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  • Acceptable Targets:
    • In the first several seasons, both political parties, with jokes about how Republicans were evil and Democrats were incompetent. The bashing of Republicans versus the lionization of Democrats is relatively new, although this is largely because the series can actually get away with such content now. As a case of Author Appeal, Matt Groening has always been quite vocal about his dislike of the Republican Party outside the show.
    • As with all of Groening's work, Richard Nixon is a popular target.
    • Family Guy, which the newer seasons get compared to or jokingly accuse of ripping off the show. This is kinda ironic since Groening is real life friends with Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane.
    • Arby's. Whenever the restaurant is mentioned, it's always in a mocking tone.
    • Anything that has to do with newspapers and magazines, especially since "E Pluribus Wiggum".
    • With the exception of some of Lisa's activism, usually portrayed as reasonable and noble, any feminists on the show are usually illogical/unreasonable, easily offended or misandristic.
  • Accidental Aesop:
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • "Homer's Enemy". Even though Frank Grimes has worked extremely hard in his life, he also comes off as a myopic pedant and a hard worker working for all the wrong reasons — Considering how he attempts to work and function in a society that is possibly morally and ethically broken beyond repair and is just asking for it, and how he looks at what Homer and his family has as "normal", and is pure straight out jealous of him, he also reeks of Epileptic Trees of self-entitled, self-pitying, and uninsightful idiots that believe that playing the same Idiot Ball game of materialistic society will make them the kings of the Idiot Ball, instead of saying "Screw the money, I have standards."
    • Another alternate interpretation relating to Grimes' death: did he just have a total psychological breakdown and kill himself accidentally? Or was he fully aware of what he was doing and deliberately commit suicide because he could no longer bear to live in such a crazy world where hard work isn't rewarded while laziness is and where everyone was, as he put it, insane?
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: Current showrunner Al Jean, when asked about the show's decline in quality, recalled someone saying the show declined in Season 2:
    Al Jean: Well, it's possible that we've declined. But honestly, I've been here the whole time and I do remember in season two people saying, "It's gone downhill." If we'd listened to that then we would have stopped after episode 13 [of Season 1]. I'm glad we didn't.
  • Anvilicious:
    • Most of the later plots/subplots involving Lisa (though the only episode that had Lisa as a Soapbox Sadie that most fans don't object to is "Lisa vs. Malibu Stacy", as the family calls her out on her activist behavior and she doesn't win in the end). Some have noted this was also a time when Groening used her as a mouthpiece for his views.
    • Some argue that the show becomes this when it discusses politics or religion, though for others it may be a case of Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped.
    • One of the worst Soapbox Sadie Lisa episodes is "Lisa the Skeptic", in which Lisa is extremely emphatic that religion and science cannot coexist, despite her consistently showing religious beliefs from the past (earlier) episodes.
  • Archive Panic:
    • If you watched all 600+ episodes back to back, it would take you almost two weeks. That's not including the movie or the comic along with its spin-offs which have been running since 1993.
    • When the show began airing in syndication on FXX in 2014, they aired all of the then-552 episodes in a non-stop, 12-day marathon called "Every Simpsons Ever."
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Marge is this, mostly due to her constant meddling and interfering in things that aren't her business (even using emotional warfare) and rarely learning from her mistakes. Whether she makes up for this by being a decent mother and the show's occasional voice of reason is debatable, as is whether her negative qualities are funny or even tolerable. Her self-righteousness was strongest on the earliest seasons (wrecking Homer's chances of succeeding a number of times because she considered it immoral), to the point Lisa became the show's "morality voice" to avoid the Simpson marriage from crumbling every other week.
    • Lisa. She's either loved for being a smart, sensitive, progressive-thinking young girl or hated for being a preachy, occasional Author Avatar in Matt Groening's various Wars on Straw who gets everything benefiting her regardless of her words or deeds.
    • Comic Book Guy, after Flanderization turned him into a Straw Fan. The debate is over whether or not he's actually funny as one.
    • Sideshow Bob. While many still enjoy his suave and Evil Is Cool moments, others have grown tired of him and think he's outstayed his welcome. It doesn't help matters that the show giving him such a detailed life and extended family has lead to some fans not finding him mysterious or threatening anymore. His severe Motive Decay and subsequent Flanderization haven't helped in this regard either.
    • Out of the main supporting cast, Moe became particularly hated when the writers started pushing him heavily (and giving him several episodes per season) to keep Hank Azaria from bailing on the show in the late '90s after he landed a series of supporting roles in several high-profile films. Some even compared this to how Denzel Crocker became overexposed in later seasons of The Fairly OddParents!.
    • Apu has become extremely divisive character over the years, especially among Indian-Americans. Some say he's an enjoyable character whose stereotypical traits are no worse than any of the other stereotyped characters on the show, while others think he's a full-blown Ethnic Scrappy who doesn't even remotely resemble a real Indian person.
    • Herb Powell. Some love him for being the Cool Uncle to his nephew and nieces and for being voiced by Danny DeVito. Others dislike him due to him blaming Homer for ruining his company, refusing to acknowledge the fact his company was already falling apart because of his own fault. Those not fond of Herb view his later reconciliation with Homer in "Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?" as undeserved, and his subsequently becoming broke again as Laser-Guided Karma.
    • Bart seems to have become this as of recently. He's either considered an unlikable brat or a Jerkass Woobie.
    • Manjula and the octuplets. While she was seen (at first) as being Happily Married to Apu and the babies are impossibly cute (and possibly seen as wasted characters), they also get dislike due to always appearing nagging and complaining, and eventually due to their presence turning Apu from a quirky and lovable character into a miserable sad-sack whose only schtick now is "complain about my family".
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • Homer's "The Land of Chocolate" Imagine Spot in "Burns Verkaufen der Kraftwerk".
    • Homer eating the Joe Millionaire promo in "Mr. Spritz Goes to Washington".
    • In "Simpson Tide", in the middle of UN negotiations, the Russian ambassador reveals that the Soviet Union never broke up, and was only pretending to have dissolved. Cut to Red Square, where the floats in a parade all abruptly stop, and open up to reveal they were concealing tanks, Germany is no longer united, and Lenin rises from the dead, moaning "must... crush... capitalism".
