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Omori (also stylized in all caps) is an adventure psychological/surreal horror RPG from artist Omocat, based off of her comic of the same name. It tells the story of a young hikikomori named Omori, as he goes about his daily life living in an enormous white expanse. A depressed individual, he rarely gets out of bed, and when he does it's only to go on the internet or to grab a tissue to dry his tears. His eccentric and fun-loving neighbors, on the other hand, rarely sleep, and their technicolor dreamworld repulses Omori...though he admits to liking them, somewhat. One day he finally works up the courage to try to experience their way of life. As Omori continues on through the vibrant and the mundane he begins to uncover a forgotten past. When the time comes, the path chosen will determine his fate...and perhaps the fate of others as well.

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Developed and launched on Kickstarter, Omori takes heavy references from other RPGs, most notably EarthBound. It has currently been funded, with several of its stretch goals met, including a full Japanese localization, due to the heavy popularity over there. The demo is currently available for Kickstarter backers. The game was released on December 25, 2020 for PC systems, with a Nintendo Switch version coming at a later date. Music by Space Boyfriend, Slime Girls, Pedro Silva and bo en, with additional tracks by Toby Fox, bansheebeat, James Roach, Lumena-tan, Madeleine Glenn, Omniboi, Samm Neiland, Shirpower, Tofie and Voia.


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Tropes used in Omori:

  • The '90s: It is heavily implied that the game takes place at some point during the 90s, and there's a lot of evidence that suggest this: Pet Rocks still being a thing, just like Tamagotchi/Digimon virtual pets; Sunny's computer being based on Windows 95/98 alongside the Download Window boss, which on itself is based on the Internet Explorer's own download window; the presence of cassete tapes and boombox enemies in Headspace; Pluto's classification as a planet (Pluto was only denounced back in 2006); the incredibly tough Nokia 3310 as a Charm with a colossal Defense boost; one of the Black Space fissures having two VHS tapes containing Sunny's memories of himself and Basil, the list goes on.
    • Still, in the real world when visiting Hobbeez you'll find a shelf full of DVD's, and even some Arcade machines that doesn't work anymore, an indicative that the game could be actually taking place in the mid 00's. With the main gang now in their teens and Hero being a young adult, all the references could be because their childhood days transpired in the 90's.
    • In the Hikkikomori route, after Hero inherits the Last Resort from Mr. Jawsum, his portrait appears in the hall alongside the previous owners, and interacting with it indicates "199X- ". Assuming the events in Headspace are supposed to take place 4 years before present time, that would mean that the events in the real time take place sometime between 1994 and 2003.
  • Action Bomb:
    • Interacting with a bookshelf in Grandma's house first makes Omori sneeze due to all the dust, and then causes an aggressive Dust Bunny to emerge. While he looks cute, he's actually capable of "exploding", which hurts both itself and the entire party for 20 damage (roughly half of their starting HP)
    • Potted Plants like to blow up if they're low on health, but you can avoid this if you defeat them fast enough.
    • The Snot Bubbles inside Humphrey's stomach have this as their entire game plan: they explode on death, and will spend every turn they have buffing themselves in preparation for that.
  • Adam Smith Hates Your Guts: Once you start paying Rococo, his art commissions will get more and more expensive, to the point where he will charge you 50,000 clams for the final commission.note 
  • All in a Row: All of the party members follow Omori around at all times.
  • All Just a Dream: After clearing the Recycultists' Lair, you suddenly find Sunny outside, daydreaming while starring at the sky. Where the cult once stood is replaced with an empty patch of dirt.
  • All There in the Manual: Hidden within the game's internal files is a more detailed version of the Black Space's photo album with captions for each photo thoroughly explaining the events of that fateful day.
  • Almighty Janitor: You wouldn't expect the Pet Rocks champion to be the Othermart fishmonger, would you?
  • Ambiguous Ending:
    • The good ending implies that Sunny comes clean about what really happened to Mari, but it cuts off before we can see their reactions.
    • The bad ending has Omori leaving the Neighbor's Room right to the hospital balcony in the real world, turning into the bandaged Sunny as it happens. He promptly jumps off and falls forever as the credits roll and multiple dream-like backgrounds appear to go along with the eerie credits theme. There's a smash cut back to the title screen, but no floor in sight.
  • Anachronic Order: Once Sunny receives the Black Space's photo album, the player is tasked to collect photos that show the truth surrounding Mari's death. The player is aware that Mari apparently committed suicide by hanging herself on a tree at this point in the game, but once you start collecting the photos, they're all out of order, and as the dream section goes on, it becomes apparent that something else happened when Mari died. All to make the reveal more shocking to the player.
  • And the Adventure Continues: Cruelly deconstructed and ultimately subverted in both the bad ending and Hikikomori route. After Sunny disappears from his own mind, Omori exits White Space to meet his friends as they leave the Neighbors Room for Headspace to embark on more adventures. However, this is far from a good thing. This represents Sunny refusing to face reality and choosing to continue to run away from his problems by further burying himself in Headspace. This decision ultimately costs him his life in the bad ending, as when the party exits the Neighbors Room, it cuts back to the real world where Sunny jumps off the hospital balcony. Meanwhile, in the Hikkikomori route, after hitting the Reset Button, Omori gets free reign to explore all of Headspace and take on new challenges within, but it's all meaningless when the only way to properly end the story is by either going to sleep with the knife in the real world, which kills Sunny, or silently moving out of Faraway Town, leaving Basil to commit suicide offscreen if the ambulance sirens in the credits are any implication.
  • And You Were There: All of the party members and most of the NPCs in Headspace are based on people from Faraway Town, or else characters from in-setting fiction.
  • Antagonist Title: Omori becomes the main antagonist during the final day, trying to take control and get Sunny to kill himself out of self-loathing and grief once Sunny confronts the truth behind Something and stops running away from his problems.
  • Anti-Escapism Aesop: The Hikikomori route. Turns out Sunny ignoring the real world outside his house doesn't solve the sea of problems he left out there, who knew? You may be able to fully explore Headspace and conquer all its challenges, but neither Sunny nor his friends in reality will be getting a happy ending, as Sunny suffers from a Death of Personality while Basil kills himself offscreen.
    • Bonus points for the Something fights in the Lost Library, as even though Omori kills them and gains new skills, all he's doing is killing off all memories of Mari, shown when the piano disappears in both the library and in reality, and you earning the achievement "Repressed".
    • And even then, SOMETHING keeps following Sunny/Omori around even in the real world. Omori might have succeeded in destroying the memories of Mari and repressing them, but the guilt? The guilt will always remain. Sunny, assuming he doesn't kill himself with the knife, walks out of that house, gets into mom's car, to drive away from the friends he will likely never see again, and along with them goes the last hope of Sunny ever getting over his guilt.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • The game ends when Omori dies but unlike other party members he gets to survive a lethal attack, so long as he didn't end the previous turn on 1 HP.
      • Cleverly inverted during the final battle, where Sunny cannot kill Omori because he keeps surviving Sunny's attacks because of this gameplay mechanics. Justified as Omori is the manifestation of Sunny's guilt and depression; He can't just make all of that going away by beating it up.
    • Talking to Mari will keep track of any ongoing and finished sidequests.
    • In segments that take place outside of Headspace and in the real world, the game generally tries to do away with the more videogamey amenities of the system in favor of a more realistic-ish approach. With a major exception: there's still random unexplained picnic baskets everywhere, because getting rid of save points for large parts of the game would just be awful.
    • Losing the Hangman Game will crash the game but you'll be put right where the game crashed when you load the game again meaning you won't lose any unsaved progress.
    • After the fight against the Slime Girls, the game will recover all your HP and Juice before the next boss fight against Humphrey.
    • Black Space has a lot of those: Almost every area has footprints guiding Omori to the key required to enter the Red Door, preventing the player from getting lost. Collecting the key not only spawns some Hands-Kun to take Omori back to the Nexus, but also removes the door you last entered, avoiding even more confusion. Lastly, you don't need to experience every room to advance — the Red Door appears after you've visited your eighth room in Black Space.
    • Sunny's healing moves will always go off before Omori's attacks so that the player doesn't die a cheap death in the finale.
  • Anti-Villain: For all intents and purposes, Omori is this. He is completely honest that he's not a hero of the story, but rather the hero that Sunny wanted to be of a leader that his friends always admire, will follow and not question. Omori also points out that Sunny created him to be this way, and that it was Sunny's choice to live in Headspace for years rather than face the fact that he was a killer, even if said death was an accident.
  • Arc Number: Doubling as Arc Words. 143, in which each number stands for the number of letters in "I love you", subtly appears a few times as battle damage and in the internal code like the ID for the WTF value. This is usually related to Something and Mari. In fact, Something does say "SUNNY... I love you..." at a certain point.
  • Arc Symbol:
    • Stairs, hands, watching eyes and nooses. The appearance and focus on those foreshadow the reveal Sunny accidentally pushed Mari down a flight of stairs and Basil hanged her corpse to make the incident look like a suicide, only to end up further traumatized by the glimpse of her open eye staring at them.
    • The commonly-seen light bulb, something typically used to represent the birth of an idea, dangling over White Space. Or in this case, a black light bulb that gives off darkness instead, doing the reverse — repressing an idea. It symbolizes Sunny's Repressed Memories, and shines darker the more those memories resurface to symbolize his subconscious fighting against it. In the normal route, Sunny smashing the light bulb ends his repression and begins his final confrontation with Something.
  • Arc Villain: Most areas in Headspace have one for each day, and they all serve to distract Sunny from the truth;
    • Captain Spaceboy, or more precisely, Captain Space Ex-boyfriend for the Prologue.
    • Sweetheart for Three Days Left.
    • Mr Jawsum for the first half of Two Days Left.
    • Humphrey for the other half of Two Days Left.
  • Arc Words:
    • "Welcome to White Space. You have been living here for as long as you can remember."
    • "Waiting for something to happen?"
    • "Welcome to Black Space."
    • "Everything is going to be okay", and variations thereof. The words were originally spoken by Basil to reassure Sunny while helping disguise his accidental murder of Mari as a suicide and represents their shared trauma and denial of the truth that created Something.
    • "There is nothing here."
    • "It's a long way down... Do you want to jump?"
