggerate this trope further by giving each armor set a unique look.
    • The trope is more apparent when you start dying pieces of your leather armor with random colors.
  • Raising the Steaks: One of the in-game horse variants is the skeleton horse, which cannot be bred or made by breeding — each must be individually tamed. They only spawn when lightning strikes a normal horse, which will transform into a skeletal horse ridden by a skeleton with an enchanted helmet and bow. A couple of clones of these will spawn nearby. In the morning, the skeletons will burn but the skeleton horses won't, at which point you can tame them. Lightning will also turn pigs into zombie pigmen.
  • Random Drop: Almost every mob in the game, except for villagers; wolves; silverfish; ocelots; and endermites, have a chance to drop some sort of loot upon being killed.
  • Random Drop Booster: It has the Looting enchant for weapons, which increases the chance and maximum number of mob drops, and the Fortune enchant for tools which does the same for resource blocks.
  • Randomly Generated Levels: The entire world is randomly generated chunk by chunk (16x16x256 space) as you explore it. However, that being said, there are many rules the game follows to keep things a little evenly distributed (caves and ore veins) and the game chooses one of several rough pre-set patterns to form believable rivers, ravines, mountains, etc. Played straight with pre-generated structures though, as navigating an Abandoned Mineshaft or Nether Fortress without getting lost can be challenging (even if you've already raided several others in the past).
  • Random Transportation: Endermen run around randomly whenever they take damage. The player can also eat chorus fruit, which randomly teleports them a short distance.
  • Rare Random Drop: Most enemies have a chance to drop items they wouldn't normally, such as armor pieces, weapons, and consumables. The king, however, is the Wither Skulls dropped by Wither Skeletons, which barely ever drop even with max Looting enchantments and are required to summon the Wither.
  • Readings Are Off The Charts: Attempting to use navigation tools like maps, compasses and clocks in the Nether won't do you any good, as you'll get a brown and grey static image with a constantly rotating player marker on the former and the dials will spin wildly on both of the latter.
  • Real Is Brown: The biomes introduced grasses with more "realistic" hues. The bright green grass does still exist, however.
  • Reality-Breaking Paradox: Presumably the reason beds explode in the Nether when you try to use them. Beds can only be used at night (or during a thunderstorm), and reset the clock to sunrise. Since neither thunderstorms nor the day/night cycle exist in the Nether...
  • Reality Ensues:
    • Swords can be made of (in order of ascending rarity) wood, stone, iron, gold, and diamond. For the most part, the rarer starting materials result in stronger weapons, except golden swords are functionally identical to wooden swords. In defiance of fantasy genre conventions, gold tools and armor, while effective, have extremely low durability and as such are almost useless except for looking cool. It came as quite a surprise when the players realized the second-rarest material made the weakest weapon, and a lot of people thought it was a bug... until they remembered gold is one of the softest metals in the world; just like in real-life, gold weapons are only good for decorative purposes. They are, however, the best material for holding enchantments. However, gold is also used in conjunction with redstone in a number of craftable items that are considerably more useful, such as powered track. This is because while gold is a terrible material to make armor, weapons or blunt instruments out of it is well known as an integral component in precision electronic devices.
    • You actually can drop an anvil on someone's head. It's just going to damage them. A lot. And it might damage the anvil, too.
    • As of Snapshot 1.12-pre3, feeding cookies to parrots will instantly kill them, and the parrot will emit poison particles as it dies. You used to have to feed parrots cookies to tame them, but this caused an uproar as chocolate is poisonous to real life parrots and the cookies are chocolate chip, something they tried to address with the addition of the "Don't feed chocolate to parrots!" splash message. Now if you want to tame them you have to feed them seeds.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: Spider eyes glow red. All eight of them. Wolves and bees also gain red eyes when they turn hostile. Ghasts have red eyes and are a more extreme example of this trope, since they only open their eyes when they're spitting an exploding fireball at you.
  • Reduced to Ratburgers: You may find yourself reduced to poisonous zombie flesh if you don't have access to a source of fresh meat. This is a pretty desperate situation in the Overworld, though, given all you need for cooked fish is wood, stone, and spider silk. In the Nether, rotten meat dropped by zombie pigmen is the only naturally occurring source of food which can be eaten without extra resources (mushrooms require wood to transform them into an edible form), and is often the last resort of a lost traveler who has exhausted the food they brought with them.
  • Refining Resources: Essentially how the crafting system works. Most recipes require some combination of wood, stone, and metal, either as part of the target item itself or to create the tools needed to make it. More literally, this is the main purpose of the Furnace: consuming fuel to refine raw resources into usable ones like Ores into Ingots, Wood into Charcoal, Clay into Clay Bricks, etc.
  • Regenerating Health:
    • Health works this way as long as your "food meter" is nearly full. When the food meter is completely empty, the exact opposite happens.