    • In "The Cartridge Family", the episode where Homer buys a gun, he brings it into the Kwik-E-Mart, which causes Apu to believe that he is going to rob him. He denies this, but then fantasizes what life would be like if he did rob the store, which somehow leads him to become a State senator (sitting in a rocking chair and sporting a monocle, no less) and for Marge to be a go-go dancer as a 60s-inspired jaunty tune nonsensically plays.
    • "Homer Loves Flanders" has Homer being conned out of some money by Bart who deceived him into believing he had tickets to a football game. He was instead given a wig coupon, which then leads to an Imagine Spot featuring him wearing a "Marge" wig, imitating her voice and muttering to himself, "I don't need her at all anymore." note 
    • In "The Front", the episode ends with a 30-second short called "The Adventures of Ned Flanders", a throwaway non-sequitur about the Flanders. This came about as the episode was short on runtime as written and needed something, anything to get it to the length needed.
    • In "Fear of Flying", Homer is banned from Moe's. A man in a nice suit and top hat, who otherwise looks exactly like Homer, enters and introduces himself as "Guy Incognito." The patrons, thinking that it's Homer in a Paper-Thin Disguise, beat him up and toss him out of the bar. As it turns out, it actually was a different person as Homer happens to walk by and see the unconscious doppelgänger. He comments on it before getting distracted by a dog with a puffy tail and the issue is never brought up again.
    • "I'm Just a Girl Who Can't Say D'oh" featured a live-action performance by the Ned Flanders-inspired band Okilly Dokilly through the credits. There is absolutely zero context in the episode for this appearance and it disappears just as abruptly as it appears.
  • Bizarro Episode:
  • The same for "The Tale of Two Springfields", which had the town divided in two because one half of it has its telephone prefix changed.
    • The "Treehouse of Horror" episodes are this by design since they are non-canon Halloween episodes.
  • Broken Base:
    • Were the first two or three seasons part of the show's classic era or just so rife with Early Installment Weirdness (and the first season's horrid art and bizarre animation) that it's hard to watch them again and take them seriously, considering how much the show has changed?
    • Latin American viewers are divided in regards about the dubbed version, which changed almost completely in the sixteenth season. Some consider the voices, while not as good as the originals, aren't that important, while others consider this ruined the series beyond repair.
    • In the same vein, should the show keep making new episodes? Many fans who don't like the new seasons still don't want to see it go off the air, and some of the people who do like them would rather see FOX or Matt Groening Mercy Kill the series before it stops being good.
    • "Homer's Enemy" (the episode with Frank Grimes): Brilliant deconstruction of the show's absurdity, or painfully and humorlessly dark? The only thing fans agree on is that the episode is only accessible to long-time viewers.
    • Which season is the last classic-era season? Seasons 8, 9, or 10?
      • Season 8 is felt to be better than Seasons 9-24 but worse than Seasons 1-7, whether it's Seasonal Rot or flawed but still fun is debatable. Seasons 9 and 10 are either considered flawed but better than later seasons, or the moment the show went downhill. The only thing fans seem to agree on is that Season 9 is probably where the series should have ended.
      • Seasons 11-onward are generally agreed to be worse than seasons 1 through 10, but beyond that, there's little consensus on how they compare to each other.
    • Who was the better showrunner? For the classic era: Is it Al Jean & Mike Reiss, David Mirkin, or Bill Oakley & Josh Weinstein? For the post-classic era: Is it Al Jean or Mike Scully? For Jean's episodes as showrunner, which were better: Seasons 13-16 when he tried to emulate Seasons 1-8, or Seasons 17-present when the show has turned into a watered-down Family Guy and South Park?
      • Mirkin may have an advantage here, as his showrunnership took place in Seasons 5-6, bang in the middle of what is generally considered to be the classic era. Those two seasons probably receive less criticism than any of the others.
    • Over "Saddlesore Galactica". Many fans hate this episode and call it one of the worst ever, but a fair number enjoy it because it spoofs the Flanderization and absurd plots that started to crop up in Season 9. The other "meta" episodes, like "Behind the Laughter", are also divisive—some fans think self-referential humor is just obnoxious and dull (and thus a Franchise Original Sin), while others like that the show has a sense of humor about itself, but none of them are as controversial as "Galactica".
    • In "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show", a focus group asks kids if they'd prefer Itchy and Scratchy to have more down-to-earth plotlines like people have every day or wacky, far out adventures with robots and magic powers. The kids answer enthusiastically to both options. The writers commented that at the time they felt stuck between these two avenues of the fanbase, with half the fans wanting the show to stay grounded in reality, others wanting it to get crazier and crazier.
    • What was the last "classic episode"? While most would agree that the quality of the series declined in season 9, with 10 being the last classic season, there are still episodes beyond them deemed "classic" and thus essential viewing. Contenders include: Season 11's "Behind the Laughter" and Season 12's "Trilogy of Error". Whether any episode from these post-classic and HD era can reach up to the heights the classics achieved is another debate.
    • With the departure and subsequent replacement of long time series composer Alf Clausen with Hans Zimmer and his company Bleeding Fingers Music in season 29. Fans are split as to whether the music is as good as the previous seasons, or if it's marginally worse in comparison.
    • The switch over to computer animation. While some believe that the show looks more polished, others find the original, hand-drawn animation style to be much more charming.
  • Crack Pairing: A few crack Epileptic Trees about Maude and both Marge and Helen have appeared over the years.
  • Crazy Awesome: Groundskeeper Willie, an insanely angry Scottish janitor who fistfights with animals, fought actual space invaders with a shotgun, and apparently thinks movies are real.
  • Creator Worship: Matt Groening gets little of the blame for the series' decline (having only a "Creative Consultant" credit for most seasons) while James L. Brooks gets none (likewise having no real involvement in the series for most of its run, having an "Executive Creative Consultant" credit for the entire series).
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • In "The Man Who Came to Be Dinner", a shallow Take That! at Disney involves a Mickey Mouse stand-in saying "My cartoons weren't good, they were just first", when anyone who's familiar with Felix the Cat, the early animations by Windsor McCay, or even the history of animation in general would know for certain that Mickey Mouse is not the first cartoon character, not even the first to become popular.
    • In "That '90s Show", a billboard in 1998 depicts Amy Rose with her design from Sonic Adventure, which wasn't released in North America until the following year.