    • More subtly, "I'm sorry."
    • In the Hikkikomori route, "It is not alive." becomes this.
  • Art-Style Dissonance: Most of the game is composed of colorful, pastel-drawn art — with the exception of Something-based monsters, which deliberately clash with the medium as Claymation-esque abominations.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Hero has three skills that forces the enemies to target him but the build will fall flat when Hero starts trying to heal people. Although he gets an Infinity -1 Sword upon finishing the Weeping Willow quest, none of his skills aside from Spicy Food can put his now-large attack skill to use, and his utility as the Item Caddy will be diminished since he'll swap out his Pan or Blender. But on the Hikikomori route, you can find the Tenderizer, which grants him an attack that not only deals massive damage but also decreases his foes' defense, allowing him to dish out some serious damage.
  • Awful Truth: The source behind everything bad that happened was Sunny accidentally killing his sister Mari before their recital, and the only witness to this crime, Basil, came up with the idea to hang her corpse to make it look like a suicide. This incident traumatized Sunny and Basil, created the Something that haunts Sunny and Basil, Omori, who would repress the incident and Something in Sunny's dreams, and shattered the friend group while Basil's sanity deteriorated.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: The final confrontation in White Space between Sunny and his alter-ego born of overwhelming grief and trauma, Omori.
  • Bears Are Bad News: Rare Bears are devastating Lightning Bruisers that can heavily damage (or even one-shot) a party member due to special modifiers that apply while they're Angry. They even move frighteningly fast in the overworld and can close the distance easily when you draw their attention. They lose a lot of bite, though, when pacified with a different emotion or even when forced to Neutral. A certain corner of Sweetheart's Dungeon is home to a large collection of Rare Bears, all guarding some valuable loot... if you can fight your way out first.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: At first, "Something", a black one eyed creature that's constantly haunting Omori throughout the game, is implied to be the sole antagonist, being the force that kidnapped Basil. However, it's only the antagonist for Sunny's Headspace. In the Faraway Town, it's implied that the real Basil is its Big Bad, being the person who seems to be connected to Mari's supposed suicide and became the source of friction that leads Aubrey and the Hooligans to antagonize him and Sunny, and eventually tries to kill himself on the final day out of guilt for what he did. In the end though, the true Big Bad is Omori himself, who is the suicidal guilt of Sunny turned into a violent Split Personality that suppresses the truth of Sunny killing Mari, and then tries to take over Sunny when he finally remembers.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The good ending has Sunny finally coming to terms with Omori, his darker self, and regains the ability to express his emotions, and it concludes with the implication that Sunny comes clean about the truth behind Mari's death, which is likely to shatter the entire friend group once more, this time permanently, and Sunny and Basil have gotten into such a bad fight that they've likely retraumatized themselves and left Sunny with eye damage. However, Sunny and Basil no longer have to live with the guilt of the secret anymore, and the secret ending hints that Something is gone, representing that they are ready to move on.
  • Blank White Void: The game begins with Omori in a tiny "room" that only contains his sketchbook, laptop and a tissue box "for wiping your sorrows away", and is somehow "illuminated" by a black light bulb. You can walk straight through its walls, however, but the outside is simply a large expanse of pure white void, its only inhabitants being a perfectly normal black cat that doesn't do anything, and nameless spermatozoa-looking things that instantly send him back to his room.
  • Black Bug Room: "White Space" is this for Sunny. Black Space is even worse in this regard, especially during the Hikkikomori Route when Black Space 2 is unlocked. And if you can find it, there's also Red Space, which is hidden within Black Space 2, and can only be accessed (outside of cutscenes and scripted events) on the good route during the final day.
  • Block Puzzle: As you ascend Snowglobe Mountain you have to navigate across slippery ice to reach the ladder on the other side. They're all pretty simple so you won't break a sweat, and the introduction of presents as movable stoppers sets up expectations of a complex puzzle near the end. Surely, the last cave has a large frozen section dotted with lots of presents... but it's all subverted when you have only one route to cross without any shuffling around.
  • Bloodless Carnage: The damage inflicted on the enemies in the game's fights never shows any outward damage. Also, when Omori stabs himself, he simply curls in on himself and falls to the ground.
    • Subverted in one of the endings where Omori takes over Sunny and stabs himself with the knife.
    • Some events in Black Space also subvert this by having Basil getting killed over and over in rather gruesome ways, such as getting his body stuck between an elevator's door. The door is left smeared in blood as he slides into the floor. Then there's another where Omori rips his head off while they're both riding a raft, with Omori leaving bloody footprints afterwards.
    • Fully averted in the fights against Aubrey the first time and Basil, the latter being the very rare example of such graphic damage being shown in amazing detail towards the protagonist in real-time and after the fight.
  • Bonus Boss: A good number of them, ranging from "you literally can't miss it" to "how the hell was I supposed to find that?"
    • A big, sturdy tree. It doesn't attack back or anything, but it has a ton of defense.
    • Planet Earth, which is in Captain Spaceboy's backyard. On the Hikkikomori route, you can have a rematch with Earth, who teams up with Pluto in his final form.
    • The Unbread Twins are the boss of the completely optional Orange Oasis.
    • The 1.0.8 Update added Snaley of all people as a new Bonus Boss.
    • The Hikkikomori route provides additional bosses to face, since Headspace has a lot of extra content there:
      • The heartbroken Captain Spaceboy, now known as Space Ex-Husband, resides at the top of Snowglobe Mountain.
      • Perfectheart, the "Perfect" clone of Sweetheart that the Slime Girls made, found by returning to Humphrey on the Hikkikomori route. Mutantheart and Roboheart are also available to fight, but are much easier.
      • Proper boss fights with Sunny's fears, but only on the Hikkikomori route. Omori gains a new skill from each one, and defeating all three unlocks access to Black Space 2.
      • Nancy, one of Sunny's imaginary friends corrupted by Something. It can only be found by inspecting the tree with the tire swing in Vast Forest.
      • ABBI, a tentacled... thingnote  found deep within The Abyss on the Hikkikomori route.
  • Bonus Dungeon:
    • On the main route, Orange Oasis is a completely optional location filled with sidequests.
    • The Abyss, which can only be accessed on the Hikkikomori route, and needs all 26 keys to access.
    • Black Space 2 is accessible on the Hikkikomori route after conquering all three phobia Somethings in the Lost Library.
    • The Recycultists' Lair, which is the only dungeon that takes place in the real world.
  • Bookends:
    • Played with. The very first time White Space is seen at the very beginning of the game past the opening scene, a particular ringing tone plays which is similar to the one that plays before anything creepy happens, but this one is a far lower pitched sound. This particular tone is only played in two places in the game: At the very beginning, and at the end of the Hikikomori Route when Omori hauls Basil out of Black Space and resets Headspace. The tone at the beginning of the game was Headspace resetting from the previous cycle, but there's no way for the first time player to know that.
    • The bad ending shows the "Welcome to White Space" cutscene again before having Omori exit White Space to join his friends on another adventure in Headspace, just like how the game begins. Then it cuts back to the real world as Sunny throws himself off the hospital balcony.
  • Boring, but Practical: A lot of skills and items the party will receive later on in the game will make them competent in branching out to other builds, but the early skills are still quite good when used correctly:
    • Sad Poem, Annoy and Pep Talk are very cheap ways to manipulate emotions of anyone, friend or foe. It'll take a bit before you can access a steady supply of emotion-manipulating items.
    • Omori's Bread Slice generates Bread when it scores a kill, giving you handy access to a good supply of healing items as you time it right. Bread's healing strength is good for most of the early game and using it removes some of the strain on Hero's Juice.
    • Aubrey does have benefits from turning herself and/or her enemies/friends Happy, but an Angry Headbutt is still one of the strongest moves the player has access to for much of the early-game.
      • Or, one could take advantage of Aubrey's high HP and good Defense, and the fact she's one of the only two people in your group (the other being Hero, the guy you don't want getting hit and/or don't want to be wasting turns with as he's your main healer) who can cause an enemy to focus on her. Make Aubrey Sad (as long as the enemy isn't angry!) and have her spam Counter while Hero cooks for her. Boring, but it's very hard to lose unless the enemy spams attacks that hit the entire group.
    • Stab remains useful even in late game because Stab is not only a guaranteed Critical Hit, but will ignore Defense if Omori is Sad as well, which adds the advantage of increasing Omori's own Defense. It's a safe and reliable method of dealing damage that doesn't cost much Juice.
    • Kel's Flex ability is effectively the only skill that makes a damage based Kel build usable, as it nullifies the penalties of happiness (an emotion Kel can get a lot out of thanks to Run n Gun) and makes his next attack deal much more damage, allowing him to deal high numbers for comparatively low Juice.
  • Boss Rush: After certain events in the Hikikomori Route, a Boss Rush is unlocked inside Humphrey. Here, the player must fight against stronger versions of previously fought mandatory bosses all at oncenote  with no healing in-between, forcing you to rely on recovery items and Hero's cooking for the rest of the fights.
  • Bowdlerise: In the original comics, Omori spends time looking at porn on his laptop, and is even shown getting drunk off alcohol at one point. In the game and in official art, the contents of the laptop's screen are censored by static, and only show a wallpaper of a brick wall when interacted with. (Omori still keeps a box of tissues around, though their description now implies they are used entirely for wiping away tears, instead of going on A Date with Rosie Palms). Omori's taste for alcohol is also phased out of the game completely.
  • Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick: The audience of Sweetheart's Quest for Hearts mostly have the same dialogue, but a handful of them have unique lines when spoken to, mostly to do with the show. Talking to one of them, however, gives the line "It is not alive."
  • Brick Joke:
    • The Elder Sprout tutorial boss is referenced at the start of Sweetheart's show... as a sudden, jarring memorial to him.
    • One of the reasons why Kel misses Basil is that he needs Basil to remind him to wash his hands. In the Last Resort, he goes to the restroom and the game goes out of its way to mention that he didn't wash his hands.
    • One of the first things you do in Faraway Town is purchase a cookbook for Hero. Kel doesn't have the $20 on hand so you have to pay out of your pocket. The next day, when he leads you into his room, you find $20 in his closet and can just pocket it to clear his debt to you.