    • Playing on Peaceful difficulty grants you regenerating health at all times. Potions of Regeneration and Golden Apples also grant temporary health regeneration.
    • The Ender Dragon mob also has this when you fight one. However, this can be stopped by destroying the Ender Crystals, which actually harms it.
    • The Wither also regenerates health, at a constant rate of half a heart every second. Unlike the Ender Dragon however, there's no way to stop this.
  • Respawn on the Spot: The game is an interesting aversion: If you die, you spawn at a fixed (albeit changeable) point. Most multiplayer servers, however, have the /back command, which instantly teleports you to the point where you died. Quite handy given that your items are left behind.
  • Retcon:
    • Reeds became Sugar Cane so there could be a source of sugar for cake. You can actually make paper from sugar cane, but it's still tasty literature.
    • As of 1.9, the End is no longer a small island in an infinite space, and you'll be able to explore more after beating the Ender Dragon.
    • The 1.12 "World of Color" update adds Glazed Terracotta to the game, which is made by smelting hardened clay in a furnace. Therefore, regular hardened clay has been renamed to "Terracotta". This is very downplayed, as those are functionally identical.
  • Retraux: The game has intentionally very low resolution textures to go with the gameplay of moving giant pixels around. Originally the intention was to update to more modern graphics but fans had already become attached to the faux-16-bit textures.
  • Revive Kills Zombie: Beta 1.9 introduced several kinds of potions with beneficial or harmful effects. For every type, you can use it on yourself, or turn it into a splash potion to throw at friends or enemies. Zombies and skeletons are healed by potions of Poison or Instant Harm, but can be damaged with potions of Regeneration and Instant Health.
  • Rewarding Inactivity: The whole concept of monster grinders. Spawners can spawn monsters indefinitely, and said monsters drop useful EXP (and some other loot)... but a Spawner will only spawn monsters if the player is near one. Thus, the solution is to create a structure that'll feed monsters into a trap to make them easy pickings, then idle endlessly next to a spawner.
  • A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma: One of the title screen quips that appears after starting up the game is, "A riddle wrapped in a mystery!"
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter:
    • Baby mobs. Just making the body smaller while leaving the head the same size should not produce such cuteness!
    • As of the "Pretty Scary" update, bats count as well. They're small brown flying bundles with big ears that make adorable squeaks and hang on walls by their tiny little feet. Aaaw!
    • Face it, those bees are adorable. All the features of a real bee condensed down into a cuboid Cephalothorax... and those giant eyes!
  • Right Behind Me: Creepers have a nasty habit of doing this, being completely quiet until you hear that tell-tale hiss, which means it's already too late to flee. Endermen also have a nasty habit of appearing behind you when they run.
  • Roar Before Beating: Endermen make a rather disturbing noise should the player provoke them by "staring" at them (moving the crosshairs directly over their torsos or heads). Then they usually go directly behind the player.
  • Robbing the Dead: The game lets you rob treasure from pyramids in the desert. Each pyramid can contain things like gold, iron, diamonds, bones, and rotten flesh, but they're also guarded by TNT traps that trigger if you step on the pressure plate. Doing so will destroy all the treasure and kill you.
  • Robinsonade: When starting a new game, you're dropped in the middle of nowhere with only your bare hands and the clothes on your back and must survive using your wits and whatever you can harvest, scavenge, or craft. Sometimes the game will even dump you on a Deserted Island.
  • Rocket Jump: This is possible, but very tricky. Unless it's an adventure map, you'd be better off just placing a couple blocks and making a stairway. However, using a splash potion of harming can double your jump height and is much safer than the previously suggested TNT.
  • Rod And Reel Repurposed:
    • The fishing rod is usually used for fishing, but it can also be used to reel mobs closer to the player. It's not recommended since it breaks the fishing rod much faster.
    • By combining a carrot with a fishing rod, you can make a carrot on a stick, which is used to steer a saddled pig.
  • Rollercoaster Mine: Thanks to the various track pieces, this can result from deliberate player designs. Sometimes players will use this as part of an elaborate transportation system.
  • RPG Elements: The game has this in the form of experience points, potions, and enchantments. Experience points are used to enchant tools and armor pieces for various effects, such as a sword multiplying the number of drops from a mob or a pair of boots that reduces fall damage. Brewing potions can get you various results, depending on what is used, and they can be made into a "splash" form that act like hand grenades.
  • Ruins for Ruins' Sake: Multiple examples. Among others, Abandoned Mineshafts, Jungle and Desert Temples, Underwater Ruins, Strongholds, and Nether Fortresses are all both clearly artificial and rather eerie.
  • Running Gag: Notch for the past several patches, including the release of version 1.0, has stated he "removed Herobrine".


Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report