    • In "To Courier With Love", the French police use poodles as service dogs. There are two problems with this, firstly, they are using the wrong breed of a poodle as they are using toy poodles. It should be a standard poodle since toy poodles are mainly bred for companionship. Secondly, poodles aren't known for being service dogs. However, this all seemingly invoked as a joke due to the comments between the chief and the officer:
      "I keep telling you, they are worthless"
      "But they are so damn cute"
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: While the series can be sadistically hilarious at times with almost the whole town filled with jerks, there are moments where viewers thought they went too far. Such as...
    • "Homer's Enemy" is a dark, bitter Deconstruction of the show's mythology, which was so shocking to fans that some think it forever tainted the series' legacy of being biting but lighthearted, not outright sick and twisted.
    • "The Boys Of Bummer" is an extremely divisive episode for this reason. What with practically 99% of the town's population driving Bart to near-suicide, it was safe to say that nobody on the show was likable anymore.
    • The Simpsons Movie attempts to address the issue regarding Homer. Homer, as everyone knows, is a bumbling idiot that always causes problems for himself, his family, and the town. When Homer dooms the town to die, Marge takes the kids with her to some place safe after she wonders why she even puts up with him after so many years, Lisa declares she has no father, and Bart finds Ned Flanders, a slightly-overbearing religious nice guy, to be a better father to him than Homer ever was. Homer took this event as a wakeup call to change himself and take responsibility for his actions. Of course, Homer goes right back to his usual antics on the television series.
  • Designated Hero:
    • Homer used to be a well-intentioned moron, but has been an outright Jerkass for the last 10 or so seasons, in part because he's become much crueler towards his family and friends.
    • The use of Recycled Script also makes Lisa this, as she will often be presented as in the right or get a happy ending, yet when someone else does the exact same thing they are treated as a jerkass and shunned for it.
    • Marge’s status as the show's Designated Victim means that no matter the situation, she's treated as the wronged party. There are many situations where Marge goes along with Homer’s plans, does the same thing as him or something worse, yet she will always be treated as the victim or at least sympathetic, if it’s not outright ignored or Played for Laughs. What makes this worse is that there are episodes where Marge is clearly shown in the wrong only for the plot to go through a Shocking Swerve or Halfway Plot Switch, so not only are her actions forgotten, but she usually ends up getting exactly what she wanted.
  • Designated Villain:
    • Horst and the other Germans from "Burns Verkaufen der Kraftwerk", which also makes Homer the Designated Victim. Aside from not being threatening or even the least bit unpleasant like everyone expected them to be (barring their "threat" to Mr. Burns at the end of the episode) and the numerous and expensive repairs in need at the plant which were still out of Homer's reach even as the safety inspector, his own incompetence and inability to explain his job or provide any ways to improve productivity at the plant got him fired, and rightfully so. Even a later scene had him complaining that they had no right to fire him, while using a fork inside of a toaster oven. In spite of his Moment of Awesome of telling off Mr. Burns at Moe's, you can't blame the men for taking action, especially since he was the only employee to be let go.
    • Bart and the IRS in "Bart the Fink". The episode and the cast act like Bart ratted Krusty out to the IRS for tax evasion and the IRS swooped in to take everything Krusty owns, and Bart feels like he's responsible when Krusty commits suicide (actually fakes his death). However, Bart's exposure of Krusty was entirely accidental and the IRS was doing their job in charging Krusty and making him pay back the taxes he should have paid in the first place. Additionally, between just how much Krusty owes on his taxes (the IRS takes everything he owns, and they'd have to garnish his wages 75% for 40 years to make up the debt), and his history of terrible business decisions, gambling problems, and general wastefulness with money, it's quite evident that Krusty has no one to blame but himself for what happened.
    • Similarly, you have Evelyn, Marge's high school classmate, and the other country club women from "Scenes from the Class Struggle in Springfield", save for Sue-sin, of course. While constantly referred to as snobs throughout the episode, none of the women were intentionally rude or even catty to Marge (and, at worst, could only be seen as Innocently Insensitive) and had she and the rest of family went to the big party at the club, they would have welcomed them in with open arms. Even Sue-sin comments she wasn't serious or malicious in her attitude.
    • Burns of all people is this in "The Burns and the Bees". All he wanted to do was become popular by building a flashy new stadium for the team he brought. Unfortunately, this went against Lisa’s plan to build a bee sanctuary and Burns is treated as the villain of the episode. When Homer unleashed a hoard of Africanized bees on the stadium, injuring who knows how many people, Burns was the one who was blamed and had to pay for all the damages (being expelled from the billionaire camp since he had less than a billion dollars) while Lisa and Homer got off scot-free.
    • The titular SSCCATAG group of "Marge vs. Singles, Seniors, Childless Couples and Teens, and Gays". Sure, their hatred for kids might be extreme, but with how unruly the toddlers were in that episode, it's hard to argue that they don't have a point with some of the laws.
    • In "White Christmas Blues" in order to make money, Marge turns the Simpson house into a bed-and-breakfast by inviting a number of people that she had no way of accommodating and promising them things that she had no way (and no intention) of providing. Yet the tenants are the ones shown in the wrong for complaining that Marge essentially conned them out of a lot of money.
    • The other girls, especially Sherri and Terri, in a lot of the "Lisa has no friends" episodes. They're often treated as shallow or straight up evil for kissing up to Lisa whenever she has something they want despite not actually liking her... but Lisa does exactly the same, trying to suck up to other girls that she only ever has contempt for simply because they're in a group, sometimes expressing this in the exact same scene. Lisa is never once called out or addressed for this and isn't subject to the disproportionate treatment the other girls get in a lot of other episodes for the apparent crime of not liking Lisa. Not to mention the twins and Janey in particular have occasionally done something nice or supported her such as in "I'm Spelling As Fast As I Can", yet Lisa's never done anything for them. As a result, it can make the other kids (even the usual Nice Girl, Allison) come off entirely justified whenever they rebuff Lisa.
    • Bart is Made Out to Be a Jerkass any time he is shown to be superior to Lisa at anything, to the point where giving up his talent for her is a recurring plotline. He's been given a What the Hell, Hero? with Marge blaming him for the consequence of Lisa's jealous antics, which ultimately convinces him to stay crippled by the end of the episode. Even when Bart is superior only because of prior knowledge, Lisa is still presented as justified in her resentment and he as wrong for retaliating, and he's also presented as wrong when the reverse is true and he resents Lisa when she proves to be superior in something he's good at.