  • But Thou Must!: Lots of this in the game's many scripted fights (usually against Something, and almost always in the game's Faraway segments). The Run command is almost always unavailable, and sometimes even the Fight command isn't available either, and abilities appear and disappear in your Skills menu when they are needed. Most notably, in the fights against Basil and Something after you break the lightbulb.
  • Call A Hitpoint A Smeerp: The game's equivalent to mana/stamina is called Juice.
  • Central Theme:
    • Main Route: Accepting past trauma and moving on from it.
    • Hikikomori Route: Self-destruction by denial.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Once Black Space is unlocked, the story takes a turn for the worse. The creepy elements that were in the background are put into the spotlight, with the reveal that the source of Sunny's problems stem from him accidentally killing his sister Mari, and Basil helped him cover it up as a suicide to escape responsibility. You also lose access to the silly and colorful Headspace as Sunny has to deal with problems in the real world and can't hide from the truth any more. Then, after everyone else comes together for a sleepover before Sunny leaves, in the middle of the night, Basil begins to go insane, and when Sunny goes to help him, the shared guilt causes the two of them to beat each other up so badly that they're left hospitalized; and for Omori to try and take control from a weakened and despairing Sunny to make him commit suicide.
    • The Hikikomori Route is more darker and depressing than the Main Route, to the point where Black Space becomes something closer to .flow in terms of tone and atmosphere.
  • Chekhov's Gun: In the beginning of the game, right before Basil disappears, he sees a photo that appears to remind him of something grave, only managing to say, "Mari... she's..." Right after, there's a split second scene of a photo depicting a broken violin, which was involved in the events leading to Mari's death. This photo would later appear in full detail and context near the end of the game.
  • Color Motif: The color purple is used for fantastic dreams, given that the kids have purple hair and skin, and the sky for Headspace. Black is used to symbolize fear, like Something and Omori, while red is used to symbolize self-loathing and suppression such as the Hand-kuns and Omori's final form.
  • Combination Attack: The game allows each character to perform these through activating "follow-up" prompts after a successful attack. However, doing so consumes "energy" (as opposed to "juice", which only used for the normal skills.)
  • Companion Cube: The first time you talk to Kel, he shows Omori the pet rock he found the other day, and says he plans to call him Kevin. He remains in his inventory in the "Charm" slot.
  • Controllable Helplessness: The end of the Sunny vs Omori boss fight. In his second-to-last phase, Omori's attacks will start inflicting Afraid to disable most of your skills, but it can be removed with Calm Down; while you have limited uses of Calm Down, he uses this attack infrequently enough that you can persevere. If pushed to his final phase, Omori drops all pretense and will repeatedly use a heavy-hitting attack that inflicts Afraid and lowers your Defense, at which point you will run out of Calm Down uses.
  • Cool Chair:
    • The ominous "Throne of Hands" atop a long staircase. Omori sits upon it after killing Headspace Basil and being unable to hide the truth behind Mari's death any longer, marking the point he becomes willing to pressure Sunny into suicide for his misdeeds.
    • If Omori gains ownership over Sweetheart's Castle, it turns into a room with an armchair and a bunch of framed family pictures on the back wall. Sitting upon the armchair causes Omori to enjoy the nice quiet day in place for several minutes until the screen fades out again. By that point, the player knows what this act represents is far from a good thing.
  • Cosmetic Award: There's a ton of sidequests in Faraway Town, but since that part of the game is almost entirely story-driven, most of the rewards you get from them are pointless beyond achievement hunting and the quest givers sending you flowers at the end of the game. The lone exceptions are the gold watch you get from helping the smelly man (it's good Vendor Trash) and the seashell necklace, which is the only item in that section to actually give you stat boosts. It helps a lot in the Recycultist Lair, the only part of Faraway where you get into non-scripted fights.
  • Creepypasta: Literally. There's an actual enemy in the game known as "Creepypasta", which is a small Rigatoni pasta tube that constantly morphs into a warped and creepy version of itself. Made it even more funnier when you read its description on the Foe Facts, which is the typical intro of a creepypasta.
    Let me start off by saying that everything you're about to hear is 100% true. There was a garage sale last summer. I spotted a dusty cartridge of a game I never heard of before. I bought it, but when I got home, it didn't work. When I went back to the garage sale, the house was burnt down. :O
  • Critical Hit: All combatants have a chance of landing one, and the game returns the message "It hit right in the heart!" when it happens. Being "Happy" raises this chance at the expense of overall accuracy. Omori's "Stab" skill outright guarantees a critical hit, but it costs a whole 10 Juice (half his starting amount) to compensate.
  • Cruelty Is the Only Option: There is a Sprout Mole excited about being close to leaving the dungeon, but the Sprout Mole is blocking the same button that would lead to the Sprout Mole's (and the party's) freedom. However, you cannot have the Sprout Mole press the button or convince the Sprout Mole to join you out of the dungeon. The only way to get rid of the Sprout Mole is by pressing another button... which would make the Sprout Mole explode.
  • Darker and Edgier: Than Omocat's previous works. More specifically, her webcomics, like Pretty Boy and her old The Legend of Zelda fan comics. While her old work is far more lighter and relied a lot on humor, Omori has a more darker tone. The story has themes of suicide, death, depression, anxiety, self-isolation, and as the game progresses, the tone gets gradually worse and worse. And that's not even mentioning the Hikkikomori Route.
  • Dark Reprise: The game uses quite a few of these. "WHITE SPACE", "By Your Side" and "A House for Flowers" (Mari and Basil's leitmotifs respectively) in particular come in a lot of increasingly sad or eerie variants.
    • "Lost at a Sleepover", the Neighbour's Room theme, has two of them: the horribly distorted "Friends." that plays in Black Space's corrupted version and the melancholic theme of its real world counterpart, "Treehouse - Here We Are, Together Again".
    • "Good for Health, Bad for Imagination" is the groovy song associated with the medicine aisle of the Faraway Mart. It later comes back as the somber "Clean Slate" when Sunny wakes up in the hospital.
    • "You Cannot Go Back", the boss theme of Space Ex-Husband, on top of obviously calling back to his previous theme, also features an off-key version of his special mixtape, because he's still completely broken over Sweetheart leaving him.
    • "Bad Morning", the song that plays at the climax of Black Space is a creepy reinterpretation of "Good Morning", the end credits theme - meaning that the reprise will technically show up several hours before the original.
  • Deliberately Monochrome: The game's title screen is a black-and-white pencil drawing of the titular character. The environment in the opening scene is also completely black-and-white. However, other elements are exempt from this, as looking in the sketchbook shows plenty of red in the disturbing drawings, the Mook Bouncer creatures are pinkish in color, and the menu elements use a pink hand as a pointer, while health/stamina bars are red and yellow. Then, the rest of the game goes straight to bright colors.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • When Kel loses Hector on the way to the Otherworld, if the player climbs back down the ladder to check if Hector is at the bottom, all there will be is "a regular rock" at the bottom, which is likely Hector except turned over so that his face is not visible so the party doesn't recognize him, preventing the quest from being completed too early. Though it is not known why Omori doesn't just pick up the rock and check it to make sure it isn't Hector.
    • During one of the game's more stressful sections, one of the required Hangman keys is easily missed. Fortunately it can still be retrieved after the fact. The key in question is the T key, which is found during a chase sequence in Humphrey. Since Humphrey becomes inaccessible after clearing it, then when the W key is awarded for clearing, the T key will pop out along with it if it was missed.
    • At one point, Hero requests that the party get some flowers as a gift. If they already have flowers on hand, he'll acknowledge it but will still insist they go and buy some, since he prefers a fresh bouquet.
    • The Slime Girls tell the party that they have to pay off Sweetheart's debt of 1,000,000 clams, to which Aubrey will exclaim that they don't have that much money. If the player actually accumulates 1 million clams by that point, Aubrey instead exclaims that they can't just hand over that much money, and the Slime Girls attack anyway.
    • If the player enters a washroom while Omori is using the Mystery Potion, s/he will enter the girl's room and not the boy's room. Also, if the party looks into a mirror, the potion will wear off before transitioning to Omori's POV.
    • In the Hikkikomori route: One of Abbi's tentacles appears in Sweetheart's Castle. If the player erases Sweetheart's Castle and then confronts Abbi, she will be short a tentacle. (Not a flawless foresight however, as Abbi still says she has "eight" tentacles on the surface even if the castle is gone.)
    • Everyone in the real world segment, including your party and your opponents can be affected by the emotion system and have different sprites for it despite the fact that you have no access to emotion manipulating skill in the real world.
  • Developer's Room: Or rather, a developer's graveyard hidden in Black Space.
  • Die, Chair, Die!: Anyone can break open watermelons to get the goodies inside. Omori's knife can cut down weeds and traffic cones, while Aubrey can smash down sturdier obstacles like barrels and crates, some of which can yield useful items.
  • Dies Wide Open: Mari appears to die with closed eyes after she's pushed down the stairs, as Sunny spends some time thinking she's just asleep. But after Basil leaves her hanged on a tree, he and Sunny glance back at her corpse and notice her open right eye glaring at them — as if rigor mortis opened her eyes after the fact. This traumatic sight shapes the "Something" creature that haunts the two ever since.
  • Distressed Dude:
    • Basil, of whom the gang's entire quest centers around searching for when he disappears under mysterious circumstances. It turns out that he was banished into Black Space by Omori for realizing the truth behind Mari's death.
    • Faraway Basil also fits this trope, who is tormented by Aubrey and the Hooligans as well as his own Something, and starts going insane upon realizing that Sunny is moving away in a few days. Part of the climax of the true route involves rescuing Basil from his inner-demons before he kills himself.
  • Double Standard: Abuse, Female on Male: Aubrey routinely hits Kel for irritating her, which nobody - not even Kel's brother Hero or Kel himself - calls her out on. In the real world, the tag image for Aubrey to Kel has her giving him an Offhand Backhand.
    • Averted with real-world Aubrey's bullying of Basil, which is realistically portrayed as harmful and drives much of the conflict between her and Kel.
  • Driven to Suicide: The fate of Mari, or at least how it's initially set up. What actually happened was that Sunny accidentally pushed Mari down the stairs in the middle of a heated argument, killing her. Basil, who witnessed the incident, helped Sunny frame it as a suicide.
    • If you don't get the good ending, the story ends with either Sunny or Basil (or both) killing themselves.
  • Earn Your Bad Ending: There's a whole story route with exclusive content that ultimately leads to either of the Neutral endings, with the addition that Sunny completely loses his sense of self to Omori before he either moves out or stabs himself to death, with Basil committing suicide off-screen.
  • Easter Egg: There is a hidden variable called "WTF" that is randomly set from 1 to 13 upon leaving the Neighbor's Room for the first time, after helping Aubrey out of the stump. A series of unique events only trigger for either a specific WTF value or a range of values.
  • Eldritch Location: Black Space. While the White Space serves as a safe haven for Omori, Black Space is a distorted, twisted and disturbing location created from Sunny's fears and repressed memories. It's also very hazardous for the dream world inhabitants, as staying too long will turn someone into Something, the same creature that's haunting Omori/Sunny.
    • Headspace itself might be one of these, since there are a handful of NP Cs that claim to have existed before Sunny's dreams reshaped it.
  • Empty Levels: Everyone stops learning new skills past level 30, so everything up to level 50 is just extra stats, Heart and Juice. Omori himself gets his final skill at level 35, and the only remaining abilities past that point are gained with new equipment or events. That's because level 30 to 35 is about the range where you're expected to defeat Humphrey, and from that point onwards, if you're on the Main Route, Headspace gives way completely to Black Space and Sunny's confrontation with the truth, and your stats are completely irrelevant at that point.
  • Enemy Scan: Star-gazing with a minor character named Shawn gives Omori the "Observe" skill, though it only reveals an enemy's current health and Juice amount.
  • Eternal Recurrence: It's explained, just before you can enter Black Space, that Omori and Sunny have done all of this before: Basil has vanished, and they've searched for him, collected keys, and reached Black Space. Every time, however, the world has reset, changing the location of Black Space, scattering the keys, and allowing Sunny to continue repressing his memories of the truth. This happens once again on the Hikkikomori Route, as only reconnecting with his friends on the Main Route allows Sunny to finally break the cycle.
  • Everyone Has Standards: If the Hooligans defeat Sunny and Kel, then everyone but Aubrey get sick of tormenting the same two guys and leave to go back home, leaving Aubrey by herself.
  • Evolving Title Screen: Four after the initial White Space screen. Upon arriving in Black Space, the title screen will turn dark with a low rumbling noise. In the last day, it will turn red with high-pitched ringing on top. Sunny and Omori will take turns on the screen with a glitchy effect. The bad ending's title screen has a sky background and ambient noises, but both Sunny and Omori are gone since the latter just jumped off a building. The good ending's title screen also shows the sky, but Sunny is present while a piano song plays.
  • Exact Words: After Omori leaves his room, he can make toast. The toast pops off the toaster... and that is that. You made toast, but you do not get toast.
    • "You have been living here for as long as you can remember." Turns out, Omori was created as a result of Sunny's Repressed Memories, meaning it is literally all he can remember.
  • Eye Scream: While trying to stop Basil from committing suicide, Sunny gets stabbed in his right eye and blacks out from the pain. His last scene in the hospital has bandages over the damaged part of his face.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Upon reaching the final door in Black Space during the main route ends with Omori killing Headspace Basil one last time before climbing up and sitting upon his Throne of Hands, making it clear that now that he can't suppress the truth, he will punish Sunny for his sins, and becomes the Final Boss on the last day.
  • The Faceless: One room in Black Space features Omori's friends wandering around, but they're all faceless and silent. Sometimes Mari's dialogue portrait will either turn into Something or her ghost and Basil's will sprout Something's tendrils from his face.
  • Flower Motifs: During the prologue, examining Basil's various flowers will have him compare the characters to each one.
    • Mari is represented by the lily of the valley, which is said to ward off evil spirits and point towards a bright future.
    • Hero's is the rose and its many colors, because he's versatile and universally loved.
    • Aubrey's is the gladiolus, which represent strength of character, and how Aubrey is honest and has strong moral values.
    • Kel's is the cactus because of their resilience means they don't need much diligence to care for, and even someone like Kel can manage one.
    • Omori's is the white tulip, because its plain and simple, but also cute.
    • Basil himself says that sunflowers always point towards the sun, and that he would like to live optimistically like such.
    • Outside of Basil's garden, the white egret comes up a lot, and almost always with a mention of it meaning "My thoughts will follow you into your dreams". It's usually associated with Basil's grandmother and the real Mari.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • Interacting with the laptop after the tutorial section will bring the desktop. For a very split second, you can see Something appearing onscreen before it changes to the Hangman screen. The laptop becomes a portal to Black Space in the Hikikomori Route, where Something resides.
    • Very early on, you are given an Emotion Chart as a reminder of how the emotion system works. The chart has cute drawings of your party members as examples, with Omori as Neutral/no emotion, Kel as Happy, Aubrey as Angry and Hero as Sad. This arrangement doesn't quite fit their in-game abilities but is very reminiscent of how their real world selves tried to cope. It also, by omission, links Basil to the Afraid status, which is also quite accurate to his situation.
    • There's an unspoken rule that only bosses have 3-Stage Emotions, as your party members only have 2. Omori, however, is the only playable character to have 3, despite seeming to be emotionless. This foreshadows their reveal as the final boss, though ironically, he doesn't use any emotions during his fight.
    • The first playable section as Sunny involves descending down a staircase at night, leading to an encounter with Something. Hinting at the staircase's involvement in the events leading to the creation of Something.
    • Likewise, when you're returning to your room on "Three Days Left" and are forced to confront your fear of spiders, you approach the long staircase from the bottom up. This time, there's a strange black mass obscuring the bottom that vanishes the moment you interact with it. You'll be shown what that means, exactly, when you confront the truth in Black Space.
    • On the second Sunny day segment, his mother's voicemail has her tell him if there's anything he wants to keep in the downstairs closet since she'll be throwing out anything left in there. Yet one cannot find said downstairs closet. Likely because Sunny is pretending he can't see it because of what said closet contains. The closet door notably reappears during the phobia segments of the game, where Sunny loses control of his repressed emotions.
    • Kite Kid will mention that he's spotting a dark void in the sky more frequently in the past few days. It foreshadows Black Space seeping into Headspace.
    • When you spot Something in Vast Forest, it'll be standing beside a tire swing before disappearing. There's a good reason for that.
    • After defeating Space Ex-Boyfriend and having no idea what happened, Captain Spaceboy explains the group that his Split Personality took over before Omori and his friends defeated him. Guess what Omori wants to do with Sunny during the final day. The eyepatch Space Ex-Boyfriend wears also mirrors the eyepatch Sunny wears as a result with his fight with Basil.
    • Early in the game, Kel and Aubrey get into an argument which knocks Basil over. The others are shocked but Basil brushes it off saying "Accidents happen." In the endgame we discover the whole story was kicked off by two people arguing and someone being knocked over, except this time it was fatal and Basil was definitely not okay with it.
    • The boss battle with Humphrey involves a Genius Loci that looks cheerful on the surface, but gradually becomes more dangerous and hides horrors that you discover the further you descend. Not unlike Omori himself, who is actually the Dimension Lord of Headspace and grows increasingly twisted and hostile as Sunny inches closer to the truth.
    • During the "One Day Left" in the Main Route, the old man in the graveyard tells Sunny that someone will grieve that night. At the night of the same day, Basil commits suicide if you don't confront him after waking up, locking you out of the Good/Bad Endings.
    • During the Prologue, you can see a funeral photo of someone in the Neighbour's Room and in the Junkyard. There's a random chance that, after interacting with the photo in the Junkyard, Something will appear and disappear for a split second. Take a guess why.
    • In one of the hidden areas in Pyrefly Forest, you can see Something standing over a tree stump before disappearing. It becomes fully relevant when you finally enter Sunny's backyard on One Day Left.
    • The titles of the two non-spoiler achievements, "Good Morning" and "Oyasumi", reference the main words of the themes of the good and bad endings respectively.
  • Final Boss:
  • First-Episode Twist: As noted below in Wham Episode, the "Omori must choose between White Space or Headspace" conundrum is thrown out the window with all of it being revealed to be the troubled dreams of a boy named Sunny who is moving out of his town in three days. The real purpose of the game is to have him reconnect with his friends in real life while discovering what caused everyone to scatter in the first place by going into his dreams.
  • Fission Mailed:
    • When you access Breaven from the Orange Oasis, you'll be put into an Indy Escape segment but can only barely outrun a rolling boulder. Whether you get squashed or fall into a large pitfall, the game will remark "You died" with an edited Game Over screen before resuming in a new room as Omori gets up in a pile of flour bags.
    • You can't defeat Omori as Sunny, but if you've persevered to the final phase of the fight and then lose to him, you are hit with the game over screen and the choice to continue is presented with a sleeping Sunny in the background. Your choice here will affect whether you get the good or bad ending.
  • Frothy Mugs of Water: Since all of Headspace is a childish fantasy, you'll encounter a lot of "adult only juice", especially in the Last Resort since it's a bar/casino. Real life drinks are properly labeled.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: One of the strongest elements of the game is how it incorporates RPG mechanics with its storytelling.
    • Each of the party members' Follow-Up attacks represent how each character fits into the friend group from Omori's perspective. Note that Omori's Follow-Ups are all selfish (such as attacking twice) when compared to his friends, which represents how withdrawn and passive Sunny is in the real world.
    • The Halfway Plot Switch to Black Space represents how Sunny can no longer hide behind his fantasies in order to escape his problems. In order to understand himself, Sunny has to go on a journey of deep introspection, much in the same way people cope with mental health problems in real life.
    • After Sunny, Kel, and Hero reconcile with Aubrey in the real world, Kel makes a lame joke, which Aubrey slaps him for. Checking the party afterwards will show that Kel is missing 10 HP.
    • Your party's stats and skills are ultimately not pivotal to the game's endings. After all, all this strength is restricted to Sunny's dreams, and it doesn't make a lick of a difference in the real world.
  • Game Within a Game: There are several of these in the Faraway Town segments:
    • Sunny can play a Blackjack game on his computer which is implied to serve as the inspiration for the Last Resort.
    • There's a space shooter arcade game inside Hobbeez called Captain Spaceboy's Space Adventure which can be described a cross between Space Invaders and Yars' Revenge.