  • Dork Age: The earlier seasons ruthlessly mocked sitcom conventions, but the more recent ones generally play them straight, and the remaining satire tends to be in the form of blunt exposition, rather than being worked into the script.
    • The episodes from Mike Scully's time as showrunner (Seasons 9-12) are accused of this due to Flanderization, crazy off-the-wall plots (and for some, too much focus on Homer, Lisa or Moe), and in Season 11, the show trying to be just like more "in-your-face" satirical cartoons like Family Guy and South Park just to keep up (though the writers saw it more as taking the piss out of those types of shows.) There were also issues with tone: Some of the episodes, including the infamous "The Principal and the Pauper" and "Saddlesore Galactica", tried to mock their own absurdity, but the parody was so subtle that it came across as Flanderization to some.
    • Al Jean's time as showrunner, Seasons 13-present: His first few seasons were attempts to imitate Seasons 3 through 7, but to some the show became a milder clone of Family Guy and South Park around Season 17 (coincidentally around the time that the former show was Un-Canceled). The heavy reliance on recycled plots, dated pop-culture references, and celebrity cameos throughout hasn't helped. Depending on the Writer characterization has also become a problem, especially with Homer and Bart: characters' personalities have been reduced to whatever the plot of the week requires.
    • As a consequence of the show's age, reusing plots has also become a problem: Homer's terrible health, he and Marge's teetering marriage, and Lisa's Wangst have all been beaten to death over the years, but keep coming back regardless.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Homer and Bart. Sometimes fans will excuse their actions when they were in the wrong, often when Homer or Bart hurt Lisa in some way, simply because they dislike Lisa or prefer Homer and Bart to other characters. It also applies to later seasons independently of Lisa — Bart often causes problems for himself or exudes an aura of Brilliant, but Lazy, but fans sometimes think the universe of the show or the writers just aren't cutting him a break.
    • Sideshow Bob gets this from some of the fandom. While he is canonically a bit of an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain, many fanworks gloss over his deliberate attempts to murder or otherwise harm people and turn him into a straight-up good guy with a heap of Dark and Troubled Past.
  • Ear Worm:
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: It has its own page.
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Many Lisa-focused plots have this as they often require ignoring or even an outright sacrifice of someone else's happiness (that person usually being Bart). There are even episodes where people are heavily injured and even killed, but ignored because Lisa got what she wanted. (It works the other way, too, with plenty of episodes that have had happy endings for everyone except Lisa, sometimes directly at her expense.)
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Over the years, Apu has become the target for a lot of Indian-American people, especially from actors who'd had to go through thousands of auditions where they'd be asked to do some variation on his stereotypical voice, not to mention dealt with racism from people making fun of them by doing that voice. Comedian Hari Kondabolu once described him as "a white guy doing an impression of a white guy doing an impression of my dad," and went as far as to make a documentary, The Problem With Apu, discussing his and other Hindi descendants' complicated relationship with the character and acknowledging that it has as much to do with a general lack of representation of Indians in American media as it did with Apu himself. Although the episode "No Good Read Goes Unpunished" tried to address this, it's gotten so bad that Hank Azaria has stated he's willing to step down from the role of Apu.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Mr. Burns is one of the most evil characters in the show, but being Born in the Wrong Century and taking joy in his wickedness has provided some really interesting quirks that make him stand out to other antagonists, especially in the early seasons.
    • Sideshow Bob. He's voiced by Kelsey Grammer and his plans tend to be well thought out and the only reason he loses is someone outgambits him in some way, but he comes pretty close to succeeding.
    • The all-powerful Kang and Kodos, who've managed to conquer the Earth a decent number of times.
    • Hank Scorpio is a fan favorite villain for being a criminal mastermind who was also a Benevolent Boss to Homer.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Sideshow Bob has amassed a fair number of fangirls through the years. The fact that he's a reasonably young man with a lot of charisma and acting talent doesn't hurt.

    F-L 
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Usually Played for Laughs, such as the one from "Itchy & Scratchy & Marge": One person can make a difference, but most of the time, they probably shouldn't.
  • Fandom Heresy: Not unlike the whole "prequels vs. the original series" debates, defense of any later episode will come across as this.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • The Simpsons is one of the media franchises most well-known for having multiple foreign dubs in the same language, most notably two different Frenchnote  and Spanishnote  versions. However, due to the drastically different voice casts and approaches to Woolseyism between regional versions, the American and European fans are often at each other's throats about whose dub is superior.
    • The rivalry that pretty much all regions of fans have with fans of Family Guy.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Nedna is literally a fan-preferred couple: FOX held a vote to see if they should break up or become an Official Couple. Nedna won (but not before Marcia Wallace died, leaving Ned Flanders a widower once again).
    • Nelson/Lisa is generally considered a better future outcome than Milhouse/Lisa, by fans and voice actors alike. So much so that in The Simpsons: Tapped Out, Nelson and Lisa spend significantly more time referencing their relationship than Milhouse does expressing his crush.
    • Bart/Laura Powers is very beloved due to the chemistry between the two's rebellous prankster personalities, and hearing Laura's promise of how she'd date Bart once he grew up a bit more in "New Kid on the Block" was icing on the cake. Even Bartkira, a 2014 fanwork combining the story of AKIRA with the aesthetics of The Simpsons, was more than happy to pair Bart/Laura together as the main duo. In addition to this, several of Bart's future love interests are considered uninteresting and bland, adding even more support to the pairing.
    • Milhouse/Samantha Stankey. Much in the vein of Bart/Laura, Milhouse/Samantha is especially adored due to the love the two shared in "Bart's Friend Falls in Love", and out of spite in regards to future seasons forcibly portraying him as a hopeless loser by having him go after The One That Got Away and winning her back against all odds.
  • Fans Prefer the New Her: In "Large Marge", Marge is not happy when a plastic surgeon gives her breast implants meant for one of Mayor Quimby's female interns and she spends the whole episode fretting about them (while all the men drool and ogle at them), which of course means they're gone by the end of the episode. This one probably doesn't need any further explanation.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Some fans treat "Lisa the Vegetarian" as this, as they feel this episode started Lisa's eventual Flanderization into a Soapbox Sadie. While Lisa was militant about her newfound vegetarianism, the episode ends with her learning to accept other people's beliefs and Lisa eventually apologizes to Homer for her actions. Later episodes would have Lisa be just as belligerent in her causes, but now she'd rarely be called out for her behavior or treated in the wrong for forcing her beliefs on others.