    • There's a Game Boy-style Snake clone called Sprout Mole Eater that can be played on the arcade machine at Gino's Pizza that is your reward for feeding fish to the orange cat and retrieving the missing arcade part. This is the inspiration for the King Crawler boss and Sprout Moles in Pyrefly Forest.
    • If you have a Pet Rock equipped, you can battle opponents across town through a Digimon-style Rock-Paper-Sissors minigame. This may have been the inspiration for Headspace!Kel's pet rock Hector (a literal rock with a face drawn on), named after his real-life dog.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation: Happens to Sunny in the Hikkikomori route. If you stab yourself, wake up, and explore his house at night, you'll see disturbing hallucinations related to the incident that get progressively worse as the game goes on.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation:
    • At the end of Black Space on the Hikkikomori route, the Stranger forces Sunny into Black Space to get him to see the truth he's been running away from. The unprepared Sunny succumbs to the sheer stress of the situation and Omori has to step in to "save" him by taking over his body.
    • In the bad ending, Sunny, unable to come to terms with the fact that he killed Mari, lets Omori consume his consciousness, where he proceeds to throw himself off the hospital roof.
    • Poor Basil suffered this after Sunny killed Mari by accident. He took charge and ordered Sunny to grab Mari's body to take it outside, along with a jump rope to fashion into a fake noose if you go by the data-mining. If you choose to save real Basil on the Main Route, his eyes are bugging out as you try to talk him down, saying that surely Sunny wouldn't have hurt his sister, it wasn't him but the Something that has been haunting them that did the deed. Then he attacks, declaring that Something is behind Sunny and Basil must save him. Basil himself seems to be questioning why he thought faking Mari's suicide would be a good idea and he can't comprehend that it was a terrible, preventable and senseless accident. It's implied he gets better after waking up in the hospital and going My God, What Have I Done? when seeing he damaged Sunny's eye badly, but Sunny reassures him that it's okay, and high time they tod the truth.
  • Gotta Catch 'Em All: One of the sidequests given to you at the beginning of the game is to collect keyboard letters for a game of Hangman. Said letters are scattered all over the game, and they must be collected if you want to play Hangman. This is required to finish the Main Route, as collecting the letters and using the right ones will grant you access to Black Space. Three keys can only be obtained via the Hikkikomori Route, but they're all not necessary to advancing the plot.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • There's an entire secret route of the game, which is accessed by refusing to open the door for any of your friends in the real world; doing this unlocks different parts of the Dream World, such as extra keyboard keys and proper boss fights against Something. Unfortunately, doing this also locks you out the good ending — staying home the whole time means Sunny's not really facing any of his problems, after all.
    • Completing every sidequest in Faraway Town during the course of three days is a gigantic pain in the ass. Not only the NP Cs do not have the lightbulb icon, but you must check for new quests or opportunities to progress in every period of the day: morning and evening, for each of the three days before you decide to end the day.
    • You can access and explore Red Space on the Main Route, but you need to do some unintuitive things to be able to reach it.
  • He Knows About Timed Hits: At the start of the game, interacting with the laptop brings up a variation of this. Your only available options are "stare at the screen", which is exactly that, and does nothing, and "look at the keyboard", which shows the basic commands for controlling your character.
  • Heroic Mime:
    • Omori doesn't actually say anything during the game's conversations, which are entirely between the other party members. You only learn of his thoughts through some of the environmental descriptions. This all changes at the end of the Main Route after he takes the role of Final Boss, where he spends most of the fight trying to break Sunny.
    • You also don't hear any of Sunny's dialogue. It all changes in the good ending with the final line: "I have to tell you something."
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: You cannot defeat Omori as the Final Boss, at least in terms of traditional gameplay. The only way to "win" is to survive until Omori can inflict "Afraid" status and then die to him. Your choice on the subsequent Game Over screen determines the ending you get.
  • Hope Spot: On the final day, Aubrey makes up with everyone else, and everyone decides to have a slumber party at Basil's house to comfort him after the hospitalization and loss of his grandmother and before Sunny moves. Then Sunny wakes up and checks up on Basil, who goes insane, and Sunny is forced to fight...
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Characters are healed through consuming food. You even have a banana whisper this into Omori's ear when you pick it up (though bananas are the one fruit you don't eat). Moreover, Hero can produce an indefinite amount of cookies during combat to heal himself or others, as long as he has enough juice for that. This is completely averted in the real world segments, where you can only heal through using normal items like bandages and first-aid kids while the snacks you've grown accustomed to will only heal a few hit points at best.
  • Infinity -1 Sword: You can find strong weaponry for all three of your party members within Humphrey. They're one step down from some of the game's own strongest equipment, but obtaining those either involves completing sidequests or traversing areas exclusive to the Hikkikomori route.
  • Interface Screw:
    • It is possible to access Black Space 2 in the normal route by waiting for a while in Black Space area where Something is declaring its love for Sunny and jumping down the pit towards the right. Via this method, the screen will be covered with static as the player explores the abyss.
    • At the end of the second to last boss fight against Basil, Sunny's right eye is severely injured. The right side of the screen turns black to show this.
  • Interface Spoiler: When naming your character in the beginning of the game, you're not allowed to choose names already taken by the main characters — understandable for your fellow party members, not so much for Omori himself. This would confuse an uninitiated player who prefers to use the character's own name instead of making one up, and is an early red flag that Omori is not what he seems. Indeed, you are not naming Omori, but his real world counterpart (original name "Sunny"), the reasons for which only become clear in the very end when the real confronts the imaginary.
  • Joke Item:
  • Jump Scare: Several, given that it is a horror game.
    • Checking a floating mirror will display a reflection of Omori with his smiling friends behind him. Rarely, the text box won't appear and all the kids in the reflection will flash distorted smiles as the scene cuts away.
    • Entering through certain doors has a very small chance of Omori landing in a creepy Black Space event in a vein similar to Yukki.
  • Justified Save Point: "Taking a break" at Mari's picnic ground saves the game. Only Mari's red picnic basket works, though; you'll eventually find blue picnic baskets, and apparently those are just not nostalgic enough to be used as save points.
  • Knife Nut: Omori's only weapon is a knife, and he never lets go of it throughout the game. When he picks it up, the message emphasizes the "nut" part by stating "you can see your reflection clearly in the blade". The fact that the knife appears after he looks at the drawings in his sketchbook, which contain plenty of gruesome scenes, is also hardly a good portent.
  • Level Cap: 50.
  • Limited Move Arsenal: Each party member can only choose up to four Skills to bring into a fight, and the Defend Command counts as a skill too.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane:
    • It's hard to say if Omori and Something are simply dream metaphors of Sunny's depression and guilt, or if they are actual beings produced by Sunny and Basil's breakdowns. Basil seems to sprout Something's shadow when he's having his Despair Event Horizon and attacking Sunny, while Sunny becomes Omori's monochrome self during the Hikikomori Endings; both are also happening when Sunny is having a full-scale meltdown and possibly hallucinating.
    • Another confounding factor in this is brief appearances throughout the game by what is heavily implied to be Mari's spirit, attempting to guide Sunny, on the true route. She even is implied to save Sunny from drowning. This is unquestionably a different entity from the usual Headspace Mari, who knows nothing about your trip through foggy waters on the way to Last Resort, and sure, that could be justified on its own as some part of Sunny's subconscious trying to encourage him to face the truth... Yet also, in a real-life segment, you also encounter this Mari playing the piano, which even Hero claims to have heard.
    • The same could be said for Headspace and the dream reality in general. 99% of the game implies it's nothing more than Sunny's imaginary fantasy world, but certain characters (such as the Branch Coral and Mr. Outback) state some form of the world and at least some of its inhabitants existed before Headspace and Sunny, bringing the former conclusion into question. Is the dialogue just another layer of Sunny's imagination or is something more supernatural at play?
  • Minor Major Character: The game makes a point of introducing the Three Great Creatures, known as the Oldest, the Wisest and the Favorite, whose existence predates Headspace itself and seem to be imaginary friends Sunny had since childhood. That definitely sounds like important information, but since Headspace doesn't exactly have any kind of hierarchy and in the end, almost nothing in Headspace can truly impact the story they are pretty much irrelevant. The Oldest is Humphrey, who is a major character but hardly matters to the plot; the Wisest is Abbi, a Bonus Boss who was locked away out of sight before the game even started; and the Favorite is... the big yellow cat in the Neighbour's Room, a piece of scenery based on Sunny's fond memories of the Faraway Park playground.
  • The Mirror Shows Your True Self:
    • Staring at mirrors in Headspace sometimes triggers a Jump Scare where everyone flashes a creepy face, hinting at Omori's and the dream friends' dark nature.
    • If Sunny checks a mirror he'll often see Something standing next to him or outside the room. In some instances it will take the full form of a ghostly Mari and towards the end of the Hikikomori route, after Sunny is fully repressed by his split personality, he will perceive himself as Omori in the mirrors.
  • Missing Secret: You can't actually find some of the keys unless you're on the Hikikomori route. Fortunately only the keys to spell "WELCOME TO BLACK SPACE" are necessary to progress through the game.
  • Medium Blending: In addition to in-game footage, the first trailer used both hand drawn animations and real life photos and clips.
  • Money Spider: All of the enemies seem to carry clams, which act as the game's currency. Don't ask why a Forest Bunny would be needing them.
  • Mood Whiplash: The game starts from Omori's room which is mostly a black-and-white void scored to an equally depressing tune and where there's nothing to do, and immediately goes to "neighbour's room" which is dominated by bright shades of purple, has flowers around and several happy kids playing skipping rope, the ladder outside literally has all its steps rainbow-colored and has a cheerful melody playing as well. The contrast literally couldn't be stronger, even if there are still off-beat elements like a small tentacle harmlessly poking out of the ground for seemingly no reason.
  • Mook Bouncer: The Blank White Void in the opening is "patrolled" by pink spermatozoa-like entities called Hand-kuns, which will instantly send Omori back to his room if they come into contact. Even the knife he picks up after looking at his sketchbook makes no difference. Then again, all he needs to do to actually exit is go through a nearby door, while the borders of the void will send him back just as effectively as the bouncers. Said bouncers are actually Familiars of Omori himself.
  • Multiple Endings:
    • Bad Ending: Omori takes over Sunny's body completely and throws himself off the hospital roof while bo en's "My Time" plays. Gotten by selecting "No" on the retry screen after dying to Omori.
    • "Neutral" Endings: Basil will commit suicide if he isn't confronted at the end, with Sunny being able to see the corpse and his distraught friends if he went back to sleep at Basil's rather than just leaving. Once home, the player is required to sleep and then wake up to trigger one of two endings — picking up a knife in the kitchen will cause Sunny to commit suicide after Omori stabs himself in the dream world, and not picking it up will make him move out with his family the next day while still wracked with guilt over everything as Something follows him.
    • Early Hikikomori Ending: Once Omori does a Split-Personality Takeover, he can wander around the house, which also allows him get the knife from the kitchen — this restores his Stab warping option, which... does exactly what you think it does in the waking world. As the credits roll, a phone rings in the background.
    • Hikikomori Ending: If Omori doesn't get the knife, then game rolls to the corresponding Neutral ending. However, Omori is now in control, and one can only dread how he'll try and enforce his Headspace rules on the real world. As the credits roll, sirens blare during the whole thing, implying that Basil has committed suicide.
    • Good Ending: Gotten by selecting "Yes" on the retry screen after dying to Omori. Sunny stops Omori by remembering the good times he had with his friends, and wakes up in the hospital after the fight with Basil. He then visits Basil's room and is implied to explain what really happened with Mari.
      • If the player has been taking care of Basil's plants throughout the game, an extra scene plays after the credits showing what happens after Sunny visits Basil. At first Basil looks at Sunny with a sad expression, with his Something behind his head seeping into his pillow. In return, Sunny genuinely smiles as his own Something fades out behind him. Basil then returns this genuine smile and his Something leaves as well, with this signifying that they’re both ready to move on from their guilt.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: Cheers is a character that has set up a natural, eco-friendly shop. The items they sell are Strawberries, Milk, and...French Fries.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The decision of "which world is real" between the simple-yet-lonely White Space and the colorful-but-insane Headspace is naturally very important to the game. If it weren't a complete Red Herring that is, which the player will learn as soon as the tutorial section ends when Omori, or rather Sunny, wakes up in a very literal case of Reality Ensues, suddenly adding the real world to the equation. While snippets of Sunny and Faraway Town were shown in the trailers, they could very easily be misconstrued as another part of the Dream World where Omori just puts on nicer clothes, but in truth the "which world is real" dilemma has shifted to a choice between reality and dreams, using Headspace serving as a medium to explore Sunny's trauma and how Omori is connected to it.
  • Nintendo Hard: Downplayed — Omori is more challenging than your average poorly-balanced RPGMaker game, but not overly difficult if you step back and give it a good look-over. The combat system wants you to master the Emotion-based Tactical Rock–Paper–Scissors, since mashing attack skills can only get you so far, and most random encounters can knock out your party members in two to three hits if you're not careful. The skill loadout mechanic also means that you have to prepare the right skills for the job instead of lazily expecting everything to be present in the battle interface. But once you get the hang of it and overcome your initial lack of options, you'll find that the game hands out enough experience to keep pace without needing to take time off for Level Grinding, and if you're thorough with checking out side content you can even be slightly overlevelled for some of its challenges. If you do find yourself stuck and have to grind, usually a few levels makes enough difference for you to just get through a challenging boss.
  • No Ending: For Headspace anyways. Once Omori enters Black Space after clearing Humphrey, everything and everyone else in there is forgotten about. Makes sense, considering that the whole thing was one giant distraction to keep the truth away from Sunny. The last we see of the Headspace kids, they have no dialogue in either ending on the main route. In the Hikikomori route, this is also the case; once Omori takes over, hits the Reset Button, and then wakes up from the dream on the final day, all that left is to either die or leave Faraway Town. In short, Headspace has no ending because it's not supposed to.
  • Non-Standard Game Over: The aforementioned Neutral endings end the story before the final boss and close on a blank credits roll with a droning noise of either an unanswered telephone or sirens in the distance.
  • Notice This: Every NPC with a new or pending sidequest is indicated with the lightbulb icon above their heads. Unfortunately this only applies to the inhabitants of Headspace, not the citizens of Faraway Town, who has their own sidequests as well.
  • Non-Standard Character Design: The various "SOMETHING" monsters range from claymation to photorealistic in their designs compared to the rest of the game's animesque art style.
  • Ocular Gushers: Weeping Willow, regularly cries in this manner as she sits besides a lake. A nearby friendly whale, Humphrey, reveals that crying is her default way of expressing any emotion, and that the whole lake he is in only exists because of her tears.
  • Ominous Music Box Tune: Playing Forever is a childish music box tune that feels just off-kilter enough to make the listener unsettled. Not helping is its perversion of the game's main theme about a minute in. This is first heard during the Hikkikomori Route as Omori hits the Reset Button for Headspace, retreating into childish adventures in his dreams once again without addressing the source of his trauma.
  • Overly Long Gag: The Spelling Bee, a cute talking insect who likes to R-E-A-L-L-Y S-L-O-W-L-Y spell everything it says. It shows up again in Humphrey, in the middle of a Chase Scene. Go ahead, talk to it, you have more than enough time for that.
  • Patchwork Map: Headspace has areas that have very little in sense of cohesion. Justified as the places are parts of a dream world.
  • Peninsula of Power Leveling: The Orange Oasis is a level not important to the main plot. However, if you are able to survive the monsters inside Dino Dig (i.e. being Level 25), there is no reason to stop you from re-entering the Dino Dig anytime for these reasons:
    • As soon as you get the Silver Spoon, it is almost impossible for you to run out of Dino Dollars because by the time you depleted the durability of the Silver Spoon (20 uses) you most likely have enough Dino Dollars to buy another one (10 Dino Dollars)
    • The return of investment largely outweighs the cost of entering Dino Dig (100 Clams) because almost every food (healing items) you gather inside Dino Dig will be worth more than the 100 Clams.
    • As mentioned above, if you are able to survive a dungeon with powerful monsters, they are perfect for grinding to Level 35 or higher.
    • Even the bunnies outside of Dino's Dig are very nice for grinding. If you go there as soon as possible (which is right after the first Real-Life Segment), you are likely about Level 14 or so. The bunnies outside of Dino's Dig drop lots of healing items that heal for 150HP (Pancakes, etc.) and also Juice items, and they give about as much XP as the enemies in Pyrefly Forest (which is your next story destination), but they do far, far less damage (especially after you get a few levels and you're almost 20; they do 0-5 per hit) and Hero isn't afraid of them like he is the enemies there. These will get you up to the levels you need to survive the snakes/bun bunnies inside the Dig proper. They also count for the bunny quest at the Train Station, too!
  • Permanently Missable Content: A lot:
    • Finishing the Junkyard before the secret boss fight with Pluto in Otherworld will render that fight and its entry in the Foe Facts permanently unobtainable for the rest of the game.
    • Starting Two Days Left (defeating Sweetheart and exploring the Lost Library) in the main route will render every sidequest in the Playground inaccessible as well, since everyone moves away to Last Resort during the next Headspace segment. If you're on the Hikikomori route after reconstructing Headspace, talking to Mr. Jawsum will have him hand over ownership of the Resort to Hero, causing the playground inhabitants to return to the Playground so that you can finish up any unfinished quests. Doing this, however, causes Berly's "Call for Inspiration" quest to be inaccessible, if you left it unfinished at that point.
    • If you finish Breaven, you won't be able to revisit anywhere past its magic circle, because the one ingredient you need to sacrifice is already dead (but its ghost can dig you back up to the surface). Which can be annoying if you missed the healing spot, since that's counted for completion to one of the game's achievements.
    • Once you enter Black Space during the Main Route, you can't go back to Headspace at all, except in the Hikkikomori route where Omori pushes the Reset Button. The game at least warns you to explore Headspace while you still can and tie up any loose ends.
    • There's a lot of sidequests during the Sunny sections that are very easy to miss. Be sure to check every house and talk to every character before advancing the story or going back home at the end of the day.
    • Choosing to take ownership of Sweetheart's Castle will lock you out of anything you haven't yet done there. Of note are Rococo's paintings, the revisit to the Lost Library, and Omori's ultimate weapon from an Abbi tentacle.
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: Invoked; there are Space Pirates who joined the command of Space Boyfriend hoping to do awesome pirate stuff, but then nearly all of them left after seeing he doesn't actually do anything.
  • Platonic Declaration of Love: On the final day, after Sunny, Kel, Hero and Audrey have all reunited and the latter three have had a heart-to-heart about the aftermath of Mari's death, they all declare that they are once again friends, and that they'll be there for Sunny, even if he moves away. Sunny uses the memory of their words as the basis for his self-healing Cherish special ability in the final battle, along with his memories of his mental Basil and Mari cheering him on toward the truth.
  • Point of No Return: Entering Black Space after clearing the Humphrey dungeon ends Headspace permanently, unless you're on the Hikikomori route. The game is generous, and advises you to explore Headspace while you still can and tie up any loose ends before continuing on to the endgame.
  • Poor Communication Kills: The crux of the plot in the real world, which drives a wedge between the group's friendship. Mari's death being Made To Look Like An Accident ended up causing Hero to think he failed to prevent her suicide, and Aubrey in particular feels like everyone tried to forget about Mari altogether which drives her to physical violence towards them. The inability for Sunny and Basil to come to grips with their guilt and speak out about the incident as they keep butting heads with the group for it nearly causes both to kill each other and themselves, and will if you take the wrong choices.
  • Pop-Star Composer: In addition to "My Time", bo en contributed two battle themes to the game (the forest battle theme and the battle theme for Sweetheart's Castle.)
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate:
    • Defeating Space Ex-Boyfriend yields his eyepatch as a Charm. It gives a sizeable Attack boost, but because you're hampering your vision your hit rate drops.
    • Completing Pessi's sidequest after defeating Sweetheart yields the Sweetheart Bust. It's one of Aubrey's hardest-hitting weapons, but because it's so heavy it bogs down her Speed and her ability to hit her target.
  • Product Placement: Naming Sunny "Omocat" gives you an achievement with a discount code and the address to Omocat's online clothing shop.