  • First Installment Wins: Some fans treat "Mother Simpson" as the only time Mona Simpson appears, as they feel her later appearances cancel out its very powerful Tear Jerker ending.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: It has its own page.
  • Genre Turning Point: It's impossible to overstate how revolutionary this show was. Not only was it one of the first mainstream western cartoons to be specifically written for adults, it was the Trope Codifier for animated sitcoms. In addition to that, the Laugh Track free, subversive, and often meta humor had massive influence on sitcoms in general, animated or not.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • Lisa. She's a Base-Breaking Character in the United States, but Lisa is very popular with Japanese audiences, due to her studiousness and Buddhism. Promotional material for The Simpsons in Japan even portrays her as the main character.
    • The show is extremely popular abroad, due to the extensive Woolseyisms involved in each foreign dub.
      • French Canadians love the series; it's one of the only foreign shows airing in French Canada to not only be dubbed into Canadian French, but to extensively use colloquial Québécois French accents and slang as opposed to the Standard French typically used in French-Canadian dubs.
      • In South America, this is pretty much the only non-Latin show to air nowadays in over-the-air channels (aside from the occasional Brazilian or Turkish soaps). The Simpsons Movie confirmed the show's popularity, being the highest-grossing movie of 2007 in Argentina, as well in the rest of the region, bringing back audiences to theaters after decades.
      • Note that the "classic" Latin American dub (until season 15) was notable among imports for replacing most North American-centric references to more localized ones (as well as translated names). This largely ended after the (infamous) voice actor "switcheroo", with more recent episodes keeping the original references.
  • Growing the Beard: While not considered bad, the first season seems jarringly different than other seasons to more recent viewers, due to the show's slower pace, Homer's voice, the quirks of the animation style, etc. The show really picks up in the second season, and then really hits its stride by the third season. The reason was largely financial: the initial Tracey Ullman shorts were done on the cheap (starting with a two-man animation team, one of whom was Matt Groening), and improved as more funding was added. The first season was a half-length trial - with the second season, they got a full whack of funding and were able to set down a regular writing and production cycle and firm up the designs.
    • Depending on who you ask many fans will consider Season 20 onwards to be the show Regrowing the Beard after a bad case of Seasonal Rot, or the show succumbing to Seasonal Rot after it Grew the Beard between Season 15 to 20, or the show maintaining its decade long Seasonal Rot.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Brush with Greatness", as Ringo Starr is responding to fan mail from the 1970s, he says, "I don't care if it takes me another 20 years. I'm going to answer every one of them." In October 2008, Starr announced he'd no longer accept any more fan mail.
    • In "Fear of Flying", Homer didn’t want Marge to go to therapy because he thought it would turn her against him. In "Specs in the City", he finds out that she is in therapy and he is her biggest complaint.
    • In "Bart Gets Hit by a Car", which first aired in 1991, Bart is told by the devil he's not due to end up in hell until the next time the Yankees win the pennant (their last World Series appearance at the time being in 1981). The Yankees won the pennant in 1996, which could mean Bart's had a short life.
    • In "Lisa's First Word", Bart spent the entire episode resenting Lisa because he felt that his parents were disregarding him as she was getting all the attention. Eventually, he is about to run away until Lisa says her first word, "Bart". Then comes "Lisa's Sax" where Bart being disregarded by his parents as Lisa gets all the attention is exactly what happens. Taken even further when Marge eventually admits she sees all of her children as Replacement Goldfish, making Lisa a serious case of the Middle Child Syndrome.
    • In "Beyond Blunderdome" guest star Mel Gibson is genuinely shocked when audiences react badly to his ultra-violent climactic blood bath ending to his remake of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. A few years later, Gibson's life and career would spiral out of control when he couldn't cope with general audiences reacting badly to his very bloody 2004 Crucifixion film The Passion of the Christ, seriously damaging his reputation in the process as he suffered a serious nervous breakdown complete with alcohol relapse and the end of his long standing marriage to Robin Moore.
    • "Bart of Darkness": Bart worrying that Maude might be dead doesn't seem so funny now that Maude really is dead.
    • Dr. Hibbert's whole situation of being the anti-Cliff Huxtable in light of the Real Life sexual crimes that Bill Cosby has been accused of doing, especially in "On a Clear Day I Can't See My Sister", where Hibbert makes a reference to dealing with a sexual harassment lawsuit.
    • Seeing what a cool, heroic guy that Jebediah Springfield, the town's founder, is portrayed as in "The Telltale Head" is this after his true identity is discovered in "Lisa the Iconoclast": as a conman and a scoundrel who tried to kill George Washington.
    • Homer killing Prince by choking him with his guitar and then smashing his head with it in the "How To Get Ahead in Dead-Vertising" segment of "Treehouse of Horror XIX" can become this after Prince's death in April 2016.
    • In "Marge vs. Singles, Seniors, Childless Couples and Teens, and Gays", while the Springfieldians are taking away every kid friendly aspect in Springfield, they changed the Toys R Us. Moe switches the backwards "R" into a normal "R", making the children cry. In 2018, Toys R Us went out of business (in the UK and the US respectively, international subsidiaries still operate), making real-life children, whether current or former, sad just like the kids in Springfield.
    • "Homer Badman" centre around Homer being wrongfully accused of sexual assault and ends up as a Memetic Molester. There have since been many cases with people being wrongfully, and even falsely accused of sexual assault, rape, etc. The Duke Lacrosse scandal and UVA scandal, just to name a few.
    • In "The Two Mrs. Nahasapeemapetilons", Manjula blithely remarks that if her and Apu's marriage doesn't work out, they can always get a divorce, and in the very next season there's a Valentine episode where Apu dotes on Manjula. And then in the next season they had octuplets, which strained their relationship to the point where Apu had an affair, which completely changed Manjula's character into a bitter, hateful shrew who seemingly only exists to make Apu miserable...and yet they stay together, seemingly just so the writers can milk their broken marriage for Cringe Comedy.