  • Prolonged Prologue: It takes until after the defeat of Space Ex-Boyfriend (a few hours of gameplay total) before the game finally transitions from "Prologue" to "Three Days Left." To many a player, the Otherworld arc may not feel like part of the prologue at all since you've been introduced to most of the game's mechanics and are starting to get free rein over where you want to explore.
  • Pun: The Mixtape enemy can attack by slapping. Turns out, its music slaps so hard it physically hurts. At least it wasn't fire...
  • Rainbow Speak: Words pertaining to gameplay elements are given colors. Equipment is purple. Snacks are green. Toys are orange. Key items are yellow. Skills are blue. Locations are light blue.
  • Random Number God: A very interesting example: certain events and secrets can happen at random within each new playthrough, to make sure not every playthrough feels the same. This is due to the WTF value hidden in the game. When you start a new game and help Aubrey get unstuck from the stump in the prologue, the game will choose a number from 1 to 13. Said number includes a certain event that will happen during that playthrough and only that playthrough. Said number can also be modified so that players can see every event at their own leisure, kinda like the "Fun" value in Undertale.
  • Red Herring: The entirety of Headspace is revealed to be this. Not only is the "choice between Headspace or White Space" fake, but your RPG-style adventures in the dreams will never get you closer to either Basil or the truth of what happen in the real world. This is because Headspace was literally made to distract Sunny from the truth. The only way for him to learn is by going outside and confronting the trauma, no mater how painful it is.
  • Reset Button: Various revelations within Deeper Well show that this isn't Omori's first foray into his dreams with Basil. Each time, he's found the entry to Black Space, rescued Basil from there, and restarted the cycle. Once Omori assimilates Sunny during the Hikikomori route and rescues Headspace Basil from Black Space, you get to see the reset button in action by going to sleep in the Neighbor's Room. Headspace is re-created, and in this variation, Basil never discovered the truth and more areas and side quests are unlocked.
  • Sanity Slippage: The Hikikomori route. During the real-world sections, Sunny's hallucinations slowly get worse as Omori takes over his mind.
    • It also happens with Basil, regardless of which route you take, though if you take the true route, you actually get to see his sanity slippage. In the true route, the already mentally unwell Basil starts to lose his mind even further upon the news that Sunny is moving away from town after just emerging from his house after four years, and regardless of which route you take, the neutral endings end with him committing suicide. If you confront Basil the night he kills himself on the true route, Sunny catches Basil in the middle of a psychotic breakdown and attacks Sunny to free him from "Something", implying that he intends to commit a murder-suicide with Sunny, all while Sunny desperately tries to fight off Basil while suffering from a full-on panic attack. Thankfully, the secret ending shows that Basil gets better.
  • Schmuck Bait: In Faraway Park on "TWO DAYS LEFT": "An unassuming beehive. Do you want to disturb it?" If you do, precisely the expected happens.
  • Scolded for Not Buying: Backing out of the shop menu without a purchase or sale irritates the Mailbox, and he says he has no patience for window shoppers.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: Once Omori enters Black Space, all of Headspace is swept aside. The other Headspace kids do appear in Black Space, though as evil, distorted entities. The kids then make one last appearance in either the good or bad ending but don't even have any dialogue.
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog: The bad ending: Sunny's character growth and willingness to move on from his dark past is rendered moot as he gives up fighting Omori after being defeated by him and allows him to consume his mind. This leads to the cycle of Sunny burying himself in his fantasies repeating once more, or it would have had he not thrown himself off the hospital roof.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: bo en's "My Time" from the trailer, or the parts of the song used for it, is a surprisingly jaunty melody for a game that has multiple Content Warnings about disturbing themes. Until you reach the point of the game where you hear it — that is, the Downer Ending. One good listen to the lyrics and understanding Sunny's position in the bad ending, and suddenly the song makes sense on an uncanny amount of levels, to the point you'd be forgiven for thinking Omocat commissioned it.
  • Staircase Tumble: Mari accidentally fell down the stairs and died, from Sunny's accidental push.
  • Status Buff: In place of Standard Status Effects, OMORI has an Emotion system. The emotion someone feels will increase one stat, decrease another stat, modifies some of their skills, and has a dash of Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors involved. Along with a Tier System. There are usually two tiers of emotions, though some bosses and (curiously for The Stoic) Omori himself has three.
    • Happy / Ecstatic / Manic: Increases Luck and Speed, but lowers Hit Rate. Increased damage to the Angry line.
    • Sad / Depressed / Miserable: Increases Defense and sacrifices some Juice to reduce damage, but lowers Speed. Increased damage against the Happy line.
    • Angry / Enraged / Furious: Increases Attack, but lowers Defense. Increased damage against the Sad line.
    • Afraid / Stressed Out: A special status reserved for special battles, usually involving Something. Prevents the use of Follow-Up Attacks and most Skills.
  • Story Branching:
    • Main Route: The most common route as well as the route with multiple variations of endings
    • Hikkikomori Route: An alternative route only possible if you stay home for the Real World events, doing chores as a replacement for all the events outside.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome: One of the major themes about dreams and reality is that life isn't a video game, best shown when most game elements are removed while awake.
    • Omori fighting in Headspace with a knife isn't much of an issue, but Sunny brandishing a steak knife in the real world causes multiple characters to freak out or be scared. Enough so that though it's minor, Sunny attacking Aubrey with the knife equipped in their first bout causes a What the Hell, Hero? from both sides of the fight and immediately ends the tussle due to a real injury.
    • Omori and his friends can travel underwater to escape the Last Resort. In the real world, Sunny's visible phobia of drowning, combined with a lack of experience or stamina, literally sinks him when he has to save Basil after Aubrey pushes him into the lake. Not helping is that he hallucinates fighting Something, and a spectre of Mari teaches Sunny how to power through and Persist to beat it. Hero has to save them both though he notes that Sunny is just waterlogged while Basil got water in his lungs and needs to get back home to rest and change into dry clothes. A flashback in the good ending reveals that Mari saved him from drowning when he was younger, for similar reasons
    • You can obtain various charms like in Headspace, but because they're not exactly armor, the charms are for mostly aesthetic value and don't affect your stats except for the Seashell Necklace. The Pet Rock is one of the few charms that has an effect, and it only lets you play a minigame with other characters.
    • Also, Sunny and friends can certainly buy and eat as many snacks as they want, and that applies to the real world also. However, there's no such things as Hyperactive Metabolism in the real world: comfort food like pizza certainly makes them feel better but not as much as actual medicine.
    • Quests in Headspace have a lightbulb icon above an NPC's head to denote them, with Mari keeping track of them as you go. Reality is less convenient. Neither the Notice This trope nor Exposition Fairy trope apply in real life, so you have to keep track of any real world quests yourself.
    • Critical Existence Failure is in full effect, as characters given a brutal beatdown can still fight if they have enough health left and some are just fine in post-battle cutscenes... in Headspace anyway. Naturally the waking world doesn't follow this rule; Sunny and Aubrey only walk away from their fights because Sunny is disarmed or the scuffle is broken up. The fight between Sunny and Basil is not broken up, and ends like a brawl between two crazy people would be expected to: with both boys battered, bloody, and bedridden in the hospital.
    • In the Hikikomori route, Omori-as-Sunny wandering around the house can get the Stab option back if he picks up a knife from the kitchen. Done in Headspace this warps him back to White Space, but done in reality...
    • The game teaches Sunny several healing Skills during his encounters with Something in the real world, like how to Calm Down or Cherish the memories important to him. When Basil confronts Sunny and gets into a fight with him, the player is prompted to use these Skills to defuse the confrontation — and none of them work, because this time Sunny is facing an extremely stressful situation that is wholly unfamiliar to him, and these calming techniques are only so effective when something real is hurting him. Sure enough, the only way to proceed is to fight. Even then, Sunny ends up in the hospital with a bandaged eye, thanks to Basil who is horrified when he realizes.
    • Omori points out with some Brutal Honesty that he didn't ask to be made; he is the way he is because Sunny wanted a means to fight the Something. Even if Sunny defeats him, Sunny has to tell his friends the truth of what happened to Mari, and his friends won't be happy that he and Basil lied to them for years on end. Only Omori's friend group will persist because they are not real but Sunny's friend group has been splintered for years. The good ending is Sunny realizing that this is all true, but he has to let go of Omori, who is a maldapative coping mechanism, and forgives him for trying to kill Sunny, saying he will retry regardless and persist despite the uknknown. Even though Omori fades while giving Sunny a Cooldown Hug, accepting his creator's decision, Sunny indeed still has to wake up and talk to his worried friends. The game ends before we see their reaction to the truth.  
    • The fight against the Hooligans on the 2nd day is typically a Curb-Stomp Battle, with Kel admitting that it was a bad idea to pick a fight with six people at once. However, there actually is a way to win the fight that's also fairly realistic - pepperspraying them.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: "There is nothing here". You get that message for inspecting a seemingly random wall, when everything else doesn't yield even a description box.
    • There definitely is something there. Sunny is trying really hard to pretend the storage closet, and all the bad memories within, does not exist.
    • The same thing happens to Basil's room if you get the ending where he kills himself; the door vanishes the moment Sunny closes it, replaced with the same "nothing here" message.
    • Defeating all phobia forms of Something on the Hikkikomori route causes the Omori piano to fade away in the Lost Library. When you return to the real world, you can visit Sunny's music room for once, but the center of the room where the piano should be is empty, even though you can collide with something invisible there. Again, "there is nothing here" if you interact with those tiles.
  • Take That!:
    • One of the people you can interact resides in a very messy room which he's never left in years, engages in online discourse, is pretentiously verbose, regards an anime character as his "betrothed", and even offers a fedora should you best him in a Clash. So, in other words, a modern stereotypical nerd!
    • The Ballpit in Last Resort is a small jab at Dashcon 2014, one of the most disastrous fan conventions of the last decade. Indeed, if Omori and his friends climb in, they just sit motionlessly with an annoyed expression.
    • The "Download Window" boss is one to Internet Explorer and its horrid speed, as the boss takes a few turns to attack the party. Its attack isn't even a proper one — the damage it does is collateral damage from it crashing and burning!