    • Homer has gotten Bart in trouble twice by telling him that being cool and following peer pressure is the most important thing in the world. Once in "The Telltale Head" and another in "Bart's Not Dead". Only once did Homer have a Heel Realization for his actions, even though the later case put Bart’s life danger.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: In "Worst Episode Ever" jokes are made about Comic Book Guy's single status, when Dr. Hibbert comments after he has a heart attack that the job of running a comic store is something he'd call "The Professional Widowmaker" except the owners are never married. Flashforward to Season 25's "Married to the Blob" and Comic Book Guy does end up Happily Married.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Has its own page.
  • Ho Yay: Has its own page
  • Hollywood Homely: Selma and Patty are presented as being extremely unattractive in the show, but they don't look substantially different from their sister Marge, who's considered to be beautiful.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: The recurring Break Up to Make Up plot between Homer and Marge from the early seasons was revived after Homer Took a Level in Jerkass during the Al Jean years. While it was supposed to make the audience wonder why someone would put up with him, Marge increasingly became portrayed as extremely vindictive, to the point where she began looking like the abusive one at times.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Bart, Homer, Lisa and Grandpa Simpson. Depending on the Writer, Nelson Muntz, Moe, and Milhouse sometimes qualify.
    • Mr. Burns, whenever he tries to atone for what he's done (he usually gets rejected).
    • Frank Grimes is another example. He's had a god-awful life after being abandoned by his parents, was such a No Respect Guy that everyone laughed at his funeral, and had to work with Homer's stupid antics.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Bart. Marge too, must run in the family.
  • Love to Hate: Sideshow Bob and Mr. Burns are incredibly sinister and Laughably Evil.
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    M-S 
  • Magnificent Bastard: Springfield has many citizens and many villains – but despite so much competition the following still manage to leave their mark of devious charm:
    • Hank Scorpio is the president of the Globex Corporation whose passions include his employees’ wellbeing, fun runs and world domination. Threatening the UN with a Doomsday device, Scorpio holds the world at ransom while at the same time becoming friends with new hire Homer Simpson, actually managing to make Homer productive. Scorpio also amiably parts with Homer when the latter decides to return to Springfield for the sake of his family. Conquering the East Coast, Scorpio gives Homer the Denver Broncos as a farewell gift and assures him they will always be friends. Emulating the best aspects of the classic Bond villains he parodies, Scorpio also cares just as much – if not more – about his employees’ happiness as he does about conquering the world. The height of Affably Evil and perhaps the show’s most successful villain, Hank Scorpio is a beloved character years after his single episode.
    • Molloy, a resident of the Springfield Retirement Castle that is in truth the Springfield Cat Burglar, enacted a crime spree across the town. When Homer, head of the new Neighbourhood Watch, was interviewed by Kent Brockman, Molloy phoned in to taunt Homer that he would steal the Springfield Museum’s Zirconia. Molloy succeeds despite Homer’s efforts. When arrested, Molloy gracefully returns all his stolen goods before being put in jail, where he tells Homer and Chief Wiggum about where he hid all his stolen loot, leading to the whole town hunting for it. When the location Molloy described is found, all that is present is a note saying Molloy lied and used the time they spent searching to escape. An archetypical Gentleman Thief, Molloy remains memorable despite his only appearance and relatively humble goals.
  • Memetic Mutation: Has its own page.
  • Mexicans Love Speedy Gonzales: A strange thing about Apu is that while he has been criticized by Indian-Americans or rather South Asian Americans (since even Pakistanis and Bangladeshis who aren't Indians are confused for the stereotype and accent), Apu is well-liked in India itself for the fact that Apu was one of the few Indian-origin characters in American TV, and that he was in the context of his time, non-stereotypical i.e. not defined entirely by religion, not overtly submissive, and generally shown with the same flaws and quirks as any Springfielder, compared to most Indian characters in Western media.
  • Mis-blamed:
    • Since he became showrunner in Season 9, Mike Scully gets blamed for "The Principal and the Pauper" during that season. Except Scully was never involved in it. It was a left-over episode from Season 8, with Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein as showrunners, Steven Dean Moore was the director, and Ken Keeler was the writer.
    • Lisa sometimes gets this from the fans, being blamed for Marge and Homer's bad parenting when fans feel they favour her over Bart. In "Lisa's Sax", many felt that Bart's unhappiness at school was shoved aside in favour of nurturing Lisa's gift. While the episode supports this to an extent, it's not really Lisa's fault as she was a toddler at the time and not consciously trying to steal their parents' attention.
    • The show itself gets a lot of blame from fans of classic animation for causing the industry to move away from Deranged Animation and popularizing the more conservative style of TV animation that became the norm from the 1990s onwards, with said fans even pointing to the rejection of the original, more cartoonish version of "Some Enchanted Evening" as proof that the show was trying to kill off that kind of animation. In actual fact, TV animation had for the previous quarter-century show been the Limited Animation of studios like Hanna-Barbera and Filmation, with classic-style animation actually having a comeback in the early 1990snote . The popularity of The Simpsons did ensure that shows like Family Guy and King of the Hill would become de jure once the "classic animation" resurgence crashed at the end of that decade, but said crash was more to do with studio politics amid lack of audience interest and the emergence of CGI animation than anything to do with The Simpsons.
  • Moe:
    • Maggie, the adorable Cute Mute baby who is always sucking on her pacifier (though she has a dark side).
    • Lisa, being a smart, caring, and idealistic Adorably Precocious Child.
    • Ralph, one of Lisa's classmates, qualifies due to his innocence and being a Cloudcuckoolander.
    • Ironically the character named Moe definitely averts this trope.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Has its own page.
  • More Popular Spinoff: This show started off as animated shorts on The Tracey Ullman Show. Although Ullman was a solid hit for the then-budding FOX network, it is today almost entirely forgotten outside the context of being The Simpsons' parent show (and even then, you'd be lucky to find many people aware of the show's origins).
  • Most Wonderful Sound: The heavenly choir at the beginning of the opening sequence.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Lisa's profile quote in the arcade game: "Embrace nothingness!" She only said it once in the actual show but many fans know her best for saying just that.
    • Similarly Bart said "Cowabunga" in only a couple of instances in the original Tracey Ullman shorts and the second season, despite it being slapped on endless merchandise of the character. DVD commentary reveals the creative team were surprised he even said it in the actual series at all.
    • The townspeople gets virtually no love at all ever since Boys Of Bummer premiered, despite them apologizing for treating Bart badly to the point Bart was nearly Driven to Suicide. One particular case is Chief Wiggum for driving Bart back to the crowd for losing the game and was the one who taunted Bart into jumping off.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Hank Scorpio. Many fans love him even if they don't like Season 8, and he was so popular that the writers even considered making him the Big Bad of The Simpsons Movie. Even when they didn't do so, the villain they did make was almost completely like him (except minus his personable manner).
  • Opinion Myopia: Even so much as suggesting latter-day episodes have a bit of spark in them is an incredibly easy way to provoke the steadfast feelings of fans of the older episodes. (But, of course, it actually works both ways: for those who tend play up the Zombie Simpsons ideology, there are also those who may deny any kind of flaws in the newer episodes whatsoever.)
  • Padding: The show's creative team readily admit that they do this, because episodes often don't end up timing out properly once all the elements get put together. This is why things like the Overly Long Gag and the Halfway Plot Switch became show staples. Bart's Prank Calls to Moe were specifically designed as standalone bits that could be dropped into an episode's storyline if they needed to fill time.
  • Polished Port: The XBLA and PSN port of the arcade game is basically arcade perfect.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games:
    • With few exceptions, most Simpsons games are terrible. The arcade game and The Simpsons: Hit & Run, however, are regarded as classics, Bart's Nightmare is fairly decent, and the 2007 multi-platform game, despite camera issues, has some genuinely hilarious moments.
    • Also averted with the pinball machine The Simpsons Pinball Party, which pinball fans commonly regard as one of the 21st century's best.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Two words: Hank Scorpio.
  • Sacred Cow:
  • Scapegoat Creator: Everything wrong with the show post-Season 8 (or any outside circumstances, like hiring writers who can't capture the magic of the early seasons, Recycling old storylines, excessive celebrity cameos, trying to keep up with current events, or retiring the characters Troy McClure and Lionel Hutz because of Phil Hartman's deathnote ) tends to be blamed on the showrunner: Mike Scully for seasons 9-12 and Al Jean for seasons 13 to the current one.
    • Scully also gets accused of ruining the show after season 12, either because he became an producer starting with Season 13, or because he did so much damage as showrunner that the show couldn't be saved.
    • Likewise, Jean gets accused of ruining the show before season 13, either because he returned to the show in season 10 or he became executive producer in seasons 11 and 12.
    • A Vocal Minority of fans, especially those who think Seasonal Rot set in around Season 6 or 7, point the finger at the writing staff who left the show after the fourth production season as "Cape Feare"note , a Season 4 holdover aired on Season 5, is the last episode written by the original writers.
  • The Scrappy: Everyone in this show is a Base-Breaking Character in some way, but these are the characters just about everyone hates.
    • Marvin Monroe is hated by almost everyone, mostly because of his annoying raspy voice, but also for his judgmental stance. His voice actor, Harry Shearer wanted the character removed from the show because voicing him actually damaged Shearer himself. And even Matt Groening hated his annoying voice, which is why he was removed from the show.
    • Agnes Skinner. She has a very toxic relationship toward her son Seymour (just about every form of abuse but sexual), openly insults anyone without them doing anything to her (like calling Homer "Jumbo" for no reason in "Simpsons Safari"), complains constantly about nothing, and is just plain unpleasant to be around.
    • The Lovejoys. The Reverend is intolerant, passive-aggressive, greedy and often antagonizes anyone that doesn't conform to his views, while also being a poor parent and an even poorer clergyman (as shown by his multiple attempts of arson and leading his followers on mob riots). Helen is gossipy, judgemental and vindictive towards everyone else, especially the Simpsons (primarily Marge). It also doesn't help that they're both the show's main targets when they need to make fun of religion or political correctness. While Timothy still has his fans, you would be hard-pressed to find someone that likes (or in other words, doesn't loathe) Helen.
    • The Crazy Cat Lady gets a lot of heat for having one joke (it's in the name) that keeps getting used long after it stopped being funny.
    • Rich Texan as well, for the same reason — his one joke is that he's a tired Texan cowboy stereotype.
    • The Yes Guy is a similar one-joke character. His entire shtick consists of an exaggerated "Yeeeeeeeees" pronunciation a la comedian Frank Nelson. He was introduced in season 10 and his (admittedly infrequent) appearances quickly lost their humor.
    • Gil Gunderson. He was introduced in "Realty Bites" as a parody of Jack Lemmon in Glengarry Glen Ross, but soon became a recurring character. While occasionally amusing, Gil's never developed beyond being a Straw Loser despite receiving several focus episodes. It doesn't help that he occasionally works as an incompetent attorney, which led many to label him a Replacement Scrappy for Lionel Hutz.
    • Joe LaBoot from "The Boys of Bummer". His hypocrisy towards Bart for losing the game while he's a consistently crap baseball player and yet is still rich and revered and then is completely evil towards him for little reason, has unsurprisingly gained him a large hatedom.
    • Poochie is this In-Universe in "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show", Poochie is a new Itchy & Scratchy character voiced by Homer, who is Totally Radical (and in Itchy's face) even in his post-episode aesops. No-one likes him, and is hastily canned, leading to the Shoo Out the New Guy trope.
  • Seasonal Rot:
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: In the early days, this cartoon was criticized for being a kids' cartoon (even though the only reason Matt Groening made the show bright and colorful was to grab their attention, not make it a kids' show) that dealt with a lot of smutty and controversial content. These days, it barely (but occasionally) raises a blip on the Moral Guardian's radar, thanks to South Park and Seth MacFarlane's cartoons being far more shocking and controversial.
  • Snark Bait: The seasons 11-onward episodes are prime targets of this. They aren't called "Zombie Simpsons" for nothing.
  • So Okay, It's Average: Believe it or not, the post-Seasonal Rot episodes has its fans, even though their positive comments will often draw negative comparisons to the earlier seasons by fans of those seasons.