  • Television Portal: Minor character Tvgirl lives in one of these. The final reward offered by the recycling machine is the Universal Remote, which allows you to use a few televisions found in Headspace as portals that lead to parts of Black Space 2. It's notably the only way to access said areas on the main route.
  • The Battle Didn't Count: Every fight that takes place in the real world will progress the story the same way, whether you win or lose. For example, during the first fight with real world Aubrey, you're expected to end the fight in a single attack because Sunny is wielding an actual knife as his weapon. But if you refuse to let Sunny attack, the fight will instead end with Aubrey finally noticing the knife Sunny is holding and nervously backing off.
  • There Are No Therapists: It's clear that Omori is struggling with some kind of repressed trauma that no one is really helping him with. Or he would if he weren't the result of said trauma, courtesy of his real self Sunny — but this just makes the lack of therapists in the modern real world even more jarring, as the source of the trauma had a domino effect that shattered Sunny's friend circle and even their families. One halfway-competent therapist or social worker would've made things a lot less complicated... but then there wouldn't be a story.
  • There Can Only Be One: One scene in Black Space has Omori dream about multiple Aubreys fawning over him while in a locker room, until the last one instigates a fight that leaves all but two of them Toasted. The two then demand which one Omori wants to go out with, but Omori wakes up the instant he chooses one of them.
  • The Stinger: If the player takes care of Basil's plants throughout the game, an extra scene plays after the Good Ending in which Sunny and Basil's Somethings vanish from behind them, heavily implying that they have forgiven themselves and are ready to move on.
  • Time-Limit Boss: The boss fight against Something in the Dark during the Hikkikomori route must be won within ten turns.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The 2014 trailer already had a subtle allusion to The Reveal.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Downplayed: During battles, the characters can experience the emotion anger, boosting their attack power, but also lowering defense.
  • Use Your Head:
    • A minor character named Berly is really proud of her headbutt skills, which she uses to play tetherball. Contrary to the expectations, she doesn't actually fight even when she formally "joins the party", and just tags along instead. However, she then teaches headbutting to Aubrey once you find her lost tetherball, and she gives you all a "Butt Certificate" to mark the occasion as well. Kel then sticks it on a flagpole to mark them getting to the otherworld, in spite of Aubrey's protests.
    • The real-world Aubrey won't hesitate to use the same headbutt on Sunny and Kel when she fights them.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: Once you reach Black Space, the game becomes an atmospheric exploration game in the vein of Yume Nikki.
  • Un-person: Basil towards the end of the regular Headspace portion of the game. It starts with Omori's friends forgetting what he looks like, and by the time they get out of Humphrey, they've completely forgotten about him, and even the quest to find him is straight-up deleted from the quest-log. This is due to Omori's subconscious actively erasing Basil from Headspace due to his connections to the truth. If you're on the Hikikomori route, Omori saves Basil and this trope is undone.
  • Unwinnable by Design: The quest "Basil" is purposely unwinnable, as it will eventually be replaced with the "Empty House" quest by the time you reach Deep Well and Deeper Well. This is due to the fact that Omori wants Headspace Basil not to be found, and Sunny's suppression of the truth gets so bad that Basil starts to disappear from Headspace, with everyone forgetting he even existed.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: You won't be able to tell right away, but Humphrey serves as Headspace's final dungeon, due to the fact that after clearing it and beating Humphrey, Black Space is unlocked and all of Headspace is forgotten about once entered as the endgame approaches.
  • Videogame Cruelty Potential:
    • Played for Laughs. One of the Sprout Moles in Sprout Mole Village has a Christmas tree in their home. Cutting down the tree gives you an achievement for ruining Christmas. What makes this even more funnier is that the game was released on Christmas Day.
    • Killing Abbi after her boss fight will give you her eye as an accessory, but you will lose a bunch of items in the process.
    • You can continue throwing balls at Scarethrow even after he tells you to stop. The following conversation becomes more and more depressing as you continue to do so.
    • There is an optional area called "Rain Town", which is rained on a bit too hard. There, you get a sidequest where you turn a valve to lighten the rain for a reward, or if you turn it the wrong way, you can intensify the rain to wash the town away, presumably killing all of its residents. Flooding Rain Town will mark the quest as complete, but you get no reward. It also renders the town inaccessible if you're not on the Hikikomori route.
    • In one of the rooms in Black Space, Mewo is strapped to a table with the cat butler from Omori's sketch book telling Omori that Mewo's been a "very bad cat". Omori has the option to cut open Mewo, while the game describes in painful detail how afraid Mewo is. There's no reason to kill Mewo unless the player is under the false pretense that he needs to be killed to leave the room, when in reality Omori has to stab himself to exit.
  • Visual Pun:
    • When party members fall in battle, they're toast. By that, we mean that they will morph into a literal slice of toasted bread, retaining only what they wore on their head (like Aubrey's ribbon).
    • One of the common enemies you fight in Otherworld is a wormhole. A worm coming out of a literal wormhole.
    • The Doombox sprite is on fire. Perhaps because the music it was playing was fire.
    • The "P" key is found in a toilet.
    • Similarly, the treasure map in Orange Oasis cheerfully tells you that "X" Marks the Spot; the buried treasure marked on it is indeed the "X" key.
    • Dino's Dig has four floors: the lowest is full of wheat and bread, the second covered in grass and veggies, the third floor has a meat theme, and the top of the building is made of cake. The Level Ate's pyramid is quite literally the food pyramid.
    • Sunny's late game trip down memory lane is done through an actual lane. Saving there shows the place is legit called Memory Lane.
    • The Keyboard Keycaps that you picked up to unlock Black Space are shown to be literal keys, the kind that unlock doors. Also played with, during some of the dialogue during your trip back to Neighbor's Room from where you fought Humphrey, where a voice tells you the 'KEYS to the other realm are different each time but each will unlock the same door'.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: Space Boyfriend is the first challenge the player will meet at the beginning of the game. If you haven't understood how the Emotion System and Follow-Up works, get ready to see your party members toasted.
  • Welcome to Corneria: Characters usually have only line (or at most, several lines said all at once) when talked to, until a plot event happens and it's switched for another set of lines.
  • Wham Episode:
    • The end of the tutorial section: Basil freaks out after a photo of some unknown broken object falls from his album, causing black tendrils to appear below him and Omori to be kicked back to White Space. With no way out, Omori stabs himself. Cut to the real world where the player is introduced to Sunny, a boy who looks way too similar to Omori.
    • The first day throws said real world into the mix, and apparently, not only has Aubrey grown into a punk, the other girl in Headspace, Mari, has been dead for four years, and everyone in your circle no longer talks to each other anymore. Also, you have only three days left before you move out of town.
    • Welcome To Black Space. In this Yume Nikki/.flow inspired section, it's revealed that not only are Sunny and Omori two different people (sort of), but the horrifying truth of Mari's death is revealed; an argument between the two ends with Sunny pushing her down a flight of stairs, killing her. Basil, the only witness to this and incapable of realizing that Sunny could do such a thing, comes up with the plan to make Mari's death a suicide to make Sunny innocent, but the shared guilt and trauma of Mari's open eye staring at them creates the Something that haunts them both, as well as Omori, who represents Sunny's violent repression of said truth and suicidal guilt. With this revealed, Omori becomes the main antagonist and tries to take over Sunny and kill himself out of grief on the last day before they move out.
  • Wham Line:
    • From the Prologue, right after you complete the tutorial section:
      You see a boy sleeping in his room. What's his name?
      Sunny
    • During the first Sunny section in Day 1 of the Main Route:
      Kel: You know, Mari would be really sad to hear that.
      Aubrey: Heh... Really? You really wanna bring Mari into this? Who cares what Mari thinks? Mari's dead.
    • And shortly after that...
      Aubrey: We haven't talked in four years, Kel. A lot changes in four years.
    • Day 2, during the Headspace section:
      Mari: It's not my place to say anymore, but... I hope you're still there... Sunny...
    • The Hangman's answer:
      Welcome to Black Space
    • Right before Day 2 ends, after you meet with Mari in the Piano Room. You think it's another one of Sunny's hallucinations, but...
      Hero: Whoa, you scared me there, Sunny! Sorry for bursting in like that. I could've sworn I heard some music.
    • And then we get confirmation on how Mari died. At least before The Reveal:
      Hero: I just... don't understand why she chose to leave us... the way she did.
    • A line from Basil near the end of the game:
      Basil: when something blacked out all of my photos...
  • Wham Shot: When Sunny enters Blackspace, he has to do a Fetch Quest to find missing photos from Dream Basil's album. To do so, he has to navigate through hospital rooms, with bloody hands flashing as he picks up each one. They confirm that Mari fell down the stairs, which doesn't match with the fact that she was found hanging from a tree. Then we get to one photo: it shows Sunny and Mari at the top of the stairs. Slowly the player comes to the realization that Sunny killed Mari by accident.
  • Where It All Began:
    • Black Space is hidden under Basil's house, which is right next to the starting area and the first major landmark you'll encounter. This one gets brought up in-story: the voice in the Deeper Well points out that the truth changes locations every time the adventure restarts, and that it spawned so absurdly close to White Space means that Sunny won't be able to keep lying to himself for much longer.
    • The final battle between Sunny and Omori takes place in White Space, the very first area of the game and the place where Omori came to be.
  • Wimp Fight: Almost all the fights in Faraway Town are this. The hardest hitter on your team is Kel, who's just throwing a regular ball at people. Even if you lose, there is no indication that any lasting damage was done. To drive the point home, the battle music used is the same from the very first fight in the game.
  • Wingding Eyes: Combat encounters briefly replace the enemies' eyes with crosses whenever they get hit (demo only).
  • World of Chaos: The world of Headspace is a very strange place. As it should be: it's the delusion of a child desperately trying to distract himself from his own suicidal depression. The reason Headspace's denizens and locations don't make a lick of sense is because Sunny's subconscious is literally making it up as he goes along to distract him from confronting his trauma. This even justifies the Hikikomori route's extra content as Sunny has nothing better to do than keep expanding on the world in his dreams, while in the True route Sunny's reconnecting with his friends and spending time in reality causes all of the Headspace shenanigans to abruptly make an exit.
  • You Shouldn't Know This Already: Even if you know the password for Sweetheart's Statue beforehand, the correct answers will not appear as options until the four guards tell you what they are.

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