    T-W 
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: How longtime fans and animation students felt about the Title Sequence that has been in use since the LABFXX production season (i.e. season 20 starting from "Take My Life, Please"). Two main instances stand out. The first one is Marge's animation during the supermarket scene, which went from elaborate movement to a simple turn of her head. It's understandable in context (her time was shortened in order to add in Gerald and Maggie fist shaking), but still. The second one is Homer getting hit by Marge's car and bursting through the door in the garage instead of him screaming at the sight of the car and running away from it via the same door.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Has its own page.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Has its own page.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Some of the criticism of the newer seasons comes from the extremely high expectations fans had after the first 8-10 seasons.
  • Toy Ship: Mary Spuckler almost married Bart, due to the Spuckler family's backwards marital traditions. She's also the only one of his many love interests to be featured prominently in more than one episode.
  • True Art Is Incomprehensible: The Scully era (namely season 11-12 with the episodes "Saddlesore Galactica" and "A Tale of Two Springfields") got routinely scathing reviews and a good amount of a Broken Base, but it has gotten praise by some as a brilliant surrealist, experimental take on all the cliches The Simpsons was dishing out. Some art critics have even called it a genuinely good work of post-modernism.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • The grotesque animation style of the earliest episodes (including the Tracey Ullman shorts) and in some episodes in which the Simpsons are depicted in another medium (claymation, live-action, as drawn by John Kricfalusi, as drawn by Bill Plympton, CGI, Lego, Robot Chicken-style stop-motion, etc)
    • The real-world celebrity cameos can come off as this, as they're always drawn as realistically as possible which clashes with the semi-abstract designs of the main and recurring cast.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: Since the writers enjoy playing fast-and-loose with morality and Sympathetic P.O.V., viewers might agree with characters who are not supposed to be seen in the right.
    • Bart, if you think about all the crap he goes through. Sure, he's a brat, but Homer strangles him constantly, he often feels ignored and useless in the face of Lisa's accomplishments, he's picked on at school, blamed for things other people have done, and of course Sideshow Bob keeps trying to kill him.
    • Homer can get this treatment as well (specifically if you don't consider him a Jerk with a Heart of Jerk Villain Protagonist [particularily in the later seasons], this even is used to justify his traits): Freudian Excuse, a menial job, being called out by everyone each time he does something wrong, and (earlier on) having Always Someone Better as a neighbor.
      • One example of Homer being Unintentionally Sympathetic is "Homer's Enemy". Here we are supposed to side with Frank Grimes, but Homer spends the entire episode being nice to the guy (it's just that Frank's frustration towards Homer goes over his head) and yet Frank is a rude Jerkass to him out of anger that Homer's life is better than his, culminating in him attempting to humiliate Homer (which fails).
    • Edna Krabappel was supposed to be the bitter, cranky teacher who yelled at Bart for every misdeed of his, but over time it was hard not to pity her when you realized how bitter and lonely she was.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Has its own page.
  • Unpopular Popular Character:
    • While the audience finds them lovable, it's made clear that most of the populace finds the Simpsons troublesome and/or dangerous. In the episode "Simpson Safari", this subtle exchange occurs:
      Homer: The Simpsons are going to Africa!
      Family: Yay!
      [In Africa, two tribesmen dance around a fire. Suddenly, one of them stops]
      Tribesman: What is it, N'gungo?
      N'gungo: Evil is coming.
      Tribesman: What shall we do, N'gungo?
      N'gungo: [puts his mask on the other tribesman's head] You are N'gungo now! [runs away screaming]
    • Milhouse is treated as a Butt-Monkey in-universe, but he has his fans among the viewers as he's also The Woobie.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • The Mike Scully era (1997-2001). Back when he was the show runner, a lot of fans thought it was a decline in quality due to the change of tone that resulted. But now, some people consider his first two seasons (seasons 9 and 10) part of the classic era, most likely due to Al Jean having the show runner position longer than the Scully, Oakley/Weinstein, Mirkin, Jean/Reiss, and Brooks/Groening/Simon years combined (15 years and counting). The fact the show has done quite a few outlandish episodes since Matt Selman became co-showrunner has helped the Scully era to look better.
    • Many earlier episodes were actually heavily criticised when they first aired. Nowadays, many of them are fondly remembered as the show's golden era.
    • The voice actors all agreed that "Marge vs. the Monorail" was one of the worst episodes they had ever done. Nowadays, it's often remembered as one of the best by fans.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Kang and Kodos are brother and sister. Arguably justified as they are Starfish Aliens.
  • Wangst: In later seasons. From all directions.
  • "Weird Al" Effect:
    • Some of their various political parodies may fall into this for newer viewers who weren't around (or were too young to remember) to witness them.
    • Many of the older guest stars on earlier seasons were still household (or at least widely-known) names during the 1990s and 2000s, yet by the 2010s these quickly slipped off the radar. Ironically, several Al Jean-era episodes have featured quite a few references to media and celebrities that yet were becoming rather obscure in the 1990s,note  leading to some Just Here for Godzilla sentiment from some fans who otherwise would give up on the show as well from pop-culture buffs.
    • Many younger viewers would not realize that many of the characters were based (at least, partly) on older media: For instance, Homer's voice is based on that of Walter Matthau (especially notable in the first few seasons), Bart was based on Dennis the Menace (something alluded a couple of times), Krusty was based on afternoon local-TV kids' hosts (this before these shows vanished in the 90s), Frink was based on Dr. Julius Kelp from Jerry Lewis' 1963 film The Nutty Professor, and the "Yes Man" was based on Frank Nelson, who appeared recurrently on The Jack Benny Program and I Love Lucy.
    • In "Bart vs. Australia", there is a parody of Crocodile Dundee with a man going "think that's a knife? THIS is a knife". For younger viewers, the film from which the meme came is not so familiar, and therefore many people think back to this series instead.
    • The title song from the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic episode "The Super Speedy Cider Squeezy 6000" was believed by many younger viewers to be a reference to the Simpsons' "Monorail Song," when they're actually both based on the same source: "Trouble" from The Music Man.
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit!: The later seasons get so much flak for this that it ends up having its own page.
  • What an Idiot!: Has its own page.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: "Bart-Mangled Banner" was criticized for being so heavy-handed against Republicans and conservatives that Seth MacFarlane could rewrite it as a Family Guy episode by just changing the names and no one would be able to tell the difference.
  • The Woobie: Has its own page.
  • Writer Cop Out: Due to being a Long Runner in Seasonal Rot, this would be eventual.

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